close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2405316

код для вставки
Aug. 6, 1946.
2,405,316
J, w_ MCBRIDE
STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
Filed Jan. '26‘, 1943
5 Sheets-Sheet 1
‘ INVENTQR
J0 n
BY
'
‘Er/dc
'
ATTORNEY
~ Aug. 6, 1946.
2,405,31 6
J, w, McB‘RlDE
STRINGED M?sIcAL INSTRUMENT
Filed Jan. 26, 1943'
5|Sheets-Sheet 2
.
lNvENToR
(/0 n M! M Brio?
5*
aéé/wv/
,
ATTORNEY
Aug. 6, 1946.
2,405,316
J. w. MCBRIDE
STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
Filed Jan. 26, 1943
5 Sheets-Sheet 3
“mN.MN,
g
I
WNW
mm
'
\NvENT'oR
g r/b’e
ATTORNEY
Aug. 6, 1946.
'
‘
J. w. MCBRIDE
2,405,316
STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT‘
Filed Jan. 26, 1943 '
5 Sheets-Sheet 4
\NvENTo-R‘
Aug. 6, 1946.
2,405,316
J. w. McBRlDE
STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
Fiiéd Jan. 26, 1943
5 Sheets-Sheet 5
IN \/ ENTOR
John PM Me Br/aé
BY’
ATTORNEY
Patented Aug. 6, 1946
2,405,316
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,405,316
STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
John W. McBride, Burbank, Calif.
Application January 26, 1943, Serial No. 473,601
21 Claims.
(Cl. 84-315)
2
1
This invention relates to a musical instrument,
and more particularly to an instrument having
one or more tensioned strings, such as a guitar,
banjo or violin.
The free vibrating length of any of the strings
determines the pitch of the musical note pro
duced by the string. The conventional manner
of determining the free length is by “stopping”
' an electric pick-up device in a simple and highly
e?ective manner; and particularly by members
that transmit the vibrations to the device by
physical contact.
This invention possesses many other advan
tages, and has other objects which may be made
more easily apparent from a consideration of
several embodiments of the invention. For this
the string with the ?ngers. In some forms of
purpose there are shown a few forms in the
instruments, it has been proposed to provide a 10 drawings accompanying and forming part of the
present speci?cation. These forms will now be
key mechanism, operable adjacent the end of the
neck, for mechanically adjusting the free vibrat
ing length of the string.
described in detail, illustrating the general prin
use of the hand in a natural position, while the
mechanism is operated, the ?ngers that are em
Fig. 2;
Fig. 4 is a sectional view, taken along the plane
4—4 of Fig. 3;
ciples of the invention; but it is to be understood
For example, such an arrangement is described
that this detailed description is not to be taken
and claimed in an application, ?led on April 14, 15 in a limiting sense, since the scope of the inven
tion is best de?ned by the appended claims.
1941, in the name of John W. McBride, under
Referring to the drawings:
Serial No. 388,379, now Patent No. 2,316,799,
granted April 20, 1943. It is one of the objects
Figure 1 is a side elevation of an instrument
incorporating the invention;
of this invention to provide a different, simple
Fig. 2 is an‘ enlarged plan view of the instru
form of mechanism for determining the free vi 20
brating length of the string.
‘
ment illustrated in Figure 1;
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary enlarged longitudinal
It is another object of this invention to provide
sectional view, taken along the plane 3-3 of
a mechanism of this character that permits the
ployed for this purpose extending in the direc
Fig. 5 is a sectional view, taken along the
transverse thereto.
plane 5-5 of Fig. 3, one of the bars determining
the free vibrating length of a string being shown
In the prior application hereinabove identi?ed,
the lower side of the tensioned string is arranged 30 in a depressed position;
tion of the strings, rather than in a direction
to be contacted by a crest formed on a rotatable
rod or bar. Angular adjustment of the rod or
bar causes a corresponding variation of the point
Fig. 6 is a plan view of a modi?ed form of bar
that may be utilized in connection with the in
vention;
where the crest contacts the string to determine
Fig. 7 is a side elevation of the bar illustrated
its free vibrating length. By the aid of the pres 35 in Fig. 6;
Fig. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary side view
ent invention, it is not necessary that the crest
(whether continuous or interrupted) progress an
of a bar, such as illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7,
gularly about the axis of the bar. The crest may
shown in cooperative position with a tensioned
string;
instead be placed on the side of the bar; the bar
is moved past the string, the position of the 40, Fig. 9 is a plan view of a modi?ed form of
crested side being thereby altered to cause any
instrument incorporating the invention;
selected part of the crest to contact the string.
Figs. 10, 11 and 12 are sectional views, taken
This motion of the bar can be arranged con
veniently in a direction toward and from the
respectively along planes |Ei—|0, H-—Il and I2
I2 of Fig. 9;
body of the instrument, in its movements past 45 Figs. 13, 14, 15 and 16 are fragmentary sectional
the string. However, it is possible to move the
views showing modi?ed forms of the bars for de
termining the free vibrating length of a string;
bar in other directions, so long as the bar pro~
gresses past the string and the crest is caused
Fig. 17 is a pictorial view of one of the bars
to press against the string. It is accordingly an
used in connection with the instrument of Fig. 1;
other object of this invention to provide a simple 50 and
form of mechanism of this general character ca
Fig. 18 is a plan view on an enlarged scale of
pable of determining the free vibrating length
the mounting means for the bars of Fig. 1.
ofrthe string.
In the form of the invention illustrated in Figs.
It is another object of this invention to make
1 to 5 inclusive, 17 and 18, there is illustrated a
it possible to transmit the string vibrations to 55 body I, shown as having the con?guration of a
2,405,316
3
extreme positions,
in a scrolled peg board 3.
The crest I8 is in contact with the string 1 at
the point 23, near the left hand end of the bar
ll. The string 7 is shown as forming an acute
Extending above the body l and the neck 2 are
a plurality of tensioned strings. Eight of such
strings are shown in the present instance, num
bored from i! to H inclusive. These strings are
shown as appropriately supported in notches, such
as I2 (Fig. 3) formed on a bridge l3. Since, in
angle with the crest i8; nevertheless, the point
of crossing of the string '8 over the crest H3 at
the maximum free vibrating position is rendered
accurate and de?nite by providing an extension
the form under discussion, a violin type instru
ment is disclosed in which the strings are ar
2! of the crest at the left hand end, and having
a direction more nearly normal to the string.
ranged to be set into vibration by a bow moving
transversely of the strings, the bridge I?» is up
wardly arched for supporting the strings at diifer-.
ent heights respectively above the body of the
instrument.
Thus, the strings considered to
4
in Fig. 3, is obtained when bar ll is in One of its
violin. It is provided with a neck 2, terminating
Thus, this maximum length may be maintained
even for slight misalinements of bar ii, that may
occur when the bar is in its extreme upper po
15 sition.
The bar ll, however, may he moved downwardly
gether are in a convex con?guration across the
in a manner to be hereinafter described, to as~
body. The right hand ends of these strings may
sume another extreme position illustrated in dot
be anchored in an anchor piece l4, appropriately
and dash lines in Fig. 3. This extreme position
attached to the tail portion of the instrument.
is also indicated in the section, Fig. 5. rl‘hus, the
20
Each of the strings ‘I! to H inclusive is adapted
crest H3 in this position contacts the string 1 at
to be tensioned. as by the aid of conventional pegs
a point 22 corresponding to the shortest adjusted
l5 extending through the scrolled portion 3. A
length
of the string.
supplemental bridge structure it (Figs. 1, 2 and 3)
Crest 58 may have an extension 8%’; at its right
is arranged adjacent the left hand end of the
25 hand extremity, serving the same function as
neck portion 2.
extension 2|.
