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Патент USA US2404101

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¿Qi? 16, 1946'.
R. E, scHocK
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REMOTE SQRT-ROL OF RADîQ BECEIVERS
Filed April l5, 1942
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ATTQRNEY
July 16, 1946.
R. E. scHocK
2,404,101
REMOTE CONTROL OF RADIO RECEIVERS
Filed April 15, 1942
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
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INVENTÓR
ROBERT E. Sch/och’
BY
ATTORNEY
My 16,' 194s.
R. E. SCHOCK
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` REMOTE CONTROL'OF RADIO‘ RECEIVERS
Filed' April 15, 1942
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July 16, 1946.
R. E. scHocK
2,404,101
REMOTE CONTROL 0F RADIO RECEIVERS
Filed April 15, 1942
I
5 SheetSI-Sheet 5
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INVENTOR
/PoßE/i‘r E. âcHoc/r
ATTO R N EY
Patented July 16, 1946
2,404,101
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,404,101
REMOTE CONTROL OF RADIO RECEIV ERS
Robert E. Schock, Riverhead, N. Y., assignor_ to
Radio Corporation of America, a corporation
of Delaware
Application April 15, 1942, Serial No. 438,979
14 claims. (C1. Z50-20)
1
2
My present invention relates to novel and im
proved methods of remotely controlling a radio
receiver, and more particularly to a novel method
by way of illustration, the remote control oscil
lator comprises an electron discharge tube hav
ing a tank circuit comprising coil 2. The cath
of, and apparatus for, controlling tuning and/or
ode, or ñlament, is energized by source F, while
direct current source P supplies the positive plate
potential. It will be recognized that the oscil
lator is of the well known Hartley type. The
coil 2 may be resonated to different control fre
quencies by choice of a proper tuning condenser.
volume of radio receivers from a remote point.
Certain types of remote control tuning systems,
introduced in the past in the broadcast receiver
field, use an oscillator at the controlling point.
The oscillator is made to send out signal pulses
for the purpose of controlling the tuning and/or
volume at the receiver. Such systems are not
readily adaptable to either push button tuning
Thus, a desired one of the plurality of iixed con
densers c, y, œ and a may be shunted across coil
2. Push-button control may be had at the
oscillator by providing a plurality of normally
or continuously variable tuning. The ideal
open switches 3, 4, 5 and 6. Each switch, upon
method of remote control should be adapted to
either push button tuning, or continuously vari 15 closure, effectively shunts its associated con
able tuning.
denser across coil 2, and simultaneously com
pletes the iilament and plate circuits. Of course,
Accordingly, it is one of the main objects of
each of condensers c, y, :r and a, is of a different
my invention to provide a remote control method
magnitude.
wherein the remote controlling device is an oscil
lator whose frequency may be changed at will 20 Tuning push-buttons 3', 4', 5', 6’ are- pro
vided for the respective switches. These buttons
by the operator, and wherein the controlled de
3' to 6’ correspond to frequencies fc, fy, fx and- fa
vice incorporates a frequency discriminator cir
respectively. In other words, actuation of a
cuit Which detects the frequency changes of the
button to close its respective switch results in
controlling oscillator and causes these changes
to direct the operation of the controlled device.
25 production of constant amplitude oscillations of
the selected frequency. For example, depression
Other features of. my invention will best be
of button 6' results in production of oscillations
understood by reference to the following descrip
of a frequency fa. The control oscillations may
tion taken in connection with the drawings in
be radiated through space to the controlled ap
which I have indicated diagrammatically sev
eral circuit organizations whereby my invention 30 paratus, or the oscillations may be transmitted
thereto by a transmission line. Let it be as
may be carried into effect.
sumed that the oscillations are radiated. Fur
In the drawings:
thermore, the frequency of the oscillations can
Fig. l shows a remote control oscillator em
be in any desired frequency band. However,
bodying the invention,
the intensity of the generated control waves
Fig. 2 shows a motor control circuit adapted
` should not be such as to cause interference with
to respond to the oscillator of Fig. 1,
other receivers in the vicinity.
Fig. 3 shows the characteristic of the discrim
At the controlled point there may be located
inator-rectiiier of thev control circuit of Fig. 2,
Fig. 4 illustrates a modification of the circuit
of Fig. 2,
Fig. 5 shows the operation of the> circuit in
Fig. 4,
Fig. 6 shows the circuit details of the motor
control circuit for tuning and. volume control,
and is adapted to be inserted between- points P
and Q of Fig. 2,
Fig. 7 shows a modified form of remote oscil
lator wherein separate tuning and volume con
trol push~buttons are used.
