close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2406738

код для вставки
Sept. 3, 1946.
J. J. BROPHY
2,406,738
APPARATUS FOB USE IN STIFFENING UPPERS OF SHOES
' Original Fliled Nov. 22, 1944
0
H,
xx)?"
1
67
4/
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
SePt- 3, 1945'
J. J. BROPHY
2,406,738.
‘APPARATUS FOR USE IN STIFFENING UPPERS OF SHOES
Original Filed Nov. 22, 1944
.
'
7616'? F196:
37 a9
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
3/
1 ‘f9 7’
"/I
_______
iii ~ \
I",
I l
.......... -.
“7
Patented Sept. 3, 1946
2,406,738
‘UNITED STATES PATENT ‘OFFICE
amass
APPARATUS FOR USE IN STIFFENING
UPPEBS 0F SHOES
John J. Brophy,‘ Salem, Mass., assignor to'United
Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. .L,
a corporation of New Jersey
Original application November 22, 1944, Serial No.
564,605. Divided and this application August
10, 1945, Serial No. 610,110
7 Claims. (Cl. 12-—51)
1
This invention relates to stiffening selected
portions of the uppers of shoes and is herein
set forth in connection with stiffening the toe
portions and the rear portions of uppers.
It is common to provide a toe stiffener blank,
usually one having a fabric base impregnated
with a stiffening substance, which can be soft
ened and rendered limp by treatment with a sol
vent or with heat; to incorporate the softened
blank in an assembled upper; and then to con 10
form the upper with the softened blank to a‘
last, the blank becoming hard and resilient upon
evaporation of the solvent or upon dissipation of
caused to run together so that, when the shellac
hardens, a stiffened portion of the upper results.
Shellac is not a satisfactory material for use in
stiffening portions of the uppers of shoes; and
subjecting the selected portion of the upper to
radiant heat for approximately an hour at a tem
perature between 210° and 250° F., as is necessary
in the patented process, is extremely injurious to
all but a very few kinds of‘ leather. Consequently
no one, so far as I am aware, has ever made use
of the Schwartz process, said patent never hav
ing advanced at all the art of shoemaking.
According to the present invention there is
‘
incorporated in a selected portion of the upper,
There are certain disadvantages involved in 15 in cold, dry, non—fused form, a resinous material
the use of stiifener blanks of the general type
which can be caused to coalesce when subjected
the heat.
outlined above. They can be most conveniently
incorporated in the assembled uppers, and are
to the heating e?ect of a high-frequency ?eld.
The resinous material, while cold and dry, is con
usually so incorporated, just prior to the pull
formed with the upper of a shoe to a last and
ing-over operation, a special solvent-applying or 20 subsequently is subjected to the heating effects
heat-applying apparatus being provided for
of a high-frequency ?eld. This material pro
rendering them temporarily limp. They become
duces a tough, strong stiffener. By making use
of a high-frequency ?eld the heat is applied di
hard and resilient as soon as the solvent has
evaporated or the heat dissipated; but it is dif
rectly to the stiffening material. The heat need
ficult to maintain them limp, and hence in con 25 be applied for only a very short interval; there
is no danger of injuring the upper of the shoe
dition for being conformed to the last, for just
the right time, and then to have them become
such as is present when radiant heat is used, and
a resinous material having a comparatively high
hard soon afterward so that the last may be
melting point can be employed.
removed from the upper. These and other dis
advantages present very considerable di?iculties 30 Preferably the electrodes of the high-frequency
apparatus are ?exible members mounted in a
to the use of such blanks as counter stifieners
?exible presser which is pressed against the se
so that, although toe stiffeners of the general
lected portion of the upper. In this manner not
type under discussion are widely used, no shoe
only is a stray ?eld from the electrodes made use
manufacturer, so far as I am aware, uses them
35 of to heat the stiifening material but the stiff
as counter sti?’eners.
