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Патент USA US2407357

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Sept. 10, 1946.
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‘F. WETHLY
REGENERATIVE
COKE
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OVEN
BATTERY
Filéd March 3, 1945
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2,407,356 7
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BY
Arra?zvagr
Sept. 10, 1946‘.
'
F. WDE'YI'HLY
’ 2,407,356
REGENERATIVE COKE OVEN BATTERY 1
Filed March :5, 1945
s Sheets-:Sheet 3
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2,407,356
Patented Sept. 10, 1946
UNITED‘ STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,407,356
REGENERATIVE COKE OVEN BATTERY
Frans Wethly, Manhasset, N. Y., assignor to
Wilputte Coke Oven Corporation, New York,
N. Y., a corporation of Maine
Application March 3, 1945, Serial No. 580,858
5 Claims. (Cl. 202-144)
1
2
.
This invention relates to lay-product regenera
tive coke oven batteries, and more particularly
to the design and construction of the regenerators
portioned to compensate for the moreimportant
of coke oven batteries.
Much thought and effort has been given to
obtaining uniform coking of the coal charge with-'
in a coking chamber ?ankedthereby in order to
obtain uniform coking of the coal within the
same cokinglperiod. Other objects and advan
in each coking chamber of a by-product coke
tages of this invention will be apparent from the
factors a?ecting the amount of heat to be sup
plied by the individual ?ues to a charge of coal
following detailed description thereof.
'
oven battery. In order to obtain this desired ob
In accordance with my invention, regenerators
jective it is necessary to take into account the
various factors which affect the amount of heat 10 of different volumetric capacities communicate
with the ?ues of a heating wall, the regenerators
to be supplied by the individual ?ues to the coal
being proportioned so that the flueo-n the coke
charge. Among the more important of these
side of the battery receives the largest volume of
factors are: (1) greater heat radiation losses take
preheated air or preheated air and preheated lean
place at the sides of the battery (the ends of the
coal charge in each coking chamber) than at 15 gas from the regenerator or regenerators com
‘municating therewith, the ?ue on the pusher side
the remaining portions of the heating vwalls
of the battery receives the next largest volume
?anking the coking chambers, and (2) the
of preheated air or preheated air and preheated
amount of coal in each unit of length of a coking
lean gas from the regenerator or regenerators
chamber progressively increases from the nar
rower pusher end of the battery to the wider coke 20 communicating therewith, and the interior ?ues
end thereof due to the conventional practice of , in a direction running from the pusher to the
coke side of the battery receive gradually increas
making the coking chambers so that they taper
ing amounts of preheated air or preheated air
in horizontal cross-section.
and preheated lean gas from the regenerators
United States Patent 2,194,404 of March 19,
'
1940, discloses a coke oven battery in which the 25 communicating therewith.
In accordance with a preferred embodiment of
end heating ?ues of each heating wall are of
my invention, the'renegerators of the coke oven
smaller cross-sectional area than the remaining
battery are arranged in rows, each row being dis
?ues, the regenerators being all of the same volu
posed crosswise of the battery and communicat
metric capacity so that more heat is generated
ing with the heating ?ues of a heating wall there
in the end ?ues to compensate for radiation losses
above, and the volumetric capacity of the regen
at the sides of the battery. In another modi?
erators of each row is proportioned so that the
cation disclosed in this patent, the ?ues in each
regenerator of smallest volumetric capacity is
heating wall are uniform in size but the end re
located near but not at the pusher side of the
generators crosswise of the battery are of larger
volumetric capacity than the remaining inter 35 battery and the volumetric capacity of the re
generators of each row progressively increases
mediate regenerators, thereby supplying a greater
from that having the smallest volumetric ca
volume of air to support combustion of the greater
pacity to the regenerator having the largest volu
volume of gas supplied to the end heating ?ues to
metric capacity, which last-mentioned regener
accomplish the same result as in ‘the ?rst-men
tioned modi?cation. While the constructions of 40 ator is disposed at the coke side of the battery,
the regenerator at the pusher side of the battery
this patent compensate for heat radiation losses
having a somewhat smaller volumetric capacity
at'the sides of the battery, they do not provide
than that at the coke side of the battery, the
for uniform coking of the coal charge since no
volumetric capacity of the regenerator at the
provision is made for supplying the different
amounts of heat required by the varying amounts 45 pusher side of the battery, however, ‘being sub
stantially greater than that of the remaining re-‘~
of coal in each unit of length of the ‘oven cham
generators except for the regenerator disposed
ber due to the tapering of the chamber.
at the coke side of the battery. The expression
It is an object of the present invention to pro
“volumetriocapacity” is used in this specification ,
vide a by-product coke oven battery, the regen
erators of which are constructed and. designed to 50 and appended claims to mean the capacity of a
regenerator to store heat from the products of
supply diiferent amounts of air, or air and com
combustion or waste gases passing therethrough
bustible gas in those cases in which lean gas is
during the out?ow periods of operation and to
preheated by passage through the regenerators,
preheat‘ air or air and lean gas passing there
the amount of air or air and lean gas thus sup- .
plied to the ?ues by the regenerators being pro
55
through during the succeeding in?ow periods oi
2,407,356
operation; this capacity in general is proportional
to the surface area of the checkerbrick or other
heat-storing material in the regenerator over
which area flows the gaseous media mentioned.
For a coke oven design in which the regenerators
all have the same kind of checkers arranged in
like manner, the volumetric capacity will be pro
portional} to the volume of the regenerators con-_
taining the checkers.
'
4
ator for each four ?ues of a heating wall is used,
the regenerator communicating with the four
?ues on the coke side of the battery may be of
a volumetric capacity to supply to these four
?ues from 16% to 18% of the total air, the re
generator supplying air to the four ?ues on the
pusher side of the battery may be of a volumetric
capacity to supply to these four ?ues from 13%
to 15% of the total air, the regenerator com
In terms of the proportionate amount of total 10 municating with the ?fth, sixth, seventh and
air supplied by the regenerators supplying all the
eighth ?ues on the pusher side of the battery
?ues of a heating well, my invention involves
may be of a volumetric capacity to supply to
proportioning the volumetric capacities of the
these four fiues from 11% to 13% of the total
regenerators so that from 4% to 5% of the total
amount of air, and the volumetric capacity of
air is supplied to the end ?ue on the pusher side,
the regenerators communicating with the suc
from 3% to 4% to the next ?ue, from 2% to 3% .
ceeding groups of fines running from the pusher
to the next ?ue, the percentage of total air ’
to the coke side of the battery increasing by an
supplied by the regenerators communicating . increment of the order of 0.17% to 0.2%. The
with the succeeding fines of each heating wall
reference herein to total amount of air is to the
up to and including the third flue from the coke 20 total amount of air fed to the ?ues of one heat
side gradually increasing by an increment of
ing wall. If lean gas is preheated by flow
from .04% to 06%, the amount of air supplied
through the regenerators, the lean gas regen
by the regenerator communicating with the
erators are proportioned in like manner as the
third flue from the coke side being of the order
air regenerators.
,
of 3% to 4% of the total air, the amount of air
In a preferred embodiment of the invention
supplied to the last two ?ues (i. e., the ?ues on
involving a separate regenerator communicating
the coke side) being of the order of 4% to 5% and
with each of the fines in a heating wall, the re
5% to 6% respectively. While the above repre
generators of each row crosswise of the battery
sents the preferred design of regenerators and
involves an arrangement in which a ?ue of any‘
given heating wall communicates with only one
regenerator, it will be understood that some of
the advantages of the invention can be obtained
by grouping the regenerators and ?ues so that a
regenerator communicates with two, three, or
‘even four hues of a heating wall. Thus the re
generators might be arranged so that one regen~
erator supplies air. totwo ?ues on the coke side
are designed and arranged so thatthe regener
ator of smallest volumetric capacity communi
cates with the third flue from the pusher side of
the battery, and running towards the coke side
of the battery, each regenerator up to and in
cluding the regenerator communicating with the
third ?ue from the coke side of the battery is of
progressively greater volumetric capacity, the in—
crease in volumetric capacity from one regener~
ator to-the next regenerator of the row being by
of the battery, the regenerator being of a volum~
‘an increment of the order of 1% to 2%, the re
etric capacity to supply to these two ?ues from 40 generator of largest volumetric capacity being on
9% to 10% of the total air, another regenerator
the coke side of the battery and having a ca
supplies air to the two flues 0n the pusher side
pacity approximately 69% greater than that of
of the battery and being of a volumetric ca
the regenerator of smallest volumetric capacity,
pacity to supply to these two ?ues from 7% to
the regenerator of next largest volumetric capa
:8%'0f the total air, and still other regenerators i'. city being on the pusher side of the battery and
communicate with the interior ?ues, these inter
having a volumetric capacity approximately 58%
ior ?ues being arranged in groups of two com~
greater than that of the regenerator of smallest
municating with a regenerator individual ‘to each
volumetric capacity, the regenerator communi
such group, the regenerator communicating with
cating with the second ?ue from the coke side of
(the third and fourth ?ues from the pusher side 50 the battery having a volumetric capacity ap
of the battery being of a volumetric capacity to‘
proximately 47% greater than that of the regen
supply to these two ?ues from 5% to 6% of the
erator of smallest volumetric capacity, and the
total amount of air, the volumetric capacity of
volumetric capacity of the regenerators com
the regenerators communicating with succeeding
municating with the second flue from the pusher
groups of fines running from the pusher to the 5 5 ‘side of the battery being approximately 12%
coke side of the battery increasing by an incre
greater than that of the regenerator of smallest
ment of the order of 0.08% to 0.1%.
If an ar
rangement of a regenerator for each three ?ues
, of a heating wall is used, the ‘regenerator con
nected to the three flues on the coke side of the
battery may be of a volumetric capacity to sup
ply to these three ?ues from 12% to 14% of the
total air, the regenerator connected with the
three flues on the pusher side of the battery may
be of a volumetric capacity toxsupply to these
three flues from 10% to 12% of the total air, the
volumetric capacity.
In the accompanying drawings forming a part
of this speci?cation and showing for purposes
of exemplification preferred forms of this in~
vention without limiting the claimed invention to
such illustrative instances:
Fig. 1 is a crosswise vertical section through
i a coke oven battery of the underjet type embody
ing the improvement of the present invention;
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary vertical section through
regenerator connecting with the fourth, ?fth and
the coke oven battery of Fig 1 taken longitudin
sixth ?ues may be of a volumetric capacity to
ally of the battery in a plane passing through
supply to these. three ?ues from 8% to 9%
the line 2—2 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a crosswise vertical
of the total amount of air, and the ‘volu 70 section through a coke oven battery of the twin'
metric capacity of the regenerators communi
?ue type embodying the improvement of the
cating with succeeding groups of fiues' run
“present invention; and Fig. 4 is a fragmentary
ning from the pusher to the coke side of the bat
vertical section through the coke oven battery
tery increasing by an increment of the order of
of Fig. 3 taken longitudinally of the battery along
.12% to .15%, If an arrangement of a regener 75 the line 4-4.
2,407,356
In the preferred embodiments illustrated in the
drawings, the invention is shown incorporated
in ‘the top of the oven battery and positioned
directly above and communicating with coking
ceptible to other applications,‘ such, for example,
with the horizontal ?ues 33 or 34 as the case
as a combination coke oven battery having two
waste heat ?ues as disclosed in Pavitt United
more or less over the passage connecting the
chambers 32. The charging holes are equipped
in a coke oven battery of the'underjet type in
with the usual removable covers 40, which are
volving a single waste heat flue, the heating walls
of which have the ?ues connected in two exterior 5 removed during charging of the individual coking
chambers and are placed in position to close the
groups communicating with one interior group
tops of these coking chambers during the coking
(Fig. 1) or have twin ?ues (Fig. 3) and'the
operation.
present invention will be con?ned to the present
Flow through each flue may be regulated by
illustrated embodiments of the invention in such
a
slide
brick or damper brick 4| to vary the ex
10
coke oven battery. It will be understood, how
tent of the passage connecting the vertical ?ues
ever, the novel features of the invention are sus
may be.
vertical flue ‘with the horizontal '?ue through ac
cess ?ues 42 which extend from the top of the
vertical ?ues. The base of 'each’?ue' is provided
with a burner for supplying coke oven gas theree
to; along the heating wall the ?ues are provided
with alternately low and high burners 43, 44
States Patent 2,155,954 of April 25, 1939,01‘ the
regenerative coke oven batteries of the Koppers
or Becker type, in which the ?ues on one side
of the coking chamber communicate with those
on the other side, or coke oven batteries of the
gas gun type in which fuel gas is supplied to the
?ues through gas conduits disposed at the base
of the ?ues.
Each slide brick 41 may be advanced
> respectively.
Fuel gas such as coke oven gas is
supplied to the fines from a supply main 45 which,
through a series of pipes 46, communicates with
a series of headers 41, one for each heating wall,
supplying gas to gas conduits 48 leading to the
high and low burners 43 and 4t. Suitable valves
(not shown) are associated with each conduit 48
to permit adjustment of the amount of coke oven
v
In the drawings there is shown a lay-product
coke oven embodying in its constructiona plu
rality of heating walls 31 each containing ver
tical ?ues and a plurality of intermediate cross
r-wise-extending horizontally elongated coking
chambers 32. Each coking chamber in horizon
gas supplied to each heating ?ue. As customary,
tal cross—section is of tapered shape as is con
ventional, ‘the wide end of the coking chamber
an air main 49 is connected by piping 56 with
the valve-controlled pipes 46 to supply decar
bonizing air to the gas conduits leading to the
burners.
The regenerators of the battery are located
beneath the coking chambers and are disposed
in rows extending crosswise of the battery par
being on the coke side of the battery, i. e. the
side the coke is discharged from the coking cham
bers, and the narrowerend on the pusher side.
‘In the embodiment of the invention shown in
Figs. 1 and 2, each heating wall on the pusher
'side has a concurrently operable group of ?ues
identi?ed by reference characters I to 8, inclu
sive, communicating through a horizontal ?ue 33
allel to the coking chambers 32. Each row- ‘of
regenerators is disposed between a pair of sup
porting walls 33. In the embodiment of the in
with an interior group of 8 ?ues identi?ed by
reference characters 9-I6. On the coke side of 40 vention shown in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings,
the number of regenerators in each ‘row is equal
the battery the vertical ?ues are connected by
to the number of ?ues in the heating wall above,
horizontal flue 34 into two unequal groups of
one and the same regenerator communicating
concurrently operable ?ues, the interior group of
with
corresponding ?ues on opposite sides of a
7 ?ues being identi?ed by reference characters
coking chamber as shown in Fig. 2. In Fig. 1
"-23 and the .outer group of 6 ?ues by reference
of the drawings, the regenerators communicating
characters 24 to 23, inclusive. The purpose of
having unequal groups of interconnecting flues ' with the ?ues of the heating wall shown in this
?gure have been identi?ed by reference numerals
on the coke side will be explained hereinafter.
the same as those identifying the ?ues commu
All the ?ues of each heating wall are of sub
stantially the same size. Thus, in the embodi
50 nicating therewith followed by the letter v‘.
ment of the invention shown in Fig. 1 of the
drawings, the ?ues of each heating wall are oper
atively disposed in two outer and an inner group
of concurrently operable ?ues, the ?ues of each
Thus,-the pusher side regenerator communicat
ing With?ue I is identi?ed by h", the regenerator
communicating with ?ue 2 by 21", etc.
All the
regenerators of lr-Br inclusive, 24r-28r inclusive,
group operating concurrently for flow in the same ;,5 lengthwise of the battery, during one period of
operation of the battery operate for in?ow into
direction. During one period of operation the
the outer groups of ?ues [-8 and 24-29 com
?ues l-8 and 24-29 of the outer groups operate
municating therewith, while the products of com
concurrently as inflow ?ues while the inner group
bustion pass down through the inner group of
of ?ues 9-23 operate concurrently as ‘out?ow ?ues.
Upon reversal, the inner group of ?ues of each 60 ?ues 9-23 into'regenerat'ors -9r-23r. Thus, cross
wise of the battery, the regenerators lr-Br and
heating wall operates as in?ow ?ues, While the
24r-29r alternately operate for in?ow and out
outer groups of ?ues operate concurrently as out
flow, while the regenerators ST-l?rr and m-zs-r
?ow ?ues.
‘operate for outflow and in?ow, and longitudi~
The heating walls form the side walls of the
respective coking chambers 32, the heating walls s5 nally of the battery the regenerator units in lon
gitudinal alignment are all in the same phase.
andthe coking chambers, together with the su
perstructure of the oven battery, being supported
by massive supporting walls 35 positioned directly
beneath the heating walls 3|. The supporting
If it is desired to operate the battery by burn
ing an extraneousiy derived gas such as producer
gas or blast furnace gas in the ?ues, such gas
walls 35 rest ‘on and are supported by a ?at mat 70 ‘may be supplied to alternate regenerators lone
or platform 36 suitably supported by pillars 31
above a basement space 38 beneath the oven bat
tery.
.gitudinally ofthe battery, while the remaining
- ‘regenerators longitudinally of ,the battery are
used to preheat the air necessaryfor combustion
of the gas in the ?ues. When operating with
chambers 32 through charging holes 39 located 75 fuel gas, such as coke oven‘ ‘gas,’ fed‘direc'tly to
The coal to be coked is charged into the coking -
7
2,407,356
8
the ?ues, all the in?ow regenerators are prefer
ably used to preheat the air fed to the ?ues.
In accordance with this invention, the regen
ply air and coke oven gas to each ?ue in accord
ance with the heating requirement per unit
length of heating wall to obtain uniform coking
throughout the length of the coking chamber in
erators of each row crosswise of the battery are
of different volumetric capacities, all the regen
erators in longitudinal alignment along the length
the same coking period. When lean gas is burned
in the ?ues, it is fed through alternate regenera
of the battery being of substantially the same
volumetric capacity.
tors lengthwise of the battery, the air being fed
through the intervening regenerators lengthwise
In each row of regenera
tors crosswise of the battery, the regenerator
of the battery so that both the air and lean gas
near but not at the pusher side of the battery ii) are proportioned to give uniform coking through
has the smallest volumetric capacity, the regen
out the length of the coking chamber during the
erator at the coke side of the battery the larg
same coking period.
est volumetric capacity, the regenerator at the
I have found it is possible to obtain optimum
pusher side of the next largest volumetric capac
results insofar as compensating for the greater
ity, and the remaining intervening regenerators,
weight of coal and radiation losses are concerned
2r-28r, of gradually increasing volumetric capac
by having on the wider coke side of the chamber
ity, the increment of increase in the case of re
generators 3r to 2'” being of the order of 1%
a group of 6 exterior ?ues (?ues 2449) com
municating with a group of 7 interior ?ues (?ues
or 2%,
l'l-23). The volume of products of combustion
In general, the volumetric capacity of the re 20 generated in the 6 ?ues is approximately equal
generators of any given coke oven battery will
to that generated in the group of 7 ?ues, and
depend on the size of the coking chambers, the
these products of combustion, due to the propor
chemical and physical properties of the brick
tioning of the regenerators as hereinabove dis
work used and other factors involved in the de
closed, ?ows through the individual ?ues of each
sign of the battery. It is, therefore, not possible - group in substantially the same proportions as
to specify the permissible range of volumetric
the regenerative capacities of the regenerators.
capacities of the regenerators coming within the
communicating with the ?ues bear to each other.
scope of this invention since these capacities will
Thus, during the in?ow period the largest volume
vary depending upon the variables such as those
of products of combustion are generated in ?ue
above mentioned necessarily involved in the de- , 29 and during the out?ow period of operation a
sign of a battery. For any given battery, how
proportionately larger volume of products of
ever, having a ?ue arrangement such as shown
in Fig. 1 of the drawings and having a row of
combustion ?ows through ?ue 29 than through
regenerators extending crosswise of the battery
connected to the ?ues of a heating wall above
regenerator 29r is the regenerator of largest volu
the outer ?ues of the group due to the fact that
metric capacity and this ?ue is one of a group
of 6 receiving products of combustion from a
with a di?erent regenerator connected to each
?ue of said heating wall, for optimum coking of‘
group of 7 ?ues.
_
the coal charge in the same coking period, the
In the base of each crosswise-extending row’ of
relative size of the regenerators of each row
regenerators are 2 bus ?ues 5!, 52. One of the
should be as follows:
40 bus ?ues communicably connects the interior
Regenerator 31" should have the smallest volu
group of ,regenerators Sr-ZSr to the waste gas
metric capacity which for comparative purposes
?ue 53 and to the air inlet channel 54 leading to
will be considered as unity.
the basement space. The other bus ?ue connects
The other regenerators of the row should have
the exterior groups of regenerators lr-Br and 241'
a volumetric capacity relative to that of 3r as
follows:
Percent
|r—158
2r-112
3r--100
4r--101
‘Jr-103.7
fir-104
‘Ir-105
Percent
9r—108
|0r—1l0.6
l lr-l11
I 2r-112
l3r-114
Mir-115
l5r_117
Percent
[Tr-120
|8r—121
Mir-122
20r-124
2 I r_126
22r—127
23r—128
Percent
251'-—132
26r-133
21r—135
28r__147
291-169
, to 297‘ to the Waste gas flue 53 and channel 54.
Valve mechanism 55 of conventional construc
tion is provided for placing channel 54 in com
munication with ?ue 52 and simultaneously plac
ing ?ue 5| in communication with waste gas ?ue
510
53. Upon reversal, this valve mechanism places
?ue 52 in communication with the waste gas
?ue 53 and bus ?ue 5! in communication with
air intake 54. Air is supplied to the basement
space through valve-controlled air inlets 55, 56
in the coke side wall of the battery.
8r—107
l6r--118
24r—130
The parts of the twin ?ue coke oven battery
of the modi?cation of Figs. 3 and 4 corresponding
- It will be noted that the coke side regenerator
to those of the modi?cation of Figs. 1 and 2 are
291' has the largest volumetric capacity, the
identi?ed by the same reference numerals. In
pusher side regenerator Ir the next largest, and
the volumetric capacities of the regenerators 3r m) Figs. 3 and 4 each heating wall is composed of
twin or hairpin ?ues. The number of sets of
to 211‘ inclusive, progressively increase by an in
twin ?ues in each heating wall will depend on
crement of the order of 1% to 2%. Since the
the size of the battery; usually 14 or 15 sets are
regenerator of largest volumetric capacity is con
employed. In the embodiment of the invention
nected with ?ue 29 and the valves controlling
?ow of coke oven gas are correspondingly set to 65 shown in Fig. 3, 15 sets, identi?ed by reference
feed the largest volume of gas to this ?ue, the
characters A, A’; B, B’; C, C’; D, D’; E, E’; F,
amount of heat generated in this ?ue is greater
F’; G, G’; H, H’; I, I’; J, J’; K, K’; L, L’; M,
than that generated in the remaining ?ues by an
'M'; N, N’; O, O’, are involved. In accordance
amount suf?cient to compensate for radiation
with customary practice, one twin ?ue of each
losses at this end of the battery and the greater 70 set, say the left-hand flue, viewing Fig. 3, cp
weight of coal to be coked opposite this ?ue.
erates for in?ow, while the other ?ue of the set
Likewise, the regenerators feeding air to the
operates for outflow. The ?ues of a pair of heat
remaining ?ues~ are graduated, and the amount
ing walls ?anking a coking chamber, opposite
of coke oven gas fed to these ?ues is controlled
each other, are out-of-phase, i. e. thus, the ?rst
by the valves individual to each burner to sup
flue A of one heating wall operates for inflow and
2,407,356
in'the next heating wal1 this ?ue operates for
out?ow. Upon reversal, the flue of each set
which operates for in?ow becomes the out?ow
?ue and the other ?ue of the set becomes the
in?ow ?ue.
I
Between each pair of pillar walls 35 isa cross-~
wise-extending row of regeneratcrs, there being
one regenerator in a row for each set of twin
?ues in the heating wall. The ?ues of eachheat
ing wall communicate with the 'regenerators of
two rows of crosswise-extending regenerators.
Thus, for example, considering heating wall 60'of
Fig. 4, ?ues A, B, C, etc, communicate by ports
6! with the alternate regenerators of row a and
?ues A’, B’, C’, etc., communicate by ports 62
with alternate regenerators of row be The re
maining regenerators of row or communicate with
.10
b, the ‘regenerator on the pusher side of the bat
tery being identified by the reference character
0, the regenerator on the pusher side by reference
character a, and the remaining regenerators of
the row by reference characters 0 to n, inclusive.
On the basis that regenerator b has a volumetric
capacity of unity, the remaining regenerators
have volumetric capacities relative to that of b,
as follows:
-
»
»
Per cent
135
Regenerator n
Regenerator c __________________________ __ 103
Regenerator d
~
106
Regenerator e
109
Regeneratorf __________________________ __ 112
Regenerator g
Regenerator h
Regenerator i
115
____
117
I
120
?ues .A', B’, C’, etc., of heating wall 63 by ports
Regeneratory' ____ _; ____________________ __ 123
64. Flues A’, B’, C’, etc. of heating wall 63 com
municate by ports 65 with the regenerators of 20 Regenerator k _____ -1 ____________ __‘ _____ __ 126
Regenerator l
129
row 0. rl‘hus, during operation of the battery,
Regenerator m~._ ________________________ __ 132
?ow of air takes place through all the regen
erators of row a into ?ues A, B, C, etc. of heating
wall E58 and ?ues A’, B’, C" of heating wall 63
supporting combustion of the’ fuel gas supplied "
to these ?ues through the burners; 43, 44, the
products of combustion ?owing through ?ues A’,
B’, C’, etc. of heating wall 68 into alternate re
generators of row b and through the ?ues A, ,B, C
of heating wall 63 into alternate'regenerators of ‘\
row 0. ‘Upon reversal, alternate regenerators of
row I) supply preheated 'air to support combus
tion of fuel gas to the flues A’, B’, C’ etc. or".
heating wall til, the products of combustion ?ow
ing through ?ues A, B, C of this heating wall into
alternate regenerators of row an; alternate re~
generators of row 0 supply preheated air to the
Regenerator n __________________________ __ 135
Renegerator o
'
'
160
While preferred embodiments of my invention
have been illustrated and described, it will be
apparent to those skilled in the art that changes
may be made without departing from the inven
tion as set forth in the appended claims. Thus,
for example,‘ instead of having the twin flue oven
of Figs. 3 and 4 provided with a regenerator ar
rangement, as shown in the drawings, so that
the oven is ?red with rich gas, a regenerator ar
rangement for preheating both lean gas andiair
' supplied to the twin ?ues may be used.
What is claimed is:
1. In a regenerative coke oven battery having
alternate horizontal tapered coking chambers
?ues A, B, C etc. of heating wall ~53 to support
combustion of fuel gas in these ?ues, the products
and vertically ?ued heating walls, rows of cross
of combustion ?owing through heating ?ues A’,
' wise extending regenerators of diiierent volu
B’, C’ of heating wall 63 into alternate regen
erators of row a. Hence, along the length of the
battery, the regenerators are arranged in cross
wise-extending rows in which a row of air-pre
metric capacities communicating With said ?ues,
the regenerator of. largest volumetric capacity in
each row being disposed on the coke side of the
battery, the regenerator of next largest volu
heating regenerators alternates with a row of
' metric capacity in each row being disposed on
waste gas regenerators,
'
In accordance with this invention, the regen
erators of each row are made of different volu- '
metric capacities, the regenerator communicat
ing with the ?ue on the coke side of the bat
tery of a heating wall being of largest volumetric
capacity, that communicating with the ?ue on
the pusher side of the batterybeing of next larg
est volumetric capacity, the regenerator com
municating with the flue next to that on the
pusher side of the battery being of smallest volu- '
metric capacity, and the remaining regenerators
the pusher side of the battery, and the volumetric
capacities of the intermediate regenerators in
each row gradually increasing in a direction run
ning from the pusher to the coke side of the bat
tery.
2. In a coke oven battery having horizontal
coking chambers and heating walls, each heat
ing wall consisting of vertical ?ues, a row of re
generators disposed crosswise of the battery com
municating with the ?ues in the heating wall,
said regenerators being of di?erent volumetric
capacities, the regenerator of largest volumetric
capacity being disposed on the coke side ofthe
battery, the regenerator of next largest volumet
generator having the smallest volumetric ca
pacity to the regenerator of largest volumetric 60 ric capacity being disposed on the pusher side of
the battery, the remaining regenerators of said
capacity on the coke side of the battery being of
row being of a volumetric capacity less than that
gradually increasing volumetric capacities, the
of the last mentioned regenerator and the volu
rate of increase from one regenerator to the next
metric capacity of most of said remaining regen
being by an increment of the order of 2% to 4%.
erators gradually increasing in a direction from
In the embodiment of the invention shown in
the pusher to the coke side of the battery to
Fig. 3, the regenerator having the smallest volu~
compensate for the varying amounts of coal in
metric capacity communicates with the flue B of
each unit length of the coking chamber heated
one heating wall and B’ of the heating wall on
by said ?ues communicating with said remaining
the other side of the coking chamber de?ned by
regenerators so that substantially uniform cok
the two heating walls in question. For purposes
ing of the coal in said coking chamber takes place.
of comparison of the volumetric capacities of the
3. A regenerative icy-product coke oven battery
remaining regenerators of each row, this re
having a tapered coking chamber and a vertically
generator will be considered as having a volu
?ued heating wall, the ?ues being arranged so
metric capacity of unity. This regenerator is
identi?ed in Fig. 3 by the reference character 75 that the ?ues on the pusher side of the battery
in each row running in a direction from the re
2,407,356
11
are in two equal groups of cocurrently operable
?ues connected by a horizontal ?ue and the ?ues
on the coke side of the battery are arranged in
two unequal groups of cocurrently ‘operable ?ues,
there being one more ?ue in the interior group
12
communicating with the ?ue on the pusher side
having a volumetric capacity approximately 58%
greater than that of the said regenerator of
smallest volumetric capacity, the regenerator
contiguous to the pusher side regenerator having
a volumetric capacity approximately 12% greater
than in the group contiguous to the coke side,
and said unequal groups being connected by a
horizontal ?ue, a crosswise extending row of re
generators of different volumetric capacities con
nected to said ?ues with a regenerator individual
to a?ue, the regenerator of largest volumetric
capacity being disposed on the coke side of the
battery communicating with the ?ue on the coke
side of the battery and the regenerator of next
largest volumetric capacity being disposed on the 15
of the regenerator of smallest volumetric capac
ity, and the remaining regenerators in the row
starting With the regenerator next to that of
smallest volumetric capacity and running from
the pusher to the coke side of the battery up to
the ?ue on the pusher side of the battery, the
and including the regenerator communicating
with the third ?ue from the coke side of the
pusher side of the battery communicating with
than that of the regenerator of smallest volu
metric capacity, the regenerator contiguous to
the coke side regenerator having a volumetric
capacity approximately 47% greater than that
regenerators communicating with the?ues start
battery being of gradually increasing volumetric
ing with the third ?ue from the pusher side of
capacity, the increase in volumetric capacity
the battery and running up to the third ?ue from 20 from one regenerator to the next being from 1%
the coke side of the battery being of gradually in
to 2%.
creasing volumetric capacity, the increase in volu
5. In a coke oven battery, having alternate hor
metric capacity of succeeding regenerators being
izontal tapered coking chambers and heating
from 1% to 2%.
walls, each heating wall consisting of vertical
4. A regenerative by-product coke oven battery 25 twin ?ues, a row of regenerators extending cross
having a tapered coking chamber and a vertically
wise of the battery communicating with said ?ues
?ued heating wall, the ?ues being arranged so
in each heating wall, the regenerators being of
that the ?ues on the pusher side of the battery
different volumetric capacities, the regenerator of
are in two equal groups of cocurrently operable
largest volumetric capacity of each row com
?ues connected by a horizontal ?ue and the ?ues 30 municating with the ?ue on the coke side of the
on the coke side of the battery are arranged in
battery, the regenerator of next largest volumetric
two unequal groups of cocurrently operable ?ues,
capacity of each row communicating with the
there being one more ?ue in the interior group
?ue on the pusher side of the battery, and the
than in the group contiguous to the coke side,
volumetric capacities of the remaining regenera
and said unequal groups being connected by a 35 tors of each row gradually increasing in a di
horizontal ?ue, a row of regenerators of different
rection from the pusher to the coke side of the
volumetric capacities each individual to a ?ue, the r
battery to compensate for the varying amounts
regenerator communicating with the third ?ue
of coal in each unit length of a coking chamber
from the pusher side being the regenerator of
heated by the ?ues communicating with said re
smallest volumetric capacity, the regenerator 40 maining regenerators so that substantially uni
communicating with the ?ue on the coke side
form coking of the coal in said coking chamber
having a volumetric capacity approximately 69%
takes place.
greater’ than that of the said regenerator of
FRANS WETHLY.
smallest volumetric capacity, the regenerator
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