close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

код для вставки
Oct. 15, 1946. -
F. ‘o. HESS
HEATING
2,409,431
wonx
.
Filed Aug. 31, ' 1942v
‘a
R
I
‘
N
b- w
Ell
w
‘
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
x _-
- '=
‘
R
a
‘a
,
Q3 @‘ ‘a I
’ \.
oigggllllllllll/
‘
\\
BY
W g/éM
A-TTORNEY
V
‘
0a.. 15, 1946.‘
F. O. HESS
2,409,431
HEATING WORK
' Filevd Aug. 31. 1942
2 Sheets-Sheet“ 2
N
INVENTOR
I FR: ?Pwf/P/c 0. 46/565
59%“ g
-
ATTORNEY
2,409,431
Patented Oct. 15, 1946
‘UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
HEATING WORK
Frederic 0. Hess, Germantown, Pa., assignor‘ to
Selas Corporation of America, a corporation of
Pennsylvania
Application August 31, 1942, Serial No. 456,787
23 Claims. (Cl. 263-3)
2
The general object of the present invention is
by a heat treatment which melts or fuses the
to provide improvements in. heating ‘work, and,
tin, but as far as I am aware, no practically satis
although not to be limited thereto, is especially
factory method had been devised, prior to my
useful in the manufacture of tin plate. More
invention, for giving the above described hot
speci?cally, the primary object of the invention 5 treatment to strip material moving continuously
is to‘ provide a novel and effective method of, and
past the ?nishing station at a high but varying
novel and effective means for hot ?nishing tin
speed.
plate stock in the form, of a thin strip coated
My present invention was devised with the
with electrolytically deposited tin while the strip
speci?c object in View of providing a practically
is travelling at high speed through a finishing
effective method and practically effective ap
station,
paratus for subjecting. tin plate strip stock to the
In the manufacture of tin plates it has been
above described heat treatment while said stock
found that when plate stock is coated with elec~
is moving through a ?nishing station at a speed
trolytically deposited tin and is subsequently sub
varying from a maximum which may be as high
jected to a suitable ?nishing treatment, the tin 15 as 800 feet per minute or higher, and a minimum
coating required for a given use of the ?nished
which may be as low as 100 or 200 feet per minute,
plates made from the stock may be substantially
and my invention is characterized by the ad~
thinner than has been found necessary in manu
justment toward and away from such strip or
facturing tincplates for the same use, from stock
other work in automatic response to increasesand
plates coated by dipping them in a bath of molten 20 decreasesin the strip speed,‘ of a heat source, such
tin as has been customary heretofore. The reduc
as refractory ‘heating walls for example, which
tion in the thickness of the tin coating made pos
are maintained at a temperature much ‘above the
sible by, depositing the tin electrolytically on the
melting temperature of tin. _ In so adjusting the
plate stock, is strikingly large and results in a
position of the heat source with repect to the
reduction of about 70% in the coating tin, per unit
work, the heat source is preferably moved through
of area coated, in the manufacture of tin plates
distances functionally‘ related to changes in the
for ordinary uses.
~
Furthermore, the manufacture of tin plates
from electrolytically plated stock can‘ be carried
rate of movement of the work.’ By thus varying
the distance between the heating walls and the
strip, I am able to vary‘the rate at which heat is
on more rapidly and, with a lower labor cost than i 30 transmitted from the heating walls to‘ the travel
has been‘ practically possible in the manufacture
ing strip through the wide range and in the rapid
of tin plates from dip coated stock plates. The
manner necessary to‘heat the strip material with
advantages last mentioned result largely from
suitable uniformity notwithstanding wide and
the fact that it is practically feasible to coat
rapid variations in the speed at which the strip
plate stock in strip form by moving it continu J 35 moves through the'treating station. Ordinarily,
ously through an elongated electrolytic coating
‘the speed at which the strip material is moved
bath and that it has not been found practically
through the finishing station may be expected to
feasible to satisfactorily coat such strip material
vary widely and rapidly as result of operating con
by moving it through a molten tin coating bath.
ditions in the continuous stripvmill from which
Heretofore, tin plate stock has customarily‘ been 40 the tin plate stock, passes to‘ the ?nishing station.
coated by the essentially intermittent process of
"The apparatus which I have ‘devised comprises
moving the stock in" the‘ formfof relatively short
a'pair of burner walls of ceramic material at
pieces or plates,‘ quickly down into and‘then up
opposite sides of the traveling plate stock strip
out of a molten tin bath. The hot ?nishing proc—
and in each of which a multiplicity of suitable
use which I have devised is a continuous, process
burners ‘are incorporated. Burners of a type
which can be carried out rapidly and at a rela
well adapted‘ forsuch ‘use are disclosed in, my
tively small
expense.