A plurality of adjustable bars is provided for
In the course of movement of the bar I? from
making it possible to adjust the free vibrating
between its two extreme positions illustrated in
lengths of the strings t! to H inclusive. For ex
Fig. 3, the free vibrating lengths of string 1 is
ample, a bar i1 (Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 17) is provided
correspondingly varied from the maximum illus
30
for adjusting the free vibrating length of the
trated in full lines, to the minimum illustrated
string 1. In the present instance this adjustable
in dot and dash lines.
bar I‘! is also utilized for adjusting the free length
of the adjacent string 6.
The movement of the bar I? is such that as
it moves the strings ii and ‘3 contact progressively
different points of the crests. The crest I9, con
.
For this purpose the bar H, which may be of
hollow tubular con?guration, is shown as pro—
vided with crests l8 and I9 disposed on opposite
sides of the bar. These crests extend generally
longitudinally of the bar 51. They press against
the strings where the strings cross the crests:
tacting the string 6, may be formed similarly to
the crest I8, and operates in the same manner,
to determine the free vibrating length oi that
string.
Conveniently, the bar if may be arranged to
and thereby the free length of the string depends 40
move, angularly to effect adjustment of the free
upon the point where the string crosses the crest.
To compensate for the increased freedom of the
strings in their central positions where the dis
tance to either bridge i3 or IE is relatively great,
the crests bulge slightly in their mid portions to~
ward the respective strings. This bulge is shown
exaggerated in Fig. 6, in connection with a modi
?ed form of bar which will be described herein
after. Furthermore, since strings 6 and 1 adja
cent bridge l3 are at different heights above the 50
body of the instrument and, adjacent bridge It‘.
at substantially the same height, the bar I? is of
substantially rectangular cross section at its end
adjacent bridge l6, as shown in Fig. 4; and is
skewed or twisted at an increasing angle toward
bridge l3 in accordance with the difference in
heights of strings ii and 1 above body I (see
Fig. 5).
The car I‘! is movable past the strings 6 and l
in such manner that the longitudinal axis of the
bar moves in a plane.
The apexes of the crests
l8 and I9 also move substantially in planes that
are parallel to this plane. The strings 6 and ‘I
extend parallel with said planes and transversely
vibrating length. For this purpose bar H’ is shown
as fastened to a spring hinge ?nger 23. This
?nger is shown as formed integrally with and
extending upwardly at a slight angle from a base
plate 24 (Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 18) supported on the
body i. The ?nger ‘Z3 is fastened in any appro~
priate manner to the end portion 85 of the bar ll.
Downward pressure on bar 5'! will cause the bar
to move downwardly, ?exing ?nger
the re»
silience of this ?nger being sufiicient to return
bar ii’ to its normal position upon removal of
such pressure.
Manipulation of the bar H" is effected by the
~ ‘
55 aid of the key 25 (Figs. 3 and 4) carried by the
left hand end of the bar W. This key 25 is shown
as accommodated in a cavity or recess formed
below neck 2 and extending beneath the scrolled
portion
3. This recess extends entirely through
> ~
so the instrument, thus serving to accommodate the
bar I’! when it is in the depressed position shown
in dot and dash lines in Fig. 3.
The ?ngers of the player, for manipulation of
such keys as 25, can extend generally in a direc
of the direction of movement of the bar. Thus, in 65 tion corresponding to .the length of the neck.
These manipulations are accomplished by insert~
the form illustrated, the bar H is movable down
ing the ?ngers into the recess 25, from below the
wardly toward the body I between the strings
instrument.
.
8 and l‘ (see Figs. 4 and 5). The lateral distance
A projecting edge 27 of the board 3 is formed
between strings 5 and ‘I is slightly less than the v' '
lateral distance across the bar from apex to, apex 70 at the top of the recess 25, to serve as a stop for
limiting the upward movement of the bar IT.
of the crests l3 and [9 at any point along the
The resilient ?nger 23 urges the bar ll into the
crests, Accordingly the strings 6 and ‘l are re~
full line limiting position of Fig. 3 when the key
siliently maintained in contact with a point along
1 25 is released by the player.
the crests l8 and 19.
Similarly, a projection 28, illustrated in Fig. 3
The maximum free length of a string, such as 75
5
2,405,816
extends toward the left from the lower portion
and is held in place thereby, no fastening means
of the neck 2 to serve as a limiting stop against
being provided.
the lower portion of the key 25. By appropriate
curving of the bar I‘! as viewed in Fig. 3, the angle
of intersection between the crest I 8 and the string
The tone control as well as intensity of re=
sponse of the sound reproducing system can be
adjusted by the aid of a control device 43 (Figs.
3 and 4). This device 45 is shown as mounted in
1 can be kept substantially constant over the
entire movement of the bar I? between its ex
treme positions. This angle is large enough to
form a de?nite place of stopping the string.
The foregoing description relates to the bar H,
which carries crests l8 and I9 capable of co
operating with the adjacent strings 6 and l‘.
Other types of bars can be used, having one or
more crests. As examples of such bars, attention
a recess 4‘! communicating with the main recess
26. Device 46 may be provided with a control arm
48 adapted to be controlled by the thumb of the
player. This control arm 48 extends through an
appropriate slot in the neck 2, and through a
slotted guide plate 49. The control arm 48 is
joined, to rotatable stem 50 of the device 45,
whereby movement of the arm about the axis
is invited to bars 29 and 33,
These bars quite similar to
only the single crests 3i and
operating with the strings 4
(Figs, 2, 4 and 5). 15 of the stem at causes a corresponding variation
bar ll, but carry
in setting of the device 45. Conductors 5! (Figs.
32, respectively co~
3 and 4) are shown as leading from the pick-up
and 5. These bars
device 45 to the device 46.
are also mounted on spring ?ngers 33 and 34 re
Figs. 6, 7 and 8 illustrate a modi?ed form of
spectively, formed on the metallic base 24. The so bar 52 that has a continuous crest 53 on one side,
bars 29 and 30 likewise terminate in key portions
and a discontinuous crest on the other side. This
35 and 36, extending into the recess 26.
discontinuous crest is formed as a series of points
In another form of bar shown at 3?, two paral
54. Each of these crests is bulged outwardly as
lel sections, 33 and 39, are provided, each quite
similar to bar I‘! and joined for common move- *
previously mentioned, the extent of the bulge
being exaggerated. Lines 33, 84 parallel to the
ment by a plurality of U-shaped or fork-like
bars 82. Each of the sections carries a pair of
tact respectively with the highest points of the
plane in which bar 52 moves are shown in con
crests 40, BI and 42, 43; crests 45 and 4! cooperate
crests. However, as in the case of a continuous
with the strings 8 and 9; crests 42 and 43 co
crest, the apexes of the points 54 fall substan
operate with the strings l0 and H. A common 30 tially in a ?at plane that moves past the cor
key 44 operates the composite bar 3?,
responding string.
As shown most clearly in Fig. 2, the sections
When the bar 52 is used, the string 55 (Fig. 8),
38 and 39 are joined to a common spring ?nger
may be controlled by the points 54 of bar 52.
8|, carried by base 24. Due to the provision of
The angular movement of the bar 52 causes these
the fork-like connection 82, the strings 9 and 35 points to pass successively from one side of the
I0 do not interfere with the movement of bar 3'!
string to the other. In the particular position
(Fig. 5). Key 44 (Fig. 4) is shown wide to con
form to the overall width of sections 38 and 39.
By appropriate manipulation of the four keys
shown in Fig. 8, and assuming that the bar 52 is
moving downwardly, the apex of point 56 has
passed the string, and the apex of point 5'! is
that extend into the recess 25 from below the 40 ready to pass the string. The string, however, is
neck, each of the bars ll, 29, 3i) and 31 may be
controlled as desired.
The instrument may con
veniently rest on the lap of the player, or held
closely to the body if the player is in a standing
in contact with both points 56 and 51, but on
opposite sides of the points respectively, and to
position, much as a guitar may be held; or if it
be necessary to use a bow, the instrument can be
supported as a conventional violin. The hand of
ward the body of the bar from the apexes. Con
tact of string 55 with point 56 creates a resist
ance against upward movement of bar 52; and
contact of string 55 with point 5‘! creates a re~
sistance against downward movement of bar 52.
the player can be kept in a comfortable, normal,
unstrained position while the keys are moved.
There is thus a stability in this position, op
erating against displacement of the bar in either
While it is possible to produce an appropriate '
volume of sound by the design of the hollow body
portion l, in the present instance an electrical
pick-up device 45 (Fig. 3) is provided. which may
be secured in body I in any desired manner. This
pick-up device is shown as in immediate contact
with the base of the spring hinge structure 24,
which is attached to the pick-up by screws 24a.
When mechanical vibrations are transmitted to
the device 45, corresponding electrical impulses
are produced in a circuit, which, as is well under~
stood, leads to an appropriate sound amplifying
system, Plucking or otherwise causing vibrations
of any of the strings sets up a corresponding
vibration in the bars ll, 29, 33 and 37, due to
the physical contact of the bars with the strings.
From the bars these vibrations are transmitted
direction.
The player can feel that a pair of ad
jacent points is in contact with the string, for
he detects the resistance thus created against
movement of the bar.
In the form of the invention just described the
body I of the instrument is shown as of conven
tional shape. In the form of the invention illus
trated in Figs. 9, 10 and 11 and 12, the body 58
is of a, different form.
It is so shaped that the
strings 59, 60, BI and 62 fOI‘m a stepped arrange
ment. The string 59, furthermore, is shown as a
double string. The strings are shown as anchored
in the anchor plate 63 (Figs. 9 and 11) appropri
ately attached to the top of the body 58. The
strings converge toward a bridge 64 adjacent the
left hand end of the instrument and are ten
sioned by appropriate manipulation of the tuning
to the spring ?ngers 23, 33, 34 and 8! to the base
24, and thence to the pick-up device 45. This
pegs 65.
against body 5 by the tension of strings 4 to ii,
That portion of the string between these points
As before, a recess 56 extends through the body
action supplements the transmission of such 70 58. In this recess are accommodated the keys 6'!
formed on the ends of the crested bars 58, 69, 10
vibrations in the usual manner and improves the
and ‘H. Some of these bars, such as 68, 69 and 70
output of the pick up. The bridge 13 is of arch~
(Fig. 12) are provided with a pair of crests, 83,
like form and spans the pick-up 45, due to the
84, arranged parallel to each other. These crests
gap or opening I3—-2. The bridge 13 is urged
83, 84 contact the string 6! at spaced points.
7
can be set into vibration, if desired, to produce a
tone musically related to the tone produced in the
main vibrating section of the string.
The bars 68, 6.‘), ‘m and ‘H are appropriately
supported by the aid of a spring hinge structure
‘12 (Fig. 9), which provides spring ?ngers 13, ‘M,
‘£5 and 76 respectively for the bars.
By virtue of the arrangement of the strings
moves past the string substantially in a plane to
cause the crest to move progressively with respect
to the string.
3. In a mechanism for adjusting the free length
of a tensioned string for a musical instrument, a
bar having a crest engaging the string, and means
for movably supporting the bar for angular move
ment such that the apex of the crest moves past
oblique to the neck, it is possible to set these
the string substantially in a plane to cause the
6!), GI and 62.
lar movement such that the apex of the crest
moves substantially in a plane past the string to
cause the crest to move progressively with respect
strings into vibration by a force applied in the 10 crest to move progressively with respect to the
string.
direction of the arrow 11 (Fig. 11).
4. In a mechanism for adjusting the free length
This direction is such that a natural motion of
of a tensioned string for a musical instrument,
the ?ngers is used, rendering the instrument easy
a bar having a crest engaging the string, and
to operate. A pick-up device 18 (Fig. 9) is shown
beneath the right hand portions of the strings 56, 15 means for movably supporting the bar for angu
The intensity of response of the
sound reproduction system fed from the pick-up
device 18 may be controlled by the arm 19, operat
ing similarly to arm 48, described in connection
with the form of the instrument shown in Figs.
1 to 8.
to the string, comprising a spring hinge to which
the bar is joined, said hinge extending trans
versely of the string.
5. In a mechanism for adjusting the free length
in a variety of ways.
neck attached to the body, one or more tensioned
The control of the free vibrating lengths of the
of a tensioned string for a musical instrument,
strings 55, 69, SI and 62 is accomplished in a
a key for operating said mechanism, and means
manner similar to that described in the form of
25 forming a hinge for the key, and extending
the instrument illustrated in Figs, 1 to 8.
transversely of the string, said key having an
The crests, such as 3|, 32 (Figs. 4 and 5) or
extension for ?nger manipulation, and extending
83, 813 (Fig. 12) are formed of rigid material, and
generally in the same direction as the string.
may conveniently be integral with the respective
6. In a stringed musical instrument, a body, a
bars. rI‘he crests, however, can be made of yield
neck attached to the body, one or more tensioned
ing or soft material, such as leather, felt, rubber
strings disposed above the neck and body, and
or the like, to act as a damper for the string vi
means for adjusting the free vibrating length
brations. Such dampers are especially useful in
of a string, including a key extending below the
connection with bows, either in the form of a con_
neck and terminating in a recess in the neck.
ventional violin bow or a rotary disk bow. Figs.
7. In a stringed musical instrument, a body, a
13 to 16 inclusive illustrate such crests arranged 35
strings disposed above the neck and body, and
Fig. 13 shows a bar 85 having a V shaped
means for adjusting the free vibrating length
groove 36 in which is accommodated a strip 8'! of
of a string, including a bar, and means for
soft material. It may be held in place by any
appropriate adhesive. This strip forms a rela 40 hingedly mounting said bar on said body, for
movement toward and away from the neck and
tively wide crest serving very effectively as a dam
per.
The apexes 9| of the groove 86 serve as
de?nite, rigid stops for the string.
Fig. 14 shows a bar 88 with a soft crest mem
ber 83 adhered thereto, and having a more pointed
apex than the member 81 of Fig. 13.
In Fig. 15 the soft crest member 90 is shown
as rectangular in section. As in Fig. 13, an apex
92 of the rigid type, supplements the yielding
crest.
In Fig. 16, a double crested bar 93 is illustrated;
one of the crests 94 is rigid, and the other crest
95 is of yielding material.
Where a discontinuous crest is used, such as
that formed by points 54 in Figs. 6 and '7, it may ;
be desirable to provide damping means acting on
past the corresponding string, said bar having
a string contacting crest.
8. In a stringed musical instrument, a body, a
neck attached to the body, one or more tensioned
strings disposed above the neck and body, and
means for adjusting the free vibrating length of
a string, including a bar, and means for hingedly
mounting said bar on said body, for movement
toward and away from the neck and past the
corresponding string, said bar having a string
contacting crest, as well as a key formed at the
free end thereof, and extending into a recess
below the neck.
9. In a stringed musical instrument, a body, a
plurality of tensioned strings disposed over the
body, a bar extending between a pair of adjacent
the string between the points of the crest, to ob
strings and having a crest on each side thereof,
viate any tendency of the vibrating string to rat
respectively
engaging said strings, and means for
tle against the points. Such damping means may
be formed by pads, indicated by 91, of any suit 60 moving the bar to adjust the points of contacts
between the crests and the respective strings.
able material such as felt, secured to bar 52 be
10. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
tween the points 54 and substantially of the same
length of_ a tensioned string for a musical instru
height as the points.
ment, a bar having a series of elevated points
What is claimed is:
1. In a mechanism for adjusting the free length 65 lying substantially in a plane and adapted to
engage the string, and means for moving the bar
of a tensioned string for a musical instrument, a
bar having one or more crests on one side thereof
and engaging said string, and means for moving
so that the apexes of the points move in said
plane to pass the string, the string extending
in a direction parallel with said plane and trans
said bar in a direction to pass the string, to cause
the crests to move progressively with respect to‘ 70 verse to the direction of said movement.
11. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
the string.
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
2. In a mechanism for adjusting the free length
ment, a bar having a series of elevated points
of a tensioned string for a musical instrument, a
lying substantially in a plane and adapted to
bar having a crest engaging the string, and means
engage the string, and a hinge structure for the
for moving the bar so that the apex of the crest
2,405,316
bar, restraining movement of the bar so that said
points move in said plane, the string extending
in a direction parallel with said plane and trans
verse to the direction of said movement.
12. In a stringed musical instrument, a body,
strings over the body, adjustable means for con
tacting the strings to determine the free vibrat
10
in a direction parallel with said plane and trans
verse to the direction of said movement, said
crest being bowed toward the string, the high
part of the bow being at an intermediate place
along the length of the crest.
18. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
ing lengths thereof, and an electrical pick-up
ment, a bar having a crest engaging the string,
the apex of said crest lying substantially in a
mission of vibrations from the strings through 10 plane, and means for movably mounting the bar
said contacting means.
for angular movement such that the apex of the
13. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
crest moves in said plane, the string extending
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
in a direction parallel with said plane and trans
ment, a bar having a plurality of crests for en
verse to the direction of said movement, at least
gaging the string at points on each crest, said 15 a portion of said crest being arched in the direc
crests extending lengthwise of the bar and lying
tion of motion of the crest, to maintain the angle
substantially in a plane, and means for moving
formed between the crest and the string at a
said bar to cause said crests to move in said plane
favorable value for all relative positions of that
to pass the string, the string extending in a
portion of the crest and the string.
direction parallel with said plane and transverse 20
19. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
to the direction of said movement.
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
14. In a stringed musical instrument, a body,
ment, a bar having a series of elevated points
a plurality of tensioned strings disposed over the
lying substantially in a plane and adapted to
body, a plurality of bars for adjusting the free
engage the string, means for moving the bar so
vibrating length respectively of the strings in 25 that the apcxes of the points move substantially
response to movement of the bars, and means
in said plane, the string extending in a direction
associated with each bar for restraining move
parallel with said plane and transverse to the
ment of said bar to a direction past the respective
direction of said movement, and damping means
string, the strings forming a series lying obliquely
on the bar adapted to contact the string between
to the said direction of movement.
said points.
15. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
20. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
ment, a bar having one or more crests on one
ment, a bar having a crest engaging the string,
side thereof and engaging said string, at least
the apex of said crest lying in a plane, and means
one of said crests being yielding, and means for 35 for moving the bar so that the apex of the crest
moving said bar in a direction to cause the crest
moves in said plane, the string extending in a
to move progressively with respect to the string.
direction parallel with said plane and transverse
16. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
to the direction of movement of the crest, where
device for the vibrations, and operated by trans
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
by movement of the bar causes said apex to move
ment, a bar having a groove along a side thereof, 40 progressively with respect to the string.
said groove having walls with crests at the upper
21. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
ends, a yielding crest member in the groove, said
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
crest member and the wall crests engaging said
ment, a bar having a crest engaging the string,
string, and means for moving said bar in a direc
the apex of said crest lying in a plane, and means
tion to cause the crests and crest member to move 45 for movably supporting the bar for angular
progressively with respect to the string.
movement such that the apex of the crest moves
17. In a mechanism for adjusting the free
in said plane, the string extending in a direction
length of a tensioned string for a musical instru
parallel with said plane and transverse to the
ment, a bar having a crest engaging the string,
direction of movement of the crest, whereby
the apex of said crest lying substantially in a 50 movement of the bar causes said apex to move
plane, and means for movably mounting the bar
progressively with respect to the string.
for angular movement such that the apex of the
JOHN W. McBRlJDE.
crest moves in said plane, the string extending
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
998 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа