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Патент USA US2404680

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2,404,680
Patenteil July 23, 1946
UNITED STATES ‘PATENT OFFICE
2,404,680
PRINTING INK
Carl W. Aneshansel, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignm- to
Sterling Drug Inc., New York, N. Y., a corpora
tion of Delaware
No Drawing. Application March 26. 1945,
x
Serial No. 585,022
7 Claims.
(Cl. 106-30)
1
2
This invention relates to printing inks, and has
particular reference to that form of printing ink
which is set after printing by the application of
moisture to the print to precipitate the binder
from the hygroscopic solvent.
Heretoiore, such moisture-setting printing inks
usually contained ethylene or diethylene glycol
as the hygroscopic solvent from which the vehicle
vention comprises a pigment or dye dispersed in
a vehicle or varnish consisting of about 25 to
about 50% by weight of shellac dissolved in about
50 to 75% polypropylene glycol by weight. The
shellac may be of any standard commercial nat
ular or synthetic grade, the most satisfactory re
sults having been obtained with re?ned natural
shellac. The polypropylene glycol has a relatively
high boiling point at normal pressure, so as not
was made by dissolving a natural or synthetic
water-insoluble resin binder therein, but because 10 to evaporate on the press under printing condi
tions, the boiling point range being between about
such solvents have low moisture tolerance during
230° C. and about 300° C. The suitable class of
periods of high press-room humidity, they were
polypropylene glycols comprises those which are
unstable, thus necessitating the addition or use
liquid or ?ow at normal temperatures, but ex
of materials increasing the moisture tolerance of
the ink, in the eilort to attain the relatively ?ne 15 cludes those of such high molecular weight as to
be solid or wax-like at normal temperatures.
balance between atmospheric humidity tolerance
These normally liquid or ?owable polypropylene
and intended moisture absorption when setting
glycols have been found to be su?iciently mois
was desired alter printing. For example, a small
ture-tolerant to be stable in a printing ink, even
amount of trlethanolamine or its equivalent has
at high humidity conditions in the press room.
been added to a moisture-setting ink vehicle con
such as during midsummer, but are nevertheless
sisting of a solution of shellac in ethylene or di
highly hygroscopic in the presence of excess
ethylene glycol in order to make them commer
moisture when spread in a thin print ?lm on the
cially practicable, but this expedient and other
order of a few microns thick. The moisture may
similar expedients render the inks short in body
so that they coagulate or "liver" upon standing 25 be applied to the imprinted paper or other fresh
ly-printed surface by directing moist air or steam
and cannot be held in storage without deteriora
thereon, or otherwise applying moisture thereto,
'
so as to render the shellac binder no longer solu
Furthermore, the vehicles of commercial mois
ble in the polypropylene glycol, thus causing the
ture-setting inks are not good dispersing agents
without further modification, and are not resist 30 ink binder and its entrained coloring matter to
precipitate rapidly and thus set the ink.
ant to animal and vegetable fats and greases,
The following examples are illustrative of the
since the color bleeds, smudges and rubs oil when
varnish and ink compositions 01 this invention:
the print is placed in contact therewith. Hence,
such inks are not useful for imprinting wrappers
Example No. 1.—Varnish
tion.
for butter, lard, oleomargarine, meats, bread, 35
sandwiches and other lat-containing foods, or
other printed articles likely to come in contact
with such foods, fats or greases.
In accordance with the present invention, a
moisture-setting printing ink is provided, which 40
Parts by weight
Shellac, re?ned ________________________ __... 40
Polypropylene glycol _____________________ _- 60
Example No. 2.—Red ink
Parts by weight
has su?icient moisture tolerance to be stable on
Lithol Red toner
_
24
the press under high press-room humidity condi
Varnish Example No. 1___-____-____________ '16
tions, without requiring the addition of stabiliz
er; which nevertheless dries quickly when printed
Example No. 3.—Yellow ink
in a thin film, either under natural drying condi 45
Parts by weight
tions or upon application of moisture by moist air
Chrome Yellow_.._..________________________. 80
or steam; which will stand in storage inde?nitely
Varnish Example No. 1_--_....__.._...._..___-___ 40
and retain its original printing body without
coagulation or “livering"; which is iat- or grease
Example No. 4.—Black ink
proof and hence does not bleed, smudge or rub 50
Parts by weight
off when placed in contact with animal or vege
Carbon Black
_ 20
table lat-containing foods, and whose vehicle is
Varnish Example No. 1 ___________________ __ 80
a good dispersing agent for all pigments without
Other ionnul atlons oi water-insoluble pigment
requiring modification for that purpose.
The moisture-setting printing ink 01’ this in 55 or dyes oi’ the desired colors may be made, the pro
3
portions varying in accordance with the color de
4. A moisture-setting prining ink, comprising
sired, the ink in any case having the consist
ency required by the printing process; press,
paper or other printing surface to be used.
Although certain preferred embodiments oi’ the
invention have been illustrated 'and described
herein, it is to be understood that the invention
is not limited thereby, but is susceptible to
changes in form and detail within the scope of
the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A moisture-setting printing ink. comprising
water-insoluble coloring matter dispersed in a
varnish consisting of a solution of about 25% to
a water-soluble pigment dispersed in a varnish
consisting of a solution or about 25% to about
50% by weight of synthetic shellac in about 50%
to about 75% by weight of polypropylene glycol
boiling between about 230‘ and about 300“ C, at
normal pressure.
5. A moisture-setting printing ink. comprising
a water-insoluble pigment dispersed in a varnish
consisting of a solution 0! about 25% to about
50% by weight of re?ned natural shellac in about
50% to about 75% by weight of polypropylene
glycol boiling between about 230° and about 300°
C. at normal pressure.
about 50% by weight of shellac in polypropylene 15
6. Avamish vehicle for moisture-setting print
glycol o! the class which is substantially liquid
ing ink, consisting of about 25% to about 50%
at normal temperature.
synthetic shellac by weight dissolved in about
2. A moisture-setting printing ink, compris
50% to about r{5% by weight 01' propylene glycol
ing an insoluble pigment dispersed in a varnish
01 the class which is substantially liquid at nor
consisting of a solution of about 25 to about 50% 20 mal temperature.
by weight of natural shellaac in about 50 to about
7. A varnish vehicle for moisture setting print
‘75% by weight of polypropylene glycol boiling be
ing ink, consisting 01' about 25% to about 50%
tween about 230 and about 300°
at normal
re?ned natural shellac by weight dissolved in
pressure.
about 50% to about 75% by weight of poly
3. A varnish vehicle for moisture-setting print 25 propylene glycol of the class which is substan
ing ink, consisting oi! about 25 to about 50%
tially liquid at normal temperature.
shellac by weight dissolved in about 50 to about
CARL W. ANESHANSEL.
75% by weight of polypropylene glycol oi’ the
class which is substantially liquid at normal tem
perature.
Certi?cate of Correction
Patent No. 2,404,680.
CARL W. ANESHANSEL
July 23, 1946.
It is hereby certi?ed that errors appear in the printed s eci?cation of the above
numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Column 2, ines 5 and 6, for “natu
lar” read natural; column 3, line 21, claim 2, for “shellaac” read shellac; column 4,
line 1, claim 4, for “priming” read printing; line 2, same claim, for "water-soluble”
read water-insoluble; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these correc
tions therein that the same may conform to the record of the casein the Patent O?ice.
Signed and sealed this 8th day of October, A. D. 1946.
[m]
LESLIE FRAZER,
First Assistant Uommc'asioner of Patents.
3
portions varying in accordance with the color de
4. A moisture-setting prining ink, comprising
sired, the ink in any case having the consist
ency required by the printing process; press,
paper or other printing surface to be used.
Although certain preferred embodiments oi’ the
invention have been illustrated 'and described
herein, it is to be understood that the invention
is not limited thereby, but is susceptible to
changes in form and detail within the scope of
the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A moisture-setting printing ink. comprising
water-insoluble coloring matter dispersed in a
varnish consisting of a solution of about 25% to
a water-soluble pigment dispersed in a varnish
consisting of a solution or about 25% to about
50% by weight of synthetic shellac in about 50%
to about 75% by weight of polypropylene glycol
boiling between about 230‘ and about 300“ C, at
normal pressure.
5. A moisture-setting printing ink. comprising
a water-insoluble pigment dispersed in a varnish
consisting of a solution 0! about 25% to about
50% by weight of re?ned natural shellac in about
50% to about 75% by weight of polypropylene
glycol boiling between about 230° and about 300°
C. at normal pressure.
about 50% by weight of shellac in polypropylene 15
6. Avamish vehicle for moisture-setting print
glycol o! the class which is substantially liquid
ing ink, consisting of about 25% to about 50%
at normal temperature.
synthetic shellac by weight dissolved in about
2. A moisture-setting printing ink, compris
50% to about r{5% by weight 01' propylene glycol
ing an insoluble pigment dispersed in a varnish
01 the class which is substantially liquid at nor
consisting of a solution of about 25 to about 50% 20 mal temperature.
by weight of natural shellaac in about 50 to about
7. A varnish vehicle for moisture setting print
‘75% by weight of polypropylene glycol boiling be
ing ink, consisting 01' about 25% to about 50%
tween about 230 and about 300°
at normal
re?ned natural shellac by weight dissolved in
pressure.
about 50% to about 75% by weight of poly
3. A varnish vehicle for moisture-setting print 25 propylene glycol of the class which is substan
ing ink, consisting oi! about 25 to about 50%
tially liquid at normal temperature.
shellac by weight dissolved in about 50 to about
CARL W. ANESHANSEL.
75% by weight of polypropylene glycol oi’ the
class which is substantially liquid at normal tem
perature.
Certi?cate of Correction
Patent No. 2,404,680.
CARL W. ANESHANSEL
July 23, 1946.
It is hereby certi?ed that errors appear in the printed s eci?cation of the above
numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Column 2, ines 5 and 6, for “natu
lar” read natural; column 3, line 21, claim 2, for “shellaac” read shellac; column 4,
line 1, claim 4, for “priming” read printing; line 2, same claim, for "water-soluble”
read water-insoluble; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these correc
tions therein that the same may conform to the record of the casein the Patent O?ice.
Signed and sealed this 8th day of October, A. D. 1946.
[m]
LESLIE FRAZER,
First Assistant Uommc'asioner of Patents.
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