The patent to Schwartz No. 1,215,875 of Feb
ener blank is caused, by the action of the presser,
to conform very accurately to the contour of the
ruary 13, 1917 discloses a method intended to
avoid the disadvantages involved in the use of
last beneath it, and the upper, stiffener and lin
ing are ?rmly bonded together.
,
stiffener blanks which are given a preliminary
treatment to ‘render them soft and limp. before 40 The invention comprises a method, an appa
ratus for use in carrying out a step of the meth
they are conformed to the last. This patent dis
od, and an article which is used in the method.
closes a method which comprises the use of a
Referring to the accompanying drawings,
stiffener blank carrying shellac in powdered or
Fig. 1 is a plan of a toe stiffener blank accord
broken form, whereby the blank is limp when
cold and dry. Such a stiffener blank is incorpo 45 ing to the present invention;
rated in the assembled upper of a shoe and con
. Fig. 2 is a similar view of a counter stiffener
formed to the last. After the shoe is lasted, the
blank;
Fig. 3 is a plan of an apparatus for subjecting
part of the upper which contains the stiffener
blank is subjected to radiant heat to fuse the
the front and» rear portions of the upper of a
shellac whereby the particles of shellac are 50 lasted shoe to the heating e?‘ect of a high-fre
2,406,738
4
quency field, a shoe being shown in place, certain
parts of the apparatus having been removed or
the stitching room. The upper may then go
through the regular shoe manufacturing opera
broken away;
tions, including being mounted upon and con
Fig. 4 is a vertical longitudinal section of the
formed to a last; and, at any time after the last
apparatus and lasted shoe shown in Fig. 3, the
ing has been completed, the toe and heel ends
plate 69 which has been removed in Fig. 3, being
of the upper, with the conformed, limp sti?ener
therein, may be subjected to the heating effect of
shown;
Fig. 5 is a perspective of the rear electrode
a high-frequency ?eld.
holder with the electrodes;
The resinous sti?ening material, as has been
Fig. 6 is a vertical cross-section through the 10 stated, is preferably incorporated inselected por
tions of the upper by incorporating two separate
rear part of the apparatus and the shoe which
are shown in Fig. 3 ; and
Fig. 7 is a vertical cross-section through the
forward part of the apparatus and shoe.
The stiifenerblanks (Figs. 1 and 2) are pref
erably made by impregnating a sheet or porous
base, such as cotton ?annel, felt or paper, with
a solution of a plastic stiffening material consist
ing essentially of a synthetic resinous material,
stiffener blanks such as are shown in Figs. 1 and 2.
In Fig, 6 a lasted upper is indicated at I", a
stiffener at 200, a lining at 300, and a last at "l.
15 After the sti?eners have been incorporated in
the upper and the upper has been lasted, the next
step is to subject the selected portions of the
upper to the heating e?ect of a high-frequency
?eld. A convenient method of accomplishing
such, for example, as ethyl cellulose, in a solvent, 20 this will now be described inconnection with a
suitable apparatus.
such, for example, as acetone; treating the im
Referring ?rst to Figs. 3 and 4, the apparatus
pregnated base with a non-solvent liquid, such,
comprises a base 9 upon which are mounted a
for example, as water, which is miscible with the front section and a rear section. The front sec
solvent but is not a solvent for the resinous ma
terial, so as to precipitate the resinous material 25 tion comprises a block H‘ which is hollowed out
to receive a ?exible rubber bag 13 shaped to
receive the toe portion of a lasted shoe, said block
being adjustable toward and from the rear sec
tion in a guideway [5 formed in the base 9 and
stices a resinous material may be carried out in
held in adjusted position by a clamping screw
any suitable manner, for example, as disclosed
ii, the purpose of this adjustment being to pro
in United States Letters Patents No. 1,256,240,
vide for shoes of different lengths. The rear
dated February 12, 1918, and No. 1,353,599, dated
section also has a ?exible bag is which is shaped
September 21, 1920, both granted upon applica
to extend around the rear and sides of the shoe,
tions of Stanley P, Lovell. The dry sheet carry
and the wings or sides of which can be moved
ing the resinous material in precipitated form,
from open to closed position. Two electrode
if stiffer than desired, may be rendered limp or
holders 2|, 23, the details of construction of
?exible by any suitable treatment. For exam
which will be described later, are placed respec
ple, the sheet may be carried between moving
tively upon the toe portion and the rear portion
belts which make sharp reverse turns over small
rolls so as to bend the sheet sharply ?rst in one 40 of the upper on the lasted shoe, and then the
lasted shoe, with the electrode holders in place
direction and then in another; or the sheet may
upon it, is placed as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 with
be run through a mangle and thus rendered limp
the electrode holder 2! resting against the bag II
and ?exible by reducing the precipitated resi
and the electrode holder 23 resting against the
nous material more or less to discrete particles.
After the above treatment the stiffener blanks 4. bag IS, the block if having been adjusted hori
zontally and locked in position by the clamping
may be cut out of the sheet.
It may be desired to omit the precipitating
screw IT. A cover 25, which is hinged to the
step, in which case the solvent may be caused to
front section at 21, is swung over and down into
horizontal position and fastened in this position
evaporate, and the dry sheet containing the res
by a hasp (not shown) on the cover, the slot in
inous material treated to render said sheet limp.
the hasp receiving a staple (not shown) driven
It will be understood that the base, instead of
into the block I I, a pin (not shown) being passed
being a separate member, may be some part of the
through the staple to hold the hasp in place.
assembled upper of a shoe, for example, the dou
bler, which has, for example, been cut out of an
The cover 25 (Fig. 7) has set into it near its
impregnated sheet. Also, if desired, the porous
middle a block of resilient material 28 which
base may be omitted, and limp, easily conform
presses down the electrode holder on the toe porable stiffener blanks produced by spraying a
tion of the shoe. A similar cover 3| (Fig, 3),
suitable solution of a synthetic resinous material
hinged to a stationary part 01' the rear section at
in a suitable manner upon a smoothsurface, peel
33, is swung over and its hasp (not shown) held
ing oil’ the comparatively thick, porous sheet 60 by a staple 35 which is driven into a stationary
which results when the solvent has evaporated,
part of the rear section. This cover 3| (Fig. 6)
and cutting out blanks from such a sheet. In any
has set into it near its middle 9. block of resilient
case, there will be incorporated in the upper 01
material 31 which presses the electrode holder 21
a shoe a synthetic resinous material which while
and the rear portion of the lasted shoe against
cold and dry may be conformed with the upper 65 the ?exible bag l9. Next, the sides or wings of
to a last and may be later caused to coalesce by
the rear bag H are forced inwardly in a manner
subjecting it to the heating effect of a high-fre
presently to be described so as to press the sides or
quency ?eld.
wings of the rear electrode against the upper
Limp stiffener blanks, for example, a toe stiff
and the upper against the sides of the rear por
ener blank (Fig. 1) and a counter stiil'ener blank
tion of the last.
(Fig, 2), may be incorporated in the upper of a
In the manufacture of shoes it is usual to tack
shoe at any suitable stage in the manufacture of
an insole to a last, the heel end of the insole
the shoe. Conveniently the blanks may be in
being somewhat narrower than the widest part
corporated in and become part of the upper dur
of the rear end of the last so that there is a
in the base; and then drying the sheet.
The procedure outlined above for impregnat
ing a porous sheet by precipitating in its inter
ing the assembling of the parts of the upper in
if
, re-entrant angle which extends around the heel
9,406,788
5
Y
and of the last and insole. said'angle (Pig. 6)
beingboundedononesidebytheedgeofthe
6
.
'
the electrode holder 28 ?rmly against the upper
‘of the shoe and the upper ?rmly against the last.
insole Ill and on the other by the somewhat
Fastened respectively to the tops of the arms
curved surface at the bottom of the heel end of
ill. I" are two thin plates u, ‘H; and fastened '
the last. It is desirable that the ?nished sti?ener
to the top of the rear wall I1 is a third thin
should bridge this angle; and in order that the
plate 13, the inner edges of these plates extending
sti?ener, while soft, shall not be forced into
over the top of the bag II. The arms III, I"
this angle, the inner wall of the bag at this
are normally held in open or spread-apart posi
locality is given sumcient rigidity. In the illus
tion, as shown in'Fig. 3, by two tension‘ springs
trated construction there is vulcanized or other 10 ‘ll, 11, one end of each spring being fastened to
wise attached to the adjacent portion of the
an arm and the other end to the base I. In order
inner wall of the bag It a strip of resilient ma
to move the arms to closed position against the
terial 8|, wedge-shaped in cross-section, so that
force of the springs ‘II, 11, there are provided
no objectionable crease or depression appears in
two cam members ‘II, II pivoted ‘respectively
the outer of the ?nished shoe.
15 about the stems of screws 88, II which are
With the shoe and the electrodes thus ?rmly
threaded respectively into the side walls II. II.
held, a ?uid under pressure, for example, com
The cam members have comparatively long,
pressed air, is forced through two pipes 4i and
straight handles which. as viewed in Figs. 3 and
43 into the rear bag it and through the pipe
4, are upright, the springs ‘II, 11 holding the
ll into the front bag I! to distend the bags. 20 arms ill, I" open. when it is desired to swing
Thereafter the electrodes are energized from the
terminals of an oscillator of a high-frequency
the arms toward each other to exert pressure.
the handles are swung down and outwardly about
the pivot screws ll, 85. This causes the cam
members, which are integral with the handles, to
force the arms inwardly. Upon the upper face
sure is twofold. First, it presses the electrodes,
of the base 9 is a block 81 of resilient material
which are ?exible, ?rmly into contact with the
to receive the cone of the last 4".
shoe, thereby rendering them much more effec
The electrodes are flexible. They are sub
stantially alike except for their shapes, and con
tive. Second, it presses the outer, the stiffen
ing material, and the lining of the shoe into ?rm 30 sequently only the rear electrode will be de
contact with each other so that the three mem
scribed in detail. The holder 23 for the rear
electrodes has the general shape shown in Fig.
bers arej ?rmly bonded together in the ?nished
5, being provided with curved side walls which
shoe.
The general construction and mode of opera
resemble in shape those of a molded counter
tion having been given above, a detailed de 35 stiffener, and with an intumed, substantially ?at
scriptlon of the parts of the apparatus will now
?ange at the top. The inner wall of the holder
thus corresponds roughly to the shape of the
be given.‘ The block ll of the front section is
rear portion of the last. The illustrated holder
hollowed out, as has been explained, to receive
the resilient bag I3. In order to aid in holding
is made of two layers of ?exible material, such
the bag properly in place, a suitably shaped thin 40 as leather, a thin layer 88 and a thicker layer
89, the thicker layer having in it a series of holes
plate 41, the inner edge of which extends over the
90 to receive spirals of wire which constitute the
top of the bag, is fastened by screws to the
electrodes of the high-frequency machine. Con_
block; and a comparatively thick, substantially
veniently, if desired, the layers of the electrode
upright, but slightly inclined plate 49 is fastened
to the block ll, said plate 49 having cut in it a 45 holder may be made of ?nely woven elastic glass,
curved bevel-edged opening to ?t closely around
and the electrodes fastened in place between the
glass layers. These electrodes are arranged in
the inner (left-hand as viewed in Fig. 4) end oi’
sets of two series of three each. To the three
the bag IS. The pipe 45, through which com
members of one set have been applied the ref
pressed air is forced into the bag, has its inner
end upset over one wall of the bag and is held 50 erence numerals 9|, and to the three members
?rmly in place by a nut 5| which is threaded
.ofthe other set the reference numerals 93. The
upon the pipe.
'
three electrodes 9i are connected to three con
machine whereby the resinous stiffening material
is caused to coalesce and, ?nally, becomes hard,
?lm-like, and resilient. The purpose of the pres
ductors I91 which in turn are connected to a
The rear section is different from the front
section principally because means are provided
single conductor 2M, said last-named conductor
for causing the sides or wings of the bag 19 to 55 leading from one terminal of a high-frequency
press the electrode holder against the sides of
oscillator. The three electrodes 93 of the other
the rear portion of the shoe. This rear section
set are connected to three conductors I93 which
comprises two stationary, upright side walls 53,
in turn are connected to a single conductor 293,
I5 and a stationary, upright rear wall 51, all
said last-named conductor leading from the other
three walls being rigid with the base 9. The rear 60 terminal of the high-frequency oscillator. It
wall has rounded ends which are adjacent to but
will be noted that the three electrodes 9| are
somewhat spaced from the side walls 53, 55.
alternated with the three electrodes 83, and that
These rounded ends have horizontal slots about
direct ?elds lie between these electrodes. It is
midway of their height, one such slot being shown
not, however, such direct ?elds which are relied
at n in Fig. 4; and extending vertically through 65 upon to heat the stiffening material in the shoe.
the rounded ends and the slots are vertical pivot
There is present a series of stray ?elds extend
pins, one of which is shown at BI and the tops , ing outwardly and inwardly from the planes be
of both of which are shown at II and 83 in
tween the electrodes, these stray ?elds being
Fig. 3. Extending horizontally into the slots and
parts of the electrostatic ?elds which are ex
pivoted on the pins are ?at tongues 85, 01 formed 70 ternal to the space between the electrodes, and
respectively on the rear ends of arms I85, it‘!
it is this, series of stray ?elds which is principally
which receive between them the sides of the bag
relied upon. The forward electrode holder is of
I I, as shown in Fig. 6, in which ?gure the arms
substantially the same construction as that of
have been swung in about their respective piv
the rear electrode holder which has just been de
ots ll, '8 to cause the sides of the bag to press 75 scribed, but differs from the rear holder in that
2,406,738
7
it is shaped roughly to correspond to the shape
Polyvinyl acetate R. H. #410 is~a polymerized
of the toe portion of a lasted shoe. The con
vinyl acetate put out by the E. I. du Pont de
ductors for the two sets of electrodes of the front
Nemours 8: Co., Inc., of Wilmington, Delaware.
holder M are indicated in Fig. 3 at 95 and 81.
Example VI
The following are examples of solutions which 5
Parts by weight
may be used to impregnate a porous base.
Example I
Normal propyl methocrylate ______________ __ 35
Acetamide ______________________________ __ 12
Parts by weight
Ethocel 100 C. P. Standard _____________ __ 16.25 m
Rosin (cherry wood) __________________ __
5.25
Acetamide
6.75
Acetone
___________________________ __
____________________________ __
________________________________ __ 80
Example VII
_
_____________________________ __ 75
Methanol
Acetone
Parts by weight
Normal butyl methacrylate _______________ __ 35
15
Acetamide
"Ethocel 100 C. P. Standard” is ethyl cellulose 15
Acetone
put out by the Dow Chemical Co. of Midlands,
Michigan. The rosin is used principally to add
to the tackiness of the compound. Acetamide is
_____________________________ __ 12
__, ______________________________ ..-
'
80
Example VIII
Parts by weight
Ethocel 100 C. P. Standard ________________ __ 16
a compound which has a lower melting point
than'the “Ethocel" and is more susceptible to 20 Rosin (cherry wood) _____________________ __ 12
Hycar __________________________ -.‘ ______ -_
6
the heating e?ect of a high-frequency ?eld than
is the “Ethocel.” Its principal function is to
Acetone
cause the “Ethocel” to melt at a lower tempera
Methanol
ture than it otherwise. would.
Example II
'
>
______________________________ ..- 20
Example IX
25
Parts by weight
Ethocel #250 C. P.‘ Standard _____________ __
Petrex
________________________________ __ 90
15
-
Parts 'by weight
Ethocel 50 C. P. Standard ________________ _- 24
Rosin (cherry wood) __________________ "s... 12
Hycar __________________________________ __
6
acid _____________ -__ ________ __'____-
6
‘Acetone ________________________________ __ 90
Acetone _______________________________ __ 100 so
Methanol
Methanol
__________ _.' _________________ __
______________________________ .. 20
28
In this formula, “Petrex acid" is used in. place
of_acetamide and rosin. This acid is a high
Hycar, a synthetic rubber, is a butadiene
acrylonitrile copolymer containing in the neigh
borhood of 25% by weight of acrylonitrile and
molecular weight, synthetic, polybasic acid of
75% by weight of butadiene put out by the Hycar
terpene origin put out by the Hercules Powder 35 Chemical Company of Akron, Ohio. Like
Co. of Wilmington, Delaware.
acetamide it has a lower softening point than
Example III
has the ethyl cellulose. The synthetic rubber
renders the stiil’ener blank more pliable when
cold so that the lasting operation is facilitated,
Ethocel #150 C. P. Standard ____________ __ 16 4o
and enhances the resilient quality of the finished
Polypale ester No. 2 _____________________ __ 12
stiffener in the shoe.
Acetone _______________________________ -_ 140
Parts by weight
Methanol ______________________________ __
Example X
28
In this formula “Polypale ester No. 2" is used,
in place of acetamide and rosin. This ester is 45
the diethylene glycol ester of polymerized rosin
and is also put out by the Hercules Powder Co.
Parts by weight
Paraplex X100 __________________________ __
Durez resin #12687 ______________________ __
Benzoyl peroxide _______________________ __
Altax
Example IV
Parts by weight 50
Ethocel 250 C. P. Standard ______________ __
Rosin (cherry wood) ____________________ __
10
10
40
70
1
_________________________________ __
1
Titanox R. A. 10M0 _____________________ __
50
Acetone
_______________________________ __ 134
Methanol ______________________________ -_
24
Paraplex X100 put out by the Resinous Prod
Acetone _______________________________ __ 120
ucts 8: Chemical Co. of Philadelphia, Pa., is an
Methanol ______________________________ __
24
alkyd type thermosetting resin having a soften
Rosin, besides adding to the tackiness of the 55 ing range of from 100° F. to 105° F. Durez resin
compound also is more susceptible to the heat
#12687 is a thermosetting phenol-formaldehyde
ing effect of a high-frequency ?eld than is the
resin, put out by Durez Plastics & Chemicals,
“Ethocel.” It will be noted that no acetamide,
Inc., of North Tonawanda, New York, which has
"Petrex acid” or "polypale ester" is present in
a softening range of 40°-60° C. and a melting
the formula, the large proportion of rosin in this 60 range of '70"-75° C. Benzoyl peroxide is an ac
case acting to increase su?iciently the suscepti
celerator for the curing of the thermosetting res
bility of the “Ethocel” to the heating effect of
inous material. Altax, benzothiazyl disul?de, put
the high-frequency ?eld. The above formula
out by the R. T. Vanderbilt Co., of New York,
produces a stiffener which, when hot, is some
N. Y., is a rubber accelerator but here probably
what more sticky than that produced by Example
acts to retard somewhat the curing operation.
I and one which will soften at a somewhat lower
Titanox R. A. 10M0 is a titanium oxide put out
temperature, but not below that to which the
stiffened portion of a ?nished shoe is liable to be
by the ‘Titanium Pigment Corporation of New
exposed.
'
Example V
York, N. Y. It serves here principally as a filler.
This application is a division of application
70 Serial No. 564,605, filed November 22, 1944, and
is directed to the apparatus.
Parts by weight
Having described my invention, what I claim
Polyvinyl acetate R. H. #410__' ____________ __ 45
as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of
Acetamide ______________________________ __
the United States is:
15
Acetone ________________________________ __ 90 75
.
1. Apparatus for use in stiffening the front and
2,406,788
9
rear portions of the upper of a lasted shoe, there
being incorporated in the two portions non-fused
resinous stiffening material capable of being
caused to coalesce by heat, said apparatus com
' prising two supports including yielding members
against which the two portions‘ 0! the shoe rest,
means for exerting pressure through the ?exible
members upon the two portions of the upperto
press them against the last,’and means for sub
iecting the pressed portions to the heating effect 10
of a high-frequency ?eld;
2. Apparatus for use in stiffening the front and
rear portions 0! the upper of a lasted shoe, there
~
10
5. Apparatus for use in stiifening a selected
portion of the upper of a lasted shoe, said se
lected portion having incorporated therein a non
fused stiffening material capable of being caused
to coalesce by heat, said apparatus comprising
a ?exible electrode holder shaped to fit about the
selected portion, an in?atable bag shaped to ?t
about the holder, means for supporting the bag
in such manner that, when in?ated, it will press
the electrode holderagainst the selected portion
of the upper and the selected portion against
the last, said bag-supporting means including
members of rigid material movable toward and
from each other, means for in?ating the bag,
being incorporated in the two portions non-fused
resinous stiffening material capable of being 15 and means for connecting the electrodes to the
terminals of a high-frequency oscillator.
caused to coalesce by heat, said apparatus com
6. Apparatus for use in stiffening a selected
prising two supports including yielding members
portion of the upper of a lasted shoe having in
against which the two portions of the shoe rest,
corporated therein a non-fused sti?ening, mate
means whereby one support may be adjusted to
ward and from the other to provide for shoes of 20 rial capable of being caused to coalesce by heat.
said apparatus comprising a ?exible electrode
different lengths, means for exerting pressure
holder having two sets of electrodes in its wall.
through the ?exible members upon the two por
the electrodes, of one set being alternated with
tions of the upper to press them against the
the electrodes of the other set, said holder being
last, and means for subjecting the pressed por
shaped to ilt over the selected portion of the shoe
tiolnls to the heating e?ect of a high-frequency
and to extend over the bottom thereof, a ?exible
?e .
bag embracing the holder, means for holding
3. Apparatus for use in sti?'ening a selected
the outer wall of the bag from movement away
portion of the upper of a lasted shoe having in
from the shoe, means for in?ating the bag to
corporated therein a non-fused sti?ening ma
terial capable of being coalesced by heat, said 30 press the electrode holder against the bottom
and side portions of the upper, and means for
apparatus comprising a ?exible electrode holder
connecting the two sets of electrodes respec
having two sets of electrodes in its wall, the elec
tively to the terminals of a high-frequency oscil
trodes of one set being alternated with the elec
lator.
trodes oi the other set, said holder being shaped
v'7. Apparatus for use in stiffening a selected
to ?t over the selected portion of the shoe, means
portion of the upper of a lasted shoe, said por
for pressing the ?exible electrode holder against
tion having incorporated therein a non-fused
the shoe, and means for connecting the sets of
sti?ening material capable of being caused ‘to
electrodes respectively to the terminals of a high
coalesce by heat. said apparatus comprising a
irequency oscillator.
4. Apparatus for use in sti?'ening a selected 40 ?exible member, means for causing said mem
ber to press the selected portion against the last.
portion of the upper oi a lasted shoe, said selected
said ?exible member having a part of su?lcient
portion having incorporated therein a non-fused -
sti?ening material capable of being caused to
coalesce by heat, said apparatus comprising a
. ?exible electrode holder shaped to ?t about the
selected portion, an in?atable bag shaped to ?t
about the holder, means for supporting the bag
in such manner that, when in?ated, it will press
the electrode holder against the selected portion
of the upper and the selected portion against 50
the last, means for in?ating the bag. and means
for connecting the electrodes to the terminals
oi a high-frequency oscillator.
rigidity located to bridge the re-entrant angle
bounded on one side by the edge 01' the rear part
oi! the insole and on the other by the curved
surface at the lower portion of the rear part 0!
the last. and means for subjecting the selected
portion while under pressure to the heating
effect of a high-frequency ?eld.
some J. BROPHY.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
947 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа