close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2407130

код для вставки
‘MM Sept. a, 1946
2,407,130
UNI-TED STATES’ PATENT OFFICE.
James Blades, Barber-ton,
Ohio, asslgnor to.
‘ Kamen Soap Products Co.,- New York, N. Y., a
No Drawing. Application August 23, 1944,
Serial No. 550,853
6 Claims.
(Cl. 252-—121) '
1
2
when the percentages are substantially, 40 parts
by weight of the synthetic agent, 5,0 parts by
vweight of the anhydrous soap, and 10 parts by
ess of making such salt water soaps.
Among the objects of the present invention it
is aimed to provide an improved salt water soap
and an improved process for making salt water
soap.
‘
‘.
eliminated, excellent results have been achieved
This invention relates to soaps in general, and
more especially to salt water soaps and'the proc
weight of water.
'
The production of the detergent is character
ized by four steps, the sulphonation step, the re
action step, the neutralization step, and ‘the ?nal
'
Heretofore it has been common practice when
step.
,
a soap was desired that could produce suds in
In the sulphonation step or process, excellent
so-called hard water, water having a high cal 10
results have been achieved when the ingredientsv
cium and/or magnesium content, or ordinary sea
approximated 5.55 parts by weight of naphtha
water, to use cocoanut oil for producing the de
lene (C10H1o) 128.06 M. Wt., 15.45 parts by weight
of lauryl alcohol (CH3(CH2)10CH2OH) M. Wt.
or sources of supply and the increasing demand 15 228.22, and 20.40 parts by weight of a 20 per cent
solution of oleum or fuming sulphuric acid (H2804
for salt water soap by the armed forces in the
plus about'20 per cent S03). The ‘naphthalene
island warfare, as well as on, the ‘ high seas,
and lauryl alcohol is initially supplied to a con
brought on by the present war, there resulted an
ventional acid resisting tank, lead lined, com
intensive research and studyvfor an arti?cial sub~
stitute or synthetic substitute for the cocoanut 20 posed of stainless steel, or the like, and either pro
vided with coils to receive a cooling or heating
oil. It is, therefore, an aim of the present in
tergent agent. With the dwindling supply of
cocoanut oil, particularly aggravated by the loss
medium or jacket to receive either a cooling or
vention not only to provide a soap that dispenses
heating medium, all according to conventional
with the use of cocoanut oil, but to provide a soap
practice. After the naphthalene and lauryl alco
which will fully satisfy the exacting requirements
of the United States Government as to the cleans 25 hol is supplied to this tank, it is there heated to a
temperature of about 40° C. when a‘ slurry is
ing qualities of this soap, and as to the ability
' formed. When a slurry is formed, the same is
of this soap to produce copious and permanent
cooled to a temperature of about 20° C.
suds in?any water, including double strength sea
Thereupon the oleum is added at a slow rate
water.
More speci?cally, it is an object of the present 30 with continued circulation of refrigerant either
in the coils or in the jacket to maintain a tem
perature close to 20° 0., care being exercised that
invention to produce a soap which includes ‘a
sulphonated synthetic detergent that will e?ec
the temperature does not exceed 25° C. While
the oleum is so added, the slurry is continually
stirred. The time required to add this oleum
. tively produce suds in any water, including sea
water.
It is still another object of the present invention
to produce a soap which is produced in part from 35 would vary, depending upon the size of the batch.
Ordinarily for a batch not to exceed one thousand
a sulphonated synthetic detergent derived pri
pounds, two or three hours should be sufficient.
marily from lauryl alcohol and naphthalene that
This would complete the ?rst step, or sulphona
will e?ectively produce suds in any. water, includ
ing sea water.
-
In the production of quantities approximating
one thousand pounds, excellent results have been
achieved when there was used about 40 parts by
40
tion step.
When all the oleum has been added, the tem
perature of the resulting mass should be raised .
' to 30° C. and maintained at this temperature for
about three hours. This constitutes the ‘second or
weight‘oi the synthetic agent, hereinafter ‘to be
>
described more in detail, 22 parts by weight of 45 reaction step. Thereupon the resulting mixture or mix is al
corn starch, 26 parts by weight of anhydrous soap,
lowed slowly to drop into a second tank or vat
containing the caustic soda, stirring well in order
to insure good neutralization. The second tank
> These percentages may vary without departing
from the general spirit of the invention. As an 50 may be similar in construction to the first tank,
all according to conventionalpractice. Excellent
instance, the starch may be materially reduced or
results have been achieved when the second batch
eliminated entirely when, however, the percent
?nally contains about 54.85 parts by weight of 30°
ages of anhydrous soap and water would be in
Baumé caustic soda, as compared to the mixture
creased to makeup for the reduction or elimina
tion of the starch. When the starchis entirely" 55 received after the completion of the reaction step.
and 12 parts by weight of water, or suf?cient wa
ter for a 32~per cent volatile material.
' '
2,407,130
3
4
.
When the sulphonated mass has been effectively
neutralized, tests should be made for the pH con
tent, and either caustic soda or sulphuric acid
added to adjust for a pH of 7.5 to 8.0. This part
of the neutralization step ordinarily requires from
two to three hours.
Thereupon the bentonite is added in the second
container and stirred until the mass becomes
homogeneous, constituting the fourth or ?nal
without departing from the general spirit of the
invention as set forth in the appended claims.
I claim:
,
.
1. The process or making a salt water soap
consisting in heating a mixture of substantially
5.55 parts by weight of naphthalene and of sub
stantially 15.45 parts by weight of lauryl alcohol
at a temperature 01' about 40° C. when a slurry
is formed, thereupon cooling the resulting slurry
step in the production of the detergent.
10 to a temperature of about 20° C., thereupon slowly
In place of the caustic soda, any suitable like
adding about 20.4 parts by weight of fuming sul
‘reacting alkaline solution may be used, ‘such as a
phuric acid while maintaining the temperature
potash solution.
below about 25° C. to form a sulphonated mass of
After the detergent has been produced as afore
naphthalene and lauryl alcohol, then raising the
said, the product contains about 50 per cent wa 15 temperature to about 30° C. and holding at this
ter. If an anhydrous product is desired, the
temperature for about 3 hours, thereupon mixing
material is then sent to a drier, either of the tray
the resulting liquid with an aqueous alkali metal
drier type or of the continuous type similar to
hydroxide solution to substantially neutralize the
that used in drying soap. When all the water
same, thereupon mixing said substantially neutral
has been removed the dry powders contain-about 20 sulphonated mass with about sixty parts by
50 per cent active ingredients and 50 per cent
weight of body forming substances consisting
salts.
principally of anhydrous soap and water and
' If on the other hand, a soap is desired, before
cooking until a suitable form retaining substance
drying, the detergent containing about 50 per cent
is produced.
water is then mixed with anhydrous soap and 25
2. The process of making a salt water soap con
cooked in the conventional soap crutcher. Excel
sisting in heating a mixture of substantially 5.55
lent results have been achieved when the mixing
parts by weight of naphthalene and of substan
kettle or soap crutcher in this step contains 40
tially 15.45 parts by weight of lauryl alcohol at a
parts by weight of the detergent agent resulting
temperature of about 40° C. when a slurry is
from the ?rst four steps aforesaid, 22 parts by 30 formed, thereupon cooling the resulting slurry to
‘weight of corn starch, 26 parts by weight of an
a temperature of about 20° C., thereupon slowly
hydrous soap, 12 parts by weight of water or su?i
adding about 20.4 parts by weight of fuming sul
cient water for 32 per cent volatile material.
phuric acid while maintaining the temperature
Excellent results have been achieved when the
below about 25° C. to form a sulphonated mass
35
mass in the soap crutcher is heated for one hour
of naphthalene and lauryl alcohol, then raising
at a temperature of 60° C. to 65° C., then allowed
the temperature to about 30° C, and holding at
to cool for two or three hours and drawn o? as
this temperature for about 3 hours, thereupon
a stable form retaining substance at a tempera
mixing the resulting liquid with an aqueous alkali
ture of about 50° C. to 60° C. and then in the
metal hydroxide solution to substantially neu
40 tralize the same, thereupon mixing said substan
conventional way out into bars.
The percentages above set forth, of course, may
tially neutral sulphonated mass with about sixty
be changed without departing from the general
parts by weight of body forming substances con
spirit of the invention. As an instance, the corn
sisting of corn starch, anhydrous soap and water
starch and bentonite may be materially reduced
in WhlCh the water does not exceed twelve parts
or even entirely eliminated. When entirely elimi 45 by weight and cooking until a suitable congealed
nated, as aforesaid, the anhydrous soap content
mass is produced.
should be materially increased. Excellent re
3. The process of making a salt water soap
sults have been produced when the detergent
consisting in heating a mixture of substantially
agent remained the same, that is, amounted to
5.55 parts by weight of naphthalene and of sub
about 40 parts by weight, the amount of, anhy 50 stantially 15.45 parts by weight of lauryl alcohol
drous soap was increased to 50 parts by weight,
at a temperature of about 40° C. when a slurry
and the amount of water was decreased to about
is formed, thereupon cooling the resulting slurry
10 parts by weight,
to a temperature of about 20° C., thereupon slowly
According to the formula, when the corn starch
-' adding about 20.4 parts by weight of fuming sul
_is included, the resulting soap will be character 55 phuric acid while maintaining thetemperature
ized in content by about 40 parts by weight of
below about 25° C. to form a sulphonated mass of
neutralized sulphonated naphthalene and lauryl
naphthalene and lauryl alcohol, then raising the
alcohol, 22 parts by weight of corn starch, 26
parts by weight of anhydrous soap and 12 parts by
temperature for about 3 hours, thereupon mixing
temperature to about 30° C. and holding at this
weight of water, or suf?cient for a content of 32 60 the resulting liquid with an aqueous alkali metal
hydroxide solution to substantially neutralize the
percent volatile material in the finished soap.
same, thereupon adding bentonite until the mass
When the starch and bentonite is materially
reduced or entirely eliminated, the anhydrous
soap would be materially increased as already set
forth, and the resulting soap will be characters
ized in content by about 40 parts by weight of
neutralized sulphonated naphthalene and lauryl
has become homogeneous, thereupon mixing said
substantially neutral sulphonated mass and ben
tonite mixture with about ?fty parts by weight
of anhydrous soap and about ten parts by weight
of water and cooking until a suitable congealed
mass is produced.
4. The process of making a salt water soap
10 parts by weight of water, or su?icient for a 70 consisting in heating a mixture of substantially
content of 32 percent volatile material in the fin
5.55 parts by weight of naphthalene and of sub
alcohol, 50 parts by weight of anhydrous soap, and
ished soap.
'
It is obvious that the several steps in the process
may be varied and that the quantities of the in
stantially 15.45 parts by weight of lauryl alcohol
at a temperature of about 40° C. when a slurry
is formed, thereupon cooling the resulting slurry
gredients of the resulting soap may be varied 75 to a temperature of about 20° C., thereupon slowly ,
2,407,130
adding about 20.4 parts by weight of fuming sul
phuric acid while maintaining the temperature
below about 25° C. to form a sulphonated mass of
naphthalene and lauryl alcohol, then raising the
temperature to about 30° C. and ,holding at this
temperature for about 3 hours, thereupon mixing
the resulting liquid with an aqueous alkali metal
hydroxide solution to substantially neutralize the
same, thereupon adding bentonite until the mass
has become homogeneous, thereupon mixing said
hydroxide solution to substantially neutralize the
same, thereupon mixing said substantially neutral
sulphonated mass with ?fty parts by weight of
anhydrous soap and ten parts by weight of water,
and cooking until a suitable form retaining mass
is produced. \
.
~
_ 6. The process of making a salt water soap con
sisting in heating a mixture or substantially 5.55
Q . parts by weight of naphthalene and of substan
tially 15.45 parts by weight 01' lauryl alcohol at
substantially neutral sulphonated mass and ben- _
a temperature of about 40° C. when a slurry is
tonite mixture with twenty-two parts by weight of
formed, thereupon cooling‘ the resulting slurry to
com starch, twenty-six parts by weight of anhy- -
water and cooking until a form retaining sub
a temperature of about 20° C., thereupon slowly
adding about 20.4 parts by weight of fuming sul
phuric acid'while maintaining the temperature
stance is produced.
below about 25° C. to form a sulphonated mass
drous soap and. about twelve parts by weight oi.’
_
-
5. The process of making a salt water soap
consisting in heating a mixture of ‘substantially
5.55 parts by weight oi naphthalene and of sub
stantially 15.45 parts by weight of lauryl alcohol
at a temperature of about 40° 0. when a slurry
of naphthalene and lauryl alcohol, thereupon
allowing the temperature of the sulphonated mass '
to rise to about 30° C. and maintaining the re
sulting liquid at this temperature for several
hours, thereupon mixing the resulting liquid with
is formed, thereupon cooling the resulting slurry
an aqueous 'alkali metal hydroxide solution to sub- ‘
to a temperature of about 20° C., thereupon slowly
stant‘ially neutralize the same, thereupon adding
‘ adding about 20.4 parts by weight of fuming sul
bentonite until the mass has‘ become homogenee
phuric acid while maintaining the temperature’ 25 ous, thereupon mixing said substantially neutral
below about 25° C. to form a sulphonated mass of
sulphonated mass and bentonite with about ?fty
naphthalene and lauryl alcohol, then raising the
temperature to about 30° C. and holding at this
temperature for about 3 hours, thereupon mixing
the resulting liquid with an aqueous alkali metal
parts by weight of anhydrous soap and cooking
the latter mixture until a suitable form retaining
substance is produced.
'
JAMES BLADES.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
420 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа