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Патент USA US2406493

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Au8~ 2.7, 1946~
w. <5. DUNN
.
2,406,493
IMITATION FIRING MECHANISM FOR TRAINING ARMS
;
‘
Filed Jan. 8, 1945
2 ‘Sheets-Sheet 1
E3Q689Q70
INVEN TOR.
826M?‘ 9%
@93
Aug. 27, 1M5.
W. G. DUNN
2,406,493
IMITATION FIRING MECHANISM FOR TRAINING ARMS
Filed Jan. 8, 1943
2 ‘Sheets-Sheet 2
Patented Aug. 27, 1946
2,466,493
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,406,493
IMITATION FIRING MECHANISM FOR
‘
TRAINING ARMS
Vlilliam G. Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa
,Application January 8, 1943, Serial No. 471,741
3 Claims.
1
(01. 42-69)
2
My invention relates to an improved form of
training arm, as used for military purposes in
Figure '7 is a perspective view showing the main
casting of the trigger mechanism, and the two
training new men.
principal operating members, in exploded rela
tion;
In many instances it is undesirable to put an
operative ri?e into the hands of recruits who
have had no training or instruction in the care
Figure 8 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional
View taken substantially on the line 8—8 of Figure
and use of such arms. But for practice and drill
purposes, it is desirable to provide an inexpensive
Figure 9 is an enlarged plan view of the portion
arm which will correspond closely to a standard
of
the arm including the bolt action, parts being
weapon in appearance, size and. Weight, and it 10
broken away to show the construction;
is further advantageous if such an arm incorpo
Figure 10 is a development, showing the blank
rates certain operative features which will enable
from which the bolt housing is made up, and
the carrying out of the customary manual of arms
Figure 11 is a fragmentary vertical sectional
drill. Speci?cally, it is desirable to have an op
View, taken on the line |l-—ll of Figure 9.
erative bolt action and a trigger mechanism which 15
is cooked by operation of the bolt.
It is an object of my invention to provide a
training arm having the advantageous features
just outlined.
It is a further object to provide a bolt action 20
In the drawings, the reference numeral H] in
dicates generally the wooden stock, which may be
provided with a regulation sling strap l2. Around
the stock are bands I 4 and [6, each carrying sling
loops [8 on ?ttings 2!), these parts corresponding
to those on the prototype arm which my training
mechanism capable of being produced by rela
arm simulates. On the under side of the band
tively low cost manufacturing methods.
i6 is a bayonet ?tting 22. The barrel 24 consists
It is a further object of my invention to provide
of
a short length of rod, with a hole, indicated in
a trigger action, cocked by operation of the bolt,
dotted
lines at 26, drilled at the outer end to simu
and releasable by pulling the trigger, with a feel 25
late the bore. The rod extends into a hole 28 in
and a click sound simulating the action of a ri?e
the stock and is retained by a screw 30 which fas
that will shoot.
tens the band I 6 and its accompanying ?tting
It is a further object to provide a trigger action
2!]. This screw extends into the barrel 24, as in
mechanism which can be cheaply assembled from
cast parts without the necessity of machining 30 dicated in Figure 3. If the barrel is made of
metal, a countersunk or shallow drilled hole 32
operations, and which requires only a single
may be provided to receive the end of the screw.
If the barrel is made of wood, this is not neces
spring.
With these and other objects which vwill become
sary.
apparent as the description proceeds, my inven
tion consists in the construction, arrangement
and combination of the various parts of my de
vice whereby the objects contemplated are at
‘rained. as hereinafter more fully set forth,
pointed out in my claims and illustrated in the
accompanying drawings, wherein:
40
Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a training
arm embodying my invention;
Figure 2 is a top View of the same;
Figure 3 is a fragmentary sectional View of the
The barrel may be provided with a front
sight 34.
The portion marked 36 in Figure 1 is formed as
a part of the wooden stock, but is painted black,
to correspond to the blued metal parts which are
found in the prototype at this point. A leaf type
rear sight 38 may be mounted on the top, in the
customary manner.
The bolt action of my training arm, indicated
generally by the numeral 49, consists principally
of a bolt 42 having an operating lever 44 attached
to a cam 45 at the rear end of the bolt. The bolt
fore part of the arm, on a somewhat larger scale 45
is slidably mounted in a housing 48, and at the
forward portion of its movement bears against a
Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view taken on
coil spring 50 which is mounted in the stock, as
the line Ii—4 of Figure 2 and Figure 5;
shown in Figure 9.
Figure 5 is a fragmentary view of the trigger
The housing I form from a heavy sheet metal
action and a part of the bolt. the view being part 50
blank
52 having an outline such as that illus
iv in elevation and partly in vertical section on
trated in Figure 10. The blank is bent along the
the line 5—5 of Figure 4;
dotted lines 54 and 55 to form the angles 58 and
Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure 5, but shows
60, respectively, as seen in the cross-sectional
the parts of the trigger mechanism in cocked
relation;
55 view’ of Figure 11, and the tongues 62 and 64 are
than Figure 1;
V
V
. curved to ?t across the top of the bolt, meeting
2,406,493
are frictionally retained thereby.
the similarly curved edge 65 of the blank, as may
also been seen in Figure 11.
The entire as~ ’
sembly can then be slipped into a mortised recess
in the gun stock, where it is retained by screws
E22. An extension 524% of the mortised recess
The formed-up
housing has a ?at bottom, so that it may be eas
ily and ?rmly mounted by screws 5| in the notch
provided for it on the top of the stock.
The shape of the blank leaves an elongated
slot 68 on the top side of the housing when it is
opens onto the top side of the stock, and permits
coaction between an extended head I28 on the
hammer and the cam 45 on the bolt.
The trigger member 95 has a recess i353, and
formed up as described. A ?llister head. screw 19
thehammer. member is provided with a project
is carried by the bolt 42, the diameter of the head 10 ing pawl 132 adapted to coact therewith. When
being such as to occupy substantially the full
the trigger is pulled, it rotates counterclockwise
width of the rear portion of the slot. In its for
as viewed in Figure 5, and releases the pawl I32
ward portion, the right hand side of the slot, as
the gun is viewed from the rear, is widened. by
, so that the hammer member can move clockwise,
reason of the additional cut-out 12 in the blank.‘
The screw 10 is located on the bolt at such a
' 66; which gives a sharp click, very similar to that
allowing the head !28 to strike against the cam
point that, as the bolt is slid forward, the spring
50 must be compressed somewhat before the bolt‘
head can pass around the corner ‘M of the hous- -_
ing, when the bolt lever 44 is moved downward.
Thus, when the bolt is rotated by pressing down
on the lever, the head of the screw ‘ID moves
downward into the notch 15. A portion '58 of
the edge of this notch is inclined slightly toward
occurring in the regulation rifle when the trigger
is pulled.
_ In Figure 4, the lever 45» is shown in fuli lines in
the position it normally occupies after the gun is
cocked. After the trigger has been pulled, the
lever is raised to the dotted line position of Figure
4, which swings the lobe 635 of the
across the
head i28 of the hammer member, depressing the
head and‘ thus rotating the hammer member
counterclockwise, as viewed in Figure 5, to the
under the influence of the spring 51}. The result
point where the notch let slips over the pawl I32,
is a bolt action which has a “feel” very closely
the‘ force of the spring tending always to move
resembling that of a gun that will shoot.
the‘ trigger 95 into latching engagement with the
For economy in the use of metal, I prefer to
pawl. The trigger mechanism is then in cocked
make thebolt itself as a metal tube 8%, formed so. condition, as illustrated in Figure 6. The bolt
up, like the housing 48, from a flat sheet. In
maybe slid rearwardly, as if to expose the cham
training arms using such construction I have
ber in‘ the usual inspection routine, and may then
found it advisable to fill the tube with a wooden
he slid back and rotated again to the full line
plug 82, both to give a square surface on the for.
position of Figure 4. As I have indicated, the gun
ward end of the bolt for adequate bearing against
is then cooked and pulling the trigger will release
the spring. 5%, and also to extend rearwardly
the hammer member. The shape of the cam is
as the member 84 simulating the cocking piece
such that in the normal locked position of the
on an operative ri?e. ‘.Vooden parts such as this
bolt the head I23 of the hammer member will en
may be given a black or blued ?nish to imitate
gage the cam before the hammer member is im
thev metal parts which they are supposed to repre
40 peded by the stop H4. This is not a feature of
sent.
substantial importance since a sharp click is ob
The trigger action of my practice arm is. par
tained in either case, but it sounds more like the
the rear, so that the bolt is locked in the notch
ticularly illustrated inFigures 4-8. The trigger
mechanism is made particularly convenient for
economical manufacture by reason of its arrange
real thing when the impact takes place against
the cam on the bolt.
In addition to the fact that the single spring
ment as a subassembly carried on the main cast- ‘r 3 supplies the force both for operating the latch
ing or frame 36, which has a side wall portion
88 and end wall portions 98. It carries the trigger
guard 92 and mountingears 94. The operative
parts of the. trigger mechanism consist of the
trigger 96 and the member $3 which I shall refer
to as'the hammer. The main frame 86 has
mounting posts It!) and I02 cast integral there
with, and the hammer and trigger elements have
cored holes M14 and W6 ?tting overthe posts.
Recesses H38 and. H0 are provided in these ele
ments to receive and retain a coil spring H2,
which is under compression at all times. when
in its workingposition. By reason of the rela
tion of the recesses “98 and H0 to the pivot holes
and for actuating the hammer, my structure has
the advantage that pulling the trigger further
compresses the spring.
As a result, the trigger
, “feel" is very similar to that of an actual rifle;
also, after the latch is disengaged when the trig
ger is pulled, the further movement of the trigger
lever is such as to follow the spring, tending to
, keep the force against the hammer from decreas
' ing, and giving a good snappy action.
A substantially flat bearing surface use is
formed on the trigger 86 adjacent the notch or
recess i30, to lie against the pawl 532 when the
latter is not engaged in the recess. The bearing
surface is of such extent as to follow the pawl to
I94 and Hit, the spring, tends to rotate both .the 60 the extreme limit of the hammer movement as
hammer member and the trigger member in
determined by the stop member illi. When the
clockwise directions, as viewed in Figures 5 and 6.
hammer is being cooked, the pawl slides freely
The main frame carries a stop H4 which limits
back along the surface lt? until the recess I38
clockwise rotation of the hammer member 98.
is reached; when the recess receives the pawl, the
The parts 86, 96 and 98 can be made up as cast
hammer is cooked.
7
ings in the form shown in Figure '7 and, if prop
From the foregoing description, it will be seen
erly made, they need no further machine opera
that I have devised a structure adequately ful
tions other than tumbling to clean them and re
?lling the various objects originally set forth.
move sharp edges.
The trigger and hammer are put inplace on.’
the mounting posts and the spring H2 is pressed
intoits recesses. The open ‘side of the mounting
plate 88 is then covered by a simple sheet metal
' plate H6 having side flanges H8 and I20 which
overlap the end walls Q0 of the main frame, and,
The arm made as described may be employed for
ordinary drill purposes, and in such use will simu
late the desired operative functions of a real ri?e.
Yetiit' can bemanufactured at very low cost,
eliminating any necessity of subjecting the more
expensive equipment to carelessness or misuse.
5
2,406,493
Some changes may be made in the construction
and arrangement of the parts of my device with
out departing from the real spirit and purpose of
my invention, and it is my intention to cover by
my claims any modi?ed forms of structure or use
of mechanical equivalents which may be reason
ably included within their scope.
6
upwardly projecting part, and a spring interposed
between the bottom of the recess in the hammer
and the upwardly projecting part of the trigger,
said hammer having a latching lug for sliding on
said forwardly projecting portion and cooperat
ing with the recess therein, said hammer having
a forwardly and upwardly extending head adapt
ed for cooperation with the breech bolt of the
I claim as my invention:
1. In a training arm, a stock having a recess
training arm, whereby the “click” of a ?rearm is
in its under side, a mounting plate in the recess, 10 simulated.
a trigger pivoted to the plate and having a for
wardly projecting portion provided with a recess
in its top, and an upwardly projecting part with
a recess in its front edge, a hammer pivoted to
the plate above the trigger and having a recess
below the horizontal line through the, hammer
pivot facing the last recess, and a spring seated
in the last two named recesses, said hammer hav
ing a latching lug for sliding on said forwardly
projecting portion and cooperating with the re
cess therein, said hammer having a forwardly
and upwardly extending head adapted for coop
eration with the breech bolt of the training arm,
whereby the “click” of a ?rearm is simulated.
2. In a training arm, a cocking mechanism, in
cluding a mounting plate, a trigger pivoted to the
plate and having a forwardly projecting portion
provided With a recess in its top, and an upward
ly projecting part, a hammer pivoted to the plate
above the trigger and having a recess below the 30
horizontal line through its pivot facing the said
3. In a training arm, a cocking mechanism, in
cluding a mounting plate, a trigger pivoted to the
plate and having a forwardly projecting portion
provided with a recess in its top, and an upwardly
projecting part, a hammer pivoted to the plate
above the trigger and having a recess below the
horizontal line through its pivot facing the said
upwardly projecting part, and a spring interposed
between the bottom of the recess in the hammer
and the upwardly projecting part of the trigger,
said hammer having a latching lug for sliding on
said forwardly projecting portion and cooperat
ing with the recess therein, said hammer having
a forwardly and upwardly extending head adapt
ed for cooperation with the breech bolt of the
training arm, whereby the “click” of a ?rearm is
simulated, said mounting plate having a stop lug
overhanging the hammer to limit its pivoted
movement away from the trigger.
WILLIAM G. DUNN.
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