1
i
‘
A thin coating of tin electrolytically deposited
prior Patent No. 2,215,079 of September 17,1940.
Such burners, commonly known‘as Duradiant
on tin plate. stock is initially'in a porous condi
burners, are now in extensive use as furnace wall
tion and to fit such stockfor'the uses to which 50 burners and‘ for other purposes. The Duradiant
tin plates are customarily put, the coating pores
type of burner shown by said patent is charac
terized by its’ shallow cup-like combustion cham
ber formed'i'n a ceramicumaterial body, and by the
provisionsmade for supplying a. combustible mix
andmade to adhere better to the steel strip body 55 ture of air and gas‘ ‘to the combustion chamber,
must be closed. It'has heretofore been found that
the coating pores can be closedand‘ that the coat
ing can be smoothed and given a glossy ?nish
2,409,431
3
in such manner as to effect the complete com
bustion of the mixture within the combustion
chamber, and the maintenance of relatively high
4
burner walls D and DA at opposite sides of said
path.
The wall D is mounted on a truck or car
riage E having supporting wheels E’ on rails F’.
The rails F’ are mounted on an inclined support
combustion chamber temperatures so that a
major portion of the heat liberated may be 5 F and extend away from the path of movement
of the strip A, and are downwardly inclined, so
that the truck or carriage E has a gravitational
bias for movement along the rails F’, which will
increase the horizontal distance between the
contemplate that each burner wall will be wide
enough to extend beyond the side edges of the 10, burner wall D and the strip A.
The burner wall DA is like the burner wall
traveling stock strip, which ordinarily will be 2
radiated away from the combustion chamber
through its open end.
In the ordinary use of the present invention, I
or 21/2 feet wide, and that each wall will extend
alongside the strip in the direction of its length
for 2 or 3 feet or so, and that in normal operation
each burner wall will be spaced away from the
strip, a distance varying between a minimum of
D, and its supporting carriage EA is similar in
form and in the manner in which it is sup
ported, to the carriage E. Further the burners,
fuel mixture supply connections, and other parts
associated with the burner wall D and carriage
E, as hereinafter described, are duplicates of
parts associated with the burner wall DA and
as the speed at which the work strip is moved
carriage EA. In consequence the following de
through the space between the two burner walls
scription of the burner wall D, its burners and
is increased and decreased.
burner supply connections, will make it unneces
The considerable areal extent of the burner
sary to separately describe the burner wall DA,
wall and the high burner combustion chambers
its burners and connections.
‘maintained, ordinarily about 24.00" F., makes it
As shown, the burner wall D comprises ceramic
possible for the burner walls to transmit heat
rapidly enough to melt the tin coatings on the op 25 burner blocks d which may be shaped and as
sembled edge to edge as they are in a furnace
posite sides of the traveling sheet when traveling
one inch or so and a maximum of several inches
at a speed as high as 800 feet per minute or higher,
although the melting temperature of the tin is
about 450° F., and only a small fraction of a
second will then be required for the movement of
a point on the surface of the tin strip through the
space between the burner walls.
wall arrangement shown in said prior patent, but
the burners may be spaced apart or grouped in
any manner which conditions make desirable.
Each of the burner blocks d is formed with a cen
tral horizontal inlet passage 11' which terminates
at the side of the burner wall adjacent the strip
A in a shallow cup-shaped combustion chamber
In its preferred form my invention comprises
d2, coaxial with the passages d’ and open at its
means not only effective to automatically move
the burner walls toward and away from the 35 end adjacent the strip A. As shown, the burner
blocks (1 in each of the different horizontal rows
travelling work strip, as the speed of the latter
of the burner wall have their inlet passages d’
increases and decreases through a normal regu
connected to a corresponding horizontal manifold
lation range in which the rate of heat transmis
G. The ?ow capacity of the manifold connec
sion to the work strip will be proportional to its
tion to each burner passage d’ may be independ
speed past the burner walls, but also effective
ently regulated in a known manner as by means
to give the burner walls rapid and substantial
of a corresponding adjustable needle valve throt
safety movements away from the work strip in
tling element d3, accessible for adjustment at the
the event of an interruption of, or radical reduc
side of the manifold remote from the burner
tion in the work strip speed. The means em
ployed for giving the burner walls their above 45 wall D. .
Each of the superposed manifolds G associated
mentioned regulating. and safety movements may
with the burner wall D is connected by an indi
take various forms. In a preferred form of the
vidual regulating valve G’ to a vertically dis
invention those movements are gravitationally
posed drum G2 mounted on the truck E. A com
produced and are regulated by a hydraulic cylin
der controlled by a valve which is actuated to 50 bustible mixture of air and gas is supplied at
suitable pressure to the drum G2 from a station
vary the liquid pressure in the cylinder in auto
ary mixture supply main H through an adjacent
matic response to changes in the work strip speed
?exible pipe connection H’.
of travel.
In the form of the invention diagrammatically
The various features of novelty which char
acterize my invention are pointed out with par 55 shown, the distance between each of the burner
walls D and DA and the adjacent side of the
ticularity in the claims annexed to and forming
work strip A is directly controlled by a servo
a part of this specification. For a better under
motor J in the form of a hydraulic cylinder hav
standing of the invention, however, its ad
ing its piston J’ cable connected to each of the
vantages and speci?c objects attained with its
use, reference should be had to the accompany 60 carriages ortrucks E and EA. As shown, the
cylinder J is vertically disposed with its upper
ing drawings and descriptive matter in which I
end open and with a passage through its lower
have diagrammatically illustrated a preferred
closed end through which the stem J2 of the pis
embodiment of the present invention.
ton J’ extends. The lower end of the piston stem
Of the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic elevation of a desir 65 J2 is connected to one end of a cable K which
extends about a guide pulley L, turning about a
able form of hot ?nishing apparatus;
stationary axis beneath the cylinder J. The end
Fig. 2 is a plan view of the portion of the ap
of the cable K remote from the cylinder J is con
paratus shown in Fig. 1; and
nected to an equalizing bar K’ midway between
Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation of a control valve.
In the embodiment of the invention illustrated 70 the ends of the latter, as shown mast clearly in
Fig. 2. The two ends of the bar K’ are similarly
diagrammatically in the drawings, the tinned
connected to the carriages E and EA at the op
plate stock strip A is hot finished as it is being
posite sides of the latter. The connection be
rapidly moved by feed rolls C through a ver
tween each end of the bar K’ and each carriage
tical path extending between the feed rolls C and
guide rolls B, by the heating action of vertical 75 at thecorresponding side of the latter, comprises
2,409,431:
6
a cable K2 connected to the end. of the ‘bar 1K!
and extending under. and thence upward‘ away
ment of the‘piston J’ when travel of’ the work
strip A is interrupted or is substantially reduced
frame pulley LA which is sodiisposed ‘that the
in speed so that it‘is then desirable to move the
burner walls D and DA far enough away from
uprising-end of the cable Kz‘i‘s alongside the-cor
responding edge of the vertical portion of the
work strip moving upward between the burner
wane. ‘Theuprisi-ng end of. each of the two cables
K2 is connected to the carriages E and EA by
the work strip, to prevent overheating- of the
latter.'
I,‘
~
~Y
‘ The control valve Q may be of any'khown or
suitable form adapted to operate as described.
corresponding cables M and MA, respectively. ‘
Each cable M extends over-a guide pulley N
As shown in Fig. 3, the body of the valve‘ Q coin
prises an inlet chamber Q’ in communication
mounted on the corresponding carriage support
F; From its guide pulley‘ N, each cable M passes
with the cylindervJ through the pipe P, andT'a-n
outlet chamber Q2 from which oil may pass
in a generally horizontal ‘direction toward the
freely 'to a receiving receptacle q. The valve
rear end of the truck E t'o-which‘it is connected
chambers Q’ and Q2 are separated by a partition
by a pin E2. Each cable, MA runs over a corre 15 formed with a central circular opening, or port
sponding pulley NA mounted on the support F
Q3 normally receiving a coaxial cylindrical valve
for the carriage EA and is connected to the latter
member Q4 of a diameter to ?t snugly in the
just as the cable M is connected to the carriage
port Q3, so that ‘when the valve member Q4 is
E. As shown, each of the cables M and MA in
moved downward into its full closing position,
eludes a turnbuckle M’ which may be adjusted 20 the upper‘end of the valve member will be
to» vary-the distance between» the corresponding
within, and will close or substantially close the
burner'wall and the work ‘strip maintained in
port Q4.‘ The valve member Q4 is formedi‘at its
normal operation.
'
periphery with a longitudinal V-shaped-slot‘Q5‘,
The gravitational bias of each of the carriages
which extends from the lower end of ‘the valve
E and EA for movement downward and away
member to a point some-what below the upper end
from the work strip A along its supporting rails
F’, tends to maintain the cables K, K2, M and
MA taut at all times, and insures suitably rapid
of the valve member, and progressively dimin~
movement of each burner wall along its support
ing track rails F’ away from the work strip A .'
when- permittedby downward movement of the
piston ‘J'.
Y
,
.
The movements of the‘piston J’ can ‘be ef
fected‘ and controlled for the purposes of the
present invention in various ways. In the form shown diagrammatically, the piston J’ is nor
mally maintained in or- near its position shown
in Fig. l by a liquid, preferably oil, in ‘the cyl~
inder J and under sufficient pressure to coun~_
ter-balance the forces acting downwardly on the
piston. Those forces comprise the pull of the
justment of the‘ valve Q, increasing or decrease
in the cylinder J will increase or decrease as
needed to vequalize the out?ow with the in?ow
cable K, the gravitational bias due to the weight
to the cylinderf The position of the piston .J”
and therefore‘ the distance between the work
strip’and each burner wall, Will thus vary in ac
cordance with the changes in position of the
ably secured. to the cylinder J by bolts J5; The
valve‘. member Q4 when the latter occupies an
maximum distance the spring J3 can expand or
elongate is ?xed by a retaining bolt J 6 in thread
intermediate position.
.
I
‘
When the travel of the ‘work strip A is inter
rupted or ‘its speed decreases below the regula;
tion range‘ and the valve member, Q4 is moved
upward out “of the portQ3, the oil is permitted to
ed engagement with the head J4 and‘ acting be
tween the latter and a belleshaped spring fol
lower J7, interposed between‘the spring J3 and
the piston J. The portionof the cylinder J above
the piston J’ is freely open to the external at
'
member Q4 will'occupy an intermediate position
with such a portion of ‘the groove Q5 within the
port ‘Q4, that the throttling effect of the valve
member will be so related to the‘ compression of
spring J3 and resultant oil pressure beneath the
piston J’, that out?ow from ‘the cylinder J
through valve Q will be‘ equal in rate to the‘ cyl
inder in?ow through the pipe 0. On any ad
‘ing‘its' throttling effect, the pressure of the oil
of the piston J’ and its stem J2, and a loading
force due to the action of a spring J‘3 acting be
tween the piston J and a cross head J4 adjust
mosphere through portsJg.
ishes in cross-section from its bottom upward.
When the speed of the strip A is constant and
within its normal operating range,‘ the- valve
escape freely from the ‘cylinder J which" then
,
In the arrangement illustrated, liquid is sup- 55
plied to the cylinder J. by ‘a pipe 0 from a source
(not shown) of liquid under a suitable ‘pressure,
and the liquid escapes from the cylinder J
quickly empties and‘ permits a ‘corresponding
rapid downward movement of the piston J", and
thereby effects ,a rapid safety movement of each
burner Wall away‘fr‘om the work strip.
In- the arrangement diagrammatically shown,
referring particularly to Fig. 1 the valve member
through an outlet pipe P, when and as permitted
Q49" is adjusted in automatic accordance with
by the adjustment .of a control Valve Q. In the 60 changes“
the traveler the work‘ stripA, ‘by
arrangement shown, ‘the supply pipe 0. is re~
means comprising "a centrifugal speed governor
stricted at 0' so that» the ‘maximum rate of. ?ow
of conventional type and having its lever S’ con
through the pipe 0 will be small enough to per
ne'bted to the‘ stem, Q6‘ of the valve Q by a link
mit the cylinder J. tov empty rapidly when the
R-"which includes a turn buckle R’ through which
Valve Q is wide open.
I
In a manner hereinafter described, the valve
Qis; adjusted automatically in accordance with
65
the effective lengthof the-‘link can be adjusted.
The speed governor S comprises
shaft S2
mounted in a support S3 for rotativabut not for
variations in the speed of travel of the work
longitudinal movement, and comprises centrifu~
strip A, to vary the oil pressure acting on the
gal weights S4 link connected to the upper end
piston J,’ and thereby adjust the burner walls 70 of the shaft S1 and, link connected to the lower
D ,and‘DA toward and away from the work strip . end of a sleeve 55, surrounding and longitudie
A‘and from one another through a small work
,nallymovable along, the shaft S2. The sleeve S5
ing range, as the speed of the strip A» varies
isformed with a, circumferential groove S-‘iwhich
through a relatively small regulation range, and
receives lateral, projections S7 carried by the
to permit a rapid: and substantial down move 75 forkedlyend of the. lever ,S’ , so that, the; lever 1S.’
2,409,431
7
turns in the direction to give an opening or a
closing adjustment to the valve member Q‘1 as
the speed of the shaft S2 decreases or increases.
8
inder under a pressure high enough to appreci
ably augment its rate of discharge. The ulti
mate operative effect of the last mentioned ad
justment of the valve member Q4, is thus to ef
As shown, the governor shaft S2 is rotated at
fect an immediate movement of each burner wall
a speed proportional to the speed of travel of
D and DA away from the work strip a distance
the Work strip A through a driving connection
adequate in extent to prevent injury to the latter
comprising a shaft T which is transverse to the
on
an interruption of, or radical reduction in
shaft El2 and has one end connected to the lat
speed of the work strip A.
ter by bevel gears T’ and has its opposite end
As will be apparent to those skilled in the art,
connected through bevel gears T2 to one of the 10
the
control of the positions of the burner walls
feed rolls C.
In the contemplated normal operation of the
apparatus diagrammatically shown, when the
D and DA relative to the work strip A, required in
the practice of my method on changes in the work
strip speed, which is obtained by the centrifugal
speed of travel of the work strip A varies, the
governor S effects corresponding adjustments of 15 speed governor S, valve Q, and servomotor J, il
lustrated, may be obtained by the use of other
the valve Q. An immediate operative e?ect of
known or suitable instrumentalities differing
an adjustment of the valve Q is to vary the po
widely from those last mentioned.
sition of the piston J’, and an adjustment in the
The multiplicity of individual and individually
position of the piston J’ directly varies the dis
tance between each of the heating walls D and ~ regulable burners din each heating wall, and the
regulable means through which a combustible
DA and the adjacent side of the work strip A.
mixture of air and gas is supplied to each of said
It will now be understood that the mechanism
burners in use, permits a ready regulation of
just described is operable, while the strip is trav
the relative heating effects of di?erent portions
eling, to move the heat sources D and DA to
ward and from the strip in a normal regulating i of each heating wall as required to insure uni
form heating of the work strip. Furthermore,
range through distances functionally related to
the described combustible mixture supply regulat
changes in speed of travel of the work.
When the speed of the work strip A is within 7
a regulation range, the body of the valve mem
ing provisions permits the overall heating e?ect
the minimum pressure required to overcome the
rows of burners out of service.
of each burner wall to be varied as required by
ber Q4 is within the port Q3, and the rate of flow 30 the conditions or” operation. For example, under
one operating condition in a particular plant, it
permitted by the valve with a given pressure in
may be desirable to maintain a regulation work
the cylinder J depends on what longitudinal por
speed range between limits above and below 600
tion of the valve groove Q5 is within the port
feet per minute, and under another operating
Q3. The work strip speed range can be varied
through wide limits by adjustment of the turn v35 condition to maintain a regulation work speed
buckle R’ and the consequent adjustment of the
range between limits respectively above and be
low a speed of 300 feet per minute. For opera
effective length of the link connection between
tion with the higher work speed range all of the
the governor lever S’ and the valve member Q4.
When the work strip speed is within the reg
burners in each heating wall may be in use and
ulation range determined by the then existing 40 operated at nearly full capacity. For operation
adjustment of the turn buckle R’, the position
at the lower work speed range, several of the
of the piston J’ will vary as the pressure of the
manifold supply valves G’ may be closed to there
oil in the cylinder J varies through a range above
by temporarily put the corresponding horizontal
In addition, the
piston loading force of the spring J3 when the
pressure at which the fuel mixture is supplied to
latter is expanded to the full extent permitted
the burners remaining in service, may also be ma
by the spring follower J7 and its adjustable re
terially reduced.
taining member J 6. The actual regulation range
To appreciate the importance of adequately
rapid adjustments of the rate of heat transfer to
of piston movement may be varied by the adjust
ment of the head J4 and thereby the parts J3, J 7 50 the work from each burner wall, account should
and J 6, longitudinally of the cylinder. The mag
be taken of the high temperature and high rates
nitude of the regulation range of adjustment of
of heat liberation involved. Thus, for example,
it is reasonable to assume that in hot ?nishing
the piston J’ can be varied by adjustment of the
a work strip which is 30 inches wide and of aver
bolt J6, to vary the maximum distance between
the crosshead J4 and follower J".
55 age thickness and which is moved through the
?nishing station at the rate of 600 feet per min
The movements of the piston J ' in the cylinder
ute, each burner wall may have its burner face
J produce corresponding movements of the burner
spaced 1 inch from the work, and may include
walls D and DA transverse to the work strip A
passing them. The relation between any partic
150 burners, and to assume further that the burn
ular position of the piston J’ and the correspond 60 ers of each burner wall are collectively supplied
with about 30 cubic feet per hour of 500 B. t. u.
ing position of either burner wall, may be varied
gas mixed or combined with the required amount
by the adjustment of the corresponding turn
of combustion supporting air.
buckle M’ or by an analogous adjustment in the
Under the operating conditions just described,
effective length of the mechanical connection be
65 the entire burner wall face adjacent the work
tween the piston and the burner walls.
strip will be incandescent, and the temperature
When the work speed decreases below the reg
ulation range, ?xed in apparatus of the form
shown by the adjustment of the turn buckle R’,
the valve member Q4 is moved up out of the port
in the combustion chambers of the burners will
be about 2400" F. While a portion of the heat
liberated in each combustion chamber is radi
Q3 thereby permitting a rapid discharge of the 70 ated directly from the burning gases to the work,
the relatively high temperatures and large heat
oil from the cylinder J’ and a correspondingly
storage capacity of the refractory burner walls,
rapid downward movement of the piston J '.
do not permit regulation of the rate of heat trans
The gravitational forces acting downwardly on
fer from the burner wall to the work strip rapidly
the piston J’ duetto the weight of the piston J ',
maintain the oil being discharged from the cyl 75 enough to compensate for rapid variations in the
2,409,431
.
work strip speedto be effected by' regulation of v
‘1J0
the rate ‘at which combustible mixture ‘is sup
tween said: walls, and means for separately ad
justing the dits'ance ‘between ‘each of said faces
plied ‘to‘the burner wall burners. '
and said strip.
‘
While in accordance with the provisions of the
8; Apparatus for hot ?nishing tin plate stock
statutes, I ‘have illustrated‘ and described the best Cl in‘ the form of a thin steel strip coated with tin,
form of embodiment of my invention now known
comprising in combination, a pair of refractory
to me, it will be apparent to those skilled in the
walls each having a hot face adjacent and nor
art that changes may be made in the form of
mally in close proxmity to the hot face of the
the apparatus disclosed without departing from
other gas wall, means for maintaining said faces
the spirit of my invention, ‘as set forth‘in the 10 at temperatures substantially above the melting
appended claims, and that in some cases certain
point of tin, means supporting each of said walls
features of my invention may be used to advan
‘for movement in a direction toward and away
tage without a corresponding‘use of other fea
from the ‘other, means gravitationally ‘biasing
tures.
‘
,
each of said walls for movement away from ‘the
Having now described 'my invention, What I 15 other, means ‘for rapidly moving said strip in the
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat
direction of its length through the space between
ent, is:
,
1. Apparatus‘ for hot ?nishing'tin‘plate stock
in the form of a thin strip having a tin coating,
comprising in combination a pair of refractory
walls having opposing faces normally in close
proximity to each other, means carried by said
walls for maintaining said faces at temperatures
substantially higher than the melting point of tin,
means normally moving said strip rapidly through
the space between said walls, and means respon
sive to the speed of said strip for increasing the
distance between ‘said. faces when the speed of
said strip diminishes.
2. Apparatus for hot ?nishing tin plate stock
in the form of a thin strip having a tin coating,
comprising in combination a pair of refractory
walls having opposing faces normally in close
proximity to each other, means carried by said
walls for maintaining said faces at temperatures ,
substantially higher than the melting point of
tin, means normally moving said strip rapidly
said walls, positioning means normally operative
to prevent movement of said walls away-from
one another, and means responsive to the speed
of said strip for rendering said positioning means
inoperative on a predetermined decrease in the
speed of said strip.
9. Apparatus for hot ?nishing a coating of tin
on one side of a thin steel strip, comprising in
combination means for moving said strip at high
speed in the direction of its length along a prede
termined ?nishing path, a refractory wall having
a hot face and at one side of said path at which
said coating ‘is ‘exposed, means carried by said
Wall for heating said face to a temperature sub
stanti'ally higher than the melting point of tin,
and means responsive to the speed of‘sald strip
for increasing the distance between said face and
path on a decrease in the speed of said strip while
the latter is moving past said refractory-wall, said
heating means during such increase in distance
between its face and the path being ‘capable of
heating the strip to effect ?nishing of ‘said coat~
through the space between said walls, and means
responsive to the speed of said strip for increas
ing thereon.
'
ing and decreasing the distance between said 40
10. Apparatus for ‘hot ?nishing a coating of
faces as the speed of said strip decreases‘and in
tin on one side of a thin ‘steel strip comprising in
creases through a regulation range and rapidly
combination means for‘moving said strip rapidly
and substantially increasing said distance when
in the direction of its length along a predeter
said speed decreases below said range.
mined ?nishing path, a refractory wall at the side
3. Apparatus for hot ?nishing tin plate stock
of said path at which said coating is exposed,
in the form of a thin strip having a tin coating,
comprising in combination a pair of refractory
walls having opposing faces in close proximity to
each other, means carried by said walls for main
means carried by said wall for heating said face
taining said faces at temperatures substantially
higher than the melting point of tin, means mov
ing said strip rapidly through the space between
said Walls, and means responsive to the speed of
said strip for increasing and decreasing the dis
tance between said faces as the speed of said strip '
decreases and increases through a regulation
range.
toa temperature substantially higher than the
melting point of tin, and means responsive to
changes in speed of said strip for increasing and
decreasing the distance between said face and
patlias the speed of said strip decreases and in
creases while traveling past said refractory well,
said heating means during such increase and de
crease in distance between its‘face and said path
being capable of heating the strip to effect ?nish
ing of said coating thereon.
4. Apparatus as speci?ed‘ in claim 3, including
means for varying the magnitude of the strip
11. In the art of heating work with the aid of a
high‘ temperature source of heat in which the
work is moved past such source of heat, the im
speed regulating range.
provement which comprises varying the position
‘
5. Apparatus as speci?ed in claim 3, including
means for varying the upper and lower limits of
said strip speed regulating range.
6. Apparatus as speci?ed‘in claim‘3, including
means for varying the distance maintained be?
tween said faces at a given speed within said
speed
regulating
range.
'
V
’
Apparatus for hot ?nishing tin plate stock
in the form of a thin strip having a tin coating,
comprising in combination a pair of refractory
walls having opposing faces‘in close proximity to
each other, means carried by said walls for main
taining said faces at temperatures substantially
higher than the melting point of tin, means for
moving said strip rapidly through the ‘space be
of said source of heat with respect to the work,
while the latter is being heated, responsive to
changes in the rate of movement of the work in
a normal'regulating range between a ?rst speed
and second higher speed of the Work, such varia
tions in the position of said source of heat with
respect to the work being effected- by“relative
movement therebetween through distances functionally related to‘ changes in the rate of move
ment of the work, and adjusting the position of
said source of heat with respect to the work so
that the work will not be injured by heat from
said source of heat when the rate of ‘movement
of the work falls below the ?rst speed in said
normal regulating range.
2,409,431
11
12
17. In the art of heating work of elongated ex
12. The combination of means for heating
work, means for moving said work past said heat
tent, the improvement which comprises rapidly
ing means in a ?xed path of movement for pro
moving the work in a ?xed path of movement,
progressively applying through a gaseous medium
gressively heating successive longitudinal por
tions of the work, said heating means being mov
able toward and from the work, and mechanism
responsive to decrease and increase in the rate of
movement of the work in a normal regulating
range between a ?rst speed and second higher
speed of the work for moving said heating means
from and toward the work, respectively, said
mechanism including means operable when the
rate of movement of the work falls below the ?rst
speed in said normal regulating range for moving
said heating means such a distance from the work
that the latter will not be injured by heat from
said heating means.
13. The combination with burner structure for
producing gaseous heat to heat work, of means
for moving the work past the burner structure
for progressively heating successive portions of
the work, the burner structure being movable to
ward and from the work, and means operable re
to successive longitudinal portions of the work,
when the work is traveling in said path of move
ment at a predetermined speed, a source of heat
which is at a temperature much higher than the
melting point of work and su?iciently close to the
work so as to melt the surface thereof, moving the
source of heat toward and from the work through
distances functionally related to increase and de
crease, respectively, in change of speed of the
work from the predetermined speed in a normal
range of speed variations of the work so as to
effect melting of the surface in such normal speed
range of the work, and, when the speed of travel
of the work falls below the lower limit in the nor
mal speed range, moving the source of heat from
the Work such a distance that undesirable over
heating of the work is avoided.
18. In the art of heating the opposing surfaces
of work of elongated extent, which comprises
rapidly moving the work in a ?xed path of move
sponsive to changes in the rate of movement of
the work, while the latter is being heated by the 25 ment, progressively applying through a gaseous
medium to successive longitudinal portions of
burner structure, for moving the burner struc
each surface, when the work is traveling in said
ture toward and from the work to control heating
path of movement at a predetermined speed, a
of the work, said last-mentioned means being
constructed and arranged to move the burner
source of heat which is at a temperature much
structure through distances functionally related
higher than the melting point of the work and
to changes in the rate of movement of the work.
14. The combination of means for heating
work, means for causing the work to travel past
the heating means for progressively heating suc
cessive portions of the work, the heating means 35
being movable from and toward the work, mech
su?iciently close to the work so as to effect melt
ing of the opposing surfaces thereof, and moving
the sources of heat toward and from the work
through distances functionally related to increase
and decrease, respectively, in change of speed of
the work from the predetermined speed so as to
effect melting of the opposing surfaces with
changes in speed of travel of the work from the
anism operable while the work is traveling for
moving the heating means from and toward the
predetermined speed.
work through distances functionally related to
changes in speed of travel of the work, the heat 40
19. In the art of heating work, the improve
ing means during such movement effected by the
ment which comprises moving the work in a ?xed
mechanism being capable of heating the work,
path of movement past a source of heat for ap
and said mechanism including means to cause
plying heat through a gaseous medium to succes
movement of the heating means from the work,
sive areas of the work, and, while heat is being
when the traveling movement of the work is 45 so applied to the work, varying the position of the
stopped, through a distance which is not func
source of heat with respect to the work respon
tionally related to change in speed of travel of
sive to changes in the rate of movement of the
the work to prevent the latter being injured by
work, such variations in the position of the source
heating by the heating means.
of heat with respect to the Work being effected
15. The combination of means for heating 50 by relative movement therebetween through dis
tances functionally related to changes in the rate
work, means for causing the work to travel past
the heating means in a ?xed path of movement
of movement of the work.
20. In the art of heating work, the improve
for progressively heating successive portions of
ment which comprises moving the work in a ?xed
the work, the heating means being movable from
and toward the work, and mechanism operable - path of movement past a source of heat, main
taining the heat source a de?nite distance with
while the work is traveling for moving the heat
ing means through distances functionally related
respect to the work for movement of the latter at
a predetermined speed so as to apply heat through
to changes in speed of travel of the work, the
a gaseous medium to the work to heat successive
heating means during such movement effected by
areas thereof approximately to the same desired
the mechanism being capable of heating the
high temperature, and, while heat is being so ap
work.
16. In the art of heating work of elongated ex
plied to the work, moving the heat source to
ward and from the work responsive to increase
tent, the improvement which comprises rapidly
and decrease, respectively, in change of speed of
moving the work in a ?xed path of movement,
the work from the predetermined speed so as to
progressively applying through a gaseous medium
heat successive areas of the work approximately
to successive longitudinal portions of the work,
to said desired high temperature upon changes
when the latter is traveling in said path of move
in speed of the work from the predetermined
ment at a de?nite speed, a source of heat which
speed.
is at a temperature much higher than the melt
ing point of the work and sufficiently close to the 70 21. In the art of heating work, the improve
ment which comprises moving the work in a ?xed
work to melt the surface thereof, and, while the
source of heat is being so applied to the rapidly
path of movement past the source of heat, main
taining the heat source a de?nite distance with
moving work, moving the heat source from the
respect to the work for movement of the latter
work responsive to decrease in speed of the work
from the de?nite speed.
75 it‘? a predetermined speed so as to apply heat
2,409,431
13
14
through a gaseous medium to the work to heat
successive areas thereof approximately to the
same desired high temperature, and, while heat is
normal regulating range between a ?rst speed
and a second higher speed so as to control the
normal heating of the work, and, when the speed
of travel of the work falls below the ?rst speed
source toward and from the work responsive to Cl in the normal regulating range, moving the heat
being so applied to the work, moving the heat
increase and decrease, respectively, in change of
speed of the work from the predetermined speed
source a sui?cient distance from the work with
out regard to the normal heating of the work so
as to prevent undesirable overheating of the work.
23. In the art of heating work with the aid of
approximately to said desired high temperature 10 a high temperature source of heat possessing
such operating characteristics that residual heat
in such normal speed range of the Work, and,
is produced thereby after the supply of heat pro
when the speed of travel of the work falls below
ducing medium thereto is substantially reduced,
the lower limit in the normal speed range, mov~
the improvement which comprises moving the
ing the heat source from the work such a dis
tance that undesirable overheating of the work is 15 work at a rate of speed in a normal speed range
past such source of heat for applying heat to suc
avoided.
'
cessive areas of the work, and, while the work is
22. In the art of heating work, the improve
openly exposed to the source of heat, increasing
ment which comprises moving the work in a ?xed
the distance between the source of heat and the
path of movement past the source of heat for
work sui?ciently to prevent undesirable overheat
applying heat, to successive areas of the work,
ing of the latter when the speed of travel of the
and, while heat is being so applied to the work,
work falls below the normal speed range.
moving the heat source with respect to the work
FREDERIC O. HESS.
responsive to changes in speed of the work in a
in a normal range of speed variations of the work
so as to heat successive areas of the work
Certi?cate of Correction
Patent N0. 2,409,431.
FREDERIO O. HESS
October 15,. 1946.
It is hereby certi?ed that errors appear in the printed speci?cation of the above
numbered patent_requiring correction as follows: Column 4, line 70, for “mast” read
most; column 5, hne _14, before “truck” insert carriage or; column 10, line 2, claim 7,
for “d1tsance” ‘read dzsta'nce; line 8, claim 8, for “proxmlty” read proximity; column 11,
comma “respectwely,” insert while the latter is
LESLIE FRAZER,
, v
’ First Assistant Commissioner of Patents.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
1 384 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа