close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

код для вставки
0d. 8, 1946.
c, c, wHlTTAKER
'
2,409,169
CONTROL SYSTEM FOR EXHAUS'I'ING BALLAST FROM TORPEDOES
Filed May 9, 1945
3 Sheets-Sheet 1
4
1
l
WITNESSES:
9%», 16%.
-
,
a” ‘/ flZ/V?Eg'LOZ
are;
BY
.
. _
/
0 en
W51 W
ATTORNEY
0c‘; 3, 1946-
c. c. WHITTAKER
2,409,169
CONTROL SYSTEM FOR EXHAUSTING BALLAST FROM TORPEDOES
Filed MayB, 1945
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTOR
?nk/e: dW?/ffmée/f
BY
W5.
ATTORNEY
Oct- 8, 1946-
' c. c. WHITTAKER
>
2,409,169 .
CONTROL SYSTEM FOR EXHAUSTING BALLAST FROM TORPEDOES
Filed May 9, 1945
F29. Z
_
72
4
WITNESSES:
% £7
I
I
5 Sheets-Sheet 3
32
7s
45 44
j
INVENTOR
??ar/es 6 ?/?/ffa/re/f
BY
M4”. 3.2mm
ATTORNEY .
‘attests
Patented Oct. 8, 1946
UNITED STATES PATENT orrl'cs
2,409,169
CONTROL SYSTEM FOR EXHAUSTING
BALLAST FROM TORPEDOES
Charles C. Whittaker, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor
to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East
Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania
Application May 9, 1945, Serial No. 592,803
8 Claims.
1
My invention relates to control devices for
torpedoes and, more particularly, to devices for
controlling the buoyancy of torpedoes.
(Cl. 114-20)
following‘ speci?cation and the accompanying
drawings, in which:
.
Figure 1 diagrammatically shows so much of
the circuits of an electrically propelled torpedo
The Government of the United States has been
granted a certain royalty-free license for govern 5 as are necessary to illustrate some features of
my invention;
v
‘
mental purposes with respect to the invention
Fig. 2 is a top plan view of my special timers
herein described.
with the cover in place;
It is extremely important that a torpedo does
- Fig. 3 is a sectional top plan view of my timer
not sink and thus make recovery di?’icult or
ll) on section line Ill-III of Fig. 7;
impossible during exercise runs of a torpedo.
Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of the _'
During exercise runs of a torpedo, the exercise
top portion of the timer mechanism and illustrat
head—corresponding to the war head for battle
ing one of the reset buttons, or stems, mountedv
shots-—is ?lled with ballast water, or some other
cheap liquid, which must be expelled, that is,
in the top cover;
Fig. 5 is a sectional view on lines V-—V of Fig. '7;
blown from the exercise head to make the tor 15
'Fig. 6 is a sectional view on line VI--VI of
pedo buoyant. For reasons well known, a tor
Fig. '7 ;
.
.
pedo is normally so loaded that it has a negative
Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view of parts of
my invention taken on line VII-—VII of Fig. 3;
and
Fig. 8 is a bottom plan view of my timer with
the cover in place.
The clearest concept of my contribution to
run, but if for any cause whatsoever the torpedo
the art can probably be had from a study of the
does not complete its normal exercise run, it is
essential to cause surfacing of the torpedo while 25 operating sequence of the subject matterv shown
in Fig. 1. The details of the timing mechanisms
it is still in motion.
will be described below after the discussion of.
With the electrically propelled torpedo now
Fig. 1.
generally used, the "blowing” of the exercise
head is usually effected by admitting carbon di 30 When the torpedo T is ?red from the ?ring
tube I, the trigger valve 2, through the operation
oxide gas into the exercise head from a high
of lever 3' by the dog 4 on the ?ring tube I, is
pressure CO2 ?ask.
operated to connect the gas pressure ?ask 5 to
One object of my invention is to effect surfac
the conduit 6. This conduit is connected to the
ing of a torpedo at the desired time.
valve ‘1 which is latched to the open position by
Another object of my invention is to effect‘
“blowing” of the ballast liquid from the exercise 35 the latch mechanism ll.
With valve 1 in the position shown, gas pres
head of a torpedo when the operating conditions
sure is admitted to the pneumatically operable
are such that the torpedo should surface to facil
switch 8. This switch, with a time delay of about
itate recovery of the torpedo.
