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Патент USA US2406084

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Aug. 20, 1946..
‘
A. J. LEVIN
2,406,084
SHIP QR VESSEL!
- Filed March 24, 1945
‘ ATTORNEY
Patented Aug. 20, 1946
UNITED
2,406,084
STATES ' PATENT
OFFICEv
2,406,084
~
>
smr 0R vEssnL
Abraham J. Levin, Detroit, Mich.
'
_
Application March 24, 1945, Serial No. 584,607
(01. 114-47)
r
l
_
9 Claims.
,
-
,
adding or subtracting cargo or ballast. The level
is pre-determined for each tank so that a tank
may ?oat at such a level so that it can be ?oated
This application relates to ships or vessels, and
more particularly to vessels comprising various
?oating members which are ?oated into relative
assembly and then relatively secured while ?oat
ing so that a complete vessel is formed.
into the space 5 of the hull, with the result ‘that
a plurality of such tanks may be floated into the
space 5 of the hull to ?ll it and thus together with
the hull form. a complete vessel of more or less
.
An understanding of the vessel herein disclosed
may be obtained upon reference to the appended
drawing, in which
Fig. 1 is a side view,
conventional shape whose sides are formed by the
merging sides of the hull and the tanks, the hull
Fig, 2 is a top plan view,
10 and the tanks being of the same width, and whose
Fig. 3 is a section view as if on line 3—3 of
deck, between prow, and stem, comprises. the
aligned top surfaces of the tanks when disposed
Fig. 1,
.
in the space 5 of the hull.
,
'.
Fig. 4 shows one of the members of the vessel
Each tank is provided with rings 9-'—I0 ‘on its
isolated from the others of Fig. 5, and
Fig. 5 shows others of the members of the vessel 15 sides and top for purposes later'to be described.
Two alternatives for loading and use and as
isolated from the member of Fig. 4.
sembly of the vessel are suggested.
The drawing shows an assembled vessel com
It is possible and preferable, especially for ocean
prising a hull member I, having its prow and stem
tra?lc, to increase the loading of each tank after
sections 2 and 3 considerably above its amidship
section 4 which is generally below the water level 20 it has been ?oated into assembly with the hull and
disposed in the space 5 thereof so that the indi
indicated. The hull contains space for equip
vidual tanks will not ?oat freely but will rather
ment, personnel, stores, fuel, etc., but is shown as
be supported partly by the hull. In such a case,
devoid of any substantial cargo space so that the
part of the support for the individual tanks will
hull ?oats at about the same level at all times.
To insure that the hull ?oats at about the same 25 be the hull and part will be the buoyancy of the ‘
tanks themselves which though less than the
buoyancy'before assembly is still su?icient to ?oat
the tanks, if they became separated from the
water so that on a journey, as fuel and stores are
hull, though at a lower level than when they were
consumed,- the tendency of the hull to rise will be
offset by the taking on of water as ballast to 80 being ?oated into assembly with the hull. .In
such a case, means may be utilized to fasten the
maintain the buoyancy substantially the same at
level at all times, provisionmay bemade for the
replacement of consumed fuel, stores, etc., by
all times.
‘While it is contemplated that hull l is not to be ’
used for cargo, it is possible that the hull may be
designed to receive some cargo; but, in any event, 35
section, 4 should, at all times, be submerged.
Between the prow and stem sections is a space
5 in which may be disposed a plurality of cargo,- ’
tanks andhull relatively, and, in such a case, the
means may be rigid fasteners such as will rigidly
secure the tanks and the hull. against relative
movement, not only laterally and longitudinally,
but also vertically. Such means may take the
form of side-locking bars H whose ends I2 ‘are
disposed in locking brackets. I4 of the hull, with -
suitable locking bolts 15 being employed to lock
and buoyant and each is capable of being ?oated 40 the bars II to the brackets I4. The bars II will
pass through the rings 9 on the sides of the tank,
into or from space 5 of the hull. Each tank is
and in this way, the tanks will be locked against
provided with an opening ‘I for which there is a
any relative motion with respect to the hull. For
movable closure 8. Cargo and ballast may be‘
additional protection and locking, there may be
introduced into or removed} from each tank.
through the opening ‘I, and for this purpose each 45 provided on the hull rings I6 and I‘! which may
be connected by a cable I8 ‘overlying the closures’
tank may be compartmented in any suitable man
8 and thus assisting in preventing relative move
ner to separate cargo from ballast within it.
ment in a vertical direction of the tanks and the
It is contemplated to load each tank, either on
containing tank members 6.
These are hollow
land, or while ?oating, with cargo and, if neces
sary, with ballast, so that the tanks when ?oating,
hull.
In such a case, disassembly may require a
either during the loading, or after the‘ tank is
decrease in the loading of the tanks before they
are separated from the hull so that they can be
loaded and moved to a body of water where it can.
?oated o? and away from the hull.
be ?oated, will?oat at about the levelindicated
in Fig, “5 which is the level of buoyancy of the.
tank at'lall times. Such level is maintained-by
It is also possible, and for river or canal tramc
it may even be found preferable, to design the
, members and their loading in such a way that
tanks being individually buoyant, before, during
each member ?oats at substantially the same
and after’ assembly, each member ?oating at sub
level after assembly as before :andduring assem
stantially the same level after assembly as before '
' bly, so that each member is individually buoyant,
and free ?oating not only before assembly but
and during assembly with all members ?oating’
during and after assembly.
at substantially the same'level, the tankshaving
In such a case, all
means for permitting their buoyancy to be ad
justed'so that they can ?oat free of the hull even
members will ?oat atsubstantially the same level ~
before, during, and after assembly, and the tanks
after assembly, the tanks and hull being so shaped
will ?oat free of one another and of the hull
after assemblyso gas to be individually free ?oat
‘ ing. In} such fal-cjase‘, vthe variousme'mbers' may
that when relatively assembledtheyiorm a ves- ‘
sel,t all-‘:5 of whose members ?oat‘? and {means for
/ relatively securing the‘ta'nks’ and hull against
securing ,means so that relative lateral and, lon'f-I, ‘7 7. relative separation when relatively assembled with
V gitudi-nal separation of the hull and tank will be~ “ Lthe‘tanks and hull individually ?oating, all mem
; prevented, without, however, interfering withiithe ; .. ibers’ili‘aving the same width so that the sides of
be relatively secured inv assembly by any suitable
slight amount of relative vertical moyement that
‘the. tanks and the sides ofthe hull are in sub
will take place during the'normaYmovem‘ent of“
and'free
a ?oating?oating
vessel consisting
tanks disposed
of'ai iree?oatinslhlrll
within the space
5. The means may be ?exible connectors'such'
' "stanti'a'l ' alignment.
3.~'An; assjembl'edyessd comprising a hull memg
' ,' berhaving its amidships section considerably’
belowits'prow and stern sections, the‘hull gen
as cables or chains, or any other suitable means, 20 erally being substantially free of variable load
factorslso as generally to have'ga substantially
andi since the detail of "o'onstructionof the means
non-variable ,buoyancy,i¥the- hullv normally ?oat
formsiin'ol part of the present reinvention, no 'e?ort
ing, with-its amidships sectionnwellrbelow the
‘ is‘- made to disclosev in detail such means.
a ‘,While it. is- contemplated that the; assembly and
water level?‘ and ,withijits prow and stern‘ sections
the idisassembly of a‘ tank Withrespect to a'hull
< well above the water-1 level, .and -a_' plurality of
may 'be effectedibest byt?oating the-tank tovand
fromtheispace. 5‘of- the hull, it may be desirable
cargo-containing tank members‘, eachbeing- hol
low and buoyant and each being ‘capable of being
, to‘use' the‘ringsul?'with alslinglllv'and a-fall 2i
?oated into the hull to'occupy the space therein
above the amidships section, and to ?t between
the prow and stern sections,’ the hull andthe
tot-enable‘ a‘ tank to be ‘lifted ibodily- out- "of? its
positionin space ,5 or placed into- such position.
1.. ‘Now having described the assembled-1 vessel
tanks beinggindividuallygbuoyant, before, during,
herein: disc'losedrreference should be ‘had- to the
and after assembly, each member?oating at sub
claims which follow.
stantially the same level after assembly as before
'
and during assembly with all members'?oating
at substantially the same level, the tanks having
means for permitting theirv buoyancy to be ad‘
1.‘ ,Angassembledvessel"comprisingahull mem
berrhaving its amidshipsesection‘considerably be
low its prow and-sternrsectionsfthe hull gen
erally being.‘substantially; free, of variable load
justed so that they can ?oat free of the hull even
afteriassembly, the tanks and bull being so shaped
th'atiw-hen relatively. assembled they form» a ves
factorslso‘ as, generally ‘_ to ,have- a, substantially
non-variablebuoyancy-the hull normally ?oat
ingiwithits amidships section well below the Wa-_
sel-,all lof'iwhose vmembers ?oat and means for
relatively securingithe tanks and bull against
relative separation when relatively- assembled with
ten-level ‘and with, its- prow and stem sections
wellzrabove'jthe water level, and-a plurality of
the! tanks and hull individually ?oating, all meme
’ cargoécontaining tank members, each-being hol-l
bers having; the same widthv so that the sides
low and;;buoyant and each beinglcapable'o‘fbeing = - of the tanks andithe-sides of- the hull are in
floatedzinto'thézhull to occupy theespace therein
substantial! alignmenta the tanks having their‘
above, the 'am'idsliips section, and to -?t‘ between
the prow’ and stern sections, the hull »and the
top surfacesi aligned, when assembled in a hull,
'_ so as to form adeck.“
tanks-being. individually buoyant; before, during;
'
~
>
-' -4.i~An-assembled'vessel comprising a hull mem
and after assembly, each member ?oating -»atlsub- 1 ‘ ber'having its amidships-sectionconsiderably be
I stantially the same level after assembly as before
lOWJil'JS prow and ‘stern sections, the hull generally
and‘duringassemlbly with: all members ?oating?
‘at-substantially the same level, the tanks having
means. for permitting their buoyancy tov be ad‘
justed’so thatJthey can ?oat free ofthe hull even
after assembly, the tanksand hull being so shaped
being substantially free of variable load~factors>
so as generally to have ya substantially non-var
iable-buoyancy, the hull normally ?oating with ,
it's-amids'hips section wellbelow the Water level
and with its prow and stem sections well above
that whenerelatively assembled they form a‘ve'ssel,
all'of whose members‘ ?oat, and'means. for rela
the water level; and arpluralit'y of cargo-contain
ing. tank members, eachebeing hollow and buoy
ant and each being capable of being ?oated into
tively, securing the tanks and 'hull against-rela'-'
tive separation when relatively assembled with 60 the hull to 'occupythegspace therein above the
the tanks and hull .individually‘?oating.
amids'hips ‘section, and to ?t between'the prow’
2.’ An assembledvessel' comprising alhull me'm; ,
and1 stem sections, the hull and the tanks be
her; having its " amidships section considerably
below its prowtand stern sections, the hullrgen
erallygbeingsubstantially free of variable load
, factors'so vas generally to have ‘a substantially
nonevariablexbuoyancy,the hull ‘normally ?oat
ingf with its amidships section well below the- wa
ter" leveli'and ~with'its' prow and stern sections
well above'_ the water level, and la pluralityof
ing individually buoyant-,- before‘eassembly, the
tanks having means for permitting their buoye
65 ancy to 'be“ adjusted, the; tanks and hull being so
shaped'that'when relatively assembled they form. '
a vessel; and means for relatively securing the
tanks andhull againstrelative separation when:
relatively assembled,
cargo-containing tank members,- each being holé'
low and buoyant and‘each vbeingcapableofbeing
?oated inwtne ‘hun- to oceu'pyTthespacethéreiny '
abbve' me'animshi-ps-I sectionfandg mint‘ between"
,
,
y.
‘5. An assembled vessel comprising a hull mem
her having its amid's'hips section considerably be- _
7'0‘ ,
low'dit’s prowl and sterntsections, thehull general
lybe‘ing'substantially free of variable load vfac
_ tors so asfgenerally to have a substantially non-s
lane-“prow and-‘stern 'sections,'~- the liull'a‘nw‘th‘e 75 ; variable-buoyancy, the hullnormally ?oating with
,
5
2,406,084
6
its amidships section well below the water level '
and with its prow and stem sections well above
.
ing so shaped that when relatively assembled they
the water level, and a plurality of cargo-contain
form a vessel, all of whose members can ?oat, and
means for relatively securing the tanks and hull
ing tank members, each being hollow and buoyant
and each being capable of being ?oated into the
sembled.
against relative separation when relatively as
hull to occupy the space therein above the amid
ships section, and to fit between the prow and
stern sections, the hull and the tanks being indi
~
8. An assembled vessel comprising a hull mem- ,
ber having its amidships section considerably be
low its prow and stem sections, the hull general
ly being substantiallylfree of variable load fac
vidually buoyant, before assembly, the tanks hav
ing means for permitting their buoyancy to be ad
justed, the tanks and hull being so shaped that
when relatively assembled they form a vessel,v and
means for relatively securing the tanks and hull
against relative separation when relatively as
sembled, all members having the same width, so
tors so as generally to have a substantially non
variable buoyancy, the hull normally ?oating with
its amidships section well below the water level
and with its prow and stern sections well above
the water level, and a plurality of cargo-contain
ing tank members, each being hollow and buoyant
that the sides of the tanks and the sides of the
hull are in substantial alignment.
6. An assembled vessel comprising a hull mem
and each being capable of being ?oated into the
hull to occupy the space therein above the amid
ships section, and to ?t between the prow and
stern sections, the hull and the tanks being in
ber having its amidships section considerably be
low its prow and stern sections, the hull general 20 dividually buoyant, before, during and after as
ly being substantially free of variable load fac
sembly, the tanks having means for permitting
tors so as generally to have a substantially non
variable buoyancy, the hull normally ?oating with
its amidships section well below the water level
and with its prow and stern sections well above
the water level, and a plurality of cargo-con
taining tank members, each being hollow and
buoyant and each being capable of being ?oated
into the hull to occupy the space therein above
the amidships section, and to ?t, between the prow ~
and stem sections, the hull and the tanks being
individually buoyant, before assembly, the tanks
having means for permitting their buoyancy to
be adjusted, the tanks and hull being so shaped
that when relatively assembled they form a ves
their buoyancy to be adjusted so that they do not
?oat after assembly but are supported, at least
partially, by the hull, the tanks and hull being so
shaped that when relatively assembled they form
a vessel, all of whose members can‘ ?oat, and
means for relatively securing the tanks and hull
against relative separation when relatively as
sembled, all members having the same width so
that the sides of the tanks and the sides of the
hull are in substantial alignment.
9. An assembled vessel comprising a hull meme
ber having its amidships section considerably be
low its prow and stern sections, the hull general
35 ly being substantially free of variable load fac
sel, and means for relatively securing the tanks
and hull against relative separation when rela
tively assembled, all members having the same
tors so as generally to have a substantially non
‘ variable buoyancy, the hull normally ?oating with
its amidships'section well below the" water level
width, so that the sides of the tanks and the sides
and with its prow and stern sections well above
of the hull are in substantial alignment, the tanks 40 the water level, and a plurality of cargo-contain
having their top surfaces aligned, when assem
ing tank members, each being hollow and buoy
ant and each being capable of being ?oated into
the hull to occupy the space therein, above the
amidships section, and to ?t between the prow
and stern sections, the huh and the tanks being
individually buoyant, before, during and after as
sembly, the tanks having means for permitting
their buoyancy to be adjusted so that they do not
?oat after assembly but are supported, at least
partially, by the hull, the tanks and hull being so
shaped that when relatively assembled they form
bled in a hull, so as to form a deck.
7. An assembled vessel comprising a hull mem
ber having its amidships section considerably be
low its prow and stern sections, the hull general
1y being substantially free of variable load fac
tors so as generally to have a substantially non
variable buoyancy, the hull normally ?oating with
its amidships section well below the water level
and with its prow and stern sections well above
the water level, and a plurality of cargo-con
taining tank members, each being hollow and
buoyant and each being capable of being ?oated
a vessel, all of whose members can ?oat, and
means for relatively securing the tanks and hull
against relative separation when relatively as
sembled, all members having the same width so
into the hull to occupy the space therein above
the amidships section, and to ?t between the prow
and stem sections, the hull and the tanks being
individually buoyant, before, during and after as
sembly, the tanks having means for permitting
their buoyancy to be adjusted so that they do
not ?oat after assembly but are supported, at
least partially, by the hull, the tanks and hull be
that the sides of the tanks and the sides of the ,
hull are in substantial alignment, the tanks hav
ing their top surfaces aligned, when assembled in
a hull, so as to form a deck.
60
ABRAHAM J. LEVIN.
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