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Патент USA US2409308

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m 15, 1946-
2,469,396
A. E. PAGE ET AL
KNITTING MACHINE v
Filed ApriI _1, 1944 I
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m 15, 1946‘
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A; E. PAGE ET AL
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KNITTINGZMACHINE
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F‘ilied April 1, 1944
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2,4099305
Patented Oct. 15, 1946
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE’
,
2,409,306
KNITTING MACHINE
Albert E. Page and Frank R. Page, Laconia, N. H.,
assignors to Scott & Williams, Incorporated,v
Laconia; N. H., a corporation of New Hamp
shire
Application 11111411, 1944, Serial No. 529,103
23 Claims. (Cl. 66—125)
1
2
This invention relates to knitting machines
having latch needles and, in particular, to the
since then there is ample space between the low
ermost permissible position of the throat plate
proper presentation of an incoming yarn for sei
zure by the ?rst needle which is to draw a stitch
edge and the level of the points of the bills of
the needle hooks as they approach the position
thereof.
‘
After a newly inserted yarn is wized by a needle
and its drawing by the needle occurs, its path of
of ?rst engagement of the incoming yarn, so that
the yarn is engaged by a needle suf?ciently below
its bill to insure proper seizure.
In the case of
approach ‘to the needles is de?ned by an upper
short latch needles, however, this space is con
by the hooks of the needles
they move down
wardly in their stitch-drawing actions. The edge
of the throat plate is above a straight line drawn
slightly from the straight path between the yarn
feeding finger and the clamp, it will be missed
by the needle which should engage it and may be
from the point at which the yarn leaves the
eye of its feeding finger to said position at which
it is first engaged by a needle hook so that a bend
in its path occurs at the edge of the throat plate,
the throat plate thereby taking a. major part in
coming yarns are desirable so that this may easily
result in failure to secure any overlap or, at any
siderably reduced so that it is quite possible that,
edge of a throat plate over which it feeds from
a yarn ?nger to a position assumed successively 10 if the yarn is loose and bowed upwardly only
seized ?rst by some subsequent needle, perhaps
spaced several needles from that which should
seize it. Very short overlaps of outgoing and in
rate, the necessary overlap to insure effective ty
de?ning the line of approach to the needles, This
upper edge of the throat plate must be positioned 20 ing in of the yarns.
In accordance with the present invention
su?iicently high to be in the path 0i swing of any
proper seizure of the incoming yarn by the needle
needle latch which might tend to swing closed
which is to take it is insured by a momentary
as it passes the throat plate (for example due to
lowering of the throat plate, and, consequently,
a press—o? incidental to yarn breakage or other
cause). thereby to insure its remaining open. If 25 of the ‘yarn ?nger carrying the incoming yarn,
permitted to swing closed, damage may occur
even though a press-off stop motion is provided
since there will, nevertheless, occur one-half or
more of a revolution; or in some cases, the stop
motion may fail to operate if the press-off occurs a‘
on only a few needles. - The upper edge of the
throat plate must also be sui?ciently high to in
sure that the partially closed latch of a needle
will fully close rather than break as it passes be
yond the throat plate and comes into engagement
with any part of the machine, this requiring, gen
erally, that the needle latch should make only a
small angle with the shank rather than be wide
open.
‘
As a yarn ?nger is ?rst moved down into action,
below the position which it must have to insure
proper control of the needle latches. By this
action, a sufficiently low path of the incoming
yarn is insured, even if it bows upwardly, to bring
it below the path of the point of the bill of a
needle to effect its proper seizure.
While the invention is thus primarily useful
a machine having short latch needles, it will
be evident that similar insurance of proper yarn
seizure is of more general application, and the
broad object of the invention may thus be stated
to be the insurance of properyarn seizure in
general.
The foregoing and other objects of the inven
tlon, particularly relating to the details of accom
plishment of this result, will be apparent _from
the following description read in conjunction with
the accompanying drawings, in which:
feeding ?nger and the point at which it is en
Figure l is a perspective view of a latch ring,
gaged by the yarn clamp. This latter point, par
ticularly in the case 01’ a machine having dial 45 throat plate, and associated sinker cap oi‘ a knit
ting machine;
needles, is necessarily high (since it must be
Figure 2 is an elevation, partly in section, of
above the dial cap, for example) _, so that the path
the throat plate and a portion of the latch ring
of the yarn as it is ?rst presented to the ‘needles
of Figure 1;
'
'
is correspondingly high if the throat plate is
su?ioiently high to insure holding open the needle 50 Figure 2A is an enlarged sectional view illus
trating certain details'of what is shown in Fig
latches as above described, since the edge of the
ure 2;
throat plate de?nes the lowest position which
Figure 3 is a fragmentary perspective View
the yarn could then take,
showing the path taken by an incoming yarn if
The foregoing considerations are not of par
however, the position of the yarn is a straight line
between the point at which it leaves the eyeOf its
‘ ticular importance if long latch needles are used, 55
.the throat plate isin its ‘normal feeding position;
2,409,306
3
4
Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 3 but show
ing the throat plate lowered in accordance with
the invention to insure engagement of an incom
ing yarn by a needle;
Figure 5 is a fragmentary elevation, partly in
section, showing one yarn in a feeding position,
and another yarn in an inactive position;
Figure 6 is a View similar to Figure 5 but show
ing the inactive yarn of Figure 5 in feeding posi
vention, pivoted to the latch ring at 20, being
the matter of Figure 6, the throat plate, however,
securing screw, this button being engageable by
. not yet having been lowered to the position of
a-thrust bar 30 guided in a slot in a plate 32
stitch cam to effect the drawing of stitches. A
throat plate l8 serving to provide a ledge 22 over
which yarns are fed from yarn guides to the
needles is, in accordance with the present in
urged in a direction to raise the ledge 22 by the
action of a leaf spring 24 secured to the latch
ring 2 and exerting a force on the throat plate
through a pin 26. In order to effect lowering of
10 the ledge 22, the throat plate is provided with an
tion with the throat plate lowered;
Figure 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view of
eccentric button 28 which is adjustable about its
that ?gure, i. e., corresponding to the position
and arranged to be acted upon by cams 34 on
illustrated in Figure 3;
15 the main cam drum 36 of the machine similar
Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7 but show
ing the throat plate in the position of Figure 6
and corresponding to Figure 4;
,
Figure 9 is a diagrammatic view showing the
relation of various cams on the cam drum to
effect a complete sequence of yarn change opera
tions;
in construction and operation to that shown in
Scott Patent No. 1,148,055, dated July 2'7, 1915.
The tilting movements imparted to the throat
plate are limited by engagement by the bottoms
40 of recesses therein with the heads of adjust
able screws 38 arranged to be locked in position
by screws 42 threaded into the same holes in the
Figure 10 is a perspective fragmentary view of
latch ring as the screws 38.
the throat plate and associated parts looking out
Yarn feeding fingers 44 pivoted at 46 to the
wardly from the needle cylinder;
25 latch ring are adapted to be acted upon by thrust
Figure 11 is an elevation, looking outwardly
bars 48 actuable by cams 54 on the cam drum
from the needle cylinder, of the throat plate and
36 to effect yarn changes. These yarn ?ngers 44
needles showing the relation of the throat plate
are provided with yarn feeding eyes 50 delivering
to the needles when lowered for a yarn change,
the yarns to recesses 52 located outwardly of toes
the needles being turned through an angle of 30 53, which, when the yarn ?ngers are in feeding
90° from their normal position for purposes of
position, are adapted to engage the ledge 22 of
illustration;
Figure 12 is a fragmentary view showing a por
tion of the throat plate and a needle, illustrating
the possibility of breakage of a needle latch if a 35
press-off occurs; and
Figure 13 is a view similar to Figure 12 but
the throat plate, the ?ngers having clearance
behind the toes so that the toes de?ne their
active positions. The yarn ?ngers 44 are urged
downwardly by springs (not shown) acting, in
effect, against the thrust bars 48 but having ten
sions insufficient to overcome the pressure exerted
by the leaf spring 24 which holds the throat plate
needle latches nearly closed as they approach a
raised. The recesses 52 insure a free space for
corner of the throat plate.
40 the movement of yarn between the yarn ?ngers
The drawings illustrate the invention as ap
and the throat plate.
plied to a knitting machine such as disclosed in
The throat plate, as illustrated particularly in
Patent No. 1,282,958 to R. W. Scott, dated Octo
Fig. 11, is provided with a corner 56 designed to
ber 29, 1918, though it will be understood that the
engage and hold the latches of needles which
invention is applicable to knitting machines in
may be riding at a level slightly above the level
general with proper modi?cation of details of
of the four highest needles illustrated in Fig. 11.
illustrating the necessity for maintaining the
v the mechanism involved. A latch ring 2 is shown
in association with a sinker cap 4, the latch ring
being pivoted at 6 to a bracket 1 upstanding from
and attached to the bed plate of the machine.
The invention is particularly applicable to a
machine having a welt dial such as indicated at 8
supported by a shaft ID as in said Scott patent,
and carrying a yarn clamp illustrated as com
prising a plate [2 against which the yarns are
held by a lever M. This clamp is associated
with a cutter which is not shown, but which may
be of conventional type. The presence of a dial
such as 8 limits the location of the clamp which
it carries and, as will be evident hereafter, the
fact that the clamp cannot be positioned sub
stantially lower gives rise to the conditions mak
ing desirable the present invention. The latch
needles it which are illustrated as of the short
latch type are mounted in the usual slotted
needle cylinder (not shown) and travel in a con
ventional knitting wave under the action of the
usual knitting cams. This wave involves succes
This corner 56 is bevelled as indicated at 58 as are
also the corners 6i] and 62 of the throat plate
ends. The purposes of these bevels will be
brought out hereafter.
Figures 5 to 8, inclusive, will .make clear the
results e?ected by the present invention. After
a yarn has been seized by the needles and is being
knit in normal fashion, its path is determined as
the shortest path from the eye of the yarn ?nger
from which it is fed, over the edge of the throat
plate, to the location where it is engaged by the
hooks of the needles as they move down the
stitch cam. This shortest path may carry it into
the corner of the throat plate (below the bevel 62
of Fig. 11) which thereby determines the point
from which feed takes place to the needle cylin
der. At any rate, during this normal feed of the
yarn, the throat plate de?nes the point from
which the direct approach to the needles occurs.
As will be evident from the upper position of the
throat plate illustrated in Figs. 5 and 7 and a con
sideration of the needle path as indicated in Fig.
sive needle positions as illustrated in Figure 11,
the needles approaching the position to which 70 11, the yarn thus feeding to the needles ap
proaches a position at the radius of the bills of
the yarn is fed at a level, such as illustrated by
the needle hooks at a level safely below the bills
the right-hand groupof needles in that ?gure,
so that as the needles move in their circular path,
being then depressed by the usual top center cam
the bills are carried well over the yarn, which ?rst
to the level shown in the intermediate portions
of that ?gure, and being then depressed by the
engages the shanks and is thereafter seized by
2,409,806
5
6
the hooks as ‘the needles move under the action
of the stitch cam.
may cause the latch to‘have a‘ force applied ‘to
it almost directly in line with its pivot which will
result in breakage. 0n the other hand, even if,
A quite different condition exists, however,
under the circumstances of the ?rst seizure of a
yarn by the needles. Figure '7 indicates what
through some accidental occurrence, the latch
would occur if introduction or“ the yarn were at
upper normal position, there would be obtained
tempted with the throat plate at the normal feed-n
the relationship of the latch to the throat plate
ing level. As illustrated in that ?gure, a yarn ?n
ger' has just been lowered‘ into action by with
drawal of its thrust rod t8 and the action of its
spring. The throat plate would, under such cir
cumstances, arrest the yarn ?nger, the effective
force of the spring 214 being sufficient to overcome
the tension applied to the yarn ‘?nger. If the
yarn is taut, it will under these conditions ex
tend from the yarn ?nger substantially hori
zontally or even slightly upwardly to the yarn
clamp. As indicated in Figure 7 this will result
in its being laid across the needle circle only
slightly, if at all, below the bill of a needle hook
riding at the level determined by the top center
cam. Even if it is below the bill of the hook when
in taut condition, such condition cannot, of
course, be assumed to occur regularly in actual
operation, and it is therefore more than likely
illustrated in dotted lines in Figure 12; i. e., the
angle between the latch and the throat plate
10 would be relatively small so that descent of the
needle would merely swing the latch toward closed
position Without resulting in the application of
lengthwise thrust to the latch to break the pivot.
Figure 12 also serves to indicate the conditions
15 which might arise in connection with the bevel
58. It will be evident that if the throat plate was
lowered as indicated in Fig. 12, the latch would
happened to get above the throat plate in its
reach the bevel at such an angle as to fail to
ride upwardly thereover. On the other hand, if
v20 the throat plate is raised, the angle of approach
of the latch to the bevel will be such that the
bevel may readily cam it upwardly.
Figure 13 shows somewhat similar conditions
arising in connection with a movement of the
25 needles in the forward direction and their co
operation with bevel 62. It will be evident that
that the yarn may be bowed upwardly so as not
with the latch in the full line position, it may
to be cleared by the bill of the hook of the needle
which should seize it as that needle advances.
engage the bevel G2 in such fashion as to be
broken, whereas, if it is in the dotted line posi
It is, of course, likely to be seized by some subse
quent needle but if a desirable short overlap is 30 tion due to the upper position of the throat plate,
it will reach this bevel at such an angle as to be
provided, the yarn which has been knitting may
caunn ed toward closed position.
be withdrawn from action before seizure of the
The operations involved in a, yarn change to
new yarn takes place.
secure the momentary depression or" the throat
To insure proper and certain seizure of the
newly inserted yarn, therefore, the present inven 35 plate followed by its rise to normal position will
be apparent frorn'consideration of Figure 9, in
tion contemplates the momentary lowering of
the throat plate and, therefore, of the'yarn ?nger , which there‘ are shown the push rod 38 which
which follows it under the action of its individual
controls the throat plate, the push rods 158' and
spring. The condition thus secured is illustrated
£3” which control, respectively, the yarn ?ngers
in Figure 8 from which it will be seen that such 40 going into and out of action, and the correspond
ing cams at, at’ and 5t" acting upon these push
depression of the throat plate and yarn ?nger
rods. The sequence of operations which occur
results in a lowering of the path of the‘ yarn ex
in a, "single advance of the pattern drum 36 in
tending to the clamp so that even though the
volves, first, the elevation of the push rod 39 to
yarn may be loose and may bow upwardly, it will,
nevertheless, be below the bill of the needle in 45 depress the throat plate, and simultaneous or
immediate release of the push rod 43' by the cam
position to be properly seized thereby.
It is not possible to maintain the throat plate . tit’ to lower the ?nger of the yarn going into
action, and then the elevation of the rod 48" to
permanently in the lowered position of Figure 8
take out of action the yarn which is being re
if short latch needles are used. This will be
evident from consideration of Fig. 11. As will 50 moved along with the simultaneous or immediate
subsequent dropping of the rod 3% oil the cam 34
be evident from that ?gure which shows the
to
the spring lit to rock the throat plate
throat plate in its lowered position correspond
upwardly to its normal position, there being
ing to Figure 8, a sufficiently low position to in~
raised slightly with it the newly lowered yarn
sure .seizure of the yarn as just mentioned will .
result in a positioning of the upper edge of the‘ 55 ?nger which rests upon it. Similar sequences of
operations occur in each yarn change in knitting
throat plate only very slightly below the level at
a stocking. The precise timing may vary depend
which there move the spoons of the needle latches
ing upon the yarn ?nger positions, inertia and
as they approach the top center cam. Since the
friction, and is properly secured by suitably form
position of these needles may vary slightly so
that some may ride slightly higher than the theo 60 ing or adjusting the cams.
The foregoing sequence of operations occurs in
retical level, it is not satisfactory to run the risk
a very small interval corresponding to the pas~
of the latches getting above the throat plate by
of only a few of the needles past a given
having them too close to the upper edge thereof.
point so that only during this very limited time
Accordingly, for the insurance of proper action,
is there any possibility that a needle latch might
the throat plate should be su?ciently high to
be located above the throat plate. Since such
have its upper edge substantially above the ends
location of a latch is, in any event, a matter of
of the latches, in which case it will normally be at
accident, the probability that there would
the level of Figures 5 and 7, too high for proper
occur any breakage is quite remote, though there
insertion and certain seizure of a newly intro
duced yarn.
70 is provided the necessary lowering of the throat
plate and inserted yarn ?nger to insure proper
Figure 12 will make clear the danger involved
in having the throat plate
too low during ‘
reciprocatory knitting. If the latch happens to
get above the throat plate, the descent of the
seizure of the ingoing yarn.
It may be noted that a similar action of the
throat ‘plate is provided when a, yarn is ?rst fed
needle under the action of the top center cam 75 to the needles at the time knitting is begun on
2,409,306
7
8
bare needles after a completed stocking is dropped '
being such that when a yarn guide is moved to
feeding position the toe of a yarn guide shall
contact the upper face of the throat plate only
at a location adjacent to the feeding edge of the
throat plate to be variably positioned by the
throat plate upon movements of the throat plate.
off the machine. In such case, the latches of the
needles will have been opened by a latch opener
and the yarn may be fed, with momentary de
pression of the throat plate, to a few of the
needles travelling along the path indicated in
Figure 11, after which every other needle is ele
vated to take the yarn for one or more courses,
4. A latch ring for a knitting machine having
a yarn lever pivoted thereto, and a throat plate,
at least the forward portion of which is mounted
10 for'vertical movement in timed relationship to
needles to eifect feed of the yarn thereto.
the knitting operations and serves as a seat for the
While in the modi?cation illustrated the entire
yarn lever, the yarn lever having a recess for the
throat plate is illustrated as lowered for the pur
passage of a yarn therethrough and adjacent
pose of insuring seizure of an ingoing yarn, it will
thereto having a toe to rest upon the movable
be evident that this action is not essential and,
this being followed by the elevation of all the
in fact, only the edge of the throat plate, forming
a ledge from which yarns feed, need be lowered
with the corresponding, and possibly independ
ent, lowering momentarily of a yarn ?nger since,
as will be evident from Figures 7 and 8, the throat
plate does not serve to guide the yarn in this
operation, the determination of the yarn path
across the needle circle being effected solely by
the yarn ?nger. It is only necessary that the
yarn ?nger be lowered to lower the path between
it and the clamp, with simultaneous lowering of
the throat plate solely for the purpose of getting
it out of the way of the yarn when the yarn is
thus momentarily lowered. In the modi?cation
forward portion of the throat plate.
5. A latch ring for a knitting machine, a throat
plate connected thereto, the yarn feeding por
tion of which is mounted for vertical movement
in timed relationship to the knitting operations,
and a shouldered member connected to the latch
ring and passing through the throat plate, the
shoulder of which limits downward movement of
the forward portion of the throat plate.
6. A latch ring for a knitting machine, a throat
plate pivoted thereto for vertical movement in
timed relationship to the knitting operations in
such a mannar as to permit the positioning of the
ering of the throat plate to permit the lowering
of the ?nger. The throat plate and the ?nger,
however, may be mechanically independent, in
feeding portion thereof to insure the feeding of
an incoming yarn into the hooks of needles, and
a shouldered member connected to the latch ring
and passing through the throat plate, said shoul
der limiting downward movement of the forward
which case the ?nger movements may be im
portion of the throat plate.
illustrated, this occurs as an incident of the low
parted by suitable formation of the ?nger thrust
bars and their actuating cams.
‘
It will be understood, therefore, that variations
in the embodiment of the invention may be made
without departing from the principles thereof, as
de?ned in the following claims.
What we claim is:
'7. A latch ring for a knitting machine and a
throat plate connected thereto, the yarn feeding
portion of the throat plate being movable ver
tically in timed relationship to the knitting oper
ations from normal feeding position to such a po
sition as to insure the feeding of an incoming
yarn to the hooks of needles.
1. A knitting machine comprising yarn guides,
8. A knitting machine comprising a member
a movable throat plate, and means for lowering
providing a ledge over which yarns are normally
the throat plate and substantially simultaneously
fed to needles, and means for imparting vertical
movements to said member in timed relationship
to the insertion of a yarn so that the point from
which a yarn approaches the needles may be dif
ferent at the time of insertion of the yarn and
therewith moving a yarn guide to a feeding posi
tion so that a yarn passing through the yarn
lever is presented into the hooks of advancing
needles;
2. A knitting machine having a pivotally
during subsequent knitting.
mounted throat plate so that the yarn feeding
9. A knitting machine comprising a plurality of
portion'thereof can be temporarily lowered to 50 yarn guides, means for selectively moving said
avoid interference with the presentation of a
yarn guides toward and from active yarn~feeding
yarn into the hooks of advancing needles, yarn
positions, a member providing a ledge over which
guides movable to and from feeding relation with
yarns are normally fed from the yarn guides to
respect to the needles, a movable pattern drum,
needles, and means for imparting vertical move
connections between the drum and the throat
ments to said member in timed relationship to
plate and yarn guides, cams upon the drum act
the insertion of a yarn so that the point from
ing upon the said connections to effect a pivotal
which a yarn approaches the needles may be dif
movement of the throat plate and to move the
ferent at the time of insertion of the yarn and
mentioned yarn lever into active position so that
during subsequent knitting.
its yarn is taken into the hooks of needles, and 60
'10. A knitting machine comprising a yarn
to move another of said yarn guides to an in
guide and means located between the yarn guide
operative position, the cams on the pattern drum
and the needles to define the path of approach of
thereby effecting a sequence of movements, in
a yarn to the needles, and means for imparting
cluding a lowering of the throat plate, a lowering
vertical movements to said means in timed re
of the ?rst mentioned yarn guide, movement of 65 lationship to the insertion of a yarn so that the
the second mentioned yarn guide to a non-feed
point from which the yarn approaches the needles
ing position, and the return of the throat plate
is different at the time of its insertion and during
to its normal feeding position, the movements of
subsequent knitting thereof.
the throat plate and the yarn guide ?rst men
11. A knitting machine comprising a member
tioned occurring in the foregoing order.
70 providing a ledge over which yarns are normally
3. A knitting machine including a throat plate
fed to needles, and means for imparting move
mounted therein for vertical movement in timed
ments to said member in timed relationship to the
relationship to the knitting operations, pivotally
insertion of a yarn so that the point from which
a yarn approaches the needles is different at the
mounted yarn guides provided with toes remote
from their pivotal mounting, the construction 75 time of insertion of the yarn and during subse
2,409,306
10
19. A knitting machine having a movable
throat plate across which yarns are fed to the
needles of the knitting machine, and means for
moving a yarn feeding portion of said throat
plate in the direction of the length of a needle
in timed relationship to the knitting operations
quent knitting, said point being farther, in the
direction in which needles move lengthwise to
draw stitches, in the ?rst instance than in the
second.
12. A knitting machine comprising a plurality
of yarn guides, means for selectively moving said
yarn guides toward and from active yarn-feeding
so as to avoid interference with the feeding of a
yarn sui?ciently low to pass into the hooks of
needles.
20. A knitting machine having latch needles
comprising means de?ning the path of approach
of a yarn to the needles, and means for imparting
positions, a member providing a ledge over which ‘
yarns are normally fed from the yarn guides to
needles, and means for imparting movements to
said member in timed relationship to the in
sertion of a yarn so that the point from which a
yarn approaches the needles is different at the
time of insertion of the yarn and during subse
vertical movements to said means in timed rela
tionship to the insertion of a yarn so that the
quent knitting,_said point being farther, in the
point from which the yarn approaches the needles
is different at the time of its insertion and during
subsequent knitting thereof, said means de?ning
direction in which needles move lengthwise to
draw stitches, in the ?rst-instance than in the
the path of approach of a yarn having portions ’
second.
arranged to prevent breakage of latches by urging
13. A knitting machine comprising a yarn
guide and means located between the yarn guide 20 them either towards open or closed position dur
ing both directions of knitting when in normal
and the needles to de?ne the path of approach of
feeding position and to prevent breakage of
a yarn to the needles, and means for imparting
latches by urging them either towards open or
movements to said means in timed relationship
closed position during one direction of knitting
to the insertion of a yarn so that the point from
which the yarn approaches the needles is differ 25 when in the position corresponding to yarn inser
ent at the time of its insertion and during subse
tion.
21. A knitting machine having latch needles
quent knitting thereof, said point being farther,
comprising means de?ning the path of approach
in the direction in which needles move lengthwise
of a yarn to the needles, and means for imparting
to draw stitches, in the ?rst instance than in the
second.
30 vertical movements to said means in timed rela
14. A knitting machine comprising a plurality
tionship to the insertion of a yarn so that the
of yarn guides, means for selectively moving said
point from which the yarn approaches the needles
yarn guides toward and from active yarn-feed
is different at the time of its insertion and during
ing positions, a member providing a ledge over
subsequent knitting thereof, said means de?ning
which yarns are normally fed to needles and also 35 the path of approach of a yarn having portions
arranged to prevent breakage of latches by urging
providing a stop for a yarn guide which is in ac
tion, and means for imparting movements to said
them either towards open or closed position dur
member in timed relationship to the insertion of
ing both directions of knitting when in normal
a yarn so that the point from which a yarn ap
feeding position.
proaches the needles is different at the time of 40
22. A knitting machine having latch needles
comprising means de?ning the path of approach
its insertion and during subsequent knitting
thereof.
15. In combination, a latch ring, a throat plate
carried thereby and having at least its edge over
which yarns feed movable vertically relatively to
the latch ring, and spring means for urging said
edge towards a predetermined position relative to
the latch ring.
16. In combination, a latch ring, a throat plate
carried thereby and having at least its edge over
which yarns feed movable vertically relatively to
the latch ring, spring means for urging said edge
towards a predetermined position relative to the
latch ring, and means for limiting movements of
said edge in the opposite direction.
17. In combination, a latch ring, and a throat
plate carried thereby and having at least its edge
over which yarns feed freely movable vertically
relatively to the latch ring, so that it may be so
moved in timed relationship to the insertion of
of a yarn to the needles, and means for imparting
vertical movements to said means in timed rela
tionship to the insertion of a yarn so that the
45
point from which the yarn approaches the needles
is different at the time of its insertion and during
subsequent knitting thereof, said means de?ning
the path of approach of a yarn having a portion
arranged to prevent breakage of latches by urging
50 them either towards open or closed position dur
ing at least one direction of knitting.
23. A knitting machine having latch needles,
comprising means de?ning the path of approach
of a yarn to the needles, and means for imparting
55 movements to said means in timed relationship
to the insertion of a yarn so that the point from
which the yarn approaches the needles is different
at the time of its insertion and during subsequent
knitting thereof, said point being farther, in the
60 direction in which needles move lengthwise to
draw stitches, in the ?rst instance than in the
second, said means de?ning the path of approach
of a yarn having a portion arranged to prevent
breakage of latches by urging them either towards
moving said throat plate in the ‘direction of the 65 open or closed position during at least one direc
length of a needle in timed relationship to the
tion of knitting.
knitting operations to avoid interference with the
ALBERT E. PAGE.
feeding of a yarn sui?ciently low to pass into the
FRANK R. PAGE.
hooks of needles.
a yarn.
18. A knitting machine having a movable
throat plate across which yarns are fed to the
needles of the knitting machine, and means for
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