Referring, now, to the accompanying draw
ings, it will be understood thatv like reference>
characters in the different figures designate
similar circuit elements. The control instru->
mentality is an oscillator, shown in Fig. 1,Y whose
circuits may be of any well known form. Merely
a radio receiver which is to be regulated in ac
cordance with the frequency of the control oscil
lations. The regulation may be with respect to
tuning or volume, or any other characteristic.
In Fig. 2 there is shown a system for adjusting
automatically the tuning of a receiver. The ad
justing mechanism is a reversible control motor
*25 provided with a drive shaft 25'. It will be
understood that shaft 25’ is mechanically cou
pled to the receiver tuning device (not shown).
The condenser gang shaft (not shown) may be
50 geared to the shaft 25’ in any desired fashion.
The motor 25 is supplied with energizing cur
rent by leads 30’. One of these leads 30’ is con
nected to one terminal of the motor by a switch
3D. The second leadv 36' is connected to the piv
55 oted arms, or contactors, of independent switches
2,404,101
"D
4
24’ and 23’. The fixed contact of switch 23’ is
connected by lead 23” to the third terminal of
motor 25, while lead 24" connects the iixed con
tact of switch 2d’ to the intermediate terminal
of the motor. There will now be described the
whose magnitude and polarity are as indicated
¿n
at Fig. 3.
various high frequency circuits for controlling
the diii‘erent motor circuits.
`
The point P is connected by resistor I E to
the junction of direct current sources I6 and
I'I. The right hand end of resisto-r l5 is con
nected to ground by a condenser l5'. The po
tentiometer resistor I8 is connected between the
positive terminal of source ES and the negative
_
The receiving system for receiving the control
terminal of direct current source i7, and the mid
waves is essentially similar to the well known
automatic frequency control (AFC) system used ._10 „point of the potentiometer is connected to the
for superheterodyne receivers. Thus, the con~ ' junction of the two current sources. The po
tentiometer resistor I8 is provided with an ad
justable tap Q, and the control grid of tube I9
is connected to the potentiometer adjustable tap.
frequency oscillations. The ampliñers maybe 15 The tap Q is mechanically coupled, by any de
sired mechanical linkagel to the motor shaft.
of well known construction, and need not be de
Such linkage is indicated schematically by the
scribed in detail. The resonant input and out~
dotted line 3|. The cathode of tube I9 is con
put circuits S1 and S2 oí amplifier T1, and the
nected in common to the cathode of the follow
resonant input and output circuits S3 and Si of
amplifier T2, are tuned to pass all the control 20 ing tube 20, and the control grid of the latter is
connected to the grounded end of the cathode
frequencies which may be employed. In other
resistor 20’. The plates of both tubes I9 and 20
words, the tuned ampliñers will be sufficiently
are supplied with positive potential from the
broad up to circuit Si so as to pass efficiently the
trol waves are collected by the collecting device
T. The waves are then passed through cascaded
amplifiers T1 and T2. These amplify the radio
oscillations of any selected control frequency.
`
The discriminator-rectifier comprises the di
plus B terminal of the main direct current source
It will be noted that the plates of
tubes i9 and 20 are connected to opposite ends
25 (not shown).
odes 9 and I@ whose cathodes are connected by
series-related resistors il and l2. Each of the
of the winding of the electromagnet 23 which
controls switch 23’. In other words, when the
latter is -by-passed for alternating currents, while
the cathode end of resistor I2 is grounded. The 30 winding of electromagnet 23 is energized, then
switch 23’ is closed.
cathode end of resistor il is designated as P;
Switch 24’ is controlled by an electromagnet
the motor control voltage is derived from point
24. The energization of the electromagnet wind
P. The common input circuit of the rectifier di
ing depends on the action of tubes 2I` and`22.
odes consists of a tuned circuit i3, One side of
The control grid of tube 2I is connected to the
the latter is connected to the anode of diode 9,
adjustable tap Q. Each of tubes 2I and 22 has
while the anode of diode it connects to the op
its cathode connected to ground through a re
posite side of the circuit i3. The numeral 'l de
spective cathode biasing resistor. The control
notes the primary winding of the transformer
grid of tube 22 is connected to the cathode of
whose secondary is composed of sections i3’ and
tube 2 I, and the plates of the tubes are connected
I3” >each coupled to the primary. The junction 40 to opposite ends of the winding of electromagnet
of the sections BSV-I3” is connected by direct
24. It will be noted that the common lead 22’
current blocking condenser 8 to the high alter
supplies plate potential to each of the plates of
hating potential side of circuit S4. The junction
tubes I9 to 22 inclusive. The network I9 to 22
of resistors Il and l2 is returned through choke
inclusive functions to provide a keyer circuit actu
coil I4 to the junction of coil sections ISL-i3”.
45 ated by the voltage variation of point P. The
The plates of amplifiers T1 and T2 are connected
keying circuit functions to key either of relays
by a common lead L to the source of positive po
tential +B. The circuit i3 is tuned to a fre
23--23’ or 2li-24', as directed, for the purpose of
determining the direction of rotation of the re
quency which is at the middle of the control fre- 4
versible motor 25.
quency range. That is to say, the voltage dif 50
A further keyer circuit is provided to close
ference between point P and ground is Zero at
switch 30 whenever there is a control signal at the
the -said frequency of circuit i3. It is pointed
receiver. Thus, tube 28 has its plate connected
to one end of the winding of electromagnet 29,
out that the present discriminator-rectiñer
while the opposite end of the winding is connected
S4-I3-9-Iû is essentially of the type `shown
by S. W, Seeley in his U. S. Patent No._2,l2l,l03, 55 to the cathode of the tube through resistor 28’.
The cathode of- tube 28 is connected to ground
granted June 21, l938._ The network acts to de
through resistor 28". Resistor 28’ together with
tect frequency changes in the control waves, rela
resistor 28" constitute a Voltage divider by means
tive to the aforesaid median frequency value, and
of which positive voltage is supplied from the
converts such changes into corresponding direct
current voltage changes at point P.
. 60l direct current source (plus B) to the cathode of
tube 28 at a magnitude which will properly bias
tube 28. When the winding of electromagnet 29
is energized switch 30 is closed. The control grid
of tube 28 has its potential regulated by the diode
abscissae are plotted against “voltage of point 65 rectifier 21. The anode of the latter is coupled
by condenser 2'I’ in series with condenser 2'I” to
P” as ordinates. The point B on the curve repre
the junction of coil sections I3" and I3". The
sents the median frequency point fe. This is the
cathode of diode 2'I is connected to ground by
frequency of circuit i3, and, as Shown, the volt»
` The curve of Fig. 3 shows how the Voltage
across the resistors Ií-i2 (the potential differ
ence between P and ground) varies with control
frequency variation. “Control frequency” as
resistor R, suitably by-passed for alternating cur
rent components. The control grid of tube 28 is
70
frequencies fc and fy the voltages at point P are
connected to the cathode end of resistor R.
negative, whereas at frequencies fx and fa the
A second diode 26 is arranged in parallel with
voltages are positive. In other words, actuation
diode 21. The diode 26 is supplied with control
of a selected one of the buttons in Fig. 1 will
wave energy from the input circuit I3 through
automatically cause pointP to assume a Voltage
coupling condenser 21”. The resistor 26’ func
age of point P is zero.
It will be seen that at
2,404,101
tions as a. load resistor for diode 26, the resistor
being by-passed for alternating current compo
nente. The anode end of resistor 26’ is connected
to the low potential end of input circuit S3
through a filter resistor 26". In other words, the
diode 26 functions as an automatic volume con
trol (AVC) circuit for the amplifier feeding the
dlscriminator-rectifier. The volume level at dis
criminator input circuit I3 is maintained substan
6
at point P would have been positive instead of
negative. As a result tubes 2l and 22 would have
been caused to close relay switch 24’ instead of
relay switch 23’.
The motor would now run in
the opposite direction causing the balancing po
tentiometer tap Q to move to a position negative
with respect to the voltage at point P. This
would stop the motor as soon as this balance
voltage were equal and opposite to the point P
tially uniform in this manner. The AVC bias 10 voltage. The signal-operated relay 29-30 turns
may be applied to tube T1, if desirable.
the motor on" whenever the control signal is shut
'I‘he operation of the present remote control
off. This prevents the control motor from oper
system is best explained by first assuming the
ating even though the voltage at point Q might
remote control oscillator as operating at the mid
not be balanced to zero in the no-signal condi
frequency for which the control amplifier and 15 tion.
discriminator circuits are tuned. This is repre
It may be seen from the foregoing discussion
sented by fB in Fig. 3. At this frequency the volt
that for any frequency setting of the control oscil
ages across the discriminator diode resistors II
lator within the range of tuning of the dis
and I2 are equal and opposite, and, therefore, the
criminator circuit I3 (that is from points a to c
voltage at point P is zero. For this condition, the 20 on the curve Fig. 3) there is a definite position
motor-driven balancing potentiometer I8 is pur
of the control motor (and the _balancing poten
posely pre-set so that the voltage on the grids of
tiorneter tap and receiver tuner mechanically
tubes I9 and 2l (point B in Fig. 3) is also zero,
linked thereto) at which the motor balancing
and, therefore, neither relay 23 nor 24 is in opera
potentiometer tap and receiver tuning device will
tion and the control motor is inoperative. For
come to rest. This makes it possible to calibrate
this specific setting of control oscillator frequency,
the controlling oscillator tuning mechanism
and of the control motor, assume the radio re
(either push-buttons or continuous) in terms of
ceiver tuning is at a desired station frequency. It
definite station tuning positions of the controlled
will be understood that an extra button could be
radio receiver tuning by proper alignment of the
provided at the oscillator to produce the fre
discriminator tuning, the balancing circuit volt
quency fB. It would only be necessary to provide
age supplies ( It and I? of Fig. 2), the balancing
an appropriate condenser, and associated switch
potentiometer I 3 and the receiver condenser drive.
es as shown in Fig. 1.
Now, to tune to a different station the remote
control oscillator is tuned to a new frequency set
ting, which by previous calibration is known to
result in the tuning of the controlled radio re
ceiver to this other station. For purpose of illus
tration assume the new control oscillator fre
quency is at point y on the curve of Fig. 3. In
other words, push-button 4' has been actuated to
initiate generation of oscillations 0f frequency fy.
The circ-uit of Fig. 4 is a variation of that of
Fig.
In Fig. 4 the operation is the same, except
for the method of balancing the voltage at point
Q back to zero for each control frequency posi
tion. In the circuit of Fig. 4, the balancing
potentiometer circuit between points P and Q is
eliminated, and the balancing is done by motor
driven tuning of the discriminator circuit. The
control motor 25 is mechanically linked to the
discriminator circuit tuning condensers, as indi
By inspection of the characteristic curve it is seen
cated by the dotted lines marked 3 I '. The curves
that the voltage resulting at point P of the dis
of Fig. 5 show how the circuit of Fig. 4 works.
crlminator circuit of Fig. 2 will now be negative. 45 Consider curve aBc to- represent the character
This negative Voltage on the grids of tubes I9 and
istic of the discriminator for normal mid-tuning
2I causes them to draw less current. Since the
position where, for a control frequency of fe,
current of tube I 9 nows through a cathode re
the voltage at point P is Zero.
_
sistor common to tube 2U, the decrease of current
If the control frequency is now shifted in tun
through this resistor decreases the grid bias of 50 ing for a different station, to a frequency fy
tube 20. Hence, enough plate current flows to
(point y on curve aBc), the voltage at point P
operate relay 23, and the switch 23' of relay 23
will go negative. This will cause the keyer and
is closed thus causing the control motor to
relay circuit I8-2ll-23--23' to key the motor 25
operate.
“on” as explained in connection with the opera
However, since the cathode resistor of tube 2l 55 tion of the circuit of Fig. 2. However, in the
furnishes grid bias for tube 22 the decrease of
circuit of Fig. 4 the circuit is brought to balance
current through the cathode resistor of tube 2I,
and the motor stopped by causing the motor to
due to the negative voltage on its grid, causes
drive the discriminator tuning condensers I3a
its cathode, and therefore the grid of tube 22,
and |31) until the discriminator characteristic
to go more negative. Hence, relay switch 24’ 60 4becomes that shown by curve a’B’c’ of Fig. 5.
remains open. The control motor 25 would now
At this position of discriminator tuning the fre
operate continuously, were it not for the fact
quency fn’ of the control signal no longer pro
that it immediately adjusts the balancing poten
duces a voltage at point P of Fig. 4, and, therefore,
tiometer tap Q to a new position which, by virtue
the motor keying circuit is released thereby stop
of the circuit arrangement, brings the voltage at 65 ping the motor. Since the radio receiver tuning
point Q back to zero. This will, in turn, cause
condenser is also mechanically linked to this same
switch 23’ to open and stop the motor. In other
control motor it may be seen that the motor
words, the circuit is so arranged that the poten
driven discriminator tuning, if properly linked
-tiorneter tap Q will always be adjusted in a direc
and aligned, constitutes a balancing circuit which
tion and to an extent such as to provide voltage to 70 will accomplish the same end as was achieved by
balance, or buck out, the voltage from point P
the motor-driven potentiometer voltage-balanc
thereby causing the relay operating the motor
ing circuit in Fig. 2.
(either relay 23-23' or 2li-24') to stop the latter.
In the circuits so far described, no provision
If the tuning of the remote control oscillator
was made for volume-controlling the receiver
had been adjusted to a frequency fx, the voltage 75 from
the remote control position. This may be
2,404,101
trol assume that the control frequency is shifted
from
the tuning range to the volume control
of Fig. 2 between points P and Q, with the circuit
range, for instance to frequency jv of Fig. 3.
of Fig. 6. The balancing circuit of Fig. 6 is
This, of course, makes point P slightly positive
aligned with respect to the radio receiver tuning
thereby biasing tube 5| to draw more current
Cl
and the remote control oscillator so that all of
through its cathode. In turn, this biases the
the receiver tuning is now accomplished within
grid of tube 52 more positive thereby causing tube
that frequency range of the control oscillator ly
52 to energize relay 53 and operate switches 51
ing between fß and fc of Fig. 3. This leaves that
and 58. The operation of switch 58 to this vol
frequency range of the control oscillator between
ume control position energizes the gear shifting
fa and J‘B of Fi-g. 3 for use in controlling volume
relay |00 to disengage the tuning and balancing
in the manner about to be described.
drive shafts and couple the volume control drive
It will be noted that so long as the control fre
shaft |01 to the control motor. The switch 51
quency is held within the range fe to fc of Fig. 3,
acts at the same time to cut out the balancing
the radio- receiver tuning control range, the volt
control circuit (|6’--|0’) and throws the nega
age at point P in Fig. 6 is negative in polarity.
tive voltage supply source 54 in series with the
Tubes 5| and 52 of Fig. 6 form a keyer circuit
lead connecting point P and point Q.
which is so biased that if the control frequency is
Since control frequency jv is between fx and
shifted to the volume control range (fa to J‘B of
fB
(Fig. 3), point Q is rnow negative due to the
Fig. 3) the voltage at point P is caused to go
voltage supply source 54 being more negative
positive. This will result in a shift of the two 20 than point P is positive at this control frequency.
single-pole, double-throw switches 51 and 50
Therefore, tube I9 and its related relay keying
from the position they were in for the tuning
circuit (shown in detail in Fig. 2) is actuated
control process, to the opposite side. As a con
accomplished by replacing that part of the circuit
sequence the circuit is set up for the volume
control process thereby releasing the tuning con
trol set-up in the following Way.
Switch 51 cuts out the balancing potentiometer
circuit |5’---|8', and connects in a voltage sup
ply source 54 which is of such a value and
polarity that it causes point Q to be negative ,
for any control frequency from fis down to a
frequency fx midway between fa and je (Fig. 3).
For any control frequency between fx and fa
the positive Voltage at point P is greater than
the negative voltage from source 54, and the
point Q will, therefore, be positive. Later it
will be shown how this feature renders the cir
cuit usable for volume-controlling. Switch 53,
when shifted to the volume control position,
to operate the control motor as previously ex
plained for the circuit of Fig. 2. Assume, now,
that the motor-driven volume control is so ar
ranged that for the above described condition
it is being driven to increase the receiver volume.
To decrease volume the control frequency is
shifted to a fa (Fig. 3). Since fa is below ,fx the
voltage at point P is now more positive than
the voltage supply 54 is negative, and point Q is,
therefore, now positive. This causes tube I9
and its related keying circuit to be de-energized,
and tube 2| with its keying circuit to be ener
giZed to reverse the direction of the control mo
tor. As a result the volume control device is
adjusted to decrease the Volume of the radio
receiver. Therefore, operating the control fre
quency at a frequency fv will increase the volume
opens one relay and closes another relay in a 40
at the receiver, and operating it at a frequency
circuit shown in detail in Fig. 6.
fa
will decrease the volume at the receiver.
The switch 58 in the tuning position actuates
Fig. 7 shows the control oscillator circuit of
relay coil |0| which, acting through an arma
ture |02 pivoted at |08, keeps the receiver tuning
drive shaft |05 and balancing potentiometer
shaft |06 geared to the control motor 25` through
sliding shaft |03, and keeps the volume control
mechanism disengaged from the control motor.
Fig. 1 with provision for remotely controlling
the volume at the receiver. To illustrate how the
remote control oscillator of this modification
works, suppose that it is arranged that
buttons 3’-fi’--5’--5’ each correspond to points
c-.e-y-B respectively of the curve of Fig. 3.
When switch 58 is shifted to the left, or volume
control, position it energizes relay |00. As a 50 These are the tuning buttons. They actuate
the respective switches 3-5--5-6. The buttons
result the gear shifting armature |02 disengages
300' and 500’ correspond to point o and a re
the receiver tuning drive shaft |05 and the
spectively of the curve of Fig. 3. Button 300’
balancing potentiometer drive shaft |55 from the
closes switch 300, while button 400' is adapted
control motor, and engages the volume control
to
close switch >400. The buttons 300’ and 400’
55
drive shaft |01 to the control motor, The slid
are the volume control buttons.
ing shaft |04 is reciprocated by the lower end
Suppose, now, it is desired to tune in a sta
of armature |02.. It will be understood that
tion for which purpose the circuit of Fig. 2 re
shaft |05 is coupled to the controlled radio re
quires a control frequency of fc (Fig. 3). The
ceiver tuning shaft (not shown); shaft |05 is
mechanically coupled to adjustable tap I8” of GO push-button 3’ at the oscillator in Fig. ’7 marked
with the station desired is depressed. This op
Fig. 6; the shaft |01 will adjust the usual volume
eration
closes the switch identified in Fig. '1 as
control device of the controlled radio receiver.
3. One portion of switch 3 closes the ñlament
The motor feeder leads will be exactly the same
circuit of tube | thus turning on the oscillator.
as in Fig. 2. At this point it should be pointed
The
upper section of switch 3 places condenser c
65
out that time constant circuit 55 is so chosen
across the oscillator coil Z. Condenser c is
that when the shift is made from the tuning
chosen of such capacity as will resonate with
control position to the volume control position
coil 2 at the frequency fc which is required byA
the action of keyer tubes I9 and 2| will be so
the
circuit of Fig. 2 in order to make it operate
retarded that switches 51 and 58, and their re
lated circuits, will have had time to complete 70 to tune in the station wanted. The depressing
of any one of the station tuning buttons of the
their duties before the control motor 25 is put
oscillator of Fig. '7 does the same thing as de
into action through either tubes i9 or 2| and
scribed above, except that each button throws
their related keyer circuits. The relays |00 and
in its own tuning capacitor which is of correct
|0| are fed with supply voltage by leads 200.
capacity to tune the oscillator to the frequency,
To illustrate the working of the volume con
2,404,101
required by the circuit of Fig. 2 to tune the par-ticular station called for.
For volume control it is necessary, as explained
before, that the circuit-of Fig. 6 be inserted be
tween points P and Q in the circuit of Fig. 2.
Depressing volume‘control button 300’ (fv) closes
the filament circuit, and puts capacitor o across
the oscillator coil 2. Capacitor o is of such ca
10
`ond’voltage of a polarity opposed to said control
voltage Vpolarity in response to adjustment of said
devices, and utilizing the second voltage to -op
pose the effect of the control voltage thereby to
terminate said adjustment at a predetermined
point.
,
3. A method of controlling the position of a
volume control device from a remote point,
which includes generating oscillations of a se
pacity as to provide the oscillator frequency fv
(Fig. 3) which, as was explained in connection l0 lected frequency at the remote point, deriving
with the volume control circuit, acts on the cir
from the oscillations a unidirectional control
cuits of Figs. 2 and 6 to cause it to decrease the
volume of the radio receiver. Depressing vol
ume control button 403’ (fa) turns the oscilla
tor on, and connects a, capacitor a across the os
cillator coil 2. This capacitor ais of such value
that it causes the oscillator to oscillate at a fre
quency fa (Fig. 3) which operates, as has been
explained, to increase the volume. It will be
noted that the oscillator is on for only that pe
riod of time required to tune in a desired sta
tion, or to set the volume level. Also the only
other operation at the oscillator, Kbeside turning
it on, is tuning its frequency, and it is not nec
essary that the push-bottom method be used. A
calibrated continuous tuning would also work at
the remote oscillator.
In that case a continu
ously variable condenser would be used in place
of the plurality of fixed condensers. Of course,
my invention may 'be carried out by using per
meability inductance tuners in place of con
densers. The method described by this disclosure
might well be used over long distances for co-n
trol work, as Well as for short distances.
While I have indicated and described several
systems for carrying my invention into effect, it
will be apparent to one skilled in the art that
my invention is by no means limited to the par
voltage whose magnitude and polarity7 are de
pendent upon the mean amount and sense of fre
quency difference between said selected frequen
cy and a predetermined reference frequency, ad
justing the volume control device to an extent
and in a direction determined by said voltage
magnitude and polarity respectively, producing
a second voltage of a polarity opposed t0 >said
control voltage polarity in response to adjust
ment of said devices, and utilizing the second
voltage to roppose the effect of the control volt
age thereby to terminate said adjustment at a
predetermined point.
4. A method of controlling the position of a
tuning device from a remote point, which in
cludes generating oscillations of a selected fre
quency at the remote point, transmitting the os
cillations to a point adjacent the device, deriv
ing directly from the transmitted oscillations a
unidirectional control voltage whose magnitude
and polarity are dependent respectively upon the
mean amount and sense of frequency difference
between said selected 'frequency and a predeter
mined reference frequency, adjusting the device
to an extent and in a direction determined by
said voltage magnitude and polarity respective
ly, and opposing said control voltage with a bal
ancing voltage derived in response to said de
that many modiñcations may .be made without 40 vice adjustment to cause said latter adjusting
departing from the scope of my invention, as
action to cease.
set forth in the appended claims.
5. A method of controlling either of the tun
ticular organizations shown and described, but
What I claim is:
ing and volume devices of a receiver from a rc
l. A method of controlling the position of a
mote point, which includes generating oscilla
45
device from a remote point, which includes gen
tions of a selected frequency at the remote point,
erating oscillations of a selected frequency at the
said frequency being to one side of a predeter
remote point, transmitting the oscillations to a
mined reference frequency for tuning control
and to the opposite side for volume control,
transmitted oscillations a unidirectional con
transmitting the oscillations to a point adjacent
trol voltage whose magnitude and polarity are 50 the device, deriving from the transmitted oscil
point adjacent the device, deriving from the
dependent respectively upon the mean amount
lations a unidirectional control voltage Whose
and sense of frequency difference between said
magnitude and polarity are dependent respec
selected frequency and a predetermined refer
tively upon the mean amount and sense of fre
ence frequency, adjusting the device to an ex
quency difference between said selected frequen
tent and in a direction determined by said volt 55 cy and the predetermined reference frequency,
age magnitude and polarity respectively, pro
and adjusting either of the tuning or volume de
ducing a second voltage of a polarity opposed to
vices to an extent and in a direction determined
said control voltage polarity in response to ad
by said voltage magnitude and polarity respec
justment of said devices, and utilizing the sec
tively.
_
ond voltage to oppose the effect of the control 60
6. A method of controlling the position of a
voltage thereby to terminate said adjustment at
a predetermined point.
,
2. A method of controlling the position of a
tuning device from a remote point, which in
cludes generating oscillations of a selected fre
quency at the remote point, transmitting the os
cillations to a point adjacent the device, deriving
directly from the transmitted oscillations a con
trol voltage whose magnitude and polarity are
tuning device, which includes generating oscil
lations of various selected frequencies, each fre
quency corresponding -to a diiferenttuning po
sition, deriving from the ‘oscillations a control
voltage whose magnitude and polarity are de
pendent respectively upon the mean amount and
sense of frequency difference between a select
ed frequency and a predetermined reference fre
quency, the reference frequency being the medi
dependent respectively upon the mean amount 70 an of the range of selected frequencies, adjust
and sense of frequency departure of said select
ed frequency from a predetermined reference
frequency, adjusting the device to an extent and
in a direction determined by said voltage magni
tude and polarity respectively, producing a sec
ing the tuning device to an extent and in a direc,
tion determined by said voltage magnitude and
polarity respectively, producing a balancing volt
age in response to said adjustment whose polar
75 ity is opposite to the control voltage polarity and
2,404,101
il
opposing the control voltage with the balancing`
voltage to nullify the effect of the control volt
age.
7. A method of adjusting the adjustable ele
ment of a circuit control device of a radio re
ceiver from a remote point, Which includes gen
erating a control wave of a selected frequency
at the remote point, transmitting the wave to
the receiver, deriving from the transmitted wave
a control voltage whose value is dependent upon
the amount of frequency difference between said
selected frequency and a `predetermined refer
ence frequency, adjusting the adjustable element
of said device to an extent determined by said
control voltage value and automatically neutral
izing the control voltage with a balancing voltage
produced during said adjustment.
