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Патент USA US2409088

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0d» 8» 1946»
J. v. WE‘IN‘BERGER
"2,
,087
WOVEN GLOTHV -
" Filed Aug. 10, 1945
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2,409,087
Patented Oct. 8, 1946
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,409,087
WOVEN CLOTH
Jan'V. Weinberger, Truro, Nova Scotia, 'Canada
ApplicationAugust 10, 1945, ,Serial No. 610,077
In Canada October 21, ,1943
7 Claims. ' (Cl. 139-390)
2
connectìonwith the accompanying-drawing, Vin
This invention relatesA to cloth and the .object
which
is to .provide a woven cloth having- characteristics
Fig. 1 isa diagram illustrating the Vmanner ,in
which render it -especially useful asa Protective
which the large gauge ñllers are bound in -place
covering for soldiers and others exposed toin
between a plurality of woven fabrics which-ex
jury by bullets, shrapnel, >or other -flying objects.
tend in sinuous or zig-zag fashion from oneface
More particularly, the invention provides a
of the cloth to the opposite face. In this -view the
thick, dense, stretchable cloth of novel construc
nllers are shown in an uncrushed condition and
tionrcharacterized by a high degree of tensile
the binding fabrics are shown in what may be
strength and the absence of internal voids or »air
termed a relaxed or untensioned condition since
spaces. These characteristics render the cloth
the main purpose of this View is to illustrate the
highly resistant to penetration by bullets, shrap
relative staggering of the fillers contained in ad
nel, fragmentation or other flying objects since
jacent courses and the manner in which the
the force of impact of such objects against the
binding fabrics are trained around the fillers in
cloth is cushioned by the thickness and internal
passing from one face to the opposite face :of
density characteristics of the cloth >and also by 15 the cloth.
the flexing and tensioning ofthe cloth which en
Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but illustrates
sures that the force of impact will be distributed
over and resisted by a large area of the cloth
the manner in which the fillers are crushed-to
gether and caused to assume a triangular ,shape
by the warp tensioning to which the `binding
bordering the point of impact. The flexing and
tensioning of the cloth also tends to vdeiiect ob 20 fabrics are subjected during the weaving of the
jects impacting thereagainst so that the effect of
cloth.
Fig. 3 is a perspective view illustratingmore
the impact on the body of the wearer is that of a
or less diagrammatically, the manner in'which
glancing rather than a direct blow.
the warp threads of each fabric pass between
In its preferred embodiment the cloth of my
the warp threads of the remaining fabrics at the
invention comprises a plurality of courses of vlarge
gauge weftwise extending fillers bound in place
points of intersection Where the fabrics -crossone
another in passing from one face of the cloth to
and crushed together by a plurality of woven
binding fabric between which-the iillers are laid
the other.
Referring more particularly -to the drawing, my
during the weaving operation. The fillers-of
improved cloth'is generally indicated at 5. It
each course are staggered rwith reference to the
comprises two courses of fillers respectively in
ñllers of the next adjacent course or .courses :and
dicated at 6 and 1 and three woven binding
the binding; fabrics exte 'd >in sinuous or zig-,zag
fabrics respectively indicated at 8, 9 andflß. The
fashion/from one face of »the Ácloth .to the'opposite
face.
The binding fabrics are complete as to
warp and weft and are woven with suflicient warp '
tension to cause the iillers of each course to be
crushed into close contact with each otherland
ñllers Bof one course lie adjacent one face of
the' cloth and are staggered withfreference to the
fillers 1 of the companion course which lie adja
cent the opposite face of the cloth. The fillers
ßïand 'l extendin the we'ftwise direction of the
with the ñllers ofthe adjacent- course oreourses.
This crushing together vof the fillers" eliminates 40 cloth and are of much larger gauge-than the
component warp -and vweft strands of the bind
internal voids and air spaces and thereby pro
ing fabrics 8, 9 and |70. Exceptionally good re
duces a relatively thick cloth of exceptional den
sults are obtained when `the fillers S and 1 and
sity. During the weaving operation in‘which the
the'warp and weft strands of the woven fabrics
iillers are laid in place therebetween, thecom
ponent fabrics of the cloth are woven so that 45 ß, S and I0 are made exclusively of “nylon” but it
is to be understood that the invention is not
the Warp threads in each fabric pass between
limited tothe use of this-material since any other
lthe Warp threads ofthe remaining fabrics at a
materials havingthe- lrequisite properties may be
number of points of intersection 'where the fabrics
used. Each'of the Íbinding fabrics 8, 9 and |0is
cross one another in passing from one face cf
50 ua lcomplete woven fabric comprising warp strands
the «cloth >to the opposite face. This produces a
A and weft strands B. These binding fabrics are
finished cloth yin which eachfiller is substan
trained around the fillers 6 and ‘I as shown in
tially completely enclosed by an enveloping
the drawings so that said fabrics extend in sin
woven fabric covering conjointly formed by
uous or zig-Zag fashion'from one face to the
filler. engaging portions of component fabrics of
opposite face of the finished cloth.
~
`
55
the cloth. The thickness of the cloth produced
During the weaving operation in which the
in accordance with .this‘invention may be in
fillers E and l are hound in place between the
creased to any desired extent within practical
fabrics 8, 9 and l0, the latter are woven so that
limits by increasing the number of courses or
the warp strands A of each fabric pass between
fillers and the number of binding fabrics.
60 the warp strands A of the remaining fabrics at
The invention will now be further described in
3
2,409,087
a number of points of intersection where the fab
rics cross one another in passing from one face
to the opposite face of the cloth. This is best
seen in Figs. 1 and 3. During the weaving oper
ation the fabrics 8, 9 and I 0 are placed under UI
sullicient warp tension so that the ñllers 6 and
l, which are initially of circular cross section as
I claim:
y
1. A Woven cloth comprising a plurality of
courses of large gauge weftwise extending ñllers
shown in Fig. 1, are crushed together so that
bound in place and crushed together by a plural
they assume the triangular shape-illustrated in
Fig. 2. Also, as clearly illustrated in Fig. 2, the
ity of intersecting woven binding fabrics.
2. A woven cloth as set forth in claim 1, in
which the ñllers of each course are staggered with
reference to the ñllers of the next adjacent course
crushing of the fillers 6 and ‘I lby the warp ten
sioning of the woven fabrics 8, 9 and I0 causes
the ñllers of each course to be crushed into con
tact with each other and with the fillers of the
1adjacent course in such manner as to veliminate
internal voids or air spaces and thereby provide
'a relatively thick cloth of great density. It will
or courses.
'3. A woven cloth as set forth in claim 1, in
which the ñllers of each course are staggered with
reference to the ñllers of the next adjacent course
or courses and in which the woven binding fab
rics are trained around the ñllers so that each
fabric repeatedly crosses each of the remaining
fabrics at a plurality of points of intersection and
also be noted that the binding fabrics S, 9 and
a woven fabric covering
extends in zig-zag fashion from one face to the
opposite face of thev ñnished cloth.
which is conjointly formed by filler engagingr
portions of the three binding fabrics. As previ
ously intimated, the invention is not restricted
to the manufacture of cloth having only two
courses of ñllers bound in place between three
binding fabrics since thicker cloths may be pro
duced by increasing the number of courses of
fillers and the number of binding fabrics em
4
be the preferred embodiment of my invention it
will be understood that various modifications
may be resorted to within the scope and spirit of
the appended claims.
275
4. A woven cloth comprising a plurality of
courses of large gauge weftwise extending ñllers
bound in place and crushed together by a plural
ity of intersecting woven binding fabrics, said
woven fabrics extending in zig-zag fashion from
one face to the opposite face of the cloth so that
In the case of a cloth comprising two 30 each fabric repeatedly crosses each of the re
maining fabrics at a plurality of lpoints of inter
courses of relatively staggered, large gauge
section where the warp strands of one fabric pass
ñllers and three binding fabrics the effect of the
ployed.
between the warp strands of the intersecting fab
crushing action to which the fillers are subject
rics, said fabrics being woven under sufficient
ed by the binding fabrics is to change the cross
sectional shape of the ñllers from the circular 35 warp tension to cause the fillers of each course
to be crushed into close contact with each other
shape shown in Fig. 1 to the triangular shape
and with the fillers of the next adjacent course or
shown in Fig. 2, thus producing a type of cloth in
courses.
which the ñllers, as viewed in cross section, pre
sent the appearance of similar reversely arranged
5. A woven cloth 4as set forth in claim 4, char
acterized in that each filler is substantially com
pletely enclosed by a woven fabric envelope con
triangles fitted together in closely nested rela
tion.
jointly formed by a plurality of said fabrics.
6. A woven cloth comprising two courses voi"
4such as that caused by the impact of a bullet or 45
other object propelled thereagainst at relatively
high Velocity and is characterised by a high de
gree of tensile strength. The density of the cloth
resulting from the manner in which the weftwise
extending ñllers are crushed together by the
binding fabrics precludes the possibility of bul
lets or other objects penetrating the cloth by
passing between and crowding aside the com
ponent fillers. Since the cloth is relatively thick
and can be pierced only by objects forcing their '
way through instead of crowding aside the
Vclosely packed fillers it will be seen> that this
cloth has great impact cushioning properties as
well as high resistance to penetration and these
properties are enhanced by the stretchability and; to
tensile strength of the cloth.
An exceptionally desirable type of protective
cloth may be formed by taking two cloths made
in accordance with this invention and laminat
ing them together so that the weftwise extending 65
ñllers of one cloth are disp-used at right angles
to the weftwise extending ñllers of the com
ponent cloth. The two cloths thus laminated
large gauge weftwise extending fillers which are
bound in place and crushed'together by a plural
ity of woven binding fabrics so that, in cross sec
tion, the two courses of ñllers present the appear
ance of similar, reversely arranged triangles ñtted
tOgether in closely nested relation, said fabrics
being woven so that the warp strands of each
fabric repeatedly pass between the warp strands
of each of the remaining component fabrics at
a plurality of spaced points of intersection where
the fabrics cross in passing from one face to the
opposite face of the finished cloth.
7. A laminated material comprising a plurality
of plies of woven cloth, each -ply comprising a
plurality of courses of large gauge weftwise ex
tending fillers bound "in place and crushed to
gether by a plurality of woven fabrics which are
woven so that the warp strands of each fabric
repeatedly pass'between the warp strands of each
of the remaining component fabrics at a, plural
ity of spaced points of intersection where the fab
rics cross inpassing in zig-zag fashion from one
face to the opposite face of the cloth, said ma
terial being further characterized in that the
component plies thereof are secured together so
that the weftwise extending ñllers of one ply cross
may b_e secured together by binding threads, riv
the weftwise extending ñllers of the next adja
ets or other suitable fastening means.
ì
_
Having thus described what I now consider to 70 cent ply or plies.
JAN V. W‘EINBERGER‘
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