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Патент USA US2408329

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Sept. 24, 1946.
P. c. McLEMORE
2,408,328
APPARATUS FOR CULTIVATION OF PLANTS
Original Filed Oct. 11, 1939
- 2 Shèets-Sheet l
Offa , %auta
2,408,328
Patented Sept. 24, 1946
UNITED STATESÃPATENT OFFICE ›
2,408328
APPARATUS FOR CULTIVATION OF PLANTS
Price Chrenlelgh McLemore, Montgomery, Ala.
9
Original application October 11, 1939, Serial No. ›
:298,870; Divided and this application Novem
ber 4, 1940, Serial No. 364,140_
?? Claims. (Cl. 126_27?.2)_'
,
tion of plants.
`
'The present application is a division of my'
pending application Serial No. 298,8'70, ?ler Oc
tober 11, 1939, issued as Patent No. 2327204, on
August 17, 1943
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ume, and also, each point in its cross section is
at only a minimum distance from the surface.
_Hence when a.. ?ame is applied to both grass
blades and to a stemmed plant, the grass may be
cooked, scorched and burned before the stemmed
Myinvention relates to apparatus forcultiva
`plant receives substantial injury. ,This results
chie?y from the shape of the subject treated.
Rapidly applied heat, that is, a high temperature
'
While the speci?c illustration and detailed de
scription is directed to the cultivation of cotton
gradient, will also-selectively act as between a
plants, it is to be understood that this is byeway
smaller plant and a larger plant of the same
10
of exempli?cation and not byway of limitation.
species.
The invention is applicable to the cultivation of
This principle of selective _reaction to applied
high temperature ?nds itslmost useful, though
v other crops, such as corn, legumes, potatoes,
tomatoes, sugar cane, and even tocrops such as
beets. My apparatus may be employed with the
by no means only, application to the cultivation
and even to such types as bushesand trees, if
desired, particularly when it concerns the prob
which will hereinafter appear.
cultivation of annual plants or perennial plar'?ts, 15 of row crops such as cotton, and it has particular
value in the case of cotton for reasons some of
lem of suppressing weeds or casual or incidental
plants as against those'intended to constitute- the
, crop or to furnish the crop.
20 within a short time, say a few weeks after?plant
Also, while the apparatus herein disclosed is
›, particularly applicable to the cultivation of row
crops, the invention in its broader aspect is not
limited to row crops, as will be apparent herein?
after.
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Theitype of plant which lends itself most read
ily to this mode of cultivation' is that which
~
The principle upon which the apparatus of my
invention proceeds is the discovery that there is
a marked -di?'erence in the resistivity of plants
ing, grows su?iciently and is of such acharacter
that it will produce or 'develop a stemg system
that is materially larger in body, both as to di-›
ameter and ,as to height, than the obnoxious
vegetation which is to be destroyed vorinhibited.
Advantage may be taken in` the di?erential in
growth: between the stem plant `and the grass or e
other obnoxious vegetation by setting out young
plants instead of growing the plants in place
„to this application of heat, particularly heat at
from seed. For a crop such as cotton, which it
high temperature. It is known that frost-and 30. protected
from freezing will -produce for several
cold affect various plants 'quite differently. r l:
?n\d that there are at least equal differenc'es in
their reaction to 'applied heat, although the
di?erences in reaction are intensi?ed, according
to my invention, inasmuch as the heat is applied
under control as to place or point of application,
as well as in respect to time, Volume and intensity'.
Theplant that will endure cold does not neces
sarily-react in. the same manner to applied high
temperature.
› ~
I have found that by the application of heat
under suitable control, and' as to, time, tempera
ture, Volume, and point or 'region of application,
years on the same root and stem system, the
difierentia? in size may be obtained at an earlier_
date than would be possible from seed grown
plants.- Since, however, most row crops -are
grown in place from seed, thespeci?c description
of v an embodiment of' my invention herein_ set
forth assumes seed planting. Since an initial
rapid growth, or an advanced stage of growth are
40 favorable factors,_I `intend the same to be. in
cluded within the scope of the present invention.
The apparatus of my present invention ?nd par
ticular_ application on any row crop which, by
natural or arti?cial means, may be made to yield
certain of the vari?tiesin: a stand of vegetation
of mixed character may be selectively destroyed. 45 a stem system whichis materially larger, and
hence moresheat resistant, than the accompany
The useful application of the principle involved
in my invention resides not so much 'in the
ing obnoxiousvegetation.
or rapiclly applied heat, particularly' at high tem
peratures, that is, applied at a high tempera
is at present attainable;
The chief object of the present invention' is to
natural resistance to hotter or colder 'climates of
provide apparatus for the cultivation of crops,
diiieret kinds of plants or vegetation, but rather
in the different e?ect? of, or reaction to\ suddenly 50 particularly such as cotton, at a lower cost _than
ture diiierential. ' such a process is' comparable v
.
It .has heretofore been attempted to mech
anize certain steps in the production of cotton
to singeing. The shape- of a blade of grass is ` ?ber; The .original bottleneck in the production
` such that it presents a large area for a given vol 55, Qi cotton was in the separation of the seeds from
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the fiber, which was solved by the cotton gin.
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.
i?cation of the apparatus shown in Fle-ures
The planting of the seeds by machinery is, of
and 2 where the bumers are carrled in advmce
course, a simple matter. Harvesting the cotton,
as by mechanical cotton pickers, is a demon
strated possibility but ,for the present is uneco
nomic for the reason that up to the present time
of the tractor.
invention, the cultivation of cotton 'in conjunc
tion with the apparatus of my present invention
no adequate and universally applicable mechan
will now ?be described.
ical device ,for destroying or inhibiting the
growth of obnoxious vegetation, such as grass
The ?eld to be planted-is plowed, bedded and
'planted as usual, with the exception that, pref
and weeds, has been developed. ,Hence hand cul
erably, care is taken to produce as ?at a seed
bed as possible. V In general, planting should fol
tivation has been unavoidable.
With the re
4
As a specific example and embodiment of my
.
`
quirement for human labor in cultivating the
low immediately after bedding in order to insure
cotton there is little economic advantage in the
use of a mechanical cotton picker when the labor
available for that step must be maintained on
account of the necessity for manual cultivation
a clean seed ?bed.
of the cotton in the earlier stages.
`
As soon as the cotton reaches
a good and full stand it is first plowed and the
dirt thrown back towards the cotton. During
the next several weeks the cotton should be
plowed as often as may be necessary to prevent
Another object of the present invention is to
provide apparatus for cultivating cotton by ma
the growth of obnoxious vegetation, preferably at
and harvesting cotton may be mechanized.
A further object of the invention is to improve
around the cotton by each plowing operation.
least once a week. While not essential, material
chinery so that hand cultivation may be Vdis 20 ly improved results are obtained if as much dirt
as possible, without' covering the plant, is thrown
pensed with and the entire operation of raising
Cultivation is continued in this manner until
the cotton plant has four leaves, or, in other
the crop in quality and yield. By the use of the
present apparatus, less disturbance of the root 25 words, about-four weeks old. At' about this stage
of growth the plants may be chopped into a
system of- the cotton plant is occasioned, and the
crop proceeds more rapidly. Also, less waste of . stand of hills each containing four to six stalks.
Chopping may ?be done in a number of ways, as,
fertilizer is entailed by the use of the present
for example, by plowing across the rows in such
ap'paratus, and I have found that crops such
as cotton which normally require considerable :30 a manner as to cover or turn under all cotton
except' theidesired hills, which preferably should
quantities of chemical fertilizers to insure nor
be spaced about two feet on centers. Chopping
,mal yield and quality, may ?be cultlvated with
a material reduction in the quantity of fertilizer
may also be done, if desired, by hand labor, where
required.
This reduction in quantity of fer
by the unwanted plants are removed by hoeing or
tilizer is accomplished by the more effective re 35 by any mechanical contrivance which will, in e!
moval of the obnoxious vegetation than here
fect, remove'the unwanted plants.` After chop
ping the cotton should, in general, be swept at
tofore was possible. The reduction in the amount
once. For the next two or three weeks sweeping is
of fertilizer used may also in part be due to
continued as often as may be necessary to keep
transformations, either Chemical or physical, in
the fertilizer due to the heat employed, with the 40 all young grass covered, prei'erably at least once
result that the active constituents are rendered
aweek.
better available to the plants throughout their
When about six weeks old the cotton will have
growing period, instead of being lost by solution
grown to a fairly substantial size, each stalk
in rain or other irrigation waters.
being, say about 17/5" in diameter and from 4"
In the preferred form of apparatus of my inven 45 to 6" tall. ,By this time the obnoxious vegeta
ticn will have become very di?icu?t to control
'tion heat is generated in the form of a blast of
by sweeping alone. The apparatus of my inven
?ame which is caused to impinge upon the ground
tion may› now be employed to effect the de
alongside of the plants in the row in such a man
struction of the obnoxious vegetation. As previ
'ner as to destroy the obnoxious vegetation with
out at the same time doing any substantial injury 50 ously noted, the apparatus preferably comprises
bumers for applying the heat in the form of
to the row crop plants.
Now in, order to acquaint those skilled in the
art with the constr-uctlon and operation of spe
ci?c embodiments of my invention I shall de
a. ?ame. The bumers or other means for pro
-Jecting heat are preferably mounted upon a ve
hicle which is adapted to be moved along at a
scribe, in conjunction with the accompanying 55 substantially constant velocity so that the time
of application of the ?ame multiplied bythe
drawings, apparatus embodying specific examples
temperature thereof will be _e?ective to destroy
of my invention.
the obnoxious vegetation, but will not injure the
In the drawings:
‹
Figure 1 is a side elevational view, more or less
crop.
Preferably, the bumers or the Llike are
diagrammatic, of a tractor provided with bumers 80 mounted upon an ordinary farm tractor which
has an automatic speed governor as' is well known
and fuel supply means in accordance with my
in the art, so that the tractor may bepropelled
invention;
at a predetermined constant velocity. Obviously,
Figure 2iis a front elevational view of the same,
the bumers or the like could be mounted upon`
showing the method of treating the obnoxious
a vehicle which is drawn by the tractor, or if
`vegetation and the crop plants;
/
Figure 3 is' a diagram illustrating how/differ
`desired constant speed could be attained?with'
ences in form a?ect the selective ability to with- ~
animals as the motive force.`
'The apparatus ispreferably designed so that
'the ?ame may be directed to e?ect destruction
stand applied high temperatures;
Figure 4 is a similar diagram, showing how
variations in size of cross section a?'ect the re
sistivity to high temperatures;
70 of the obnoxious vegetation of approximately two
to four inches on both sides of the row. With
this type oi' apparatus the obnoxious vegetation
Figure 5 illustrates how the same plant at dif
in the center of the' row may be controlled by
tereni; stages of growth has different resistivity
plowing.
to applied high temperatures; and
Figure 6 is a fragmentary illustration Of a, mod .75 Although it is not essential, I prefer that the
v
cotton be swept after each burning. Burnlng
equipment. and through the conn'ecting arms ?s,
may be repeated as often as is necessary to sup- '
~|9 and connectlng rod 20, the sweeps !3 and the
burners IS may be raised and lowered. suitable
bracing means (not shownimay be employed
for supporting the sweeps and burners. Power
mechanism may be employed, if desired, to raise
press the obnoxious vegetation, preferably once
a week for the next four to six weeks or until
mature plants are obtained.
As the plants grow older, more intense heat
for longer intervals of time may be?applied to
e?ect the destruction of the obnoxious Vegeta
tion, without injury to the cotton plants them
and lower these parts.
”
The arm IS has a horizontal extension 22 at the
rear end and upon this horizontal portion are
selves. In the latter stages of growth, obnoxious 10 mounted, by means or brackets 23, 23 the indi
vidual burners 25, 25. The burners are adjust
vegetation of practically any size may be re
able as to height in the lbrackets 23 as by means
moved by ?aming. `With the young cotton, how
of the set screw adjustment 24. In each of the
ever, care must be exercised to prevent injury to
banks of burners here shown I have indicated
the cotton plant. For this reason it is preferable
that the cotton be swept during the interval 15 four individual burners 25, but obviously the
number may be larger or smaller, as desired. The
prior to the ?rst burning often enough to prevent
burners 25, 25 may generate a free ?ame of from
the growth of obnoxious vegetation until the
2" to 21/2" in diameter ?by 12" to 16" long, and
plants are large enough to withstand ñaming, as
they are spaced from the surface of the ground
previously noted. The ?rst several burnings
should preferably, therefore, be frequent enough 20 a distance of approximately 6", in the speci?c in
stance here illustrated, so that the ?ames from
so as to insure that no obnoxious vegetation
these :burners bathe the ground and the stems
reaches an advanced stage of growth. Tests have
of the cotton plants 21. Preferably, although
shown that grasses and other forms of obnoxious
not necessarily, heat barriers in the form of as
vegetation are burned almost _instantly by the
torch ?ame if the ?ame is applied as soon as the 25 ?'bestos or transite plates 28 are carried on brack
ets 29 from the arm extensions 22, 22 so as to
obnoxious vegetation breaks through the ground.
As previously noted, the burning is continued
interpose their insulating e?ect between the burn
ers and the foliage and tops of the cotton plants
'at intervals until a mature and fruiting plant is
or other crop plants in the row. These shields
obtained. The burning may then be discontinued
and the cotton left until the bolls open. The 30 are not Strictly necessary, but they permit the
burners to be brought more closely together ad
cotton may then be picked, either by hand labor
jacent the foot or stem of the plant without do
or by a mechanical device, as desired;
ing any unnecessary injury to the foliage and
Referring now to Figures 1 and 2, I have shown
tops. Since the ?bodies of the burners 25, 25, par
a tractor of known construction, comprising diri
gible wheels l at the front and driving wheels 2 35 ticularly in the :blow torch type of burner, grow
quite hot these shields, in addition to limiting the
at the rear. The front wheels l are steered by
projection of ?ame, limit or guard the plants
a suitable steering mechanism including the
against contact with the hot burner parts.
steering wheel 3, Operating mechanism in the
A supply tank 3I is carried on brackets 29, 29
front post 4 to steer the tractor as desired. The
front and rear wheels are connected by a suitable 40 upon the vehicle.
chassis frame 5, and upon this frame and partly
in it is mounted a power plant including an in
ternal combustion engine having suitable fue] `
supply means, an exhaust pipe, and suitable con
trols'for governing the starting, stopping, and
speed of the engine. The tractor is provided with
an automatic speed governor for maintaining a
fixed speed as is well known in. the art. A cool
ing system, including the radiato?' 6, is mounted
at the front end of the chassis frame and a
suitable hood 1, which forms a protection for the
engine and houses fuel and water tanks for the
engine, extends rearwardly from the top of the
radiator 6. The tractor is provided with a suit
able seat 8 for the operator, and in convenient
position from the seat are the usual controls for
governing the operation of the tractor. The
In this case the b?'ackets are
mounted upon the top of the tractor hood 1,
although any other suitable, preferably elevated,
position may be employed. The location of the
tank 3| is not of importance except that where
gravity feed is desired the tank should be suit
ably elevated. The tank may be carried upon an
other vehicle or at some other location on the
same vehicle, if desired. The tank 3| is provided
with a ?ller cap 30, which is preferably .capable
of affecting an air seal, and the tank in the pres
ent instance is adapted to be put under air pres
sure :by means of a hand air pump 32, a gauge
33 being provided to indicate the pressure in the
tank. For :burners of the blow torch type here
illustrated, this pressure may be'of the order of
from 10 to 50 lbs. per square inch. ›
As shown in Figure 2, four banks of burners
!6, for servicing two rows of plants simultane
rear wheels 2 are spaced to go outside of two
ously, are provided. From the tank 3! a supply
rows and the front wheels I are located so as to
travel between the same two rows, as is clear GU line 34, provided with a suitable shut-off valve
from Figure 2. This type of tractor,` commonly
employed for agricultural purposes, is equipped
with a cross-bar 9 at the front. The cross bar 9
is secured to the frame of the tractor as by means
of brackets |0-|0. This type of tractor is fre
quently supplied with' sweeps either extending
35, extends to a cross pipe 36, each end of which
is extendecl downwardly as at 31 to connect with
a manifold 38 at each side of the tractor. The
manifold 38 is provided with T connections
39, 39 leading o?' through suitable ?exible con
nections 40, 40 to the individual burners 25. The
?exible connections may be of a rubber-like ma- V
in front of the cross bar 9 or to the rear of the
terial immune to the action of oil, such as neo
same. Likewise, at the rear of the tractor a simi
prene or Thiokol, or alternatively it may be a
lar cross bar |2 mounts the rea-r sweeps 13 upon
a suitable mounting arm 14. A similar arm !5 70 flexible metal turbing, or ?exible metal hose, or
armored hose, or any other suitable ?exible pres
connected to the cross bar 9 at the front may
sure and oil-resisting connection. Each ?exible
normally support sweeps such as those at !3 but,
in the present Construction, there is held mount
ed upon the lower part of the arm [5 a bank of
oil burners IS.. By- means of a lever l'? or like
hose 40 connects to its individual burner 25
through a regulating valve 42. A removable
screen is mounted at 43 in the line between the
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8
fuel supply tank and the burner tip so as to screen
or strain out any scale or other solid impurities
which might plug up the :burner ori?ces.
I have shown the vaporizing type of burner,
such as the common blow torch embodies. The
that the ratio of area to Volume of the blades of
grass as compared with the stem of the cotton
v
' plant is immensely greater.
Likewise, the dis
tance of any living cell in the grass blade from the
surface is very much less than the distance of a
burners are initially heated up and upon becom
ing heated they serve to vaporize the fuel which
cell in the central part of the stem 46 from the
surface. So that, even if the stem 46 should be
is fed to them under pressure and project a hot,_
singed upon the surface, the living cells in the
colorless and smokeless flame, as is well known
central part of the stem would receive no injury,
to those skilled in the art. The ;bank of burners 10 whereas the entire blade of grass would be de
stroyed.
IS, instead of being carried rearwardly on the
arm l5 may ibe carried on an arm 44 projecting
Even in the case of stemmed vegetation of
forwardly of the ;cross bar 9, as shown in Fig
smaller diameter than that of the crop plant 46
ure 6, the bank of burners; in that case, being
as shown in Figure 4, it will at once be appre
mounted upon a horizontal portion 45 of the 15 ciated that the smaller stems 48, 48 would be de
arm 44 so as to be carried in front of the vehicle
stroyed before the stem 46 would receive sub
instead 'of ?behind the_ front wheels I.
stantial injury if the two were subjected to a
The particular form of burner is optional With
high temperature ?ame for a short period of
in my invention. That is to say, while I have
time.
shown the vaporizing type of burner (and this 20
is the preferred type), I intend to include with
in the invention any alternative form of burner
or heat projecting means for accomplishing the
The principle of selectively causing inJury by
the application of heat is applicable to plants of
the samekind of di?erent size, as may ?be seen
in Figure 5. Assume that the older plant 50
same purpose in substantially the same mannner.
and the younger plant 49 are subjected to the
For example, an atomizing type of burner de 25 same projected heat, it will be obvious that the
pending upon the dellvery of oil through an ori
younger plant 49 will perish before the older
?ce at very high pressure may be u-tilized. In that
plant 50 is seriously aifected. Quite obviously, as
case, a suitable power pump and storage tank
_ between vegetation of a lighter structure, such as
may ;be employed. The pump in that case may
blades of grass, and that of a heavier structure,
be driven from the tractor engine or any other 80 such as stemmed plants, there is a wide margin
suitable source of power, and one or more or all
which my invention may be employed to take
advantage of.
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of the burners may be supplied with pressure
from the same source.
An air atomizing or steam atomizing burner`
of the cannon type may also be employed, if de
sired. In that event, means for generating a suit
able atomizing ?uid pressure,'as, for example, an
air compressor and tank, or a steam ?boiler, for
generating the atomizing pressure, may be carried
by the tractor or on a vehicle Operating in con
I prefer a higher temperature differential, such
as is Secured either by a ?ame, since the heat
transfer not only is more rapid but is instantly
discontinued as the nozzle or burner passes.
While I have indicated certain ways in which
my invention may be embodied and practiced,
it is to be understood that the above speci?c
40 illustrations are but exemplifications of the basic
junction therewith.
concept, and that I do not intend to be limited by
The vaporizing or blow torch type of burner
the speci?c illustrations except as the following
is` generally preferable for the reason that an un
claims are speci?cally directed to the same.
con?ned ?ame generated by this form of burner
In the more or less schematic showing of Fig
is shorter, that is, burns in shorter length and in 45 ures 1 and 2, four burners on each side of each
less space than an atomizing type of burner,
row are shown. Obviously the number of ?burn
although I do not mean by this to exclude others
ers may vary with local conditions and different
by the above indicated preference.
crops. However, the burners shown, when at
The operation of the device shown in Figures' 1
tached to a tractor running four miles per hour
and 2 is as followsz- The operator of the tractor
and generating ?ames from 2" to 21/2" in diam
having put the burner banks IS into operation,
eter by 12" to 16" long if directed into free space,
drives the tractor along the two rows as indi
are on the average satisfactory for the cultivation
cated in Figure 2 at a speed`which is adjusted
of cotton as previously outlined. 'For other row
to the ?ame and to the selective action upon the
crops, or other local or unusual conditions, either
r crop plants and obnoxious vegetation as deter
mined by the size of the plants 21, the density of
the obnoxious vegetation, and similar factors.
Usually the tractor is driven at a rate of about
55 fewer or more burners may be used as required,
and it is to be understood that the size of plants
determines to a large extent the intensity and
I amount of heat which they will withstand with
four miles per hour, at a substantially uniform
out injury, and the operator is .expected to vary
speed throughout the length of the row. When 60 the procedure accordingly.
'
the ?ame is developed in good Volume and directed
One great advantage of the present system of
upon the ground at the base of the crop plants
cultivation is that it is substantially independent
21, it cooks, sears and singes the grass and other
of the soil conditions. That is to say, even
obnoxious vegetation without doing substantial
though the ground might be too wet for cultiva
injury to the crop plants, such as the cotton
tion by plowing or sweeping, the apparatus of my
plants 21 illustrated in Figure 2. One reason
invention may be employed if the ground is ?rm
why a stemmed plant is less subject to injury
enough to support the tractor, or any other con
than grass or other obnoxious vegetation of that
veyance suitable for the application of heat in
type is illustrated in Figure 3.
v
accordance with my invention
In Figure 3 I have shown a cross section, and
The sweeps shown in Figure 1 at the rear of
diagram?natically, the stem 46 of a stemmed
the tractor are preferably employed immediately
plant. This is, .of course, on an enlarged scale.
after flaming, but it is to be understood that this
At 41 I have shown in cross section, and diagram
is optional and 'they may be dispensed with.
matically, leaves of grass constituting the ob
The operation of ?aming, according to my in
noxious vegetation. Now it will at once Ibe seen 75 vention, appears to have a greater retarding ef
25408328 r
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9.
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mere-cutting'o? of as_ much as is' destroyed by
the ?aming. In other words, ?aming_ appears to
give a greater setback to plant growth than does i
equivalent injury by mechanical means., _
.
10
.
,
pair of burners carried by said mounting means
upon opposite sides of an intermediate vertical
plane which extends longitudinally of the vehicle
and which intermediate vertical plane is adapted
to coincide substantially with the crop row in the
operation of the vehicle, each of said' burners
feet upon the growth of noxious plants than the
I claim:
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e
_
being directed diagonally down toward the sur
1. A ?ame cultivator comprising a vehicle hav
face .of the supporting ground short of 'the line
of intersection of the" plane and the ground.
vehicle on the ground, aupair of burners 'con
nected to the vehicle ,for travel therewith, and 10 said burners comprising means for projecting a
Volume of' ?ame which spreads along the ground
fuel supply means carried by said vehicle for sup- ›
and ?oods across the intersection of the plane and
plying said burners, said burners being disposed
ing ground engaging wheels for supportingthe
'the ground for impinging directly against the
upon opposite sides of a vertical plane which ex- _
tends longitudinally of thevehicle and parallel
weeds and the plants in the piant row, lifting
burner being dir'ected diagonally downwardly in
means substantially vertically around said trans
verse pivot axis to raise and lower said burners,
to the line of forward travel of the vehicle, each ` 15 mechanism operative to Swing said“ mounting
a direction substantially crosswise of said vehicle
for causing its ?ame ”to strike the surface of the
ground supporting the `vehicle at a point short of
a fuel tank on said vehicle, and supply connec
tions for conducting the fuel from\ said tank to
the line of interséction 'of the said plane and the, 20 said burners, said supply connections comprising
sections of fiexible hose to accommodate the
ground, said burners and fuel supply means co- I
Operating to cause each burner to project a rela
tively long` otherwise uncon?ned ?ame which is
aforesaid vertical movement of said burners. g '
'5. A row crop cultivator forbathing the bases
of the crop plants and weeds in a row with ?ame,
spread by impingement' _against the ground to
form a laterally widened sheet of ?ame of shallow .25 comprisingthe combination with a vehicle having
ground engaging wheels for supporting the vehicle,
_said vehicle being adapted to travel along the
depth which flows along the ground and ?oods
across the line of intersection of 'the said plane
and the ground_
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crop row to be treated, offa blast burner con
i
2. The cultivator of claim 1 wherein the vehicle
is self-propelled and has a speed control governor
whereby the time of application of the ?ame to an
object exposed to the ?ame is de?nitely deter V _
nected to the vehicle for travel therewith, fuel
supply means carried by said vehicle for supply
ing said burner,said burner being disposed' to
mined.
tudinally of the vehicle and paralle? to the line of
_forward travel of the vehicle, said burner being
directed diagonally downwardly in a direction
`
3. A row crop cultivator for bathing the bases
one side of a vertical plane which extends longi
of the crop plants and the weeds in and along the
,sides of a row with ?ame, comprising the 'com
substantially at right angles to said vertical longi
bination with a 'vehicle 'having ground engaging
tudinal plane for causing its ?ame to strikethe
wheels for supporting the vehicle and adapted to'
ground at a point short of the line of intersection
travel along the row to be treated, of a burner
tof thesaid plane and the ground and in a direc
system carried by said vehicle comprising a liq 40 tion substantially 'at right angles to said plane,
uid fuel tank, and a pair of high pressure liquid - and a. shield connected to said vehicle and
fuel burners fed therefrom and mounted on said
_adapted td travel between the burner and the
vehicle upon opposite sides of an'intermediate
crop row in the operation of the vehicle, said
vertical plane which extends longitudinallyof the
shield having its lower edge spaced 'from the
vehicle in'the direction of itsintended line of 45 ground, said burner being of a'high capacity blast
travel, and which, plane is adapted to coinclde
type projecting a relatively long uncon?ned ?ame
substantially with the crop row in the use of said
vehicle, each of said burners being directed di
which passes under the lower edge of 'said shield
and ?oods into and through the plant row, where
_agonally down toward the surface of 'the sup- '
by as the vehicle moves along the row 'the bases
porting ground short of _the line of intersection of 50' of the crop plants and the weeds in said row are
the plane and the ground, _and having means for
bathed in ?ame.
?
,
_
projecting a relatively long uncon?ned blast of
6. In a ?ame cultivator adapted to cultivate
high intensity ?ame against and along the sur'
row crops by the ?ame method, 'the combination
face of 'theground in a direction substantially
a vehicle having ground .engaging wheels for
transverse to the line of travel, said burner sys 55 ofv
supporting the vehicle, a pair of burners con
tem and. burners being of the high pressure _type
nected to saidvehicle for travel therewith,` and
Operating at pressures up to approximately 50 lbs.
'fuel supply means carried by said vehicle for sup
per square inch for causing each of said burners
plying said burners, said burners being disposed
to project a voluminous blast of ,free ?ame of ap
upon opposite sides of 'a vertical plane which ex
proximately'lmto 16 in'chesin' length,` and the
discharge ends of said burners adapted tof-be
60
tends longitudinally of the vehicle and parallel ~
to the line of forward travel of the vehicle, each
spaced from the ground a distance of approxi
mately 6 inches so that the ?ames fromI-said
burners bathe the ground' along and on each side
burner being directed diagonally downwardly in
a direction substantially crosswise of, said vehicle
and toward said plane for causing its ?ame to
of said line of _intersectionin a voluminous high 65 strike
the surface of the ground at a?point short'
intensity ?ame./
i
`
' of the line of intersection of the said plane and
4. In a ?ame cultivator adapted to cultivate
the ground, whereby the ground serves as ade
row crops bythe ?ame method, the combination
flecting means for causing each ?ame to'spread
of a vehicle having 'ground engagíng wheels for›
'
supporting
the
vehicle, . vertically
swinging
mounting means pivotally connected to said ve
hicle „on a substantially ,horizontal transverse
pivot 'axis and 'extending rearwardly from said
` axis 'whereby the rear portion of said mount
pivot
70 out and to ?ood across the line of intersection of
the said plane and the ground in_ the form of a
thin sheet of ?ame ?owing along the ground, so
/
that_ the impingement of the ?ames against the
plants in the' crop rows is con?ned substantially
ing means 'can swing substantially vertically, a 75 _entirely to the base portions of the plants and'
, frago/3,398'
i 11'
12
,
destructive inJu?-yto the upper portions of the
› by said mounting .means `for supplying said' _
burners; said burners being disposed upon opposite .
r
v
sides of a vertical' plane which extends with re
7. A row crop cultivator for bathing the bases
spect to 'said mounting means parallel to the in
of the crop plants and the weeds in and along the
sides of a row with ?ame, comprising' the com- _5 tended line of forward travel thereof, each burner
being directed diagonally downwardly in a direc
bination, of mounting means for mounting on a
vehicle, said vehicle having ground engaging „ tion substantially crosswise of said vertical plane
for causing its ?ame to strike the surface of the
wheels for supporting the same andwhich'is
.ground at a point short of the line of inter-sec
adapted to travel along the row to be tr?ated, a
plants is avoided.
burner system carried` by said mounting means 10 tion of the said plane and the'ground, said burners
'and fuel supply means cooperating to cause each
comprising a liquid fuel tank, and a pair of high'
/ burner to project a relatively long otherwise unpressure liquid fuel burners fed therefrom and
con?ned ?ame which is spread by' impingement
mounted on saidmo?mting means upon! opposite
sides of an intermediate vertical plane which ex
_
. against the ground to form a laterally widened
tends with respect to said mounting means in the 15 sheet of ?ame of shallow depth which -?ows along
the ground and ?oods_ across the line of inter
direction of its intended line of travel; and which
section of the said plane and 'the ground.
plane'is adapted to coincide substantially with
10.; A row crop cultivator for bathing the bases
the crop row in the use „of said mounting means, I i
of the crop plants and weeds 'in a row with ?ame,
each of' said burners being directed diagonally
, down toward the surface of the. ground'short of 20 comprising-the combination, of mounting means
for mounting on a vehicle,-said vehicle 'having
`the line of intersection of the plane and the
ground, and having means for projecting _a rela- .` ground engaging› wheels for supporting the ve
hicle, said vehicle being adapted to travel along
tively long uncon?ned blast of high -intensity
?ame against and along the surface of the ground
the crop row to be treated, a blast 'burner con
in a direction substantially transverse to the line 25 nected to said mounting means for travel there
with, fuel supply means carried by said mount
ing means for' supplying said burner, said burner
of travel, said burner system and`burners being
of the high pressure type Operating at_ pressures
being disposed to. one side of a vertical plane
up. to approximately 50 lbs. per square inch for'
which extends 'with 'respect to said mounting
causing each of said burners to project a volumi
nous blast of free ?ame of appro'ximately 12 to 16„ 30 means parallel to the intended line of forward
inches in length, and the discharge ends of said , travel thereof, said burner being directed diago
nally downwardly in a direction substantially at
bume?'s'adapted to be spaced from the ground?a
distance of approximately 6 inches so that the _ right angles to said vertical longitudinal plane
for causing its ?ame to strike the ground at a
?ames from said burners bathe the ground along
and on each side of said line of intersection/in a '35 point short of the line of intersection of the said
voluminous high intensity ?ame.
plane and the ground and in a direction substan
ing means pivotally connected to said 'support t
means on a substantially horizontal transverse
type projecting a relatively long uncon?nedl?ame
tially at right angles to said plane,_ and a shield
8. In a ?ame cultivator adapted to cultivate
connected to said mounting means and adapted
row crops by the ?ame method, the combination,
to travel between _the 'burner and the crop row
of support means 'for mounting on a vehicle, said
vehicle having ground engaging wheels for sup- 40 in the operation of the vehicle, said shield being
adapted to -have its lower edge spaced from the
porting the vehicle, vertically swinging mount- `
ground, said burner being of a high .capacity blast
which passes under the lower edge of said shield
pivot axis and extending rearwardly from said
pivot axis whereby the rear portion of said mount- 45 and floods into and through the plant row; where
by asthe burner is moved along the row the bases
ing means. can swing substantially vertically, a
of the cropplants and the weeds in said row _
pair of burners carried by said mounting means
are bathedin ?ame.
upon opposite sides of an intermediate vertical
` 11. In a ?ame `cultlvator adapted to cultivate
plane which extends transversely of said pivot
axis and which intermediate vertical plane is “row crops bythe ?ame method, the combination,
of mounting means for mounting on a vehicle,
adapted to coincide substantially with the crop
sald vehicle having ground engaging wheels for
row in; the intended› movement of 'said support
supporting the vehicle, a pair of burners connected'
means, each ofsaid burners being directed'di
to said mounting means for travel therewith. and
agonally down toward the surface of the ground
short of the line of intersection of the plane and .55 fuel supply means carried by said .mounting means
for supplying said burners, said burners being dis
the ground, said burners ccmprising means for
posed, upon opposite 'sides of a vertical plane
projecting a Volume of ?ame whiclrspreads along
which extends with respect to- said mounting
. the ground and ?oods across the intersection of
*means parallel to the intended line of forward
` the plane and?the ground for impinging directly
against the weeds and the plants in the plant row, 60 travel -thereof, each burner being' directed diago
nally downwardly in' a direction substantially
lifting mechanism operative to swing said mount
crosswise of said vertical plane and toward said
ing means substantially ?ertically around said
plane for causing its ?ame to strike the surface
transverse pivot axis to . iee and lower said›
of the ground at a point short of the line of in
burners, a fuel tank adapted to be mounted on p
said support means, and 'supply connections for 65 tersection of the, said plane and the ground.
whereby the ground serves as a de?ecting means
conducting the fuel from said tank to said
burners, said supply connections comprising sec- _ for causing each flame to _spread out and to ?ood
across the line of intersection of- the said plane
tions of ?exible hose to accommodate the afore- _
I said vertical movement of said burners.
and the _ground in the form of a thin sheet of
9. A ?ame cultivator comprising the combina- 70 ?ame. ?owing along the ground, so that the im
pingement, of the ?ames against the plants in the -
tion. of mounting means for mounting on a ve
hicle, said vehicle having ground engaging wheels
' crop rows is conflned substantially entirely to the
for supporting the vehicle on the ground. a pair
of burners connected to said mounting means for .
travel therewith, and fuel supplyxmeanslcarried 75'
base portions of the plants and destructive injury ›
to the upper portions of the plants is avoided.
PRICE CHRENLEIGH MCLEMORE.
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