A more speci?c object of my invention is the 40 three-fourths of a second, closes the contacts 9,
whereupon a circuit is established from the posi
provision of timing‘ means so devised that the
tive terminal in of the battery B through the
ballast liquid is expelled from the exercise head
motor armature of motor M, the ?eld windings
of a torpedo just prior to the end of the exercise
F, and contacts 9 to the negative terminal H of
run, or prior to the expiration of such time if
buoyancy. To effect surfacing of a torpedo at
a desired time, the ballast liquid is expelled from
the exercise head to cause surfacing of the tor
pedo. The most desirable time for effecting such
surfacing is just prior to the end of the exercise
the operating conditions are such as to make sur
facing of the torpedo desirable.
Another not so speci?c object of my inven
tion is to e?ect surfacing of a torpedo a de?nite
time after ?ring of the torpedo, or prior to the
the battery.
The pneumatically operable switch is of the
type disclosed and claimed in the pending joint
application of myself and Ruel C. Jones, Serial
No. 559,077, ?led October 17, 1944, and entitled
expiration of such de?nite time period should. 50 Controls.
Per se the switch 8 forms no part of my present
invention, but in the combination herein dis
. some other operating condition of the torpedo
closed this switch 8v functions to close contacts
make surfacing desirable.
9 with a suf?cient time delay to assure that the
Other objects and advantages of my invention
will become more apparent fro-m a study of the 55 torpedo is well clear of the louvers at the front
the torpedo speed decrease to a given speed or
2,409,169
4
w
of the torpedo tube. Rotation of the propellers
P is thus delayed just su?iciently to prevent ro
tating contact of the propellers with the louvers.
after the closing of the contacts 9, the voltage
drop across the ?eld F is built up su?iciently to
energize coil 28. The circuit for coil 28 may
be traced from junction 29 through conductor
A time delay of a half to one second is usually
selected. This time is ample for the torpedo to :31 30, coil 28, conductor 3i, contacts 32 and 45,
clear the tube.
conductor 33, contacts 159 and 5D, conductor 35,
In the equipment with which my invention has
and contacts 9 to the negative terminal E2 of
actually been used, the time constant of switch
the battery B. The full energization of'coil 28
8 has been so adjusted that the contacts 5 close
thus- occurs a moment after acceleration of the
after a delay of three-fourths of a second after
torpedo ceases and while the armature I5 is in
the ?ring of the torpedo.
its initial stages of its counterclockwise move
Since the ?ring of the torpedo produces an
ment. The armature is thus again, but now
acceleration of approximately 11G, I make use
eiectromagneticaliy, moved clockwise and will
of this accelerating force to set-my timing mech
remain '9. contact. with the horizontal surface
anisms in operation. My timer mechanisms in-.
of guide ‘2.?’ as long- as coil 28 remains energized.
clude two distinct clock mechanisms one, namely
The second timing device or clock mechanism
l3, for producing a short time delay, and a sec
39-1 utilize is also in itself in part of well known
ond, namely 36, for producing a longer time
design and includes a clock spring for driving
delay.
its timing elements.
The spring or" this timing
The timer l3 per se is of well known design and 20 device iswound by a suitable key attached to
includes an inertia gear train. When a torque
the shaft 3?. Another shaft?'i', operableby the
is applied to its actuating shaft Hi, (seeFigs.
3 and 7), thistimer tithroughthe inertia ele
mentsof its geartrain, permits rotation‘of shaft
38 meshing" with, a. gear sector 39, ?xed on' a.
sleeve shaft 68 which; is, rotatably disposed on
mat a constant speed for; as long as, a torque is 25
shaft’ 40.
applied to this shaft Ill. The time-of operation
of shaft I4 is selected at about’ two to three sec
onds.
Torque is applied tothis shaft by the armature
l5 pivoted at l6 on the U-shaped bracket l'l
rigidly securedto' the insulating plate i3 ?xed
onv the timer mechanism frame.
The armature
I5 is’ biased for counterclockwise, rotation by the
tension spring l9 hooked to the back end of the
armatureand the frame, as shown most- clearly
in Fig. 7. The armature carriesa weight 25.
The timer mechanism is mounted on the torpedo
so that the bottom-thereof is directed aft of the
torpedo. Acceleration, of the torpedo through the
inertia of weight 26 thus causes the armature
I 5 to move clockwise. about its pivot 15.
The right-hand end of the armature. is pro
vided witha clip 2! having at its extreme right
end, an, upwardly directed, hook engaging, the.
left-hand leg ofthe, U-shaped upper end of the
leaf, spring 22; This, leaf spring, at its base is.
secured to the frame and is, biasedto move to.
Ward the right once released by the hook on the
clip 2|.
The right-hand end of the armature is, by
means of'link 26, operatively, connected to the
ba-r't’iiloosely mounted on, the shaft M. The
bar 23' carries a pair of spring, biasedpawls 24
disposed to’ engage- the ratchet-wheel, 25 rigidly
connected tothe shaft A it.
The instant torpedo is ?red,vthe weight 28
causes the armature to move clockwise till it
engages the horizontal base on the brass guide
plate 21’. The horizontal base is accurately ma
chined so as to have a proper space relation to
the top of‘ core 21-‘ of the actuating coil 28 for
the armature 15. A proper air gap is thus pro
vided to‘prevent sticking of the‘armature.
In
so doing; the spring 22 is released, and the bar
23 is rotated clockwise on the shaft I4. The
instant the torpedoacceleration ceases, spring
I9 starts the armature-rotating counterclockwise
about pivot 16, but such rotation is retarded be—
cause the pawls 2‘3. engage wheel 25 ?xed on
shaft M.
A torque is thus applied to shaft ill,
but its counterclockwise rotation is slowed to a
constant speed by the inertia elements of the
clock mechanism I3.
The actuating coil 28 is connected across the
?eld windings F of the motor. A short time
clock spring, not shown, I provide with a gear
-
To the gear sector 39 I rigidly secure a friction
sector 4!. A leaf spring 62 is pivotally‘mounted
at 43 and is so biased thatit frictionally engages
the friction sector 5A by. anaxially directed force.
Any clockwise movement. of. the friction sector
AM, as seen in Figs. 5 and. 6; causes counterclock
wise movement of theleaf spring 4-2.
The pivot block 441 for the leaf spring 42 is of
insulatingmaterial carrying the leaf-spring con
tact 55. Any relatively small angular movement
of‘ the leaf spring in a counterclockwise direction
will thus cause contact. 55‘ to engage resilient
contactsz'disposed on. a suitable block of in
sulation-t5 ‘mounted on the frame on the timing
device. It will thus be. apparent that setting of
timing device 3-6 presently'to be. discussed and
involving clockwise-movement of friction sector
it! 1Wi11 cause engagement of; contacts 32 and 45.
These two contacts are connected in parallel. to
thecurrent limiting resistor 34. During the en
ergization of coil 23, maximum voltage is thus
applied to this coil 28.
To the gear sector 3?} -I also rigidly secure the
cam 41'. This cam 47, when the. timer is. in its
? full, zero position, as shown'in Fig. Band Fig. 6,
is in such a position that the- cam surface ‘28
moves the resilient contact 49 so that it is out
of contact with contact.v 5B but is in engagement
with contact 5!.
Whenthe exercise run. is tobe. made by the
torpedo, the. shaft B8.is turned thus actuating
friction sectorv 4i and .thisoperation carries'leaf
spring d2 counterclockwise to thus cause engage~
ment of contacts 32‘ancl'45. The shaft is turned
till the index 52 on cam 41 is opposite the num
ber selected on the adjacent dial 53.
It will‘ be noted that the graduated sector or
dial 53carries numerals running from‘ 0 to 10.
This simply means that by suitablemanipulation
'of the key on shaft 31, the. index 52 may be
brought adjacent any one of the numbers on
the dial 53. The number selected indicates, for
normal operation, the timein minutesafter ?r
ing'of the torpedo that the ballast. liquid is to
be expelled from the exercise head.
If ‘the index‘ is moved opposite. number. 8 on
the dial 53, then the cam region-is well out of
the way of the actuating end of theresilientcon
tact 49, and contacts 49' and‘ 50‘ are inengage
ment.
2,409,169
5
The second timing device or clock mechanism
36 is set in operation by depressing the button
54. A weight 55 is mounted directly above this
button 54 and is biased away from the button
by the leaf spring 56 ?xed to the frame at 51.
6
5| and 49, conductors 35 and 66, and contacts
9 to the negative terminal of the battery.
This valve thus moves through 90° with a snap
action. The pneumatic switch is now connected
to the timing leak device ‘II. This device is de
scribed in considerable detail in the hereinbefore
The leaf spring 56 carries the weight 55. The
mentioned pending application.
weight 55 is provided with a notch 56 coacting
It su?ices to state in this application that the
with the downwardly directed leaf spring 59.
timing leak device ‘|| permits the gas pressure
(See Figs. 3 and 4.) The spring 59 is ?xed at
its upper end to the relatively rigid bracket 60 10 acting on the pneumatic switch 8 to leak away _
at a selected speed. When the pressure acting
secured to the frame.
on pneumatic switch 8 decreases to a selected
Upon ?ring of the torpedo, the weight lags the
value, contacts 9 are opened with a snap action
movement of the torpedo and thus actuates the
and the motor is thus disconnected from the bat
button 54. The leaf spring immediately moves
into the notch 58 and the weight 55 and thus 15 tery. The torpedo is thus stopped and may be
readily recovered since normally by this time
the button 54 remains in the actuated position.
it is also buoyant.
The timing device is thus set in operation and
My device is, however, not limited to the nor
continues to operate until a short time after the
index moves opposite the zero reading on th
dial 53.
-
mal functioning of all elements. If for any rea
20 son, when the torpedo is ?red, power fails to be
applied to the driving motor, the coil 28 is deen
An instant after the torpedo is on its way,
ergized and as a consequence the contacts 6| and
the timing device 36 starts the movement of
62 are closed. The ballast liquid is thus imme
elements 39, 4| and ill in a counterclockwise di
diately expelled even though the cam 41 has by
rection. (See Figs. 5 and 6.) A relatively short
time—a half minute or somewhat less-the leaf ' no means moved to its Zero position.
If, after the torpedo starts in a normal man
spring 42 is moved clockwise an amount su?i~
ner, some di?iculty develops during the run so
cient to open the contacts 32 and 45. The cur
that power to the driving ~motor is interrupted,
rent limiting resistor is thus inserted in the cir
coil 28 becomes deenergized and the device func
cuit of coil 28. The armature |5 is, however, not
released since this coil 28 is normally energized 30 tions to expel the ballast liquid.
Also, if, after the torpedo starts in a normal
su?'iciently even though the resistor 56 is inserted
manner and the power supply gradually fails, the
in the coil circuit. By the use of the resistor 34
device functions to cause the torpedo to surface
the drop-out voltage is made nearly equal to
before it has lost sufficient speed such that it
pull-in voltage. The coil is thus made more sensi
tive to voltage changes after ?ring of the tor 35 would start to sink.
pedo.
The right-hand end of the armature is pro
vided with a contact 6| disposed to engage con
tact 62 in the event coil 28 is for any cause de
. Since the clock mechanisms must be useful for
repeated exercise runs it is very desirable to pro
vide simple resetting means and means for ef
fecting operation of the clock mechanism 36 in
4 0 dependent of ?ring of the torpedo.
For independent starting of the clock mecha
If the operation of all the elements is normal,
nism I utilize the actuating stem 12. This stem
namely as expected, then after the lapse of eight
projects through the top cover and has a, lower
minutes of torpedo movement through the wa
end projecting through a guide opening in the
ter, the cam portion 48 engages the actuating
bracket 13. A biasing spring 14 is disposed on
end of the resilient contact 4.5, thus causing a
the stem 12 and is disposed between the bracket
break between contacts 49 and 50. Disengage
73 and a shoulder 15 ?xed on the stem 12. The
ment of these contacts interrupts the energizing
spring l4 thus biases the stem upwardly so that
circuit for coil 28 at these contacts.
its lower end, which terminates directly above
The armature I5 is thus released, and the
spring l9 moves the armature counterclockwise.
weight 55, is out of contact with weight 55. By
The speed of movement is, however, retarded by
depressing stem 12 the weight 55 and stem 54 is
the timing device I3 since the pawls 24 engage
actuated in the same manner as if the inertia
wheel 25 to rotate the gear train for actuating
of weight 55 were to actuate stem 54.
the Verge escapement of this timing device or
If both clock mechanisms have completed their
clock mechanism l3.
cycle of operation the leaf spring 22 is out of en
After the lapse of four or ?ve seconds at the
gagement with the clip 2| and spring 59 is dis
most, contacts 6| and ‘62 are brought into en
posed in notch 58. Button 16 constitutes the reset
gagement. As soon as these contacts engage each
button for both weights 20 and 55, this button is
other, a circuit is established from the positive
spring biased upwardly to a given position. The
terminal of the battery through contacts 6| and
inner, or lower, end is provided with a bracket 11
62 to conductor 63, the squib 64 of the CO2 ?ask
having actuating arms 18 and ‘i9 and a heel por
65, conductor 66, and contacts 9 to the negative
tion 85 for actuating armature l5 and leaf springs
terminal of the battery B.
22 and 59 respectively. When button 16 is de
The CO2 ?ask gas pressure is thus admitted
pressed arm ‘58 engages clip 2| to thus move the
to the exercise head and the ballast liquid is ex 65 armature l5 down su?iciently so that the upper
pelled from the exercise head. It will be noted
U-shaped end of spring 22 can be moved over the
that the expulsion of the ballast liquid takes
energized.
place—-or at least is well underway—while the
torpedo is still in motion.
hook on clip 2|. At the same arm 19 engages the
contact 49 engages contact 5| whereupon a cir
cuit is established for the latch release coil for
the valve. The circuit is from the positive ter
right to thus release the weight 55 so that the
right-hand surface of spring 22 placing the spring
Some ten to twenty seconds after the contacts 70 22 in the position shown in Fig. '7; The heel por
tion 80 engages spring 59 to move it toward ‘the
59 and 56 move out of engagement, the resilient
spring 56 carrying this weight moves the weight
to the position shown in Fig. 4. When the button
minal l0 through coil 69, conductor 10, contacts To is released it moves to the position shown in Figs.
2,409., 16,9
7
4 and 7 but the armature l5 and Weight 55 remain‘
in the position shown in Figs. 4 and 7.
While I have shown but one embodiment of my
invention, I do not wish to be limited to the spe
ci?c showing made but wish to be limited only
by the scope of the claims hereto appended.
I claim as my invention:
1. In an electro-mechanical control system for
controlling the buoyancy of an underwater craft
normally having a negative buoyancy, in combi
nation, a chamber containing a ballast liquid, a
flask containing gas under pressure mounted on
8
ber to expel the ballast liquid therefrom, elec
tric means for establishing ?uid communication
between the ?ask and chamber, a pair of electric
terminals normally energized at a constant po
tential, electromagnetic switching means, a tor
pedo propulsion motor, trigger means operated
during the initial stages of torpedo acceleration
for connecting said electromagnetic switching
means to said terminals, said electromagnetic
10 switching means having a time limit just suffi
cient so as to connect said propulsion motor to
said terminals at the end of the accelerating
the craft for connection to the chamber contain
period of the torpedo, a short-time timing device,
ing the ballast liquid, means for establishing ?uid
a long-time timing device, inertia responsive
communication between the chamber and?ask, a 15 means for setting said short-time timing device
pair of electric terminals normally energized at a
during launching of the torpedo, electromagnetic
substantially constant potential, means respon
means, energized by the switching. means, for
sive to predetermined drop of said potential for
holding said short-time timing device in set po
operating said means for establishing ?uid com
sition, inertia responsive means for setting said
munication between the chamber and the ?ask to 20 long-time timing device during launching of the
thus admit gas from the ?ask into the chamber
torpedo, said short-time timing device being op
containing the ballast liquid.
7
erable, when released by the electromagnetic de
2. In an electromechanical control system for
vice, to energize said electric means to thus effect
controlling the buoyancy of an underwater device
connection of the ?ask to the chamber, and means
normally having a negative buoyancy, in combi 25 operable by said long-time timing device for de
nation, a chamber in the device containing a
energizing said electromagnetic means in a given
ballast liquid, a ?ask containing gas under pres
interval of time and deenergizing said electro
sure mounted on the device for connection to the
magnetic switching means in a longer interval
chamber containing the ballast liquid, electric
of time.
means for establishing ?uid communication be 30
5. In an electromechanical control system for
tween the chamber and ?ask, a pair of electric
controlling the buoyancy of a torpedo normally
terminals normally energized at a substantially
having negative buoyancy by the inclusion of a
constant potential, electromagnetic means, re
ballast liquid, normally being ?red from a ?ring
sponsive to the potential of said terminals, for
tube with considerable acceleration, and normally
energizing said electric means upon a selected 35 including means for expelling the ballast liquid
decrease in the potential across said terminals,
from the torpedo when it is to be made buoyant,
and timing means set in operation when the de
in combination, a source of electric potential, a
vice is placed under Water for automatically de
timing device, means responsive to inertia and
creasing the potential across said terminals sul?
thus normally operable during acceleration to set
ciently, after the lapse of a selected time interval,
said timing device, said timing device including
to effect deenergization of said electromagnetic
means for e?ecting the operation of said means
means to thereby effect the energization of said
for expelling the ballast liquid of a selected time
electric means.
interval after the timing device is set.
3. In an electromechanical control system for
6, In an electromechanical control system for
controlling the buoyancy of a torpedo normally 45 controlling the buoyancy of a torpedo normally
having a negative buoyancy and normally being
having negative buoyancy by reason of the in
launched with acceleration over a relatively short
clusion within the torpedo of a ballast liquid,
time interval, in combination, a chamber in said
normally being ?red from a ?ring tube with
torpedo containing a ballast liquid, a ?ask con
taining gas under pressure mounted in the tor
pedo and disposed to be connected to said cham
ber to expel the ballast liquid therefrom, electric
considerable acceleration, normally including pro
pulsion equipment set in operation the instant
the torpedo clears the ?ring tube and normally
including means for expelling the ballast liquid
means for establishing ?uid communication be
when the torpedo is to be made buoyant, in com
tween the ?ask and chamber, a pair of electric
bination, a source of electric potential normally
terminals normally energized at a constant po 55 of constant value, means responsive to a prede
tential, electromagnetic means connected to said
termined drop in potential of said source of elec
terminals and operable on a selected decrease of
tric potential, regardless of the cause of such
the potential of said terminals to energize said
drop, for effecting the operation of the means
electric means, timing means, inertia responsive
for expelling the ballast liquid from the torpedo,
means operable by the acceleration of the torpedo
a timing device, means responsive to inertia and
during launching for setting said timing means in
thus normally operable during the accelerating
operation, said timing means including means op
period of the torpedo for setting said timing de
erable a selected time interval after the timing
vice, said timing device including means for ef
means is set in operation for decreasing the po
footing the operation of said means for expelling
tential across said terminals su?iciently to deen
the ballast liquid a selected time interval after
ergize said electromagnetic means to thus eiTect
the timing device is set and including means for
energization of said electric means.
deenergizing the propulsion equipment a greater
4. In an electromechanical control system for
time interval after the timing device is set.
controlling the buoyancy of a torpedo normally
7. In an electromechanical control system for
having a negative buoyancy and normally being
controlling the buoyancy of a torpedo normally
launched with acceleration over a relatively short
having negative buoyancy by reason of the in
time interval, in combination, a chamber in said
clusion within the torpedo of a ballast liquid,
torpedo containing a ballast liquid, a ?ask con
normally being ?red from a ?ring tube with con
taining gas under pressure mounted in the tor
siderable acceleration, normally including pro
pedo and disposed to be connected to said cham
pulsion equipment set in operation the instant
2,409,169
9
the torpedo clears the ?ring tube, and normally
including means for expelling the ballast liquid
when the torpedo is to be made buoyant, in com
bination, a source of electric potential normally
10
siderable acceleration, normally including propul
sion equipment set in operation the instant the
torpedo clears the ?ring tube, and normally in
cluding means for expelling the ballast liquid
when the torpedo is to be made buoyant, in com
bination, a source of electric potential normally
sive to inertia and thus normally operable dur
of constant value, means responsive to a prede
ing the accelerating period of the torpedo for
termined drop in potential of said source of elec
setting said timing device, said timing device in
tric potential, regardless of the cause of such drop,
cluding means for effecting the operation of said
means for expelling the ballast liquid a selected 10 for effecting the operation of the means for ex
pelling the ballast liquid, a timing device, means
time interval after the timing device is set and
responsive to inertia and thus normally operable
including means for deenergizing the propulsion
during the accelerating period of the torpedo for
equipment a greater time interval after the tim
setting said timing device, said timing device in
ing device is set.
8. In an electromechanical control system for 15 cluding means for e?ecting the operation of said ‘
means for expelling the ballast liquid a selected
controlling the buoyancy of a torpedo normally
time interval after the timing device is set.
having negative buoyancy by reason of the in
clusion Within the torpedo of a ballast liquid,
CHARLES C. WHITTAKER.
normally being ?red from a ?ring tube with con
of constant value, a timing device, means respon
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
895 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа