close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

код для вставки
Patented Oct. 15, 1946
' UNU'ED
2,4t9,275
STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,409,275
CHEMICAL COIWPOUNDS AND METHOD OF
PRODUCING SAME
Benjamin B. Harris, Chicago, Ill.
N0 Drawing. Application May 19, 1944,
Serial No. 536,432
16 Claims.
1
This invention relates to the preparation of
new and useful water-soluble or water-dispersihle
chemical compounds which are characterized by
possessing interface modifying properties render‘
ingr the same highly useful for the purposes here
inafter set forth.
In general, the new and useful compounds and
reaction products of the present invention are
most, suitably prepared by reacting an anhydride
of a lower molecular weight carboxylic acid ester
of a hydroxypolycarboxylic acid with a carboxyl
ic acid partial amide of a polyamine, particularly
, an alkylene polyamine, the carboxylic acid radical
of which amide contains preferably at least four
carbon atoms and especially from eight to eight
een carbon atoms. By way of illustration, this
may be exempli?ed by reacting the anhydride of
the acetic acid ester of citric acid with the lauric
acid mono-amide of ethylene diamine. In addi
tion to the novelty of the method, the reaction
products produced herein have never been dis
closed heretofore and, therefore, their utility for
the purposes hereinafter described has been un
known.
While many of the novel products of the pres
ent invention may best be de?ned in the form of
reaction products, they and particularly some of
the more potent constituents thereof can, at least
in part, be characterized or described by way of
structural formulae. Illustrative examples of
such compounds which fall within the scope of
the invention are as follows:
0
O
0-
CH:
l\OOONa
»
Hr-COONa
(10)
2,409,275
3
In order that the full signi?cance of the inven
tion may be even more apparent, the following
illustrative examples are set forth. It will be ap
preciated that the proportions of reacting ingre
dients, times of reaction, temperatures of reac
4
tralized in whole or in part, and may be treated,
if desired, to recover the compound in pure or
substantially pure form.
The hydroxy polycarboxylic acid anhydrides
GI
tion, and the like may be varied and that sup
whose acetic acid esters and similar derivatives
are reacted with the esters, in accordance with
the present invention, may be selected from a
large group including, for example, citric acid,
plementary process of puri?cation and the like
may be resorted to wherever-found ‘desirable or
tartaric acid, malic acid, hydroxy methylsuccinic
convenient. These and other variations and
10 acid, trihydroxyglutaric acid, mucic acid, sac
modi?cations will be evident to those skilled in
charic acid, and the mono- and poly-hydroxy de
the art in the light of the guiding principles
rivatives of adipic acid, pimelic acid, suberic acid,
which are disclosed herein. ‘
‘
'
Example A
24 parts of weight of the lauric acid mono
amide of ethylene diamine and 23 parts by weight
of the anhydride of the O-O-diacetic acid ester,
of tartaric acid anhydride are heated at about
azelaic acid, sebacic acid, and the like. 1 It is pre
ferred to employ the anhydrides of the acetic acid
esters or like esters of those hydroxy polycar
boxylic acids which are water-soluble and of ali
phatic character. These acids may contain other
substituents such as CN, NI-Iz, N02, F, Cl, Br, I,
SOsI-I, phosphate, sulphate, SCN, etc., but, for
100° C. to 115° C. until a homogeneous product
is obtained. The resulting reaction product con 20 best results, substituents should be absent. Of
particular importance are citric and tartaric
tains a substantial amount of a compound of
acids.
the formula
In place of the anhydrides of the acetic acid
"esters of the hydroxy polycarboxylic acids, there
may be employed the anhydrides of any carbox
ylic acid ester of a hydroxy polycarboxylic acid,
said carboxylic acid being preferably water-solu
ble and of aliphatic or fatty character and par
ticularly containing not more than six carbon
The product may be partially or completely neu-.I 30 atoms although the invention is not so limited.
Examples of such derivatives are those from pro
tralized with any of the alkaline materials men
Vpionic acid, butyric acid, valeric acid, maleic acid,
tioned hereafter. It shows good foaming and
succinic acid, and the like. or particular utility,
wetting-out characteristics. The reaction mix
however, are the acetic acid ester derivatives.
ture may, if desired, be treated to recover the
desired compound therefrom by means of organic. 35 The partial amides which are reacted with the
anhydrides of the acetic acid esters of the hy
solvents. Alternatively, if desired, the reaction
droxy polycarboxylic acids may be derived from
mixture may be evaporated to dryness, preferably
a large group of carboxylic acids and polyamines.
in vacuo, and used as such or the desired com
Representative of such partial amides are, for
pound recovered therefrom by means of organic
example, including some of those set out herein
solvent media.
above, the lauric acid mono-amide of ethylene di
Example B
.
amine, the oleic acid mono-amide of ethylene di
34 parts by weight of the palrnitic acid mono
amine, the lauric and oleic acid mono-amides of
amide of diethylene triamine and 23 parts by
diethylene triamine, the caprylic acid mono
weight of the anhydride of the acetic acid ester
45 amide of triethylene tetra-amine, the ricinoleic
about
100°
C.
to
120“
of citric acid are heated at
acid mono-amide of propylene diamine, and the
C. until a homogeneous product is obtained. The
like.
resulting product contains a substantial amount
A representative list of carboxylic acids the
of acompound of the formula
partial amides of which with the polyamines are
50 utilized in accordance with the present invention
comprises straight chain and branched chain,
saturated and unsaturated, carboxylic, aliphatic
(including cycloaliphatic), fatty, aromatic, hy
dro-aromatic, and araliphatic acids including
The reaction product, which had properties simi 55 acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, caproic
acid, pimelic acid, enanthic acid, caprylic acid,
lar to those of Example A, may be neutralized
pelargonicv acid, capric acid, sebacic acid, behenic
in whole'or in part, and may be treated, if de
acid, arachidic acid, cerotic acid, erucic acid, me
sired, to recover the compound in pure or sub
lissic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, ricinoleic acid,
stantially pure form.
too ricinelaidic acid, ricinostearolic acid, linoleic acid,
Example C
linolenic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic
32 parts by weight of the oleic acid mono
amide of ethylene diamine and 26 parts by weight
of the ‘anhydride of the propionic acid ester of
citric acid are heated at about 100° C. to 120°~' 65
C. until a homogeneous product is obtained. The
resulting reaction product contains a substantial
amount of a compound of the formula
The reaction product, which has properties simi
lar to those of Examples A and B, may be neu
acid, mixtures of any two or more of the above
mentionedv acids or other acids, mixed higher
fatty acids derived from animal or vegetable
sources, for example, lard, coconut oil, rapeseed
oil, sesame oil, palm kernel oil, palm oil, olive oil,
corn oil, cottonseed oil, sardine oil, tallow, soya
bean oil, peanut oil, castor oil, seal oils, whale oil,
shark oil and other ?sh oils, partially or com-.
70 plete hydrogenated animal and vegetable oils such
as those mentioned; oxidized hydroxy and alpha
hydroxy higher carboxylic, aliphatic and fatty
and/or polymerized higher fatty acids or higher
fatty acids derived from oxidized and/0r polymer
ized triglyceride oils; acyloxy carboxylic acids
2,409,275
5
6
amino-propanol; alkylamines such as ethylamine,
as i-hydroxy stearic acid, dihydroxypalmitic acid, -
di-hydroxy-stearic acid, dihydroxybehenic acid,
alpha-hydroxy capric acid, alpha-hydroxy stear
ic acid, alpha-hydroxy palmitic acid, alpha-hy
droxy lauric vacid, alpha-hydroxy myristic acid,
alpha-hydroxy coconut oil mixed fatty acids, a1
pha-hydroxy margaric acid, alpha-hydroxy ara
C1
propylamine, laurylamine, cetylamine, butyl
amine, hexylamine, cyclohexylamine, aniline,
toluidines, dimethylamine, diethylamine, N
methyl-N-ethyl amine, triethylamine, trimethyl
amine, ethylene diamine, diethylene triamine, tri
ethylene tetra-amine, betaine, mono-methyl
ethylene diamine, monoethyl diethylene tetra
amine, mono-allyl amine, hydrazine and substi
tuted hydrazine, aromatic and heterocyclic bases
chidic acid, and the like; fatty and similar acids
derived from various waxes such as beeswax,
spermaceti, montan wax, coccerin, and carnauba
Wax and higher molecular weight carboxylic
acids derived, by oxidation and other methods,
from para?in wax, petroleum and similar hydro~
and cyclic nitrogenous substances such as ben
zylamine, cyclohexylethyl aniline, morpholine,
pyridine, dimethylaniline, N-methyi-N-benzyl‘
amine, N-ethyl-N-naphthyl amine, quinoline,
carbons; resinic and hydroaromatic acids such as 15 quinaldine, piperidine, alkyl pyridines such as
hexahydrobenzoic acid, naphthenic acid and
abietic acid; araliphatic and aromatic acids such
methylpyridine, pyrrolidines, nicotine, and homo
as phthalic acid, benzoic acid, Twitchell fatty
acids, naphthoic acid, pyridine carboxylic acid;
hydroxy aromatic acids such as salicylic acid, hy
droxy benzoic and .naphthoic acids, and the like.
thereof, and, in general, primary, secondary and
logues and derivatives or substitution products
tertiary amines substituted or not with other rad
icals, such as hydroxy, alkyl, aryl, cycloalkyl
groups and the like; ' quaternary ammonium
bases or hydroxides such as tetra-methyl ammo
It Will be understood that mixtures of any two or
more of said acids may be employed if desired
and it will also be appreciated that said acids may
contain substituent groups such as sulphate, sul
nium hydroxide, tetra-ethyl ammonium hydrox
ide, quaternary ammonium bases with dissimilar
alkyl radicals such as methyl-triethyl ammonium
hydroxide, propyl trimethyl ammonium hydrox
phonic, nitrile, cyanogen, carbonyl, amide, amine,
vhalogen, ketone and other groups. Of particular
utility are the unsubstituted fatty acids contain
ing from twelve to eighteen carbon atoms.
The polyamines the partial amides of which are
employed in the reactions may be selected from
a large group, particularly the alkylene poly
amines and polyalkylene polyamines and the alkyl
and aralkyl derivatives thereof, as for example,
ide; mixtures of any two or more of said bases as,
for example, in the case of commercial triethanol
amine which contains minor proportions of mono
and di-ethanolamine; proteins and partial di
gestion or hydrolysis products thereof. It will be
understood that these substituted ammonium
compounds or organic nitrogenous bases may be
utilized in pure, impure, or commercial form.
It will be understood that by the term “cation,”
as used throughout the speci?cation and claims,
ethylene diamine, diethylene triamine, triethyl
ene tetra-amine, propylene diamine, butylene di
amine, dipropylene triamine, mono-ethyl ethyl
is meant hydrogen and such other elements as are
ene diamine, mono-ethyl diethylene tetra-amine,
piperazine, mono-ethyl ethylene diamine mono
ethyl diethylene triamine, beta-dimethyl-amino
ethyl amine, and the like.
It will be understood that partial amides of any
of the listed carboxylic acids with any of the
listed polyamines may be utilized for reaction in
accordance with the invention.
>
The reaction products may be used as such or
mentioned herein, and, in general, atoms or radi
cals which are regarded as hearing a positive
40
charge or capable of replacing acidic hydrogen.
The reaction products may be neutralized to
methyl orange, litmus or phenolphthalein or to
any desired hydrogen ion concentration. As a
general rule, if the salts of the reaction products
' are employed, it is preferred to use the sodium,
potassium, ammonium, alkylolamine, or other
soluble salts.
suitable anti-acid materials. In this connection,
The compounds of the invention have utility in
considerable latitude and modi?cation may be
various arts in which interface modifying agents
exercised. In general, inorganic as well as or 50 are employed. Many of them are fairly resistant
ganic anti-acid agents may be employed. Exam
to precipitation by calcium and magnesium salts
ples of such agents which may be used satisfac
and are compatible with acid and alkali media.
torily are bicarbonates of the alkali metals, po
They may be utilized in Washing and laundering
tassiiun hydroxide, potassium carbonate, metal
and in the textile and related industries wherein
lic sodium, sodium hydroxide, sodium oxide, so 55 they function for wetting, lathering, detergent,
dium carbonate, ammonium hydroxide, ammonia
emulsifying, penetrating, dispersing, frothing and
they may be neutralized, in whole or in part, with
gas, calcium‘, magnesium, ammonium, and zinc
oxides, hydroxides, and salts, potassium stearate,
sodium stearate, and the like; organic nitrogenous
foaming purposes. The textiles, various treat~
ments of which in the presence of the agents of
the present invention is rendered effective, com
bases such as primary, secondary and tertiary 60 prise natural products such as cotton, wool, linen
amines including alcohol-, alkylol-, and aral
and the like as well as the arti?cially produced
kylol-amines, including monoethanolamine, di
ethanolamine, triethanolamine, propanolamines,
butanolamines, pentanolamines, hexanolamines,
glycerolamines, sugar alkylolamines and sugar al
cohol alkylolamines such as those of dextrose,
sucrose, sorbitol, mannitol and the like; dimethyl
monoethanolamine, diethyl monoethanolamine,
dibutyl mono-ethanolamine, diethanol methyl
amine, diethanol ethyl amine, diethanol butanol
amine, cyclohexyl ethanolamine, diethanol cyclo
hexylamine, ethanol aniline, alkylol polyamines
such as alkylol derivatives of ethylene diamine,
mono-methyl mono-ethanolamine, diethyl mono
etha-nolamine; l-amino-Z, 3-propanediol; 1,2-di
?bres (and fabrics) such as rayon, cellulose, ace
tates, cellulose ethers and similar arti?cial silk
fabrics. ,It will be understood, of course, that the
agents may be used in aqueous and other media
either alone or in combination with other suitable
salts of organic or inorganic character or with
other interface modifying agents. In the dyeing
of textiles many of them may be employed as as
sistants in order to bring about even level shades.
Many of them also may be used in the leather in
dustry as wetting agents in soaking, dyeing, tan
ning and the softening and other treating baths
for hides and skins. Their utility as emulsifying
75 agents enables them to be employed for the prepa
2,409,275
7
ration of emulsions which may be used for in
secticidal, fungicidal and for similar agriculture
purposes. They have utility in the preparation of
hair washes. and hair shampoos, dentri?ces of
liquid, cream and powder type, cosmetic creams
such as cold creams, vanishing creams, tissue
creams, shaving creams of .the brushless and
lathering type and similar cosmetic preparations.
um sulphate, and the like; higher molecular
weight sulphonic acid derivatives such as cetyl
sodium sulphonate and lauryl sodium sulphonate;
sulphocarboxylic acid esters of higher molecular
weight alcohols such as lauryl sodium sulphoace
tate, dioctyl sodium sulpho-succinate, dilauryl
potassium sulpho-glutarate, lauryl monoethanol
amine sulpho-acetate, and the like; higher fatty
acid partial esters of aliphatic polyhydric alco
Another use to which many of the agents of my
invention may be placed is for the treatment of 10 hols, such as monolaurin, mono-olein, monoste
arin, dilaurin, lauric acid mono-ester of ethylene
paper or paper pulp or the like. Their capillary
glycol 0r diethylene glycol, stearic and oleic acid
or interfacial tension reducing properties en
partial esters of polyglycerols, and the like; sul
ables them to be employed in the fruit and vege
phuric and sulphonic derivatives of condensation
table industry in order to effect the removal from
products of alkylolamines and higher fatty acids;
fruits and the like of arsenical and similar sprays.
.
reaction products of phosphoric, pyrophosphoric,
They possess utility in the ore dressing industry
meta-phosphoric tetraphosphoric, and polyphos
wherein they function effectively in froth ?ota
tion and agglomeration processes. Their inter
face modifying properties also permit their use
in lubricating oils and the like enabling the-pro
duction of effective boring oils, cutting oils, drill
ing oils, wire drawing oils, extreme pressure lubri
phoric acids with higher molecular weight alco
hols; Turkey-Red oils; compounds of the type of
isopropyl naphthalene sodium sulphonate, and
them useful in various environments such as
not be utilized in the pure state. Indeed, in most
instances it will be found to be more convenient
and commercially desirable to employ them in
other classes of wetting agents, such as cationic
agents, for example, lauryl amine and lauryl
amine hydrochloride, lauryl pyridinium chloride,
cants and the like. Various of them possess bac
octadecyl pyridinium iodide, quaternary ammoni
tericidal, germicidal, bacteriostatic, antiseptic,
disinfectant, fungicidal, preserving and, in gen 25 um compounds generally, and the like.
It will be understood that the compounds need
eral, chemotherapeutic properties which render
tooth pastes, tooth powders, liquid dentifrices,
mouth washes and the like. Many of them may
also be used with effect in the preparation of
metal and furniture polishes, shoe polishes, in
rubber compositions, for breaking or demulsify
ing petroleum emulsions such as those of the
Water-in-oil type which are encountered in oil
the form of their reaction mixtures with or with
out the addition of diluents. It will also be un
derstood that mixtures of any one or more of the
reacting constituents may be employed in pro
ducing the products hereof and this is particu..
?eld operations, in paints and the like, and for 35 larly the case where commercial supplies of the
chemicals are utilized; and, in addition, any of
various other purposes which will readily occur
the esters of the hydroxy polycarboxylic acid an
to those versed in the art in the light of my dis
hydrides listed above may be reacted with any
closure herein.
of the partial amides of the polyamines described.
As detergents, they may in general be dissolved
in water or aqueous media and utilized inthat
form or, in the case of solid products, they may
The term “higher,” as used herein and in the
claims to describe carboxylic and fatty acids and
the like, will be understood to mean at least eight
be packaged and sold in such form preferably
carbon atoms unless otherwise speci?cally stated.
mixed with diluents. They may also be utilized
The term “poly” wherever used herein will be
for commercial cleansing, 1aundering and wash
45 understood to be employed in its usual sense,
ing operations with advantage.
namely, to denote two or more.
It will be understood that the products of the
What I claim as new and desire to protect by
present invention may be employed for their var
Letters Patent of the United States is:
ious purposes either alone or together with lesser
1. A process of preparing new chemical com
.or greater quantities of inorganic or organic com
pounds. Thus, for example, many of them may 50 pounds which comprises condensing a carboxylic
acid mono-amide of a polyamine with an anhy
be employed together with salts such as sodium
dride of an aliphatic carboxylic acid ester of an
chloride, alkali metal phosphates including pyro
phosphates and tetraphosphates, sodium sul
phate, alums, perborates such as sodium perbo
rate, and the like.
aliphatic hydroxy-polycarboxylic acid, the radi
cal of said last-mentioned aliphatic carboxylic
Many of said products may 55 acid containing less than 6 carbon atoms, to
be utilized in alkaline or acid media in the pres
ence ofsodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate,
dilute acids such as hydrochloric, sulphurous,
acetic and similar inorganic and organic acids.
They may also be employed in the presence of
such diverse substances as hydrophilic gums in
cluding pectin, tragacanth, karaya, locust bean,
gelatin, arabic and the like, glue, vegetable, ani
mal, ?sh and mineral oils, solvents such as car
amidify the mono-amide of the polyamine
through a carboxyl group of said polycarboxylic
acid anhydride.
2. A process of preparing new chemical com
pounds which comprises condensing a fatty acid
mono-amide of an alkylene polyamine, the fatty
acid radical of which contains at least 6 carbon
atoms, with an anhydride of a lower molecular
weight fatty acid ester of a water-soluble ali
bon tetrachloride, monoethyl ether of ethylene
glycol, monobutyl ether of ethylene glycol, mono
ethyl and monobutyl ethers of diethylene glycol,
cyclohexanol, and the like.‘ They may be used
phatic hydroxy-dicarboxylic acid, the lower mo
lecular weight fatty acid radical of which con
tains less than 6 carbon atoms, to amidify the
mono-amide of the alkylene polyamine through
together with wetting, emulsifying, 'frothing,
foaming, penetrating or detergent agents such
hydride. ,
as the higher molecular weight alkyl sulphates‘,
phosphates,
pyrophosphates,
and
tetraphos
phates as, for example, lauryl sodium sulphate,
myristyl sodium pyrophosphate, cetyl sodium
tetraphosphate, octyl sodium sulphate, oleyl sodi
a carboxyl group of said dicarboxylic acid an
3. A process of preparing new chemical com
pounds which comprises condensing the lauric
acid mono-amide of an alkylene diamine with an
anhydride of a lower molecular weight aliphatic
monocarboxylic acid mono-ester of a water-solu;
2,409,275
'
10
9
ble aliphatic hydroxy-polycarboxylic acid, the
lower molecular weight aliphatic monocarboxylic
acid radical of which contains less than 6 carbon
atoms, to amidify the mono-amide of the alkylene
diamine through a carboxyl group of said poly
carboxylic acid anhydride.
4. A process of preparing new chemical com
pounds which comprises condensing a fatty acid
mono-amide of an ethylene polyamine, the fatty
acid radical of which contains from 8 to 18 car
bon atoms, with an anhydride of a water-solu
ble acetic acid ester of an aliphatic hydrdxy
alkylene polyamines, the fatty acid radical of
which contains from 8 to 18 carbon atoms.
11. Amides of polyamines containing at least 2
primary amino groups, one of said primary amino
groups being amidi?ed with a carboxylic acid
containing at least 6 carbon atoms in a straight
chain, and one of said primary amino groups be
amidified by a lower molecular weight ali
phatic carboxylic acid ester of a hydroxy-poly
10 carboxylic acid through a carboxyl group of the
polycarboxylic acid, to amidify the mono-amide
hydroxy-polycarboxylic acid, the lower molecu
lar weight aliphatic carboxylic acid radical of
said ester containing less than 6 carbon atoms.
of an ethylene polyamine through a carboxyl
12. Amides of ethylene diamine wherein one
group of said polycarboxylic acid anhydride.
15 amino group of the ethylene diamine is amidi?ed
5. From water-soluble to water-dispersible ali
with a fatty acid containing from 8 to 18 carbon
phatic carboxylic acid esters of aliphatic hy
atoms, and the other amino group of the ethyl
droxy-polycarboxylic acids, the aliphatic carbox
ene diamine is amidi?ed by the acetic acid ester
ylic acid radical of Which contains less than 6
of tartaric acid through a carboxyl group of the
carbon atoms, at least one carboxyl group of said 20 tartaric acid.
hydroxy-polycarboxylic acid being amide-linked
to a carboxylic acid amide of a polyamine con
13. The acetic acid ester of citric acid at least’
one carboxyl group of which is amide-linked to
taining at least one free primary amino group,
a carboxylic acid amide of a polyamine, and salts
said amide-linkage occurring through said pri
thereof.
mary amino group of said carboxylic acid amide 25
14. The acetic acid ester of citric acid at least
of a polyamine.
'
one carboxyl group of which is amide-linked to
6. From water-soluble to water-dispersible fat_
the lauric acid mono-amide of ethylene diamine,
ty acid esters of aliphatic hydroxy-polycarbox
and salts thereof.
ylic acids, the fatty acid radical of which con
15. Chemical compounds in accordance with
tains less than 6 carbon atoms, at least one car 30 the formula
‘
boxyl group of said hydroxy-polycarboxylic acid
being amide-linked to a carboxylic acid amide of
an alkylene polyamine containing at least one
free primary amino group, said amide-linkage
occurring through said primary amino group of 35
said carboxylic acid amide of an alkylene poly
amine.
7. From water-soluble to water-dispersible ali
phatic carboxylic acid esters of aliphatic hy
droxy-polycarboxylic acids, the aliphatic carbox 40
ylic acid radical of which contains less than 6
carbon atoms, at least one carboxyl group of said
hydroxy-polycarboxylic acid being amide-linked
to a fatty acid mono-amide of an alkylene dia
mine, the fatty acid radical containing from 8 45 is a fatty acid acyl radical containing from 8 to
‘
18 carbon atoms, alk is alkylene, M is a cation,
8. From water-soluble to water-dispersible
and '0 is an integer from 1 to 3.
acetic acid esters of aliphatic hydroxypolycarbox
to 18 carbon atoms.
ylic acids, at least one carboxyl group of said hy- 7
droxy-polycarboxylic acid being amide-linked to
16. Chemical compounds in accordance with
the formula
0
a fatty acid mono-amide of an ethylene polya
rnine, the fatty acid radical of said mono-amide
containing at least 8 carbon atoms.
9. From water-soluble to water-dispersible
acetic acid esters of water-soluble hydroxy-poly
carboxylic acids, at least one carboxyl group of
‘said hydroxypolycarboxylic acids being amide
linked to a fatty acid mono-amide of ethylene di
amine, the fatty acid radical of said mono-amide
containing at least 8 carbon atoms.
60
CH3
+=<>
CH3
Where
R-o
t
10. Amides of lower molecular weight aliphatic
carboxylic acid esters of aliphatic hydroxy poly
is a fatty acid acyl radical containing from 8 to
carboxylic acids, the lower molecular weight ali
l8_carbon atoms, and M is a cation.
phatic carboxylic acid radical containing less
than 6 carbon atoms, with fatty acid amides of 65
BENJAMIN R. HARRIS.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
748 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа