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Патент USA US2407089

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Sept. 3, 1946.
?R, J, MQFALL
' 2,407,089
SNAP SWITCH
Filed May 18. 1944
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Sept. 3, ?1946.
R. J. MCFALL
_ 2,407,089
SNAP SWITCH
? Filed_May 18, '1944
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
21
22
93
I
Patented Sept. 3, 1946
2,407,089
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,407,089
SNAP SWITCH
Robert J. llIcFall, Haworth, N. .1.
Application May 18, 1944, Serial No. 536,167?
10 Claims. (Cl. 200-122)
1
2
This invention relates to snap switches, and
more particularly to switches of the type con
structed of resilient? sheet metal.
The present application is a continuation in
rounding this hole as? by hammering or pressing
part of my prior co-pending application Serial
No. 162,056, ?led September 1, 1937, now Patent
No. 2,352,215, dated June 2'7, 1944.
The general object of the invention is to pro
vide a snap switch of exceptionally simple con
so as to form a kind of bulge or cup 3.
In other
words, the material is spread out in this area,
and thus, con?ned by the surrounding material,
is placed under strain.
It will be understood that
the strip is, in actual practice, relatively much
thinner than shown in Fig. 2, and that the bulge
may not be so deep.
When the bulged or
strained portion of the strip is however clamped
struction, and which may be readily operated 10 tightly as, for example, against a ?xed support,
either manually or by any suitable actuating de
such as 4, by means of a screw 5, as shown in Fig.
vice.
3, it develops the peculiar property of snapping
A speci?c object is to provide a snap switch
suddenly from side to side when moved laterally.
consisting of but a single piece or strip of metal,
Furthermore, instead of being like a pivoted lever,
and so constructed that pressure applied to one 15 in which opposite ends move in opposite direc
tions, the opposite ends of my improved resilient
end causes the other end to move, to open or close
a circuit.
strip move in the same direction. rl?hus, when
A still further object is to devise improved ther~
the lower end is pushed toward the right, the up
mally operated means for? actuating such a
per end snaps over to the right, and vice versa.
switch.
20 In Fig. 3, I have shown the movement and bend
ing or bowing of this strip as somewhat eXag~
In order that the invention may be readily un
gerated for the sake of clearness.
derstood, reference is had to the accompanying
drawings forming part of this speci?cation, and
It will, of course, be understood that the head
of the screw 5 is relatively small, as compared
in which:
Fig. 1 is a front view of my improved switch 25 with the bulge 3', so as to permit the metal in the
region immediately surrounding the screw head
member itself;
within the bulge to freely move or buckle. It
Fig. 2 is an edge view thereof, partly in section;
Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view illustrating one
will be further understood that, as one end of the
strip I' is? moved laterally, it ?nally reaches a po
manner in which my improved switch may be
employed, and showing my novel thermally oper 30 sition where the bulge is caused to suddenly re-~
verse, relative to the: body of the strip, shifting
ated means for actuating the same;
Fig. Li is a similar View, showing magnetically
from one side to the? other, thus throwing both
operated means for actuating the switch;
ends of? the strip in the? same direction, with a
snap action.
5 is a diagrammatic view showing another
thermally operated means for actuating the 35
In Fig. 3, I have shown an improved thermally
operated switch actuating means or thermo-elec
switch;
tric' relay.
I
Fig. 6 is a similar view showing pressure oper
This improved thermo-ele'ctric relay comprises
ated means for actuating the switch;
Fig. '7 is a diagrammatic view illustrating man
a pair of bi-metallic strips 6 and ?l, mounted in
ual means for operating the switch, parts being 40 any suitable way at one end to a ?xed support as
indicated at Sa'and 9a. The other end of each of
shown in dotted lines; and
Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 3, parts being
the strips is bent inwardly toward the other strip,
so that the free ends are substantially in align
omitted, and showing a somewhat modi?ed ar
rangement.
ment.
?
My improved snap switch member 5 is posi
So far as concerns the switch itself, and the 45
actuating means therefor, Figs. 1, 2 and 3 are
tioned between the two strips 6 and ?I, generally
identical with ?gures contained in the drawings
parallel therewith. The ends of the binmetallic
of my said prior co~pending application.
strips 6 and l are adapted to engage the strip I
Referring ?rst to Figs. 1 and 2, I have at
at a point below the support ll, and to push the
tempted to illustrate in detail the construction 50 strip one way or the other, at this point. As
of my improved snap switch member itself. It
above explained, this has the effect of causing the
consists of a thin, flat strip I, made of springy
upper'end to snap over in the same direction in
which the lower end is pushed.
material, such as bronze, and at a suitable point
intermediate its ends I make a hole 2, and de
' The upper end of the strip or switch I is adapt
form or upset the material immediately sur 65 ed to engage contacts 8 and 9, connected re
2,407,089
3
4
spectively with the ends or windings II] and II,
which encircle the respective bi-metallie strips
6 and ?I. The opposite ends of the windings II)
and II are connected to binding posts which are
the distance they must move in order to oper
ate the switch. By varying these factors, a re~
lay can be designed to operate on almost any
desired time interval.
Moreover, by providing
connected by Wires I2 and I3 to the opposite con
adjustments for the contacts, the delay period
of any given relay may be varied considerably.
tact points I4 and I5 of the usual thermostat I6.
Referring now to Fig. 4, I have shown electro
The bi-metallic strip of the thermostat I6 is con~
magnets I0? and II? for operating the switch or
nected by wire II with one side of a transformer
relay instead of the heating windings I0 and II
I8, the other side of which is connected by wire
49 with the screw 5. The primary of the trans 10 of Fig. 3. Otherwise, the arrangement is the
former I8 is connected with a suitable source of
same, except for the time delay feature, and the
parts are similarly numbered. Fixed contacts
alternating current 2|, 22. From one side 25,
8' and 9' are arranged to be engaged by the
of this source, extends a wire 23 to a motor 24,
switch member I? and control the circuits through
which may be the motor of a stoker or oil burner.
The circuit of motor 24 is controlled by a spe-' 15 the electro-magnets II' and I0? respectively.
In Fig. 5, I have diagrammatically illustrated
cial contact 26 carried by but insulated from the
an arrangement in which my improved snap
lower end of the spring strip I. This contact is
switch I may be actuated directly by a thermo
adapted to engage a ?xed contact 21, which is
static element subjected to the temperature of the
connected by Wire 28 directly with the other side
of the supply circuit, at binding post 22.
20
The snap switch I is shown in full lines in the
position to which it has been moved by the last
operation of the thermostat It, namely, an op
eration which moved the snap switch I to a po
sition in which it opened the circuit of motor 24.
Should the building become too cool and the
thermostat I5, answering the demand for more
heat, move over into engagement with the left
ambient atmosphere. In this ?gure, the motor
24 is supplied with current through leads 29 and
3I, and its circuit is controlled at a contact 30,
arranged to be engaged by the switch member I.
A thermostatic device in the nature of an ex
pansible bellows is illustrated at 32 and a rod
33 extends from this bellows and is provided at its
end with a yoke 34, which loosely engages over
the lower end of the switch member I. If we
hand contact I4, a circuit will be established from - assume that, in this case, as before, the motor
one side of the transformer through wire Iil to 30 24 operates a Stoker Or oil burner for heating the
premises where the thermostatic element 32 is
the snap switch I, thence to contact 8, through
located, then when the temperature has risen to
the winding IE], wire I2, thermostat I8, and wire
the desired point, this thermostatic element ex
I?I, back to the transformer. Current ?owing
through this circuit will cause the Winding I0 1� pands, thus pushing laterally the lower end of
the switch element I over to the position illus
to heat the bi-metallic strip 6 and its free end
trated in dotted lines. As above explained, this
will therefore move inwardly until it ?nally encauses the upper end of the switch element to
gages and pushes over the lower end of the snap
also snap over into dotted line position, thus
switch I. When this lower end has been moved
over a certain distance, the strip will snap into , opening the motor circuit. When the tempera
dotted line position, thus closing and holding
ture falls too low, the bellows 32 contracts, thus
moving the switch back to full line position again
closed the motor circuit at 21, and at the same
and again closing the motor circuit.
time breaking contact at 8 and closing it at 9.
In Fig. 6, I have shown a similar arrangement,
The breaking of the contact at 8 stops the cur�
but arranged to be controlled by a ?uid pressure
rent flow through the actuating or heating coil
I0, which caused the operation, and at the same 45 responsive device. This? is also indicated as a
bellows 32', supplied with fluid through a pipe
time prepares a circuit through the other heat
35. In this case, the motor 24 might operate a
ing coil I I, ready for the next operation. The
pump or compressor. When the pressure rises to
motor circuit being closed at 21, the motor 24
the desired point, the bellows 3f!? expands and
will operate to feed coal or oil to the furnace and
at the same time supply air thereto until the de 50 pushes over the lower end of the switch element,
thus causing the upper end to snap over into
sired heat has been produced. When the term
perature rises to the desired point, the thermo
stat IB engages the right hand contact I5, thus
closing the circuit through the heating coil II,
and causing the bi-metallic strip 1 to push the
snap switch I back into full line position again,
thus opening the motor circuit and allowing the
burner to be idle.
dotted line position, thus interrupting the motor
circuit.
In Fig. 7, I have illustrated one Way in which
my improved switch member may be operated
manually. In this ?gure, I have shown, in dotted
lines, the conventional representation of an ordi
nary lamp socket, the body being indicated at
35, and the threaded shell at 31. The usual push
tric relay above described is that it operates as 60 pin is shown at 3B? and this is provided with a
slot or opening in which the lower end of the
a time delay device. If the house thermostat
switch member I is loosely received, this switch
closes at I4 (say), thus causing current to ?ow
member being anchored at its middle part to a
through heating coil I0, this current must per
?xed support, by means of the screw 5, as before.
sist for an appreciable length of time before the
In the closed positions shown, the switch member
bi-metallic element 6 heats up enough to expand
is adapted to engage a contact 39, connected with
su?iciently to kick the switch over. By this
the threaded shell 31 of the socket. One wire
means, a momentary closing of the circuit at I4,
all of the lamp cord is connected to the screw
due to vibration, or to a gust of cold air as from
5. while the other wire 42 is connected to the
a suddenly opened door, has no effect on the mo- .
center contact 4I.
tor 24. Thus, my slow acting relay lends sta
bility to the system, and prevents accidental op
From this, it will be seen that when the push
pin 38 is moved toward the right, the lower end
oration.
of the switch member I will be de?ected later
The timing is controlled by several factors, in~
cluding the heating capacity of the windings,
ally until a point is reached where the deformed
the length and mass of the bi-metallic strips, and 75 portion buckles, thus causing the upper end of
An advantage of my improved thermo-elec- .
2,407,089
5
the switch member to snap toward the right
also, and thereby disengage the contact 39.
It will be understood that the resilience of
the strip I is suiiicient to yieldingly hold the
push pin 33 in either of its extreme positions.
Thus, in my improved construction, the switch
member itself takes the place both of the circuit
6
8. The combination with a snap switch com
prising a resilient strip anchored at a point in
termediate its ends, and having a deformed por
tion adjacent the point of anchorage, of a pair of
electrically actuated means for moving one end
of said strip laterally in opposite directions, a
controlling means and of the spring means usual
pair of contacts to each of which one side of one
of said electrically actuated means is connected,
ly employed in this type of mechanism.
and. the other end of said strip being positioned
In Fig. 8, I have shown a slight variation of 10 to play between and alternately engage said con
tacts, and said strip forming a part of the circuit
the arrangement illustrated in Fig. 3. In this
of said electrically actuated means, whereby when
modification, the switch member is designated
the first mentioned end is moved laterally by
5', and its lower end is made somewhat shorter
one of said electrically actuated means beyond a
than in Fig. 3. The motor controllirrr contact
25 is mounted on the upper, instead of the lower 15 certain position, the other end moves in the
same direction with a snap action, thereby disen
end of the switch member, and engages the con
gaging one of said contacts and breaking the cir
tact point 22' at the same time that the extreme
cuit through one electrically actuated means, and
end of the switch member engages the contact
engaging the other contact and establishing at
9, as indicated in dotted lines. This arrrange
ment gives a somewhat better snap action.
20 that point a circuit through the other electrically
What I claim is:
actuated means.
9. The combination with a snap switch com
l. A
switch comprising a thin strip of
prising a resilient strip anchored at a point in
resilient metal, means for anchoring said strip
termediate its ends and being transversely de
to a ?xed support at one point, said strip having
a deformed, laterally oiiset area immediately 25 formed in the region surrounding said anchorage,
of a pair of thermostatic elements having free
adjacent said anchoring means, and a circuit
ends adjacent and opposite each other, a heating
controlling contact associated with said strip.
winding on each of said elements, a pair of con
2. A snap switch comprising a thin strip? of
tacts to each of which one end of one of said
resilient metal, means for anchoring said strip
to a ?xed support at one point, said strip hav 30 windings is connected, one end of said strip be
ing disposed between and adapted to be engaged
ing a deformed, laterally offset area surround
and moved by the free end of either one of said
ing said anchoring means, and a circuit-control
elements, and the other end of said strip being
ling contact associated with said strip.
positioned to play between and alternately en
3. A snap switch comprising a thin strip of
resilient metal, means for anchoring said strip 35 gage said contacts, and said switch forming a
part of the circuit of said heating windings,
to a ?xed support at a point intermediate its ends,
whereby when the ?rst mentioned end is moved
said strip having a deformed, offset area imme
laterally by one of said electrically actuated
diately adjacent said anchoring means, a circuit
means beyond a certain position, the other end
controlling contact near one end of said strip,
and means for moving the other end of said 40 moves in the same direction with a snap action,
thereby disengaging one of said contacts and
strip laterally.
breaking the circuit through one electrically ac
4. A snap switch comprising a thin strip of
resilient metal, means for anchoring said strip
tuated means, and engaging the other contact
to a ?xed support at a point intermediate its
and establishing at that point a circuit through
ends, said strip having a deformed, offset area
the other electrically actuated means.
immediately adjacent said anchoring means at
10. The combination with a snap switch com
both sides thereof, a circuit-controlling contact
prising a resilient strip anchored at a point in
arranged to co-operate with one end of said strip,
termediate its ends and being transversely de
and means for moving the other end of said strip
formed in the region surrounding said anchor
50 age, of a pair of thermostatic elements having
laterally.
5. A snap switch comprising a thin strip of re
free ends adjacent and opposite each other, a
silient metal, means for anchoring said strip to
heating winding on each of said elements, a pair
a ?xed support at a point intermediate its ends,
of contacts to each of which one end of one of
means for moving one end of said strip laterally,
said windings is connected, one end of said strip
means whereby such movement causes the oppo 55 being disposed between and adapted to be en
site end of said strip to move in the same direc~
gaged and moved by the free end of either one
tion, and a circuit-controlling contact arranged
of said elements, and the other end of said strip be
to be engaged by said strip.
ing positioned to play between and alternately en
gage said contacts, and said switch forming a part
resilient metal, means for anchoring said strip 60 of the circuit of said heating windings, whereby
to a ?xed support at a point intermediate its ends,
when the ?rst mentioned end is moved laterally
6. A snap switch comprising a thin strip of
means for moving one end of said strip laterally,
means whereby such movement causes the op
posite end of said strip to move in the same di
by one of said electrically actuated means beyond
a certain position, the other end moves in the
same direction with a snap action, thereby disen
rection, and a circuit-controlling contact arranged 65 gaging one of said contacts and breaking the cir
to be engaged by said opposite end of said strip.
cuit through one electrically actuated means, and
'7. The combination with a snap switch com
engaging the other contact and establishing at
prising a resilient strip anchored at a point in
that point a circuit through the other electrically
termediate its ends, and having a deformed por
actuated means, and an additional independent
tion adjacent the point of anchorage, of electri
cally actuated means for moving one end of said
strip laterally, and a contact arranged to be en
gaged by the other end of said strip for control
ling the circuit of said electrically actuated means.
pair of contacts constructed and arranged to be
opened and closed by the lateral movements of
said strip.
ROBERT J. MCFALL.
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