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Патент USA US2408886

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Oct. 8, 1946,
2,408,886
F. w; SCHARF
ELECTRIC I‘RON
Filgd Nov. 1, 1941
4 Sheets-Sheet l
u\Tl3m€¢i$RcM§
INVENTOR.
FRANK W. Sa/ARF
_ _ $7277 #43 '
ATTO
EY
Oct. 8, 1946.
F. w. SCHARF
ELECTRIC IRON
Filed Nov. 1, 1941
2,408,886 '
4 Sheets-Sheet 2 _
A.“
“I“Q
Q
Hm.ul27/1
‘
INVENTOR.
FRANK \/\/. SCHARF
ATTORNEY
Oct. 8, 1946.
2,408,886
F. W. SCHARF
ELECTRIC IRON
Filed Nov. 1, 1941
45heefcs-Sheet 3
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0A. R.”8
- m s, 1946.
F. W. \SCHARF
2,40s,sss
ELECTRIC IRON
Filed Nov. 1, 1941
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
INVENTOR.
‘
FRANK W. Somm
n/mM '_
ATTORNEY
Patented ‘Oct. 8, 1946
- 2,408,886
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
~ELECCITRIC 'IROTN
Frank W. vScharf, San Gabriel, Calif” assignorsto
McGraw Electric Company, Elgin, 111., ‘a cor
poration of Delaware
Application November 1, 1941, lSerial'lNo. 417,437
13 Claims. (Cl. 219—-25)
1
My invention relates to electric'sadirons.
An object of myinvention'is to provide an elec
tric sadiron having means ~toreduce the amount
of heat reaching the housing from the soleplate.
Another ‘object of my invention is to provide
means for supporting ‘the housing and the "han
dle by common means supported from the ‘rear
end of the sol'eplate.
Another object of my ‘invention is to provide-a
common means for supporting the heater termi
nals, ‘a heater control switchga housing ‘and a
handle for a sad'iron, said means ‘being secured
to the heated body or to the sole'plate of an elec
tric iron and being made of relatively poor'heat
conducting material.
Other objects ‘will either be ‘apparent from a
description of one form of device embodying ‘my
invention or will be pointed out in the vcourse of
a description thereof and set forth more particu
larly-in the appended claims.
2
Fig. v16 is a side view of the ‘skeleton'frame of
Fig. ‘15.
An electric sadiron, designated generally by
numeral 21'and embodying my invention, com
prises‘a relatively'thin ‘so-lepla‘te 23 and while this
may be made of ironor ‘steel, I prefer to make it
of high ‘heat "conducting material such "as brass
or copper, but my invention is not limited “par
ticularly to the material of the soleplat'e 23.
The soleplate '23,'whi'chis shown as of 'substan:
tialiy triangular section to ‘provide a form ‘now
usually used for electric-sadirons, is provided with
a plurality of ‘depressions or recesses 25 in its
upper-surface, ‘which recesses o'r depressions are
preferably made circular'so'that it is relatively
easy to provide such‘recesses as by drilling or ma
chining ‘the same to the desired depth, Each of
these recesses has located therein an ‘electric
heating element '21 which heating‘elements indi
vidually comprise an intermediate "substantially
In ‘the drawings,
circular piece ‘of thin electric insulating’material
Figure l‘is a‘vertical'longitudinal sectional view
29, sulohl'as ‘mica, having recesses over a part of
through an iron embodying my invention,
its‘opposing outer periphery, as will be noted from
Fig. 2 is a plan view'of the vtop of the heated
Fig. .5, to permit of Winding 'thereonla resistor
25 strip ‘SI ‘of a suitable material to -be traversed by
body, taken on the lines ‘2——2 of Fig. 1,
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary vertical section taken
the heating current. I provide ‘further two outer
on ‘the line 3—'3‘of ‘Fig. 2 to show the method of
sheets ‘33 and 35 ‘preferably of mica, positioned
crimping the heating elements into the soleplate,
against the upper and the ‘lower ‘surfaces of the
Fig. 4 is a fragmentary substantially vertical
intermediate sheet 29, to permit of locating ‘the
sectional view taken on‘the line 4—4 of Fig. 1,
resistor comprising the strand 3| in one of the
vFig. 5 is a'plan'view of one of .the heating ele
recesses 25.
ments,
vThe terminal leads 3‘! from eachof the heating
elements may be made of increased current-car
Fig. 5,
rying ‘capacity as by doubling over the end por
Fig. '7 is a fragmentary sectional View on the 35 tions ‘of the resistor strand 3! and'I prefer to pro
line '!—'I of Fig. 2,
vide a bushing 39 for each terminal lead. ‘I may
Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional plan 'view
make this bushing of any suitable refractory ma
taken on the'l-ine 8-8 of “Fig. ‘9,
terial which has the characteristics of electric_in
sulation as ‘well as high temperature resistance
Fig. 9 is a vertical longitudinal fragmentary
sectional View similar to Fig. *1 except that the
since a heating element of this kind will cause a
temperature on ‘the order of 500° F. to I700° F. or
switch contacts are shown in closed position to
Fig. v6 is a side view of the device shown in
produce a minimum soleplate temperature,
Fig. 10 is asubstan'tially horizontal sectional
plan view'on the line 10-410 of Fig, 11,
Fig. 11 is a view similar to Fig. 9 and ‘the con
tacts'are shown in lclo'sed position to produce a
even more‘to'occur. Each bushing 39 is provided
with a lower ‘or inner end portion of increased
diameter such as ‘is ‘possessed by the usual Wood
screw.
Each heating element'is held in one of the plu
rality of‘ recesses 125 by a 'thin'shee't of metal ‘4|
which. ‘is of substantially the same diameter ‘as
Fig. 12 is a diagram of the electrical connec
that of the recess '25 and may even be initially of
tions of the heating elements and of the control
50 slightly greater diameter to necessitate a pres
switch therefor,
Fig. 13 is asubst'anti'ally vertical sectional view
sure being applied thereto to force it into the
taken on ‘the line -I 3—'l3 of Fig. 1,
recess 25 wherebyra relatively low thermal re
'14. is a top plan ‘view of a skeleton frame,
. luctance heat path is provided between the
‘Fig. .15 vis a front view of the device shown in
clamping ‘member 4t and the surrounding en
55 gaged wall of a recess 25. In order to ensure that
Fig. 14,;and,
maximum .soleplatie temperature,
2,408,886
3
.4
the plate 4| will remain in its proper operative
position in close engagement with the upper sur
face of the electric heating element, I may crimp
mitting area and it is to be noted particularly
that the openings reduce the area of the webs
connecting the lower members ‘H and 13 with the
upper members 15 and 11, all as will be noted by
reference to Figs, 14, 15 and 16.
or swage the adjacent wall of the recess 25 over
against the outer peripheral portion of the mem
ber 4|y as is shown at 43 in Figs. 2 and 3 of the
drawings, and while I have shown four such
crimped portions, I do not desire to be limited
thereto.
The terminal leads 3'! of the individual heating
elements may be located on the mica sheet 29
at substantially diametral points and may be
connected as by a connector 45 in any suitable or
desired manner, an additional sheet 41 of mica
being located between the engaging pair of ter
minal leads 3‘! to thoroughly insulate them
against accidental contact with either the sole
plate 23 or the member 4|.
I provide a pair of terminal members 49 and
5| for the plurality of electric heating elements
hereinbefore described and mount them respec
tively on supporting beams 53 and 55. These
supporting beams are provided with portions ex
tending at substantially right angles to each
other, as shown particularly in Fig. 1 of the draw
ings, one of these portions extending substan
tially vertically as indicated by numeral 51 while
the other portions may be part of the substan
tially horizontally extending inner end of the
The members ‘H and 13 are adapted to be se
cured to and supported by the beams 53 and 55
respectively, heat-insulated washers 83 being
placed therebetween, bolts or screws 85 and nuts
thereon being provided to tightly clamp the
washers 83 between the portions ‘H and 13 of the
skeleton frame and the beams 53 and 55 of the
supporting beams.
It is to be noted that the upper surface, and
particularly the members 15 and ‘H of the skele
ton frame, slant downwardly and rearwardly to
cooperate with the rear end portion 65 of the
housing.
I provide further a, composite handle which
includes an inner metal skeleton frame 81 which
is preferably made hollow and as light as con—
sistent with the desired strength and surround
at least a portion of this handle frame 91 with
a handle 89 which is preferably made of heat
insulating material such as a moulded plastic
composition. I may
for the combination
strip 9! of metal of
having its lower end
provide a further support
handle in the shape of a
suitable or pleasing form
secured against the outer
beams and are indicated by numeral 59 in Fig. 2 30 surface of the shell 63 as by a machine screw 93
of the drawings. A plurality of screws may ex
while its upper end may be properly or suitably
tend through members 51 and 59 and into the
inter?tted with the front end portion of the
rear end portion of soleplate 23 and it is to be
handle member 81.
noted that the beams 53 and 55 extend rearwardly
At the rear end of member 81 I provide sub
of the rear end portion of the soleplate 23. As
stantially horizontally extending ?anges 94 at
will be noted from Fig. 2 of the drawings, the
each side laterally of the handle and I provide
terminal members 49 and 5i hereinbefore referred
also suitable openings 95 in these ?anges through
to are insulatedly supported on the two beams. I
which a common securing means, indicated by
screws 91 in Fig. 1 of the drawings, extend to
wish to point out here that I prefer to make the
supporting beams of a material which has a high
thermal reluctance and for illustrative purposes
I may mention that the so-called “stainless steel”
may be used by me for such purpose. I may also
point out that a plurality of perforations 6| may
be provided in the wall of the beams in order to
reduce the heat-transmitting area of these beams.
I provide a shell or housing 63 to cover the
heated body by which I desire to have it under
clamp the handle against the outer surface of
the rear end portion 65 of the housing and the
housing against the upper surfaces of members
or portions 15 and 11 of the skeleton frame. I
provide an additional machine screw 99 at the
front end portion of the rear part of the handle
member 81 extending through the housing por
tion 65 and into the front portion of the ?ange
members 93, as shown more particularly in Fig. 1
stood that I refer to the soleplate and the heat
of the drawings.
ing elements swaged therein as hereinbefore de
The cross member 19 of the skeleton frame 89
scribed. This housing 63 is of usual hollow shape.
has insulatedly mounted thereon a pair of con
on the interior, and is provided with a raised rear
tact members I9] and I03 which are adapted to
end portion 65, as will be seen by reference to
be engaged with a thermally-actuable 'contact
Fig. 1 of the drawings. The upper surface of the
bridging member I05. Further, these terminal
rear end portion 65 slopes downwardly and back 55 members are connected in electric circuit with
wardly and its rear edge portion 6‘! is preferably
one of the hereinbefore described heating ele
spaced apart from the ironing surface of the sole
ments and with one of the terminals of the
plate 23, that is, from the horizontal level of the
switch, all as shown in Fig. 12 of the drawings.
ironing surface an appreciable distance, as is well
A twin conductor cord I0‘! is provided extending
known in the art.
'
60 outwardly through a, rear end portion I99 of
I provide a skeleton frame 69 (see Figs. 14, 15
member 89 of the handle.
and 16) and I prefer to make this skeleton frame
I provide a bimetal bar III in a recess H3 ad
of a shape combining connected portions of rela
jacent the rear end portion of the soleplate 23,
tively small area of cross section and further to
this bimetal bar being secured to a portion of
make this skeleton frame of "stainless steel” in 65 the soleplate 23 in the recess H3 as by a, rivet
order to increase its thermal reluctance. Gen
or screw I I5 and I may provide a cover member
erally speaking, the skeleton frame 59 may in
H1 above the recess H3 held by a small machine
clude two lower ?at portions ‘Ii and 13 and upper
screw against the soleplate 23 in order to prop
spaced parallel extending portions 15 and 11 with
erly protect the bimetal bar.
integral connecting webs between the respective 70 Means for operatively mechanically connect
portions ‘H and 15 and I3 and 11, together with
ing the contact bridging mem'ber I05 with the
a cross bar 19. I wish to here point out that
bimetal bar Ill may comprise a linkage includ
wherever possible, particularly in the webs here
ing two parallel extending spaced bars H9 and
inbefore mentioned, I may provide a plurality of
IZI connected by a cross plate I29 pivotally sup
openings 8| in order to decrease the heat trains 75 ported on the inner and front end portion of the
5
skeleton frame '69 by jpivot pins ‘I22. Thelink
age/includes further a - rearwardly ‘extending’ arm
I23 of substantially L-shape having a .‘longer
substantially horizontally extending ‘arm pivot
6
,
The operating temperature of a shell or hous
ing =on.an electric iron-is,'in general, determined
by the amount-of heat which reaches it either‘by
conduction, by convection currents of air, or by
ally mounted to bar I I 25 connecting the two arms CR radiation from the heated body of an electric
'I I9rand I'ZI . .I provide further a central arm'I2'I
iron, it being obvious that such heat will beradi
integral with th‘etwo arms vH9 and I2I, this arm
atedxfrom vor otherwise'disposed of ‘by theishell
or housing such as by convection currents of air
striking the housing, particularly while vit'is ?be
provide a manually-‘actua'ble arm I3I .ipivotally 10 ing‘moved back 'and ‘forth as in ironing,'a'nd the
extending rearwardly and upwardly through an
aperture I29 in portion 65 of the housing. I
mounted :on a side portion-of the rear rend por
tion I55 of the .shellyapivot screw I33 permitting
of manual movement of arm I3I from the posi
tiontshown in broken ‘lines in FiguB of the draw
ings't'o the position shownin'fulllines in Fig. 10
temperature is, of cours'ey?xed by the‘condition's
of heat radiation :from the housing and the heat
otherwise-lost therefrom as noted‘ above.
It is, therefore, highly desirable to reduce the
amount of heat reaching the shell from the sole
of the drawings. The-arm I:3I is connected'with
plate or 'heated'body and it willibe ‘noted, partic
arm .12‘! by a hooked link I35.
ularly from Fig. 1 ofithe drawings, that the shell
A spring :member I31 of U-shape and made
63 is notin direet‘heat-conducting engagement
preferably of a spring wire, is so ‘constructed and
with the soleplate 23. I prefer to providean ‘ap
appliedrto pivot .bar I25,"to“a pin I39 in arm I21 20 preciable gap between the .lower peripheral "edge
and to one of the arms of bell crank lever I23,
of the housing ~63 ‘and the "adjacent upmr-"sur
as to cause bell ‘crank lever I23 to move in -a
face of the ‘outer peripheral ?ange of the soleplate
clockwise direction or, in ‘other "words, ‘to bias
23 to permit'of some convection currents "of'air
lever I23 in a direction to cause "engagement
from the outside flowing therebetween. Heat‘ra
between contact bridging member I05 and con 25 diated from ‘the otherwise ‘uncovered 'upper's'ur
tact members MI ‘and I03.
face of the heated body ‘of an electric ‘sa'diron
Bell crank lever I23 has depending therefrom
causes an appreciable 'rise of temperature of the
a bar I M pivotally connected with arm I23 and
covering housing and in order to reduce the
extending through an opening I43 in member I I‘!
amount of heat radiated by the soleplate 123
to either be ‘in ‘engagement (with bimetal bar “I
against the ‘inner surface of the housing '63, I
initiallyorduring theoperation of the iron with
provide a heat-insulating shell I 41 between ‘the
the object of causing ‘disengagement of contact
upper surface of ‘the Soleplate 23 or of the heated
bridging member ‘I05 from the, ?xed contact
body and ‘the inner surface of‘the housing 63.
members ml and ‘I03 ‘when the sole plate is
This heat insulating cell comprises a band or
heated .to a predetermined ‘temperature. It may ‘ strip I49 preferably made of a metal or alloy'hav
be'n'oted that when manually-adjustable arm I‘3I
ing a relatively high thermal reluctance, formed
hasibeen moved to ‘substantially one of its limit
into a substantially V-shaped member corre
ing positions, as shown by broken lines'in Fig. ‘8
sponding ‘to the general outline of the soleplate
of ‘the drawings, arm I21 has been turned in a
and of the housing. I provide a plurality of cross
counter-clockwise direction‘as have also arms I I9 40 bars 148 secured thereto and extending laterally
and I2I, on pivot pins I22. The result is that
of the iron 21. I provide further an upper skele
member I 41 has been ‘moved ‘downwardly and
ton frame I5I also of substantially V-shape'hav
may have been moved into engagement with bi
ing its front end connected ‘with the front end
metal bar I II :and contact bridging member I05
of the band I49 by a short rod I53. vThe rear end
may vhave been‘moved out of engagement with ' portions of member I'5I extend angularly up
contact members IIII and I03.
wardly to be secured against two front surfaces
If arm I3I is moved by the operator in aclock
of skeleton frame 69 as shown in Figs. 1 and 13
wise direction, as seen in Fig. 10, farm I21 and
of the drawings, two short'machine screws or bolts
the members H9 and I 21 integral therewith will
I55 ‘being provided to hold the frame I 5I "and the
be turned in ia'clockwise direction on the :pi-vots
band I49 in the desired ‘operative position sub
I22. The rod I25 will .ialso’be turned ionzthe pivots
stantially parallel with the upper surface of ‘sole
I22, which movement, in ‘combination with the
plate 23 and spaced therefrom at all points
action of the spring I31, .causes ,a'pivotal move
thereof. The rear end portions of the arms of
ment ‘of arm I23 iaround‘member I25 and also
member I5I may extend downwardly as shown
around the pivot‘pin "at the upper ‘end of ,rod I4I .
byrnumeral I51 in Figs. 1 and 13 of the drawings
This motion willcontinue until thebri'dging ‘mem
to have their lower end portions suitably con
ber I05 engages contacts I01 and I03, as ‘shown
nected to inwardly extending rear end portions
in Fig. 9, .after which further movement of farm
of member I49.
I21 in a clockwise .direction causes arm I23 to
I provide a lower sheet I59 of thin sheet metal,
move as an integral "part of members I21, “I19, 60 such as aluminum. and usually called “Alfoil,”
I20 ‘and I2I. The engaging surfaces of ‘bridging
and I provide 1further an upper sheet IIiI of a
member I05 and contacts IN 'and I03 are radial
similar metal, the characteristics of which are
around the pivot points I22, so that continued
that it is highly polished to resist the reception
movement of arm I2‘I will cause ‘these surfaces
of radiant heat ‘and that :its mass is relatively
to ‘move over this radius with the result of an up 65 small. The ‘two sheets I59 ‘and I61 are spaced
ward movement of rod I‘4.I ‘as shown‘in Fig. 11.
apart an appreciable distance, as shown in Fig.
While these parts are in any oneof the positions
1 of the drawings, to include ‘a volume of air
of Figs. 9 and 11 or intermediate therebetween,
therein or therebetween and :it is evident that
an upward movement of ‘rod I4I because of up
such heat-insulating shell will be highly effective
ward ?exing of bimetal bar .III will cause ia'rm
to .prevent heat radiation ‘of any appreciable
I23 to move counter-clockwise around the pivot
magnitude from the 'soleplate 23 ;to the housing
I25 against the bias of spring I31 to disengage
63. It is, of course, obvious that the sheets I59
the contact bridging member I05 from thecon
and IBI will have openings ‘provided therein
tacts I-0'I and I03 itoiinterrupt the 'energizin’gicir
through which rod »I'4TI may extend.
cuit.
I (provide a bottom ‘closure plate I68 which is
2,408,886
7
8
adapted to be secured as by machine screws [65
against the rear edge portion 61 of the housing.
portion extending outwardly beyond the rear end
extending louvers or openings I59 at each side of
of the soleplate, a heat-insulating cell between
the soleplate and the housing, a bimetal bar on
the soleplate, a switch for controlling the electric
heating means actuable by said bimetal bar and
the rear end portion 65 of the housing.
a skeleton supporting frame secured to the rear
I provide a plurality of slots I61 in member I53.
I provide a plurality of substantially horizontally
end portion of the soleplate and extending out
wardly beyond the rear end of the soleplate into
cured to the inside of the housing near the front
the rear portion of the housing and supporting
end thereof and the lower end of the rod l‘ll ex~
tends into a small recess I13 in the upper surface 10 the housing, the heat-insulating cell and the con
trol switch in spaced relation to the soleplate and
of the soleplate. As will be noted by reference to
the housing and cell in spaced relation to each
Fig. 1 the rod I'll does not engage the bottom
other.
surface of the recess, since its function is to
4. In an electric sadiron comprising a soleplate,
prevent undue strain on the members supporting
electric heating means embedded in the soleplate,
the housing, which supporting members oper
a pair of spaced supports secured to the rear end
atively connect the rear end portion of the hous
portion of the soleplate and extending rearwardly
ing with the rear end portion of the soleplate,
therebeyond, terminal members for said heating
in case the iron is accidentally dropped on its
means insulatedly mounted on said supports, a.
handle.
‘ A thin rod or Wire I'll has one of its ends se
The device embodying my invention comprises 20 skeleton supporting frame projecting outwardly
of heat from the heated body or soleplate of an
iron to the means supported thereby.
I provide further a common means for support
beyond the rear end of the soleplate and carried
by said supports and a thermally-actuable switch
for said electric heating means supported on said
skeleton frame.
5. A sadiron comprising a soleplate, heating
means for said soleplate, a housing for the iron,
rigid supporting means supporting the housing
ing a thermally actuable switch, heating element
in spaced relation to the soleplate, said support
particularly an initial supporting means for cer
tain parts of an electric sadiron secured to the
rear end portion of the iron and extending back
wardly thereof and adapted to reduce the flow
terminals, a housing, a handle and a manually
ing means being secured and con?ned to the
actuable lever arm adapted to adjust the ther
30 local rear area of the soleplate and upstanding
mally-actuable switch.
I provide further a common means in the shape
of a plurality of screws for holding the handle
against the rear end portion of the housing and
therefrom to engage the rear end portion only
of the housing, said supporting means comprising
a skeleton frame, a handle having its rear end
support resting on and supported by the rear end
for securing the housing against a skeleton frame 35 portion of said housing and common fastening
means for holding the rear end of said handle
supporting it. My invention provides further a
against said housing and said housing on said
supporting means for the housing and the handle
skeleton frame.
which is made of material having a high thermal
6. A sadiron comprising a soleplate, electric
reluctance to appreciably reduce the amount of
heat conducted from ‘the heated body or the 40 heating means for the soleplate, a housing spaced
above the soleplate and having a perforated rear
heated soleplate of an electric iron to the housing
and to the handle.
portion de?ning a ventilated chamber, and rigid
supporting means spacing and interconnecting
Various modi?cations may be made in the
the housing and the soleplate, said supporting
structure embodying my invention and all such
modi?cations clearly coming within the scope of
means being con?ned to the rear end portion of
the soleplate and the housing and located in said
the appended claims shall be considered to be
covered thereby.
‘
ventilated chamber.
7. An electric sadiron comprising a soleplate,
I claim as my invention:
electric heating means for said soleplate, a pair
1. A sadiron comprising a soleplate, heating
of spaced beams secured to the rear end portion
means for the soleplate, a housing for the iron
of the soleplate and extending rearwardly there
forming with the soleplate an air chamber, and
rigid supporting means supporting the housing
beyond, a skeleton supporting frame on said
in spaced relation to the soleplate and being con
beams, a thermally-actuable switch for said elec
tric heating means supported on said skeleton
?ned to the local area of the rear end of the iron,
said supporting means comprising a pair of spaced
frame, a housing for the iron supported by said
supports secured to the rear edge portion of the
skeleton frame, a handle for said iron having its
soleplate and a skeleton frame upstanding from
rear end support resting on the rear end portion
of the housing, a manually-actuable lever arm
said supports and being secured to the local rear
end portion of the housing.
'
for said switch supported by the rear end portion
2. A sadiron comprising a soleplate, heating
of the housing and a, heat-insulating cell between
means for the soleplate, a skeleton supporting
the housing‘ and the soleplate having means of
frame of high thermal reluctance supported by
high thermal reluctance for supporting it from
the soleplate and extending outwardly beyond
the rear end of the soleplate, a hollow housing
for the iron having a rear end portion extending
outwardly beyond the rear end of the soleplate
and being supported at its rear end portion only
and by said skeleton frame and a heat-insulating
cell between the soleplate and the housing sup
ported at its rear end portion by said skeleton
frame in spaced relation to the soleplate and
the housing.
3. An electric sadiron comprising a soleplate,
electric heating means embedded in the soleplate,
a. hollow housing for the iron having a rear end
the skeleton frame in spaced relation to the sole
plate and the housing.
8. A sadiron comprising a soleplate, heating
means for said soleplate, a pair of spaced beams
having high thermal reluctance secured to the
rear end portion of the soleplate and extending
rearwardly therefrom, a skeleton frame of high
thermal reluctance supported by said spaced
beams, heat-insulating means spacing said skele
ton frame from said beams, a hollow housing for
said iron supported by said skeleton frame, said
housing having openings in its side and top walls
at its rear end portion, a heat-insulating hollow
2,408,886
cell between the soleplate and the housing and
generally coextensive in area with said housing
and means for supporting the cell on the skeleton
frame, said cell-supporting means having rela
tively high thermal reluctance.
9. A sadiron comprising a soleplate, flat heat
ing means in heat conducting relation with the
soleplate, said heating means occupying the
major area of the soleplate but terminating short
10
eluding heat con?ning shield means substantially
coextensive in area with the soleplate but of nar
rower width than the iron casing, said shield
means being secured at its rear portion to and
suspended by the upstanding casing supporting
means at the rear of the iron, and extending hori
zontally through the air circulating space in
spaced relation to the soleplate, heating means
and iron casing,
11. A sadiron comprising a soleplate, heating
of an area adjacent the rear end of the soleplate, 10
means located forwardly of the rear end portion
rigid casing supporting means secured to said
of the soleplate, supporting means secured to and
rear end area of the soleplate and upstanding
projecting rearwardly beyond the rear end por
therefrom in horizontally spaced relation to the
tion of the soleplate so as to be subject to mini
casing supporting means by the heating means, 15 mum heating by the heating means, a hollow
housing of greater length than the soleplate and
said casing supporting means being of lesser
having a rear portion housing said projecting
width than the rear portion of the soleplate and
heating means so ‘as to minimize heating of said
supporting means, said housing being supported
having its opposite sides spaced inwardly from
at its rear portion only and by a securing con
the side edges of the soleplate, said casing sup—
porting means being bounded at its front end 20 nection to said supporting means.
12. A sadiron comprising a soleplate, heating
and at its opposite sides by an air circulating
means located forwardly of the rear end portion
space of substantial depth which extends from
of the soleplate, supporting means secured to and
the rear end of the iron forwardly over the sole
projecting rearwardly beyond the rear end por~
plate and heating means to the front end of the
iron and which extends laterally to the side edge 25 ti-on of the soleplate so as to be subject to mini
areas of the soleplate, and a hollow iron casing
overlying the soleplate de?ning with the sole
plate the air circulating space and surrounding
said casing supporting means, said casing being
mounted on and secured at the rear of the sole
mum heating by the heating means, a hollow
housing covering the soleplate and having a rear
extension portion projecting outwardly beyond
the rear of the soleplate, said rear extension por
30 tion being formed with air openings to de?ne an
aerated chamber and said supporting means be
ing located in said chamber, said housing being
supported at its rear portion only and by securing
connection with said supporting means.
an opening therebetween for the admission of
13. A sadiron according to claim 12 further in
outside air for circulation lengthwise and trans 35
cluding heat-con?ning shield means substantially
versely through the air circulating space over
co-extensive in area with the soleplate supported
substantially the entire area of the soleplate and
by said supporting means between and in spaced
heating means and around the casing supporting
relation to the soleplate and the housing.
means.
.
FRANK W. SCHARF.
10. A sadiron according to- claim 9 further in 40
plate by the said casing supporting means with
the margins of the casing adjacent but spaced
from the side edges of the soleplate to provide
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