8. A method of controlling the position of a
tuning device from a remote point, which in
cludes generating control energy of a selected
frequency at the remote point, transmitting the
energy to a point adjacent the device, deriving
12
mitting said waves to 'a desired point, deriving
from the transmitted waves a direct current volt
age whose polarity and magnitude depend re
spectively upon the sense and extent of frequenN
cy difference between the chosen frequency and
an intermediate frequency of said range, control
lin-g the adjustment of said volume control in
response to said voltage, balancing said direct
current voltage against a voltage of opposite po
larity to provide a resultant voltage, and ending
the adjustment automatically in response to a
concurrent gradual decrease of the said resultant
voltage produced by a balancing voltage of op
posite polarity.
12. A system for controlling the position of a
motor-operated radio receiver control device
from a remote point, which includes means for
generating oscillations of a selected frequency
chosen from a range of control frequencies, each
of said control frequencies corresponding to a
different adjustment of said motor, means for
transmitting said oscillations to a point adjacent
from the transmitted energy a control voltage
the motor, a discriminatcr-rectifier network for
amount and sense of frequency difference be
tween said selected frequency and a predeter
mined reference frequency, utilizing the control
voltage for adjusting the device to an extent and
in a direction determined by said Voltage magni
remote point for generating oscillations of a se
lected frequency chosen from a range of control
deriving from the transmitted oscillations and
whose polarity is dependent upon the direction
of frequency departure of said selected frequency 25 at the transmitted frequency a direct current
voltage whose polarity and magnitude depend
relative to a predetermined reference frequency,
respectively upon the sense and extent of fre
adjusting the device in a direction determined
quency difference between the selected frequen
by said voltage polarity and automatically neu
cy and the median frequency of said range,
tralizing the control voltage with a balancing
means
energized by the voltage for controlling
voltage produced during said adjustment.
the adjustment of said motor in response to said
9. A method of controlling the position of a
voltage, and further means, responsive to motor
receiver control device, which includes generat
adjustment, for opposing said direct current
ing oscillations of a selected frequency, transmit
voltage with a second voltage of opposite polarity
ting the oscillations to a desired point, deriving
thereby rendering said energized means ineffec
from the transmitted oscillations a unidirection
tive subsequent to a period of motor adjustment.
al control voltage whose magnitude and polarity
13. A control system comprising means at a
are dependent respectively upon the mean
tude and polarity respectively, and reducing the
eiîect of said control voltage sebsequent to the
adjustment of said device by a balancing voltage
of opposite polarity and equal magnitude.
10. A system for controlling the position of a
frequency adjusting device from a remote point,
which includes means for selectively generating
various oscillations of desired selected frequen
cies at the remote point, means for receiving os
cillations of one of said frequencies, means for
deriving from the received oscillations a control
voltage whose magnitude and polarity are de
pendent respectively upon the mean amount and
sense of frequency difference between said one
frequencies each of which corresponds to a dif
ferent adjustment of a control device, means for
deriving from the oscillations a direct current
voltage whose polarity and magnitude depend
respectively upon the sense and extent of fre
quency difference between the selected frequen
cy and the median frequency of said range,
means for controlling the adjustment of said
control device in response to said voltage and
means responsive to said adjustment means for
' balancing the said voltage with a second voltage
of opposite polarity thereby to terminate ad
justment of the control device.
14. A method of selectively controlling the re
spective operation of a tuner device and volume
control from a remote point, which includes gen
erating a wave of a selected frequency chosen
from a range of control frequencies, certain of
which frequencies located- on one side of a me
quency, motor means energized in response to
the control voltage for adjusting the device to an 60 dian frequency correspond to» different adjust
ments of said tuner while others of the frequen
extent and in a direction determined by said
cies located on the other side of said median fre
voltage magnitude and polarity respectively, and
quency correspond to diiferent adjustments of
additional means effective subsequent to a pre
said volume control, transmitting said wave to
determined adjustment of said device, for 0D
posing the control voltage with a balancing volt 65 a desired point, deriving from the transmitted
wave a direct current voltage whose polarity and
age thereby rendering said adjusting motor
magnitude depend respectively upon the sense
means inoperative.
and extent of frequency difference between the
l1. A method of controlling the operation of
selected
frequency and the said median frequen
a volume control from a remote point, which in
cy of said range, and selectively controlling the
cludes generating waves of a frequency chosen
adjustment of said tuner device and volume con
from a range of control frequencies, each of
frequency and a predetermined reference fre
which control frequencies corresponds to a dif
ferent desired adjustment of said control, trans
trol in response to said voltage.
ROBERT E. SCHOCK.
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