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‘Oct; 1, 1946.
J.
MOORHEAD
2,408,673 _
GAS BURNER SYSTEM 7
Filed Sept. 29, 1944
2 Sheets-Sheet l‘
FIG}.
57
63
23’
/ F'IG.3.
Oct. 1, 1946.
J. o. NIIOORH.EAD
_
2,408,673
G_AS BURNER SYSTEM
Filed Sept. 29, 1944
'
.2 Sheets-Sheet 2
2,408,673
Patented Oct. 1, 1946
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
GAS BURNER SYSTEM
John 0. Moorhead, Attleboro, Mass, assignor to
Metals and Controls Corporation, Attleboro,
Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts
Application September 29, 1944, Serial No. 556,348’
9 Claims. (01. 158—11'7.1)
2
1
This invention relates to a gas burner system Q
and more particularly to a pilot ignition system
for a gas burner.
Among the objects of this invention are the
provision of a gas burner system which operates
more e?iciently; the provision of a system in
which the pilot is ef?ciently electrically ignited;
greater moves diaphragm l3 to admit gas to pipe
5. A shaft 2| is mounted on the diaphragm l3
and projects through an opening 23 in the case.
The outer end of shaft 2| abuts contact arm 25.
Arm 25 is pivotally mounted at 21 and carries
on its opposite end contact 29. Contact 29 co
operates with ?xed contact 3i mounted on the
exterior of valve 1. .
the provision of a gas burner electrically ignited
A gas valve 33 is connected to bleed H at one
in which the resistance wire is protected from
the pilot ?ame and main burner ?ame; and the 10 side and at the other side to line 35. Line 35 is
provision of a gas burner system of the type de
' scribed in which a pilot is electrically ignited
also connected to a gas pilot 31. Valve 33 is
shown .in detailin Fig. -3. It is controlled by a
snap-acting thermostatic disc 39, such as shown
in Spencer Patent 1,448,240 which, when it snaps
The invention accordingly comprises the ele— 15 to its opposite position of concavity shown in
dotted lines in Fig. 3, moves valve member Ill
ments and combinations of elements, features of
from its solid line position to its dotted line posi
construction, andv arrangements of parts which
tion away from seat 43. Shaft 45 which carries
will be exempli?ed in the structures hereinafter
valve M is abutted at its opposite end by spring
described, and the scope of the application of
41 which normally keeps the valve seated on 43.
which will be indicated in the following claims.
Spring 41 is designed so that it is overcome by
In the accompanying drawings, in which are
disc 39 when the latter snaps to its dotted line
illustrated several of_ various possible embodi
position. Disc 39 is loosely mounted at its edges
merits of the invention:
in the case 49 of valve 33 leaving thecenter free
Fig. 1‘ is a diagram of the system partially in
after a time delay. Other objects will be in part
apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.
section;
25 to move from one position of concavity to an op
.
Fig, 2 is a section on an enlarged scale taken
on the line 2-2 in Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a section through a gas valve shown in
Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a diagram of an alternative form of _
the invention; and
-
Similar reference characters designate corre
‘
Disc 39 is designed so that it is normally con
cave upwardly (in its solid'line position) when
cool. A'heater 5| is located close to disc 39 to
transmit heat thereto. Heater 5| is connected
to terminals 53 and 55.
V
Fig. 5 is a-section of the pilot operated control
valve in Fig.4.
positely concave position.
.
,
Pilot 31 includes a tubev 51 made of an electrical
insulating material, such as soap-stone, which
contains a spiral groove 59.
A heater BI is lo
sponding parts throughout the several views of 35 cated in this spiral groove and is connected to
terminals 63 and 65. A metal tube 51 is located
the drawings.
within the soap-stone tube. Ports are bored in
Referring now to Fig. 1, a main burner l is
this metal tube to allow the gas to seep around
connected by pipes 3 and 5 to a diaphragm-con
the heater 6|. Located below the tube 61 is a
trolled regulator valve 1. Diaphragm valve 1
is in turn connected to a gas supply pipe -9 and 40 thermostatic disc 69 similar to disc 39. Disc 68
is mounted in a chamber 1| which is attached
has a bleed line H connected to the opposite
to tube 61. Chamber 1| loosely holds the edges
.
of. disc 69 leaving the central portion free to snap
The diaphragm valve 1 is of the usual type
from
one position of concavity to an oppositely
and includes a diaphragm l3 which separates 45
concave position.
~
.
compartments l5 and I1. The compartments are
Mounted on the center. of disc 69 is a shaft 13
connected by a by-pass IS. The flow of gas to
which carries a shut-off valve 15. Valve 15 seats
side of the diaphragm.
pipe 5 is controlled by the bleed H in known
manner. Thus, when bleed II is closed the pres
on connecting member 11 attached to chamber
1! and tube 35. Disc 59 is located so that when
sure on both sides of diaphragm I3 is, the same 50 it ,is in its Fig. 2 position it seats valve 15 against
'since by-pa'ss I9 connects compartments [5 and
'member 11, but when it snaps to its opposite. p0.
[1. Opening bleed l I lowers the pressure in com
partment l1 since gas is withdrawn therefrom
‘siticn, of concavity disc_69 moves valve_15 away
from its seat. An opening 19is formed ,inydisc
,69 to permit gas ?ow into the tube 61. _ _ g
faster than it can be replaced through by-pass
IS. The pressure in compartment l5 now being 55 Electrical lc'onnectionsyare made froma main
2,408,673
3
electrical circuit BI, 83 to terminal 21, ?xed con
tact 3|, and terminals 53, 55, G3 and 65 as shown
in Fig. 1. A suitable room thermostat 85 and a
time switch 81, diagrammatically illustrated in
Fig. 1, and constituting demand means, are de
sirably included.
The operation of the device is as follows: As
suming that thermostatic switch 85 and time
switch 81 are closed, a circuit is made to termi
4
gas ?ow cools the wire and makes it more diiicult
to ignite the gas. After ignition of pilot 31 the
wire is out of the gas ?ame and is therefore not
subjected to the destructive action of the high
temperature of the gas ?ame. Heater 5| can
therefore be a Nichrome wire rather than plati~
num wire previously employed in electrically ig
nited gas pilots.
Gas valve 33 has been described as a disc and
nals 21, contacts 29 and 3|, terminals 53 and 55,
heater gas valve, but in ‘lieu thereof a gas sole
and terminals 53 and 55. No gas is admitted to
noid valve may be substituted. The disc and
pipes 3 and 5 through the diaphragm valve since
heater valve is preferred since the time delay
the bleed II is closed. As soon as the current be
thereby obtained avoids danger of gas ?ashing
tween terminals 53 and 55 has, by means of heat
back if the valve is accidentally stuck. It will be
er 5|, heated disc 39 su?iciently so that the disc 15 noted that the present control system cuts oil
snaps to its dotted line position in Fig. 3, valve
current to the heater 6| as soon as the pilot 31
4| opens against the bias of spring 41 and gas
lights. This adds to the life of heater wire 6|.
is admitted from pipe I I to pipe 35.
An alternative form of the invention is shown
At the same time disc 59 has been heated by
in Figs. 4 and 5. This embodiment is similar to
heater BI and disc 69 likewise snaps thereby 20 the Figs. 1-—3 embodiment but a gas line 89 is
opening valve 15. Gas is thereby admitted by
taken from the main gas supply pipe 9 ahead of
bleed II and pipe 35 to pilot 31. Here the gas
regulator valve 1. Line 89 directly connects gas
di?uses around heater BI through the ports in
valve 33 to the gas supply and a pilot line 9| is
tube 61 and is thereby ignited. As soon as such
taken off the opposite side of valve 33 to feed a
ignition takes place the ?ame is drawn by its own
pilot 93 of the usual type. A bleed 95 is taken
suction out of contact with heater BI and the pilot
from diaphragm valve 1 and is connected to a
is ignited. Admitting gas to bleed I I, tube 35 and
valve 91.
pilot 31 opens the diaphragm valve 1 and passes
Valve 91 is a thermostatically operated gas
gas to main burner I as described above. This is
control valve including a shut-oil valve member
ignited by pilot 31.
99 (see Fig. 5) which seats against the tube con
When the diaphragm I3 of valve 1 moves in
nection IOI. Valve 99 is carried by shaft I03,
response to gas passing to bleed II and pilot 31,
the other end of which is mounted on the center
the circuit between terminal 21 and terminal 3|
of a snap-acting thermostatic disc I05. Disc I05
is broken by the movement of arm 25 which sep
is similar in its operation to discs 39 and 89. Disc
arates contacts 29 and 3|. These contacts re
I05 is shown in its hot position in Fig. 5; it will
main separated as long as gas passes to pilot 31
be noted that valve 99 has been moved away
and therefore to burner I. The separation of
from its seat. Disc I05 is mounted in a cham
contacts 29 and 3I breaks the circuit to terminals
ber I01. A thermal conducting ?nger I09 is at—
63 and 65 so that no more current passes to heat
tached to this chamber and projects outwardly
er BI. Disc 69, however, is maintained in its hot 40 and into heat conducting relationship with the
position by conduction of heat from the pilot
pilot 93, and may contact it (as shown) or finger
?ame by means of tube 61. Terminals 53 and 55
I09 may extend into the pilot ?ame. Tube IOI
remain in the circuit so that heater 5| keeps disc
carries a burner port III the end of which is lo
39 in its dotted line position (Fig. 3). The time
cated adjacent to pilot 93. A heater Wire H3 is
delays should be matched to give best perform
close to ?ash tube II5, attached to the end of
ance.
pilot 93.
Assume now that either thermostatic switch
85 or time switch 81 opens. This breaks the cir
cuit and no further current passes to terminals
53 and 55, Disc 39 thereupon cools, snaps to its
The operation of the Figs. 4-5 device is as fol
lows: Assuming that switches 85 and 81 close, a
circuit is made through heater H3, contact 3|.
contact 29 and terminal 21, and likewise between
solid line position (Fig. 3) allowing spring 41 to
terminals 53 and 55. Heaters H3 and 5| there
close valve 4|. This prevents the passage of gas
upon begin to heat and shortly disc 39 will snap,
to pilot 31 and the diaphragm valve thereupon
opening valve 4|. This permits gas to flow to
cuts off the flow of gas to burner I. Thermal disc
pilot 93. Heater II3 thereupon ignites pilot 93
69 in pilot 31 cools and closes valve 15. This 55 through the diffusion of gas through ?ash tube
takes place after diaphragm valve I has closed.
H5. The heat from pilot 93 is transmitted by
Closing of the diaphragm valve automatically
tube 9| to ?nger I09 and causes disc I05 to snap
moves arm 25 to bring contacts 29 and 3| to
to its Fig. 5 position. This permits gas to pass
gether again and the device is ready to repeat the
from bleed 95. This gas is ignited by pilot 93.
operation described.
Opening of bleed 95 operates the diaphragm
60
During the operation of burner I it will be
valve 1 to admit gas to burner l which is ignited
noted that the pilot 31 is constantly burning to
by pilot 93. Operation of diaphragm valve 1
relight the burner I if for any cause it goes out.
breaks the circuit to heater II 3 by separating
If pilot 31 should go out disc 69 will thereupon
contacts 29 and 3|. Terminals 53 and 55, how
cool, snap to the position shown in Fig. 2 and 65 ever, remain in the circuit and current passes
thereby close the bleed circuit to pilot 31. This
through heater 5| until either switch 85 or 81
will cause the diaphragm valve 1 to close cutting
opens.
oil‘ gas to burner I. If switches 85 and 81 are
If pilot 93 is accidentally extinguished, it will
closed at this time the device will re-cycle, ?rst
be reignited by burner III or the ?ow of heat
lighting pilot 31 and thereby lighting burner I. 70 to disc I05 through ?nger I09 will stop and disc
Until this occurs, however, the escape of gas is
I05 will snap from its Fig. 5 position and close
prevented since the gas supply to burner I is shut
valve 99. This shuts off the bleed from dia
off until pilot 31 lights.
phragm valve 1 thereby shutting oil‘ the ?ow of
It will be noted that heater wire 6| is out of
gas to burner I. The device thereupon recycles,
the gas current. This is advantageous since the
lighting pilot 93 as described above.
2,408,873
.5
If switch 85 or ‘switch 81 opens this cutsi oi
the flow of current to heater 5|, disc 39 cools and
ignition’ means operatively associated wlth'the
snapsto its opposite position permitting spring
pilot burner means, an electric heater controlling
the thermostatically controlled gas valve, circuit
41 to close valve 4|. This cuts off pilot 93, disc
I05 cools as described above, valve 99 closes,
cutting off bleed 95 and this closes diaphragm
valve 1 shutting oi the gas to burner l. The
device is thereupon ready to recycle when switches
to diaphragm movement of said diaphragm valve
adapted to open the circuit only to the pilot heater
ignition means independently of the other heater
means including demand means arranged to con
trol both of said heaters, and a switch responsive
means.
,
85 and 81 are closed.
3. A gas burner pilot system comprising a
It will be noted that in both embodiments of 10
main burner and a pilot lburner' means, a dia
the invention, the breaking of the electrical cir
cuit closes o? both the pilot and the main burner,
thus preventing the escape of gas.
This is a
' desirable safety feature.
phragm-controlled regulator valve controlling a
supply of gas to the main burner, the gas being
fed to one side“ of the diaphragm of said valve,
It will be clear that the gas burner system 15 the pilot burner means including a connection to
the opposite side of the diaphragm of said valve,
disclosed may be varied in other ways in which
a connecting passage between the opposite sides
the heater wire which ignites the pilot, is physi
of the diaphragm, a thermostatically controlled
cally out of the pilot ?ame but is adjacent thereto
gas valve controlling at least part of the gas sup
so that gas admitted to the pilot will be ignited
by the electrical heater but the ?ame will ?ash 20 ply to the pilot burner means, a thermostatically
controlled shut-o? valve controlling at least some
out of contact with the heater upon ignition.
?ow of gas supply from the diaphragm valve to
In addition it will be noted that in the above
the pilot burner means, pilot heater ignition
embodiments the heater which ignites the pilot
means operatively associated with the pilot burn
is turned off after it has accomplished its func
er means but outside of the pilot ‘?ame, an elec
tion. This conserves both electrical current and
tric heater controlling the thermostatically con
the heater wire itself. Also the pilot is turned
trolled gas valve, circuit means including demand
off when the main burner is not operating,
means arranged to control both of said heaters,
thereby saving gas.
means for transmitting heat from the pilot burn
In view of the above, it will be seen that the
several objects of the invention are achieved and 30 er means to said shut-off valve, and a switch re
sponsive to diaphragm movement of said dia
other advantageous results attained.
phragm valve adapted to open the circuit only
As many changes could be made in the above
to the pilot heater ignition means independent
constructions without departing from the scope
ly of the other heater means.
of the invention, it is intended that all matter
4. A gas burner pilot system comprising a main
contained in the above description or shown in 35
burner and a pilot burner means, a diaphragm
the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted
controlled regulator valve controlling a supply
as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.
of gas to the main burner, the gas being fed to one
I claim:
side of the diaphragm~ of said valve, the pilot
1. A gas burner pilot system comprising a main
burner means including a connection to the op
burner and a pilot burner means, a diaphragm
posite side of the diaphragm of said valve, a con
controlled regulator valve controlling a supply of
necting passage between the opposite sides of the
gas to the main burner, the gas being fed to one
side of the diaphragm of said valve, the pilot
burner means including a connection to the oppo- \.
site side of the diaphragm of said valve, a con- ‘
necting passage between the opposite sides of the
diaphragm,v a thermostatically controlled gas
valve controlling at least part of the gas supply
diaphragm, a thermostatically controlled gas
valve controlling at least part of the gas supply
to the pilot burner means, a thermostatically con
trolled shut-o?f valve controlling at least some
flow of gas supply from the diaphragm valve to
the pilot burner means,‘ pilot heater ignition
means operatively associated with the pilot bum
to the pilot burner means, a thermostatically
controlled shut-off valve controlling at least some 50 er means but outside of the pilot ?ame, an elec
tric heater controlling the thermostatically con
?ow of gas supply from the diaphragm valve
trolled gas valve, circuit means including de
to the pilot burner means, pilot heater ignition
mand means arranged to control both 01 said
means operatively associated with the pilot burner
heaters, and a switch responsive to diaphragm
means, but outside of the pilot ?ame, an electric
heater controlling the thermostatically controlled 55 movement of said diaphragm valve adapted to
gas valve, circuit means including demand means
arranged to control both of said heaters, and a
switch responsive to diaphragm movement of said
diaphragm valve adapted to open the circuit only
to the pilot heater ignition means independently
of the other heater means.
2. A gas burner pilot system comprising a main
burner and a pilot burner means, a diaphragm
controlled regulator valve controlling a supply
of gas to the main burner, the gas being fed to
one side of the diaphragm of said valve, the pilot
open the circuit only to the pilot heater ignition
means independently of the other heater means,
one of the thermostatic controls for the pilot
burner means being in heat conductive relation
to the ?ame of the pilot burner means to main
tain the pilot burner valve open only so long as
the pilot burner means carries a ?ame.
5. A gas burner pilot system comprising a main
burner and a pilot burner, a diaphragm-con
trolled regulator valve controlling a supply of
gas to the main burner, the gas being fed to one
side of the diaphragm of said valve, the pilot
burner including a connection to the opposite side
posite side of the diaphragm of said valve, a
of the diaphragm of said valve, a connecting pas
connecting passage between the opposite sides
of the diaphragm, a thermostatically controlled 70 sage between the opposite sides 01Ev the diaphragm,
a thermostatically controlled gas valve control
gas valve controlling at least part of the gas
ling the gas supply to the pilot burner, a thermo
supply to the pilot burner means, a thermostati
statically controlled shut-off valve also control
cally controlled shut-off valve controlling at least
ling flow of gas supply from the diaphragm valve
some flow of gas supply from the diaphragm
valve to the pilot burner means, pilot heater 75 to the pilot burner, pilot heater ignition means
burner means including a connection to the op
2,408,673
operatively associated with the pilot burner but
outside of the pilot ?ame, an electric heater con
trolling the thermostatically controlled gas valve,
circuit means including demand means arranged
to control both of said'heaters, and a switch re
sponsive to diaphragm movement of said dia
phragm valve adapted to open the circuit only
to the pilot heater means independently of the
other heater means, the thermostatically con
trolled shut—off valve being in heat conductive re
lation to the flame of the pilot burner to main
tain the shut~o? valve open only so long as the
pilot burner carries a ?ame.
associated with the pilot burner means but out~
side of the pilot ?ame, a heater controlling the
thermostatically controlled gas valve, circuit
means including demand means arranged to con
trol both of said heaters, and a switch responsive
to movement of said regulator valve adapted to
open the circuit only to the pilot heater ignition
means independently of the other heater means.
8. A gas burner pilot system comprising a
10 main burner and a pilot burner, a regulator valve
controlling a supply of gas to the main burner,
the pilot burner including control means con
trolling said regulator valve, a thermostatically
6. A gas burner pilot system comprising a main
controlled gas valve controlling at least part of
burner and a pilot burner, a diaphragm-con
the gas supply to the pilot burner, a thermostat
trolled regulator valve controlling a supply of gas
ically controlled shut-off valve controlling at
to the main burner, the gas being fed to one side
least some ?ow of gas supplyfrom said regulator
of the diaphragm of said valve, a thermostatical
valve to the pilot burner, pilot heater ignition
ly controlled bleed line controlling said regulator
means comprising a heater located within the
valve, the bleed line being connected to the op 20 pilot burner but outside of the pilot flame, a
posite side of the diaphragm of said valve, a con
heater controlling the thermostatically controlled
necting passage between the opposite sides of the
gas valve, circuit means including demand means
diaphragm, a thermostatically controlled gas
arranged to control both of said heaters, and a
valve controlling the gas supply to the pilot burn
switch responsive to movement of said regulator
er, pilot heater ignition means operatively as 25 valve adapted to open the circuit only to the
sociated with the pilot lourner but outside of the
pilot heater ignition means independently of the
pilot ?ame, an electric heater controlling the
other heater means.
thermostatically controlled gas valve, circuit
9. A gas burner pilot system comprising a
means including demand means arranged to con
main burner and a pilot burner, a regulator valve
trol both of said heaters, and a switch responsive
controlling a supply of gas to the main burner,
to diaphragm movement of said diaphragm valve
the pilot burner including control means con
adapted to open the circuit only to the pilot
trolling said regulator valve, a thermostatically
heater ignition means independently of the other
controlled gas valve controlling at least part of
heater means, the thermostatically controlled
the gas supply to the pilot burner, a thermostat—
bleed line being in heat conductive relation to the '
ically controlled shut-off valve controlling at
?ame of the pilot burner to maintain the bleed
least some flow of gas supply from said regu
line open only so long as the pilot burner carries
lator valve to the pilot burner, said pilot burner
a ?ame.
having a passage-way for gas, the walls of said
7. A gas burner pilot system comprising a main
passageway having at least one port therein, an
burner and a pilot burner means, a regulator 40 electric heater for igniting said pilot burner lo
valve controlling a supply of gas to the main
cated out of said passage-way but adjacent to
burner, the pilot burner means including control
said port, a heater controlling the thermostatical
means controlling said regulator valve, a their“
1y controlled gas valve, circuit means including
mostatically controlled gas valve controlling at
demand means arranged to control both of said
least part of the gas supply to the pilot burner 45 heaters, and a switch responsive to movement of
means, a thermostatically controlled shut-off
said regulator valve adapted to open the circuit
valve controlling at least some ?ow of gas supply
only to the pilot ignition heater independently of
from said regulator valve to the pilot burner
the other heater.
‘
'means, pilot heater ignition means operatively
JOHN O. MOORHEAD.
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