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Патент USA US2407125

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Sept- 3, 1946‘
LAUNDRY
w. J. ASHER
MACHINE -
2,407,125
‘
Filed March 21, 1945“
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2,407,125
Patented Sept. 3, 1946
UNITED STATES 1“ PATENT OFFICE.
.
2,407,125
’
LAUNDRY MACHINE
William ‘J. Asher, Colorado Springs, 6610'.
Application March 21, 1945, Serial N0. 583,928
10 Claims. (or. 223"»521) . i
2
1
This invention relates to pressing machines, and i
more particularly to bucks for such machines used
for pressing collars, either the separate type or
those attached to shirts.
It is a general object of the present invention to
provide a novel and improved collar pressing
buck capable of so shaping the collar that its
?t, appearance and tie accommodating character
istics are materially improved.
More particularly it is an object of the inven
tion to provide a buck and corresponding pressing
surface for ‘pressing men’s collars which is capable
. 5
a source of continual annoyance. in the stif?y
starched collars the neckband portion always
seems to be of too great a length in respect to the
outer or visible fold- so that when the tie is tight
ened thereis a buckling of the neckband into
substantially vertical ridges which are both un
comfortable and unsightly. If the collar is of the
detached type and is starched to that degree re
ferred to as _“s-tiff,” the tendency to buckle is not
so prevalent, but in bending the collar. in the
.19 sci-called turning or folding operationathe sub
stantially identical lengths of the neckband ‘and.
outer fold are such that these‘are pulled into al
of imparting to the collar‘, before turning. such
most direct‘ contact‘, particularly at the back.
and outer portions are separated by a greater .15 This makes it extremely di?icult not only to intro~
a shape that in its ?nished form the neck-band
amount, especially at the back, than is provided ‘ ‘duce a necktiebut, after the collar is buttoned and
the tie partially tied, great resistance is offered
by the usual pressing‘ service, whereby space is
to sliding the tie lengthwise between the folds
‘provided for convenient sliding ‘of the necktie.
of the collar and adjusting it. ‘Sometimes it is
It is an important feature of the invention to
almost impossible and occasionally ties are torn
provide a buck having a collar-engaging surface
in attempting to slide them.
shaped so as to provide relative contraction in
The present invention provides a buck for use
length to the neckband portion of the‘collar in
on a steam heated pressing machine which is
respect to the‘ outer fold thereof, whereby when
capable of automatically shaping the two folds
the collar is turned and bent into its circular form
the neckband is of smaller diameter and circum 25 of the collar so that in the turning operation space
is provided between them for reception of the
ference than the visible fold providing the’dcsi‘red
necktie. At the same time the collar is so shaped
tie space.
as to provide additional comfort and improved fit
Other and further features and objects of the
invention will be more apparent to those skilled
in the art upon a consideration of the accompany
and appearance.
The more progressive laundriesv no longer iron
ing drawing and following speci?cation wherein
collars, shirts and similar garments by hand, but
disclosed a single exemplary embodiment of the
invention, with the understanding that certain
changes in form, materials, construction and use
may be made as fall within the scope of the ap
pended claims without departing from the spirit
of the invention.
In said drawing:
Fig. l is a plan View of a collar buck constructed
press them on machines‘ quite similar to those
in accordance with my invention shown with a
suit coats, etc., but in the pressing of collars such
bucks are customarily substantially flat so that
collar attached shirt having its collar in position
thereon for pressing;
.
Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the buck shown
positioned beneath a pressing head;
.
used for pressing suits. Such machines normally
include a lower and usually stationary table pr~~
vided with suitable resilient padding and a fabric
cover on which the garment to be pressed is
spread. In the usual parlance of the industry
this is referred to as‘ a “buck.” Bucks of various
shapes‘ are used to provide for shaping parts of
the collar is pressed with both folds in the same
plane and as nearly flat as possible on the soft
resilient surface.- ,To dry and ?nish the collar on
Fig. 3 is a transverse vertical section on line 45 ‘the buck and to provide the pressure and heat, a
3--3 of Fig. 2;
Fig. 1i is a central transverse vertical section
metal. ‘pressing element-‘is movably supported for
line 5-—5 of Fig. 2; and
cooperation with the buck and superimposed collar. It is usually steam heated and its smooth
undersurface is shaped complementary to the
upper buck surface. The present device‘ is inde
Fig. 6 is a View of a collar after pressing on
the buck of the present invention shown super
imposed on a collar pressed flat in the usual man
ing steam and the like and relates‘ particularly to
the surface con?guration of the buck for forming
ner.
the collar to the desired shape. Naturally the
taken on line 4—4 of Fig. 2; '
‘
Fig. 5 is a transverse vertical section taken on
pendent of the‘ arrangement for heating, provid
Men’s collars as now laundered and pressed are 55 pressing surface is shaped as acomplement to that
2,407,125
3
4
of the buck, taking into account the padding
applied to the latter.
In the following description the buck alone
tached to the shirt in the case of an attached col
lar, closest to the curved edge of the buck.
is described as to shape and con?guration, it be
ing understood that appropriate padding and cov
Collars are made from ?at plies of fabric folded
and stitched so that the neckband and outer fold
meet on the curved fold line 32, which is usually
ering cloths are arranged thereon and that the
pressing head is appropriately shaped to coop
erate with the same.
so shaped that when the collar is folded or turned
along this line it assumes a curved or partially
cylindrical shape to ?t smoothly about the neck.
The buck may be formed of any material, but
If the two portions of the collar are pressed on
as shown in the ?gures is a simple block of wood 10 tirely ?at on a plane surface the fit is not good,
It), Whose upper or work engaging surface is
as previously described, when they are turned
shaped in accordance with the present invention
to form the curved ?nal shape.
to impart the desired con?guration to the col
The present buck, by having the progressively
lar. As seen in plan, the buck is somewhat longer
changing length of top surface is designed to ad
than the collar l2 shown positioned thereon, and 15 just the relative lengths of the neckband and
is considerably wider than the maximum width
outer fold portions of the‘collar, making the lat
of the collar to accommodate the long points of
ter longer in respect to the former whereby, when
some collars and the greater width in accordance
the collar is folded, the inner or neckband sec
with the height of the ?nished article. This ex-'
tion is su?lciently shorter, particularly near its
tra size eliminates the need for exactness in 20 inner edge, to be well spaced away from the outer
placing the collar on the buck.
fold, thus giving the desired tie space.
Roughly the top surface of the buck may be
By referring now to Fig. 6, the result of using
likened to that of a low-pitched gable roof in that
the buck of the present invention is illustrated in
the lower portions or ends 14 are de?ned by in
the collar shown in full lines. Here the folding
clined planes whose projections would intersect 25 line 32 as well as the lower edge 34 of the neckband
with the horizontal plane in parallel lines IS.
portion is given distinct added concavity caused
The front and rear surfaces of the buck are
by shortening its length in respect to the main
preferably vertical planes, although this is not
position of the outer fold 35, to which it is at
essential. This arrangement is assumed, how
tached along this line 32. The dotted line 36 illus
ever, for convenience in de?ning the work sur
face shape. The inclined planes l4 intersect the
30 trates the result of pressing the identical collar on
the usual flat buck or with a hand iron. The
back face 16 to form straight lines l8 which merge
lower edge is more nearly straight and the ends
into the slightly rounded apex at IS}. The front
or tabs adjacent the buttonholes are sufficiently
face 20 of the buck intersects the inclined planes
longer to project out from beneath the super
l4 in straight lines as far as the points of in?ec— 35 imposed collar, pressed in accordance with the
tion or tangency 22. Between these points a low
present invention, by approximately the amount
flat are 24 de?nes the intersection of the top
illustrated at 31. In addition there is further
surface of the buck with the front face 29. The
curvature given to the junction line 32 between
surface 26 between this arc 24 and the apex i9
the folds of the collar as illustrated in dotted
is warped or curved so that it is de?ned by the
lines. This explains the superior results, ob
elements 25, indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 1,
tained by the use of the properly shaped buck, for
which are substantially straight lines. However,
when the properly pressed collar is turned it con
sections lying in vertical planes parallel to the
forms better to the shape of the neck and pro
lines 15 are curved or sweeping arcs. The inter
vides more space for receiving the necktie.
sections of the curved area 26 with the plane areas 45
I claim:
M are not sharp, harsh lines but are well rounded
1. A buck for a collar pressing machine having
and faired, as seen at 21.
a collar-engaging surface generally shaped like
In Fig. 2, at 30, is schematically shown the
cooperating pressing element which may be
heated by steam entering and leaving by hoses 3|.
The several sectional views illustrate clearly
the changes in shape of the buck surface as the
sides rise to the apex. In Fig. 3 the top surface is
shown plane and horizontal, in the transverse
sense, at M, while in Fig. 4 the top surface at the 55
a low-pitched gable roof, two planes forming a
portion of the said surface and substantially in
tersecting near one edge of the buck, the remain
der of said surface comprising a generally coni
cal segment having its apex near said intersec
tion and meeting the opposite edge of the buck in
an arc below said apex and with its opposite ends
in said planes.
2. A buck for a collar-pressing machine hav
center is shown to be a straight incline 28 with
ing parallel front and rear faces and a padded
only a semblance of rounding at iii to eliminate
collar-engaging surface generally shaped like a
any harsh lines. Any sections between the points
low-pitched gable roof, and formed by portions
of in?ection 22 and the center section will ap
pear somewhat as in Fig. 5 where a portion of 60 of two inclined planes, said planes stopping just
short of intersecting near the rear face of the
the top still is horizontal, in the transverse sense,
buck only, the portion of the buck surface inter
as at M, to the junction curve 21 and from there
mediate said planes being curved outwardly and
is rounded on a long, sweeping are as seen at 29.
downwardly progressively from said near inter
It will be noted that, measured longitudinally "65 section and intersecting the front face of the
along the top surface, the length of the buck from
buck in a relatively long are terminating at the
adjacent ends of the lines of intersection of said
planes with the front face.
3. A buck for a collar-pressing machine having
buck substantially as shown, preferably with the 70 substantially parallel front and rear faces and a
right side of the outer fold up, for a surface gloss
collar-engaging surface generally shaped like a
to be imparted by the smooth metal of the press
low-pitched gable roof, and formed by portions
ing head. This outer fold has its free edge near
of two inclined planes, said planes approaching
the V-shaped edge of the buck while the neck
intersection in an apex at the rear face of the
band portion has its free edge, or the edge at
buck only, the top center portion of the buck
end to end progressively increases from the sur
face having the curved edge to the surface having
the V-shaped edge. The collar is placed on the
2,407,125
5
surface being curved outwardly and downwardly
from said intersection, said curved surface inter
secting a vertical plane forming the front face of
the buck in an arc terminating at the adjacent
ends of the lines of intersection of said Planes
with said front face, the apex of the buck sur
face being rounded at the portion adjacent the
6
buck comprising a cloth covered block having an
upper or working surface of generally convex
shape longitudinally of the collar, said surface
being progressively reduced in the extent of con
vexity transversely from the portion engaging the
free edge of the outer fold to the portion engag
ing the lower edge of the neckband whereby the
outer fold of the collar is relatively lengthened
in respect to the neckband.
4. A buck for a collar-pressing machine hav
8. A buck for pressing collars in the open
ing substantially parallel front and rear faces 10
form comprising a block of suitable material
and a collar-engaging surface generally shaped
having a collar-supporting surface including op
like a low-pitched gable roof, and formed by por
positely inclined substantially plane end portions
tions of two inclined planes, said planes substan
each adapted to position a collar end for sub
tially intersecting at the rear face of the buck
stantially one quarter of the collar length, said
only, the top center portion of the buck surface
portions being horizontal in vertical transverse
between said planes being an area curved out
section, and an intermediate convex portion to
wardly and downwardly from said plane inter
support the middle section of the collar, said in
section and intersecting a vertical plane forming
rear face.
the front face of the buck in an are substantial
termediate portion being inclined downwardly
ly terminating at the adjacent ends of the lines 20 from one edge of the buck toward the other in
an area‘ generally triangular as viewed from
of intersection of said planes with said front
above, said plane and inclined areas merging
face, the curved area meeting and merging with
smoothly whereby to impart an increasing longi
the two plane surfaces along divergent lines and
tudinal curvature to the collar parts as they
there being faired into the same on easy curves.
progress from the free edge of the outer fold.
5. A buck for a collar-pressing machine having
9. A buck for a collar-pressing machine hav
a padded collar-engaging surface generally
ing a collar-engaging surface generally shaped
shaped to provide a longer surface for engaging
to provide a longer surface for engagement by
the outer fold of the collar than for engaging the
the outer fold of a collar than for engagement
neckband portion and including portions of in
by the neckband portion thereof, said surface in
clined planes substantially intersecting at the
cluding portions of inclined planes substantially
rear face of the buck, and being‘ progressively
intersecting near one edge of the buck, and
merged into each other along curves of increas
merging into each other along curves of progres
ing length as they approach the forward face of
sively increasing length .as they approach the
the buck.
>
6. A buck for hand or machine ironing of col 35 other edge of the buck.
10. A buck for a collar pressing machine hav
lars of the starched type in open position, said
ing a pressing surface engageable by the neck
buck comprising a block having an upper or
band and outer fold portions of a ?attened out
working surface of generally convex shape lon
collar, the surface portion engageable by the
gitudinally of the collar, said surface being pro
gressively changed in curvature transversely 40 outer fold being of greater extent lengthwise of
the collar than the surface portion engageable
from the portion engaging the free edge of the
by the neck band whereby a progressive reduc
outer fold of the collar to the portion engaging
tion in the length of the neck band from its
the lower edge of the neckband whereby the lat
connection with the outer fold to its free edge is
ter is less stretched than the said free edge.
'7. A buck for hand or machine ironing of col
lars of the starched type in open position, said
45 effected on pressing the collar. '
‘
WILLIAM J. ASHER.
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