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Патент USA US2409134

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Oct» 3» 1946-
'
w. P. LEAR
' _
2,409,131
SIREN FOR AIRCRAFT
Original Filed Feb.. 21, 1942
K15
-
INVENTOR
wom?fe?war
BY
-
42W
,4; ATTORNEY
Patented Oct. 8, 1946
' *
,
2,409,131
UNl'l‘ED STATES PATENT OFFICE-ii
Calif., assign
' William P. Lear, North Hollywood,Lear,
Incorpo
or, by mesne assignments, to‘
rated, Grand Rapids, Mich, a corporation of
Illinois
(h'iginal application February 21, 1942, Serial No.
431,814. Divided and this application August
24, 1943, Serial No. 499,755
4 Claims.
“
(01. 244-4)
1
This invention relates to high intensity sound
producing systems for aircraft, and more particu
larly to siren systems adapted to be incorporated
' siren systems 25 are so arranged as to be substane
tially enclosed within the fuselage In ‘so as to
offer no aerodynamic resistance to ?ight of the
in the structure of an aircraft in such a way as
to offer substantially no aerodynamic resistance.
The present application is a division of my co
pending application Serial No. 431,314 ?led Feb
aircraft. Each siren system comprises a pivoted
funnel intake section H to which is- secured a
fuselage section or window l2 for movement ;as
a unit therewith.
Both the intake section and
the fuselage section may be extended by a lever
ruary 21, 1942, now Patent No. 2,392,394 issued
l3 through the medium of a bell crankjarrange
January 8, 1946.
'
,
ment i4. Lever 13 may extend to a position adja
10
In accordance with the present invention, sirens
cent the pilot’s compartment for selective opera
or similar sound producing devices are incorpo
tion by the pilot or be remotely controlled,‘ ‘
rated within the surface structure or fuselage of
The intake section l2 converges to a central
an aircraft for operation by aerodynamic power
conduit section It which encloses a siren 25 at
generated during ?ight. The siren systems are
its region of smallest cross-section. The conduit
so arranged as to normally not interfere with the 15 section 15 ?ares outwardly from its narrowest
aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft, nor
section to an outletsection l'i- which communi
add any drag. When it is desired. to operate the
cates with the exterior of the fuselageat an‘ open
sirens to produce intense sounds, as for exampie
ing l8. The conduit arrangement of intake_sec—
during dive bombing maneuvers, the tremendous
tion ll, conduit section l6 andoutlet section». I‘!
aerodynamic forces associated with the aircraft 20 is generally in the shape of a_Venturi tube, so that
in high speed ?ight are utilized for the operation.
maximum air?ow intensity exists at the siren
An important feature of the present invention
25 located at the narrow portion of section ‘I6,
thus resides in the utilization of a substantial
The walls of intake section ii are aligned and
portion of the aerodynamic power generated by
substantially coextensive with the walls of central
an aircraft in ?ight to operate powerful sound 25 section [6 when section I l is in the illustrated ex,
producing means. When it is considered that a
tended position. Intake section I l scoopsup and
modern combat plane exerts thousands of horse
otherwise receives air at the high velocity of the
power in full ?ight condition, a considerable array
of siren means according to my invention can be
driven without requiring auxiliary or standby
power plants. The invention is particularly di
rected to a novel arrangement for incorporating
an array of powerful sirens within the structure
aircraft in ?ight, and imparts the air in a sub
stantially continuous and uninterrupted stream to
the siren 25. The air thus drives the siren 25 and
is discharged through the outlet section II to
the outside and towards the rear of the aircraft.
The general air ?ow through the conduit is indi
of the aircraft, and for selectively operating them
cated by the series of arrows in Fig. 3.
into the inactive and into the sound producing 35 The sirens 25 may he of any suitable size or de
conditions.
The above and further advantages, capabilities
and features of the present invention will appear
in the following description of a specific embodi
ment thereof and from the accompanying draw
ing. In the drawing:
Fig. 1 is an elevation view of an embodiment of
the invention incorporated in the fuselage of an
sign for emitting the powerful sounds required at
the desired pitch. While two siren assemblies
have been illustrated, it is to be understood that
any other number may be employed. Preferably,
all the siren systems are interconnected to a com
mon operating control, such as the lever IS. The
front'face of siren 25 is in the form of an annular
face plate 2| attached to the corresponding cir
cular minimum section of conduit I6. Face plate
Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view through the sys 45 2| has suitable spaced openings 22. A rotor 23
tem of Fig. 1 as taken along the line 2-2 of
is arranged adjacent to plate 2 I, and is supported
Fig. 1.
between bearing 24 in plate 2| and bearing 26 in
Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view through
a bracket 21 suitably secured to the walls of sec
aircraft.
the siren system of Figs. 1 and 2 as taken along
50
the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.
In the embodiment of the invention shown in
the drawing, the sirens are mounted within the
fuselage H) of an aircraft [5 having a wing struc
tion It.
,
The rectangular windows l2 are essentially sec
tions of fuselage II) which correspond to the re
spective components required by the intake sec
tions I l in their extended position. Each window
I2 is secured to its conduit section II along the
of the lower portion of fuselage Ill as shown. The 55
ture 20. Two siren assemblies, one on each side
3
2,409,131
central longitudinal region. Thus, when a section
II is retracted as shown by the dotted line indi
cation Ha in Fig. 3, window I2 is flush with fuse
lage H] as shown by dotted line I211. Intake sec
tion H in its retracted position fits into a corre
sponding shaped receptacle 28 joined With the
forward edge of the central conduit section l8...
Receptacle 28 is constructed so as to prevent air
leakage from the conduit siren arrangement into
4
and extending on either end to air intake and air
outlet openings in the fuselage, each of said ducts
converging from each end toward its center; said
sirens being supported at substantially the nar
rowest cross-sectional region in said ducts; air
scooping means attached to said fuselage at said
intake openings; said air scoop means each hav
ing a fuselage section secured thereto and con
the interior of the fuselage. The bell crank l5 10 forming with the surface contour of the fuselage
when said scoop means is retracted; said ducts
for mounting the intake section II and-window
being formed with receptacle portions receiving
I2 is pivoted on a suitable pivotal mounting 29 in
said scoop means in the retracted position; and
fuselage [0.
common operating means for extending and re
Normally, the intake section H is in the re
tracted position shown in dotted lines in Fig. 3. 15 tracting said scoop means in unison.
3. The combination with an aircraft of sirens
When it is desired to operate the sirens, lever i3
?xedly mounted within the fuselage of the air
is actuated and through bell crank l4 intake sec
craft; an air duct surrounding each of said sirens
tion I l is extended to scoop up air and cause op
and extending on either end to air intake and air
eration of the sirens. It will be noted that, in
outlet openings in the fuselage, each of said ducts
the retracted position, the intake section II and
window I 2 form a substantially unitary part of 20 converging from each end toward its center; said
sirens being supported at substantially the nar
the fuselage l0 and offer no aerodynamic resist
rowest cross-sectional region in said ducts; air
ance to ?ight of the aircraft.
scooping means attached to said fuselage at said
While a speci?c embodiment of the invention
intake openings; said air scoop means each hav
has been shown and described to illustrate the ap
plication of the principles thereof, it will be un 25 ing a fuselage section secured thereto and con
forming with the surface contour of the fuselage
derstood that the invention may otherwise be
when said scoop means is retracted; said ducts
embodied without departing from such principles.
being formed with receptacle portions receiving
What I claim is:
saidscoop means in the retracted position; and
l. The combination with an aircraft of sirens
?xedly mounted within the fuselage of the air 30 common operating means comprising an arm
connected to each scoop means and levers con
craft; an air duct surrounding each of‘said sirens
nected to said arms for extending and retracting
and extending on either end to air intake and air
said scoop means in unison.
outlet openings in the fuselage, each of said ducts
4. The combination with an aircraft of an air
converging from each end toward its center; said
siren ?xedly mounted within the structure of the
sirens being supported at substantially the nar
aircraft; an air duct, in the form of a Venturi
rowest cross-sectional region in said ducts; air
tube, surrounding said air siren and extending on
scooping means attached to said fuselage at said
either end to ?aring forwardly and rearwardly
intake openings; said air scoop means each hav
directed openings in the structure; said siren be
ing a fuselage section secured thereto and con
ing located at the smallest cross-section of said
forming with the surface contour of the fuselage
air duct; a tubular air scoop hinged to said struc
when said scoop means is retracted; and said
ture at said ?aring forwardly directed opening
ducts being formed with receptacle portions re
and constituting a movable section of said duct;
ceiving said scoop means in the retracted position.
and mechanism for controlling the extension of
2. The combination with an aircraft of sirens
said
scoop to conduct an air ?ow through said
?xedly mounted within the fuselage of the air
duct to operate said siren.
craft; an air duct surrounding each of ‘said sirens
WILLIAM P. LEAR.
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