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Патент USA US2405256

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‘Aug. 6, 1946. ‘
- D, E, JACK ET AL
>
2,495,256
HEAT EXCHANGER
Filed Feb. _l0, v1945
_
5 Sheets-Sheet l
Q'INVENTORS
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'
DELBIRTE-J'ACK
BY muauasau okR. _
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ATTORN EYS
Aug; 6, 146.
D. E. JACK‘ ET AL
‘
’
2,405,256
HEAT EXCHAN-GER
Filed Feb. 10, 1945
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTORS
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ATTORNEYS
Ange , 1946.
D. E. JACK ET AL
2,405,25?
I HEAT EXCHANGER
Filed Feb. 10, 1945' '
5 Sheets-Sheet 3
ATTORNEYS
ug.
, 1946.
‘D. E. JACK ETAL
HEAT
. 2,405,256
EXCHANGER
'
Filed Feb. 10, 1945
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INVENTORS
@ELEERT E. JACK,
DALE. AUGSBURGER,
ATTORNEYS
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Aug- 6, 1946-
D. E. JACK ET AL
2,405,256
HEA T EXCHANGER
Filed Feb. 10, 1945
15.51,
5 Sheets-Sheet 5' -
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NVENTORS
DELBERTEJ'ACK.
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BYDALE AUGSBURGER,
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ATTCRNEYS
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Patented Aug. 6, 1946
2,405,25
UNITED STATES a PATENT
FEFHCE
2,405,256
7
HEAT EXCHANGER_ I
Delbert E. Jack and Dale Augsburger, Dayton,
Ohio, assignors to The Duriron Company, Inc.,
Dayton, Ohio, a corporation of New York
Application February 10, 1945‘, Serial N0.'577,190
6 Claims. (Cl. 257—245)
The present invention relates to heat exchange
apparatus. In the arts, a number of instances
present themselves in which it is desired to ele
vate the temperature of large quantities of ?uid
2
in an improved manner in order to‘eliminate
leakage between the grooves.
Still another object is to provide heat ex
change apparatus in which the grooved sections
by abstracting the necessary heat from another 01 are made such that when secured together su?i
?uid maintained at a higher temperature. In
cient springiness is obtained between the sections
certain other installations there is also the need
to cause the sectionsto contact one another over
of cooling large quantities of?uid by abstracting
the grooved areas without leakage and regardless
therefrom the undesired heat and this loss of heat
of the pressure of the ?uid.
'
is most conveniently caused by passing a, ?uid
Another
object
is
to
provide
improved
heat
of lower temperature in heat abstracting rela
exchange apparatus formed of'a plurality of sec
tion to the ?uid to be cooled. For example, in
tions stacked and suitably bolted, the sections be
the acid handling and control industry it is com
ing provided with grooves which register with one
monly desirable to cool the acid as it is being
another when the sections are assembled to
manufactured in order to facilitate the ?lling of
gether. The grooves in the improved structure
drums for shipment.
Considerable difficulty has been encountered
are such as to provide a series ?ow for the vari
ous ?uids or a multiple pass ?ow without neces
heretofore in the manufacture and assembly of
sitating radical changes in the apparatus in or
heat exchanger parts due to the exacting condi
der to convert from one type of ?ow to another.
tions under which the sections must be held to 20
A still further object is to provide an improved
gether in order to prevent leakage between the
heat
exchanger of simple and relatively inexpen
various passageways through which the ?uids are
sive construction and one which is adapted to
passing. This di?iculty is enhanced in propor
accommodate large quantities of ?uid while using
tion to the pressure of the ?uids being handled
the minimum amount of metal for constraining
because the resulting leakage served to reduce
the ?uid or ?uids to pass through the designated
the heat exchange eifects of the grooves or pas
channels in the apparatus.
sageways through which the ?uids are traveling.
The invention will be better understood when
It will be understood that it is di?icult, if not im
reference
is made to the following description
possible, to bolt the sections together at the areas
and the drawings, in which
over which the ?uids are moving. Leakage would 30
Fig. 1 represents a plan view of the improved
necessarily be involved since bolts at these places
would leave cracks or other escape openings for
heat exchanger which employs some of the prin
ciples of our invention. This view is taken look
the ?uids, causing them to intermingle within the
ing downwardly on the heat exchanger.
apparatus.
The primary object of the invention is to pro 35 Fig. 2 is a schematic View of the structure
shown in Fig. 1 but on a somewhat smaller scale
vide an improved heat exchange apparatus which
and indicating the path taken by a particular
is so constructed that even in the large unit sizes
?uid
in passing from the inlet to the outlet of
calling for sections of considerable diameter and
the heat exchanger.
’
'
a large number of sections the joints between the
Fig. 3 is an elevational View of the heat ex
sections can be made ?uid tight so that when a 40
changer
shown in Fig. l with theouter shield or
series of grooves are provided in the sections. at
the abutting surfaces, the ?uid or ?uids passing
through these grooves are constrained to their
own passageways and there is no leakage between
grooves.
casing partly cut-away in order to‘expose the in
terior parts.
Fig. 4_is a fragmentary ‘sectional View taken
along line 4~4 in Fig. 1 and showing the position
al relationship between the inlet for one of the
?uids together with the necessary supporting
Another object is to provide heat exchange ap
paratus formed in a plurality of sections in con
plates and clamping structures._
tact with one another with passageways formed
Fig. 5 is a relatively small elevational view,
at the contacting surfaces and in which the sec
tions are secured together at their outer portions 50 partly in section of one of the conically shaped
heat exchanger sections which are arranged in
but in such a manner that there is no leakage be
nested relation to form the heat exchanger
tween the various sets of grooves.
Still another object is to provide heat exchange
apparatus formed of a plurality of grooved sec
tions in which the sections are secured together
proper.-
.
_
,
,
Fig. 6 is a'fragmentary sectional View some
what enlarged showing a modi?ed form of a con-_
ical ‘section designed to provide di?erently
2,405,256
3
4
is provided with two pairs of adjacently posi
shaped passageways from those obtained in the‘
heat exchanger formed of the sections shown in
Fig. 5.
tioned semi-circular extensions 24, 25 in which
there is a circular hole 26, 21. As shown in Fig.
1, the holes 21 are disposed oppositely to one
upper portion of the water inlet compartment,
particularly showing the manner in which the
another as are also the holes 26. Thus, when the
sections are positioned together, i. e., on top of
Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional View of the
one another in nested relation, the openings 26,
2‘1 and the enlargements 24, 25 form two pairs
troduced into the heat exchanger. , '
'
‘
of compartments of which one pair is positioned
Fig. 8 is a section taken across the heat ex
diametrally opposite the other pair and a com
changer along the line 8-8 shown in Fig. i. This 10 -'-partment
of each pair is immediately adjacent
Fig. 8 is considerably enlarged in order to show
a
compartment
of the other pair. One pair of
more clearly the position and arrangement- of
water or other heating and cooling ?uid is in
diametrally disposed compartments which is
the various passageways and their interconnect
ing compartments
Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional" view,‘ with the"
indicated as for handling acid to be cooled or
heated, is designated generally by reference
character 28. The remaining pair of compart
ments which are also diametrically positioned
but are displaced from compartments 28 and in
are caused to pass through the structure in a v __
tended to receive heating or cooling ?uid such as
different manner from the structure shown- in
20 water is generally designated 29.
Fig. 8.
,
'
The upper and lower clamping plates or rings
Fig. 10 shows still another modi?ed'form of
8~and
9 respectively are given a shape at their
heat exchanger in which the ?uids pass'through
inner'peripheries as to follow the shape of the
the structure differently from the structures
outer surfaces of the upper-most and lower-most
shown in Figs. 8 and 9.
‘ ‘
l3 and 18 respectively with suftlcient
Referring more particularly to Figs. 1, 3, 4 and 25 sections
overlap
as
to provide a clamping effect against
8, the heat exchanger apparatus is supported
the outerv portions of these sections when the
on an outwardly ?ared heavy base member in
nuts i6 and I2 are tightened. Thus, the sec
dicated at l which is placed on the floor and if
tions 13 to IE are held'together solely at their
desired may be bolted thereto as indicated by
peripheries by the rings 8 and 9. The upper
the bosses 2. There is a heavy plate member 3 30 ends of the.compartments 28, 29 are closed by
forming part of the base member I and this
removable caps 30 (Fig. 8) which are also
member directly supports the various sections of
clamped in position by means of a C-shaped strap
support base removed, of a modi?ed form of heat
exchanger in which either or both of the, ?uids
the
heat
exchanger.
‘
'
'
.
‘
'
3! which extends over two adjacent caps as in
A sheet metal shield 4 surrounds the plate
member 3 and conveniently rests on the member 35 dicated in Fig. 1.
Each strap 3| is bolted as indicated at 32 to
by means of a circular ledge 5 so that the shield
the main support plate 3. A spring 33 may be
can be readily‘removed. The plate member'3 is
interposed between the nut 34 and‘ the upper
provided with a number of bolt openings 6 at its
surface of the clamp 3| (Fig. 4). A spring 35
outer area to receive the long shanked bolts 1
may be interposed between a nut 36 at the posi
40
which extend upwardly throughout the height of
tion where the bolts 32 pass through the clamping
the heat exchanger.
' '
ring 8 ‘as is also indicated at Fig. 4. These bolts
32,01‘ which there are two, one for each clamp
shaped sections which will be described in'detail
member 3!, are also bolted to the lower clamp
hereinafter all held together at their outer edges
ring 9 as indicated at 31 and a nut 38 tightens
by means of a pair of spaced plates 8, 9 which 45 the lowermost end of the bolt against the main
The latter is formed of a number of conically
are secured together by the bolts ‘I. The plate
support plate 3.
8 is drawn downwardly onto the uppermost heat
The lower ends of the compartments 28 as
exchanger section by means of nuts Ill which
shown in Fig. 8 terminate in a heavy angularly
abut the springs H. The speci?c manner in
shaped conduit 39 which is provided with a shoul
which plates 8 and 9 serve to clamp the sections 60 der 4!! and a circular plate member 4! reinforced
of the heat exchanger together will be apparent
as indicated at 42 can be pressed against the
when the sections have been described in detail.
shoulder 49 by means of a number of equi
The lower clamping plate 9 is drawn downwardly
distantly spaced bolts 43 to hold the ?ange 44
against the main support plate 3 by means of a
tightly against the lower surface of the lower
65
series of nuts 12.
section I8. The arrangement is such that liquid,
As shown more particularly in Figs. 5 and 8.
for example acidpcan be introduced into the
the heat exchanger sections l3 to It inclusive
conduit 39 and pass up through one of the com
are given broadly a conical configuration for
partments 28 and after traveling through the
reasons which will be pointed out hereinafter
heat exchanger in a manner which will be de
and in addition are provided with helical grooves 00 scribed‘ ' presently, will reach the diametrally
and corresponding ridges indicated at l9 and 2!!
disposed compartment 28 and flow downwardly
respectively, which when the sections are nested
through the oppositely positioned conduit 39
together form a number of series of inter-con
which serves as an outlet.
‘
necting passageways 2|.
'
'
Each section at the bottom terminates in a
relatively large circular ?ange portion 22' which
05,
The sections l3 to l8 may take a number of
di?erent shapes but conform generally to a con
ical con?guration as indicated in Fig. 5 and the
converging surfaces of the cone are provided with
portions register with one another when the sec
tions'lare placed in position. The lowermost sec
corrugations or other projections indicated at
tion l8 has its flange portion extended as indi
19 and 20 which, when the sections are ?tted to
cated at 23 so as to provide a circular ledge for 70'.
gether form grooves.
receiving the clamping ring or plate 9.
7
These corrugations and the grooves formed
It has been pointed out in connection with
Fig. 4 that ‘the plate or ring 9 is bolted to the
plate 3 by means of nuts l2. In addition to the
circular ?ange portions each section 13 to I 8'
thereby encircle the conical surface, preferably
as a- double helix, the plan View of which is dia
; grammatically illustrated in Fig. 2. It will be
2,405,256
5
6
noted for example,‘ if the lower left hand com
tions of the adjacent sections, passageways for
partment 28 were considered the inlet for ?uid
the water. Thus the passageways for the acid
such as acid which would pass through the ascend
are interposed in the vertical direction between
ing helical groove 45 formed partly by the depres
the passageways for the water.
sions I9 of the conical section and in part by the
‘The corrugated or projecting portions of each
mating depressions of the adjacent conical sec
of
the sections come in contact with one another
tion. When the ?uid reaches the top portion 45
when the various nuts ID are tightened which
of a given section after traveling through the
serve to apply a clamping pressure between the
helical passageway, the latter is caused to re~
sections
so that the various passageways are com
verse and the ?uid travels downwardly through 10 pletely independent
of one another except through
a set of grooves which is intermediate the ascend
the helical path or paths thus formed. There
ing set to ?nally reach the outlet 28 shown in
can be therefore no short circuiting or leakage of
the upper right‘hand portion of the ?gure.
water
or acid between directly adjacent passage
The ?ow of the ?uid can be readily traced from
ways and the acid is kept entirely separate from
the showing in Fig. 2 in which the inlet 28 and 15 the
water by the tightness of each joint.
the ascending and descending portions of the
It
has already been explained that the bulge
helical passageway are designated by arrows.
portion 25 of the circular ?anges 22 form the
It will be obvious that by reason of the double
acid compartments 28 and the water compart
helix effect in which the ?uid passes through a
ments
29. The tightness of the ?ange serves to
continuous groove upwardly along the conical 20
determine the distance apart that the sections I3
surface and then downwardly through an inter~
to I8 assume when these ?anges 22 are tightly
mediate groove the'?uid actually ?ows in opposite
bolted
together at the nuts It]. It is also appar
directions in adjacent grooves. It will be fur
ent that the nuts 34 at the two diametric posi
ther noted that the top portion 45 of each con
tions on the heat exchanger also serve to clamp
ical section provides an open compartment in
the
sections together at the compartments 28 and
which there are no grooves, the function of this
29 since these bolts press downwardly on the
compartment being to permit readily reversal of
straps‘3l which in turn rest on the caps 30. In
the ?uid after it leaves the ascending groove and
order to prevent even the slightest possibility of
prepares to enter the descending passageway.
leakage at the upper and lower surfaces of the
In this manner eddies and frictional resistance to
?anges 22 and particularly at the bulge positions
?ow are prevented.
25 where the compartments are located, gaskets 54
The heating medium inlet compartment 29 is
of
any suitable ‘material, soft metal or synthetic
constructed somewhat differently from the acid
rubber may be employed and the thickness of
inlet compartment 28 but the heating medium
this gasket also serves to give a ?ne determina
and acid outlet compartments have substantially
tion of the spacing between the sections I3 to H!
the same form. The reason for the difference in
and may be so calculated that when the nuts l5
the acid and water inlets is mainly because the
are tightened in a proper manner registry is estab
water is usually applied to the heat exchanger
lished between the corrugated portions of adjacent
under considerable pressure and this pressure
sections.
preferably should be reduced before the water 40
Openings 55 are provided between each of the
enters the exchanger. For this reason a pipe 41
compartments 28 and the alternate sets of helical
(Fig. 4) is provided. This pipe extends through
grooves so that an acid can be caused to travel
the center of the water inlet compartment 29
through the conduit 39, and a portion will follow
and is provided at its upper end with threads 53
(Figs. 4. and 7) to which is screwed a hollow 45 the arrow 56 then through the lower set of pas
sageways indicated at 5'! as explained hereinbe
cylindrical cap to closed at the top by a hemi
fore, ?nally emerging at the opposite side of the
spherical portion. The cap is provided with a plu
heat exchanger through the opening 55. After
rality of equidistantly spaced ribs 5| with open
leaving this opening the acid will ?ow down
ings 52 therebetween. The interior of the cap
communicates with the interior of compartment 50 wardly as indicated by the arrow 58 into the dis
charge conduit 39. Another portion of the acid
29 through the openings 52 and also communi
passing through the inlet conduit 39 will flow up
cates with the interior of the pipe 4‘! through the
wardly through the inlet compartment 28 and
opening at the end of the pipe. Thus, as water
follow
the arrow 59 passing through the grooves
under pressure is forced through the pipe, this
water will pass through the end opening of the 55 Ell and then through the opening 55 into the out
let compartment 28. Still a third portion of the
pipe into the interior of the cap and will return
acid passing through the inlet conduit 39 will
downwardly through the openings 52 into the
reach the uppermost opening 55 in the inlet com
compartment as a circumferential layer at re
partment 28 and following the arrow 6| will pass
duced pressure. Thus, the cap 50 serves in effect
to take up and reduce the impact of the water 60 through the uppermost set of grooves 62 ?nally
emerging at the opening 55 in the outlet com
column which tends to move at a fast Velocity
through the pipe 41.
-
There are lateral outlets from the compart
ment 29 leading to helical grooves formed in the
heat exchanger similar to those that were ex~
plained in connection with the ?ow of acid and
illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.
It will be seen from a studyof Fig. 8, that the
upper surfaces of the grooves and corrugations
partment 28 and following the arrow 63 to join
the acid which had passed through the grooves
5‘! and 60. Thus, separate portions of the acid
pass through the respective grooves 51, 50 and
62, each traveling through the heat exchanger
once and all traveling through the ascending
portion of its respective groove until it reaches
the top of the conical section and then traveling
formed in the various sections constitute when 70 down the descending portion of the groove until
it reaches the opening at the opposite side of the
mated with corresponding grooves and corruga
heat exchanger as was explained in connection
tions of the adjacent sections a series of passage
with Fig. 2.
ways for the acid, and the lower grooves and cor
The water takes a path quite similar to that
rugations on the same sections constitute when
which has been described in connection with the
mated with corresponding grooves and corruga
acid except that the water has its own inlet and
2,405,256
8
It was explained in connection with Fig. 8 that
portions of each of the water and acid pass
through different portions of the heat eXchanger.
, outlet compartments 29. Openings (not shown)
are provided between each of these compart
ments and the grooves 64, 65 which’are positioned
vertically intermediatev the acid grooves 51, 60
and 62 so that a portion of the water will pass
through the heat exchanger from the inlet to
If desired, the entire quantity of acid or water
may be required to pass any predetermined num
ber of times through the heat exchanger as a
multiple or series arrangement. The advantage
of structure of this particular type is that the
the outlet compartment 29'through the groove
64 and another portion will pass through the
inlet-and outlet compartments can be positioned
heat exchanger through the groove 65. The
at the same side of the heat exchanger rather
10
water grooves are preferably similar to those de
than at diametrally disposed positions.
scribed in connection with the acid grooves in
In Fig. 9 the lower conduit 39 for the inlet
that they form a double reverse helix as the water
fluid may be secured to the enlarged ?ange por
is caused to flow ?rst upwardly to the apex of the
tion 25 of the lower most section 68 in any suit
conical section and then downwardly (Fig. 2).
able and well-known manner. This ?ange por
Thus, it is seen that'the acid makes three
tion has an opening 69 therein which constitutes
passes through the heat exchanger, separate por
the inlet. There is an opening ‘Ii! extending from
tions of the acid passing through the heat ex
the opening 69 into the grooves ‘H between the
changer in multiple ‘paths. Separate portions
sections 68 and 12. At the opposite side of the heat
of the water likewise pass once through the heat
exchanger the section 68 is provided with an
exchanger and these paths are positioned inter‘ 20 opening 13 which forms in part the discharge
mediate the acid paths, Consequently if the acid
compartment and its opening 14 leading from
is at an elevated temperature with respect to
the grooves 1| into the compartment 13.
the water the latter serves to cool the acid as
The section 12 at the inlet or left hand side
its heat absorbing effects are transferred through
as shown in Fig. 9 is solid at the positions indi
25
the walls of the sections.
'
'
cated at 15 directly above the opening 69 so
The advantage of forming the sections l3 to
as to close off that opening. However, the sec
l8 of a conical con?guration rather than in a
tion 12 has an opening 16 in register with open
substantially ?at shape is that considerable
ing 13 thus also forming part of the discharge
springiness is obtained at any point of contact
compartment. The section 11 is provided with
when clamping pressure is exercised at the pe
a wall ‘I8 directly above the wall 15 at’ the left
ripheries of the sections. 'It is apparent that
hand side of the structure and at the diametrally
these clamping effects tend td apply tensile
opposite position there is provided an opening
stresses ‘along the lengths of the metal walls
19. The fourth section up from the bottom on
which in turn causes a contraction in the vertical
the exchanger 89 is provided with an opening 8%
direction between the sections, thus assuring a 35 at the left hand side but at the opposite side
substantially ?uid tight contact between the cor
there is a wall 82 which closes off the outlet com
rugations ofv the adjacent sections. While we
partment. An opening 83 permits communica
have described our invention from the standpoint
tion between the grooves 84 and the outlet com
of employing a relatively small number of sec
partment which is formed of the openings l3, ‘l6
40
tions providing three multiple passes for the acid
and 19. A wall 85 is provided on the section 86
and two for the coolant, it will be understood
similar to the wall 82 and directly above. This
that" the construction is such that any number
wall constitutes the bottom of a compartment 8'!
of sections can be employed to an advantage and
the top of which is closed by a wall 88 which!
in Fig. 3 we have indicated at least thirteen sec
tionsl
v forms a part of the upper-most section 89. The
section 90 is provided witha wall 9| directly above
the wall 19 as is also the remaining section 92.
The upper-most section 89 is provided with an
opening 93 which registers with the interior of
the upper discharge conduit 94.
There are horizontally extending openings 95
‘
The improved heat exchanger lends itself
equally well to a'hot ?uid heater in that a cool
?uid can .be passed through the grooves '51, 60,
62 and a heated ?uid through the intermediate
grooves 54 and 65 in order to transfer heat from
the latter ?uid to the cool ?uid, in fact,‘ there
and 96 for connecting the grooves 91 and 98 re
spectively to the interior of the compartment 81.
There is also a horizontally extending opening
changer may be adapted since it operates on the
99 interconnecting the groove N30 with the open
principle of transferring heat from one medium,v
55 ing 93, and similar openings Hit and 1:12 con
liquid or gas, to another medium. ‘
necting grooves 98 and 84 with the interior I03
Instead of providing the sections l3 to it with
is no limit as to the uses to which the heat ex
of the compartment generally designated I04.
circular grooves and depressions we may, if de
sired, give these grooves and corrugations a sub
stantially rectangular shape as shown in Fig. 6.
Caps I05 and H16 secured by C-clamps 3| are
positioned at the top and bottom surfaces of the
compartment generally designated I01. A shield
This particular shape of groove and corrugation
4 may surround the entire heat exchange appa
ratus and the latter is conveniently mounted on
a base member I (not shown).
It is apparent that if acid orw?uid is introduced
65 under pressure to the conduit 39 taking the path
at these places.
indicated by the arrows I08 the ?uid will pass
We have also found that sections made in
through the grooves 'H, through the openings
accordance with the’shape shown in Fig. 6 are
l3, l6 and 19 as indicated bythe arrows I691.
easy'to cast and the grooves or passageways may
thence through the grooves 84, thence into the
be made relatively small in width but of consid
compartment 8| and through the grooves 98 to
erable length,‘ which in e?ect assures extensive 70 the
compartment 81, following the arrow H0
contact between the cooling or heating ?uid and
through the grooves 91 and ?nally out through
the walls of the sections. Thus, the efficiency of
the conduit 94 as indicated by the arrow Ill.
heat transference between the moving ?uid in one
Thus, the ?uid makes four passes through the
lends itself particularly well to a machining op
eration of the surfaces indicated at 66 in order
to provide flat surfaces at the points of registry
and thereby completely assure guiding channels
set of passageways and the ?uid in the adjacent
set of passageways is increased.
'
heat exchanger, these passes being connected in
2,405,256
10
series to form a so-called multi-pass. The ad
vantage of the arrangement shown in Fig.‘ 9
over that explained in connection with Figs. 1.
and 8 is that the conduits 39, and 94 remain on
the same side of the heat exchanger rather
orboth of the ?uids passing through the heat
exchanger. It will be understood that if clamp
ing bolts'were passed through the conical portions
of ‘the sections there would be a tendency for
leakage to occur around the bolts but in the
than being positioned diametrally opposite one
present structure in which the clamping eifects
another. .
are applied solely at the peripheries of the sec
It will be understood that the other ?uid which
is to be admitted to the grooves H2 are provided
tions no bolts are necessary to be provided
through these peripheral portions but the clamp
with compartments similar to compartments HM
ing effects are obtained by a pair of rings 8, 9
and bolts 1 which are positioned wholly external
to the sections proper. Even the clamping ef
fects applied to the various parts of the com
and I01 except that the walls which extend across
the compartments would be positioned differently
and so would also the openings which communi
cate between the grooves and the interior of these
compartments in .order that the particular ?uid
would be constrained to ?ow through the grooves
partments 28 (Fig. 8) I04, I01 (Fig. 9), H3, H4
(Fig. 10) are obtained by means of c-shape
II2 as will be readily understood by those skilled <
in the'art. In this particular case the inlet and
discharge conduits similar to elements 39 and 84
would be provided for this particular ?uid and 20
would preferably be positioned on the same side
of the heat exchanger,
Fig. 10 is still a different form of structure
in which the sections or rather the grooves
formed by the sections are so interconnected at
the compartments generally indicated H3, H4
through a system of openings I !5 and walls H5
brackets 3I and bolts 32 which are also positioned
external to the structure of the heat exchanger.
Thus the improved device is de?nitely more
leak-proof than those of the prior art in view
of this consideration and accordingly is able to
withstand the greater pressure on the applied
?uids.
‘ Having thus fully described our invention,
what we claim as new and desire to secure by
Letters Patent is:
1. Heat exchange apparatus comprising a plu
rality of generally conical sections arranged in
nested relation, each of said sections having spi
ral corrugations, the corrugations being con
structed and arranged so that the humps of one
that the outlet conduit II‘! is positioned at the
opposite side of the heat exchanger from the
inlet conduit II 8 and further, that conduit II‘!
is positioned near the top of the structure and
section are in contact with the humps of sections
conduit I I8 is positioned near the bottom thereof.
on either side thereof, and the humps of said con
By following the arrows indicated at I I9 it will
tacting sections forming a spiral passageway ,for
be seen that the ?uid makes ?ve passes through
?uids between each pair of sections, each pas
the grooves I 20 of the heat exchanger beginning 35 sageway winding spirally inward from the pe
at the conduit II8 and‘ending at the conduit
riphery of a pair of said sections toward the cen
“1. It will be understood that the second fluid
ters oi'said sections and outwardly toward the
which is either to give‘ up heat or to abstract heat
peripheries of said pair of sections, a ?uid con
from the ?rst ?uid passes through the inter
nection from a source of ?uid of one temperature
mediate grooves IZI and makes four passes 40 to one set of passageways, and a ?uid connection
through the heat exchanger. The second ?uid is
from another source of ?uid of another temper
constrained to its various paths by the use of
ature to another set of passageways, the passage
compartments similar to those exemplified by
ways of said one set alternating with the passage
compartments I I3 and I I4 but by which the wall
ways of said other set, whereby to provide a heat
sections H6 and the various openings are ar
ranged so as to direct the second fluid into its
proper grooves or passageways.
As in the case
exchange relationship between the passageways
of one set and the passageways oi the other set.
2,. Heat exchange apparatus comprising a plu
rality of generally conical sections arranged in
nested relation, each of said sections having spi
to conform to the shapes illustrated in Fig. 6 50 ral corrugations, the corrugations being con
of the structure shown in Fig. 8 the various sec
tions illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10 can be made
in which the grooves or passageways are rela
tively small in width as measured horizontally
but of considerable height if measured verti
cally.
structed and arranged so that the humps of one
section are in contact with the humps of sections
on either side thereof, and the humps of said con
’
tacting sections forming a spiral passageway for
It will be understood that sections having 55 ?uids between each pair of sections, each pas
curvilinear corrugations as shown, for example
sageway winding spirally inward from the pe
in Figs. 8, 9 and 10, can if desired, be machined
riphery of a pair of said sections toward the cen
in the same manner as the corrugations shown
ters of said sections vand outwardly toward the
in Fig. 6 in order to assure ?uid tight contacts
between the various grooves or passageways.
It is evident from the foregoing that we have
disclosed a heat exchanger which can be made
of any number of sections, these sections being
peripheries of said pair of sections, a ?uid con
60 nection'from a source of ?uid of one temperature ‘
to one set of passageways, and a ?uid connection
from another source of ?uid of another temper
ature to another set of passageways, the pas
sageways of said one set alternating with the
so grooved or corrugated as to provide passage
ways for two or more ?uids which are to be 65 passageways of said other set, whereby to pro
brought into heat transferring relation.
The
conical configuration of the sections permits the
clamping of the sections to be done solely at the
peripheries thereof since when the clamping
vide a heat exchange relationship between the
passageways of one set and the passageways of
the other set, and means for clamping the sec
tions together adjacent their peripheries.
nuts I0 are applied there is a drawing down 70
3. Heat exchange apparatus comprising a plu
eifect on these sections assuring substantially
rality of generally conical sections arranged in
?uid tight guide channels between the corruga
nested relation, each of said sections having spi
tions of the sections and preventing any appreci
ral corrugations, the corrugations being con
able “short-circuiting” eifect, i. e., cutting out
structed and arranged so that the humps of one
a length of the grooves or passageways for one 75 section are in contact with the humps of sections
2,405,256
11
on either side thereof, and the humps of said
contacting sections forming a spiral passageway
for ?uids between each pair of sections, each pas
sageway winding spirally inward from the ‘pe
riphery of a pair of said sections toward the
centers of said sections and outwardly toward
the peripheries of said pair of sections, a ?uid
structed and arranged so that the humps of one
section are in contact with the humps of sections
on either side thereof, and the humps of said
contacting sections forming a spiral passageway
for ?uids between each pairv of sections, each
passageway winding spirally inward from the
periphery of a pair of said sections toward the
centers of said sections and outwardly toward
the peripheries of said pair of sections, a ?uid
connection from a source of ?uid of one temper
ature to one set of passageways, and a ?uid con
nection from another source of ?uid of another 10 connection from a source of ?uid of one temper
ature to one set of passageways, and a ?uid con
temperature to another set of passageways, the
nection from another source of ?uid of another
passageways of said oneset alternating with the
temperature to another set of passageways, the
passageways of said one set alternating with'the
a heat exchange relationship between the pas
sageways of one set and the passageways of the 15 passageways of said other set, whereby to pro
vide a heat exchange relationship betwe'en’the
other set, said sections having aligned openings
passageways of one set' and the passageways of
adjacent their perip’heries providing inlet vand
the other set, and a dome'for each section, each
outlet passages for said ?uids.
pair of adjacent domes forming a circular
4. Heat exchange apparatus comprising a plu
passageways of said other set, whereby to‘provide
rality of generally conical sections arranged in 20
nested relation, each of said sections having spi
chamber.
‘
'
‘
"
6. Heat exchange apparatus comprising a plu
rality of generally conical sections arranged in
nested relation, each of said sections having ‘spi
ral corrugations, the corrugations being con
ral corrugations, the corrugations being con
structed and arranged so that the humps of one
section are in contact with the humps of sections
on either side thereof, and the humps vof said con 25 structed and arranged so that the humps of one
section are in contact with the humps of sections
tacting sections forming a spiral passageway for
on either side thereof, and the humps of said
fluids between each pair of sections, each pas
contacting sections forming a spiral passageway
sageway winding spirally inward from the pe
for ?uids between each pair of sections, each
riphery of a pair of said sections towardthe‘cen
ters of said sections and outwardly toward the 30 passageway winding spirally inward from the
periphery of a pair of said sections toward the
peripheries of said pair of sections, a ?uid con
centers of said sections and outwardly toward
nection from a source of ?uid of one tempera
the peripheries of said pair of sections, a ?uid
ture to one set of passageways, and a ?uid con
connection from a source of ?uid of one temper
nection from another souroe‘of ?uid of another
temperature to another set of passageways, the 35 ature to one set of passageways, and a ?uid con
nection from another source of ?uid of another
passageways of said one set alternatingwith the
temperature to another set of passageways, the
passageways of said other-set, whereby to pro
passageways of said one set alternating with the
vide a heat exchange relationship between “the
passageways of said other set, whereby to pro
passageways of one set and the passageways of
the other set, said sections having aligned open; 40 vide a heat exchange relationship between‘ the‘
passageways of one set and the passageways of
ings adjacent their peripheries providing inlet
the other set, and means‘ for clamping the pe
and outlet passages for said ?uids, said inlet and
ripheries of said sections to each other in nested,
outlet passages for each ?uid being located on
relationship whereby the humps of ‘a section
diametrically opposite sides of said sections.
5. Heat exchange apparatus comprising a plu 45 made a tight ?t with the humps of each section
lying on either side thereof.
rality of generally conical sections arranged in
DELBERT E. JACK.
nested relation, each of said sections having spi
DALE AUGSBURGER. '
ral ‘corrugations, the corrugations being con
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