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Патент USA US2408215

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Sept. 24, 1946.
Y
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H. AQ'HUSTED
HIGH TRACTION SOLE_ AND HEEL
Filed A'pril- 28, 1945
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2,408,214
Patented Sept. 2-4, 1946
UNITED
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men vrnaorlon soL-E- ‘AND knits-L.
" “ Harry 341-, 1155M! si-1.c_1a1;..1viah.
Application
_
K28, 1945, Serial No. 599,308
2
.
' precisely similar to .the pyramidsin ‘the?alrea 1,5,
but which are approximately onerhalf the size of
It is an objectof this invention toprovide a
sole and heel each of which has a tread surface
particularly adapting it to use in snow covered
hill country.
the
approximately
pyramids .in1% area
inch wide.
L6- Eachpi the. :FilQ_S$~'|§
The above and other objects willbe made clear
in the following detailed description taken in con- .
As the sole narrows toward the instep, the over
all length of the ribs l8 decreases, and spaced
rearwardly from the last of the ribs there is pro
nection with the annexed drawing, in which:
vided a series of transverse
Figure l is a plan view of the improved sole and
heel;
'
'
r
ribs 22, 24 and 26, ,
which are semi-cylindrical in cross section, and
respectively decrease in diameter toward the in
10
Fig. 2 is a section on the line. 2-2 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.
the requirements
There is a sharp‘distinction in
the requirements '
of a tread-for vehicle tires and in
Generally speaking, a ve- .
of a tread for a shoe.
.hicle tire must be designed with a view to meet;
ing a'wide variety of conditions and to exerting
strong tractive force in a single direction in the
plane of the contact of the tire with the ground.
A shoe "sole representing a relatively small in
vestment may be specialized to meet any par
ticular service. A vehicle‘ tire operates at high
rotary speeds and under severe vibration. It is
not, therefore, necessary to pay‘any particular
attention to the ability ofa vehicle tire to free
step.
.
'
As best seen in Fig. 2, the top side of the sole
is recessed to receive a sheet of cork 30. This
sheet“; of cork is provided for the purposes de
‘ scrib'edin detail in co-pending application, Serial
No. 590,803, ?led of even date herewith.
The heel i2 has at its inner or breast margin
a relatively plain space 32 on which may be mold
indicia, such as a trade-mark, the
' ed any suitable
Adjacent the plain area 32 is a
heel size, etc.
knurled area 34, the surface of which is identical
with that of the toe area Hi. Adjacent the end
of the knurled area 34, and from there to the
itself from clogging the tread with snow or mud. 25
rear of the heel, there are molded a series of ribs
36 which are semi-cylindrical in cross section, and
are separated by grooves 38.
I
'
1
In a shoe sole, the element of centrifugal force
In ordinary walking, the rear end of the heel
is entirely lacking and the element of vibration
strikes the gl‘Oundé’lI'St, subsequently the entire
is practically nil. As a result, it is necessary in
heel is- in contact with the ground before the sole
makes contact with the ground. This is particu
larly true in walking down grade. On a severe up
grade, however, the toe touches the ground ?rst,
designing a shoe tread for use in snow or mud to
arrange the elements of the tread so as to mini
mize clogging of the tread by such snow or mud.
It is also necessary to take into account the
mechanics of human walking. The weight of the
body is never equally distributed over the entire
35
area of the sole in contact with the ground, but
rather concentration of weight shifts from point
and the heel may not be involved at all. Since
normally the heel takes the most severe impact,
it is at the heel where ice or snow has the great
est tendency to form a ball and thus to clog the
tread.
Accordingly, while friction is distinctly
ing a shoe tread, the tread elements must be con
desired, it is necessary to minimize the oppor
tunities for anchorage of snow or ice, and thereby
to minimize the tendency toward balling. It will
height of the pyramids, base'to peak, approxi
to be self clearing, and for this reason an area
mates 3% of an inch. The area i6 terminates in
wardly from the toe in a zig-zag line H.
of minimum anchorage is provided at the toe.
The area occupied by the relatively coarse ribs
to point throughout the sole, depending on the
nature of the terrain being covered. In design
structed and distributed to meet these exigencies. 40 be noted that the surface of the heel l2 responds
to this principle in that no really deep anchorage
In Fig. 1 there is shown a sole iii to which is
is provided. At the extreme toe of the sole, the
attached a heel I2. Adjacentjthe toe is a raised
pressure involved is usually not so great as at the
area [4, the surface of which is diagonally grooved
at [6 to form a plurality of pyramids having 45 heel, but probably less flexure takes place within
the area l4 than at any other part of the sole.
rhomboidal bases. The spacing of these pyramids
Accordingly, there is less tendency for this area
is preferably about {is inch peak to peak, while the
Spaced from the zig-zag line H, but following 50 i8 is the area where maximum flexure occurs, and
is also the area which carries most of the tractive
its pattern, is a zig-zag r'b l8 followed by sim
effect in walking. Accordingly, the ribs l8 are
ilar ribs i8 liberally spaced by substantially the
designed to give a solid bite into snow or mud,
same distance as the ?rst rib i8 is spaced from the
line I1. Each of these ribs I8 is surfaced with a 55 and although this design affords excellent an
plurality of rhomboidal pyramids 20 which are
3
2,408,214
chorage which might result in balling, such an
chorage is provided in what is substantially a
self-clearing area.
The soles and heels are preferably molded of
4
in said sole intermediate said toe area and the
shank comprising zig-zag ribs of substantial width
and substantially spaced, one from the other, said
synthetic rubber, since the intrinsic characteris 5 tread being formed of the material of said sole
and heel.
tics of such rubber may be accurately controlled.
The invention is not, however, limited to any par
ticular formula,‘ nor indeed to synthetic rubber.
Various dimensions have been indicated and as
2. A sole, a heel attached thereto, said sole and
heel being molded of rubber-like material, a tread
on said sole and heel, said tread comprising: an
a practical ‘matter these are preferred. They are 10 area at the toe knurled to provide traction in any
direction in the plane of the sole and to provide
given, however, by way of illustration and not of
minimum anchorage nonnal to said plane; an
limitation.
I claim:
area at the rear of said heel providing traction
in the plane of said heel primarily in the direction
1. A sole, a heel attached thereto, said sole and
heel being molded of rubber-like material, a tread 15‘ of the toe,'the remainder of said heel surface sub
stantially duplicating said toe area; and an rea
on said sole and heel, said tread comprising: an
in said sole intermediate said toe area and the
area at the toe knurled to provide traction in any
shank comprising‘zig-zag ribs of substantial w dth
direction in the plane of the sole and to provide
and substantially spaced, one from the other, aid
minimum anchorage normal to said plane; an
area at the rear of said heel providing traction 20 tread being formed of the material of said sole
and heel, the free surface of said zig-zag ribs being
in the plane of said heel primarily in the direction
knurled to a smaller pattern than said toe area.
of the toe, the remainder of said heel surface sub
stantially duplicating said toe area; and an area
HARRY A. HUSTED. .
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