close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2409695

код для вставки
011-22, 1946.
’
v
Y
Y
A. H. LAIDIG f
ELEcTRoN
DISCHARGE
DEVICE
_Filed June` 2G, 1942
2,409,694
l
s sheets-sheet l1
r
.
l
e1
El
a
-
INVENTOR
SM_ lIl
A ATTORNEY
Oct. 22, 1946. '
`
A, H, LAIDlG
2,409,694
ELECTRON DISCHARGE DEVICE`
Filed June v26', 1942
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
34
BY'
A..
'ATTORNEY
Oct. 22, 1946. '
A, H, LAlDlG
'
2,409,694 '
ELECTRQN DISCHARGE DEVICE
`
Filed Jima 26, 1942
3 Sheets-Sheet 5
l
\
AE.
61
A
¿z J9!
"58
¿i
Y
l l
l I
.
l
| I |
,
î
au'
A
’ l 1
25.
5
l
i5
' l ‘j
"a
I l
BY .
ALUM/YW»
ATTORNEY
2,409,694
Patented Oct. 22, 1946
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,409,694
ELECTRON DISCHARGE DEVICE
Alfred H. Laidig, Bloomfield, N. J., assîgnor to
Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pitts
burgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania
Application June 26, 1942, Serial No. 448,555
9 Claims.
.
l
This invention relates to electron discharge de-vices generally, and to the generation and uti
lizatîon of ultra high frequency currents, the in
vention having reference, more particularlyyto
novel high frequency radio apparatus including ‘
hollow-body resonators.
The type of electron discharge device with
which the present invention may be classified,
consists essentially of two hollow conducting cir
cuit members or resonators within which fields,
comprising standing electromagnetic waves, are
adapted to be set up by the passage of a stream
of electrons through a restricted part thereof.
The said members are so constructed that they
have or may be adjusted to have the same reso
nant frequency. They are also so Aconstructed
that electrons pass completely through the field
of said restricted part of each member prefer
2
netic inter-connection is provided between res
onators with proper phase relations between their
respective fields, that is, when the electron groups
pass the mid-point between the restricted por
tions or poles of the catcher of energy abstract
ing resonant member when the iield in that mem
ber is most strongly opposing the proper mo
tions of the electrons therethrough. The major
ity of the modulated electrons, likewise, pass
completely through the restricted portion of theA
second- or catcher resonator, and enter a collec
tor. Since the electron group gathers around
the electrons of normal velocity which are pre
ceded by slow electrons and followed by fast
electrons, this group of normal velocity electrons
should pass the mid-point in the field of the re
stricted portion of the buncher resonator when
that field is changing from zero so that the fol
lowing electrons will be assisted thereby.
ably within the period of a minute portion of a
half~cycle of the operating resonant frequency 20 Electron streams, in velocity modulated tubes,
are of relatively high impedancev and match
ofthe cavity members. VWith the electric vector
readily the resonators through which they pass.
of the'electromagnetic field of each member act
The high electron stream impedance is obtained
ing along the line of travel of the electrons and
by means of a high potential, but low stream cur
upon the latter for a time preferably equal to a
minute portionof one-half cycle, successive elec 25 rent. This procedure in the microwave region of
a few centimeters wavelength encounters diffi
trons of the stream will emerge from the restrict-`
culties by seriously limiting the output of the os
ed part of the initial hollow resonant member,
cillators, etc. to i almost useless levels. Since
referred to as the buncher, with minute variable
practically there is a deñnite limit to the stream
velocities and will move through the ñeld-'free
space separating the restricted parts of thetwo» 30 electron density the only other factor in increas
ing current is to increase the cross section area
members, whereby a concentration o_f electrons
will form around electrons of normal velocity,
of the’stream. However, in the prior art, as re
lated to the short microwave region, the reson
that are preceded by slightly slower electrons and
ators are scaled down to such an extent that the
followed by slightly faster electrons. Likewise,
diminished numbers of ‘electrons will obtain b_e 35 oriiice area through which the stream passes is
much restricted. This reduces the stream cur
tween bunches consisting of electrons of nor-‘
rent.
‘
`
mal velocity that are preceded by fast electrons
The proportional magnitudes of theresonators
and followed by slow electrons. Thus, the elec
and streams is at once evident if one considers,
trons of the stream pass a given point in waves
of increasing and decreasing density, which 40 in the simplest case, an Eno mode in a cubical
resonator, This designation refers to an electric
waves are caused to. pass through the restricted
vector parallel to the axis (having 11:0) , the fre
part of the second hollow resonant member, re
quency of which is independent of the dimen
ferred to as the catcher, by virtue of the phase
sions along this aXis (Z) and having only one
relationship between the buncher and the catch
er grid voltages which in conjunction with equal 45 mode of oscillation 4,with the longest possible
ity, though not necessarily/,of the resonant fre
wavelength, l, given by 2\/2a, wherein A desig
nates wavelengths and adesignates the dimen
sion from the center normal to a side of the cube.
From this simple relation, we immediately see
ber that are stronger at the expense of the direct
current energy than those existing in the initial 50 that, in the microwave region of present concern,
the largest resonator dimension is of the order of
or buncher member. With proper coupling of
a fraction of an inch at a few centimeters wave
the electromagnetic waves in thecatcher member
length.
,
with those of the buncher member, sustained
rI'he effective Q of such a small resonator is ap
electromagnetic oscillations will result, such cou
quency of the two members, electromagnetic
waves are excited in the second or catcher mem
pling obtaining when proper electric and mag
preciably ínñuenced by the extent of the orifice
3
4
and this in fact varies approximately as ¿t6/b3
As here shown, the inner cylinder I3 projects
axially through the next larger or resonator cyl
inder I2 which in turn projects axially through
(assuming plane waves which, of course, are not
strictly existant in hollow resonators in general),
where b is the area of all the orifices involved.
Hence, the ratio of orifice to resonator surface
must be kept as small as possible (even though
the next larger or outer cylinder II. The con
struction is such that the outer cylindrical wall I4
of the resonator cylinder in Dart is the inner
there are _modes of oscillation whose fields more
cylindrical wall for the annular outer cylinder.
or less avoid ,the oriñce) and this is not `possible
Similarly the outer cylindrical wall I5 of the in
rwith conventional methods of enveloping the
ner cylinder I3 in part is the inner cylindrical
resonators around electron streams, without se 1,0 wall for the annular resonator cylinder, Within
rious loss in electron stream current and hence
outer cylinder II, and in the area around the
output.
.
An object of the present invention is accord
ingly to improve upon prior art structures to over
come effectively the deficiencies therein and par
ticularly to increase power output in the micro
wave range with an increase rather than de
crease in the size of mechanism employed.
A further object of the invention is to provide
for a central collector toward which electrons
converge from a ring-like cathode.
Another object of the invention is to enable the
collector to be adequately cooled notwithstanding
its central position.
common `portieri of cylindrical wall I4 is an an
nular ring of insulation I6, outwardlj7 flanged for
supporting purposes and to provide an outer
region fora vpair -of bus-bars Il engirdling the
ring of insulation and held thereby from contact
with each other or with the cylinder walls.
Sealed input connections I8 are provided for said
bus bars from the exterior of said outer cylinder.
The circumferentially inner face of the insulation
ring IS is preferably concave and provides ade
quate depth for reception of heater filament seg
ments =I il shown as short coils of appropriate wire
the ends >of which project radially through the
insulation ring and connect with the two bus-bars
I'I. The several segments I9 are arranged, with
proper insulative spacing, end to end, and accord
A still further object of the invention is to pro
vide a heater for the cathode adequately sup
ported to have a circumferential position around
the cathode and retained from physical contact
ingly compose a coiled heater making a full con
with the cathode.
volution, with each segment in electrical parallel
Still further objects will appear as the descrip 30 to the others. Burning out of one filament seg
tion proceeds both by direct recitation thereof
ment accordingly does notl stop operation of the
and by implication from the Context.
device .as a whole.
In the accompanying drawings, wherein like
numerals of reference indicate similar parts
throughout the several views, and wherein pre
ferred physical embodiments of the invention are
disclosed by way of example;
Figure i is a perspective view of an electron
discharge device embodying my invention;
Figure 2 is a vertical section on an axial plane
as on line II-II of Figure 3;
Figure 3 is a sectional view on a plane perpen
dicular to the axis and taken midway of the
length of the device, that is to say on a vertical
A ring-like cathode 26, having side flanges, is
carried by said flanges upon said ring of insula
. tion, the emitting portion of the cathode being
radially inward from the heater and overlying
both the heater and the concave face of the ring
of insulation. The diameter of the inner cir
cumference of the cathode is only slightly greater
than the outside diameter of the next adjacent
outer curved wall I4 of cylinder I2 which is pro
vided with a circumferential opening 2I directly
in front of the cathode. Electron emission from
the cathode accordingly enters radially through
line through the middle of Figure 2;
said opening 2I in the common part of wall I4
Figure 4 is a perspective View of o-ne of the grid
cages;
bgtween outer cylinder II and resonator cylinder
Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional view similar
to Figure 2 showing a modification;
Figure 6 is a fragmentary sectional view on
line VI-VI of Figure 5; and
Figure 7 is a fragmentary sectional view on
Inwardly of the said circular or circumfer
ential opening in said cylindrical wall I4 is an
annular field-free space 22 defined by a pair
I
.
of washer-like plates 23, spaced apart substan
tially the width of said opening. Said field-free
line VII-VII of Figure 5.
space ris annular and extends in a radial direc
In the specific embodiment of the invention
illustrated in said drawings, the structure pro
vides a generally cylindrical housing I0 the out
ward assembled form of which presents an outer
cylinder I I of short length with a somewhat
tion from proximity of and between the cylin
drical walls I4 and I5 of the resonator cylinder.
The field-free space v22 is entirely within the
confines of the resonator cylinder and the plates
23, accordingly divide the end portions of the
cylinder from the middle portion forming the
smaller cylinder I2 projecting axially therefrom
at both ends and yet smaller cylinders I3 pro 60 field-free space except» for small circular gaps
24, 25 between the peripheries of the plates and
jecting from both ends of cylinder I2. The outer
cylindrical walls I4 and I5 respectively.
cylinder II constitutes the cathode and cathode
heater region, the next smaller or intermediate
Resonator cylinder I2 has a washer-like or an
cylinder I2 provides the resonator and field-free
nular end wall 26 at each end thereof hermetically
sealed with respect to cylindrical walls I4, I5 and
area, whereas the small cylinders I3 afford a
region for collection of the electrons. These sev
parallel to each other and to the plates 23,
eral cylindrical portions of the housing as a group
within that cylinder. Between each said end wall
are vacuum sealed so that the entire interior may
and plate 23 nearest thereto, perpendicular to
be an evacuated region with the housing con
stituting the envelope maintaining the vacuum.
The invention will first be described in a simple
form, illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, to acquaint
the reader with the subject matter generally, and
then added detail will be discussed with reference
to the remaining figures of the drawings.
both is an intermediate wall 21 which is cylin
70 drical and situated such that the volume of the
resonator cylinder, exclusive of the area occupied
by the field-free space, is substantially divided
in half. Thus are provided two resonator cham
bers 28, 29 of which one, as 29, is radially within
the other, each chamber being annular and the
.2,409,694
6
5
full length of cylinder I2 with a restricted central
between the grids in the proper phase in accord
portion at gaps 24 and 25 respectively. Inter
ance with classical theory. A small amount of
this energy is utilized, as indicated above, as
mediate wall 21 is common to both of these
resonator chambers and has an` aperture 30
through which extends a coupling loo'p 3l for
maintaining resonance in the outer chamber
from resonance of the inner one.
feed back through loop 3| to the lirst resonator
chamber 28 in order to modify the flow of other
electrons in the gap 24 between the larger ñrst
pair‘of grids 33, so that the cycle of operations
above explained may continue. Utilization of
energy thus built up in inner or smaller diameter
providing an opening 32 therethrough in close 10 resonator chamber 29 is obtained by meansY of
a suitable output connection such as the coaxial
proximity to the space included between field
line coupling 44. .This coupling is preferably
free space conñning plates 23 so that electrons
constructed as a copper tube 45 within a sleeve
emitted from cathode 20 after passing through
4E. soldered or otherwise vacuum sealed through
field-free space 22 continue into the smaller cyl
inder I3 through said opening 32. The openings 15 the resonator wall. The outer end of this sleeve
is vacuum sealed to a sleeve 41 which virtually
2| and 32 in the outer and inner cylindrical walls
constitutes a continuation of the first sleeve 416
I4 and I5 of the resonator cylinder, as well as
but of a material such as that sold under the
the openings to and from the ñeld-free space
trade name of “Kovar” which has a coeliicient
at the outer and inner peripheries of the afore
Cylindrical wall I5 .between resonator cylinder
I2 and smaller cylinder I3 is peripherally slotted
mentioned washer-like plates 23 have appropriate 20 of expansion substantially equivalent to that of
borosilicate glass. A glass cap 48 is sealed to the
grids 33 thereacross. These grids may eachbe
fabricated as a unit, appearing as a cage shown
outer end of this “Kovar” sleeve and completes
in detail perspective,> view by Figure 4. The grids
are of generally cylindrical construction, having
end hoops 34 `and transverse stays 35 edgewise
to the electron flow with desired interpositioning
of grid wires 36 parallel to the stays to give ap
the vacuum-tight enclosure. Copper tube 45 pref
erably extends from the resonator wall to the
outer end of the “Kovar” sleeve and constitutes
a good electrical conductor.
A coaxial wire 49
extends through the tube, projecting at opposite
ends thereof and providing a loop 5|) within the
resonator and a loop 5I within the glass cap 48,
the ends of the wire in each instance being se
cylindrical collector electrode 31 the structure of .
cured to the next adjacent end of the copper
which is the same in all figures of the drawings.
It is provided with a plurality of pyramidal cavi
tube. Other output connection, however, may be
employed, as found desirable or expedient. It
,ties 38 the bases of which open outwardly in
proximity to the electron-passing opening 32 of
will be seen now that the present structure of
the surrounding cylindrical wall I5 of said cylin- . I the disclosed ultra high frequency device is very
simple, due in large part to the compact cylin
der I_3. Projecting coaxially from opposite ends
drical shape, that it `can be very accurately built,
of this collector are pipes 39 having other pipes
and when assembled is very rigid. These ad
40 within the same so that a cooling medium
vantages are important to achieve a resonator
may be introduced, as through inner pipes 4I)
structure pretuned in manufacture and without
to a cooling chamber 4I of the collector and re
propriate grid area by wires and stays.
_
Within the small cylinder I3 is a generally
turned outward for discharge by outer pipes 39.
Said outer pipes 39 are sealed with respect to
the collector and to metal caps 42 at outer parts
of the pipes, these caps in turn having glassed
seals 43 with the inner cylinder I3. This struc
ture likewise constitutes an appropriate support
means for tuning in use.
>
In order that the device may be illustrated as
capable of being tuned, I have shown an elabora
tion of the structure above described, by the il
lustration of Figures 5 to 7. Equivalent parts
in this illustration have been identiñed by nu
merals heretofore used but with the addition of
In operation it will be understood that elec
a prime mark on the numeral. While some of the
trons emitted from the cathode travel in a di
parts illustrated in this elaboration are identical
rection radially inward of thev device and DaSS "5() with parts shown and described in the more sim
through the first two grids33 which are sep
ple disclosure of Figures 1 to 4, and -some parts
arated by gap 24, and then into the field-free
are similar or equivalent thereto, it is believed
that repetition of the above description will be
space. The resonance of chamber 28 affec‘ts the
>electrons in their said passage between the grids,
found unnecessary. Suffice it to say that asbe
"modifying the electron stream such that some 55 fore, a cylindrical cathode 2B’ is provided (shown
electrons pass through unaiîected as to velocity,
in this’instance as concave for focussing pur
for the collector.
, .
poses), the cathode directing electrons through
other electrons are minutely slowed down, and
yet other electrons are minutely speeded up. The
a ñrst pair of grids 33', a ñeld-free space 22', a
magnitude oi the modulation is partially depend
second pair of grids 33' and thence to the co1
_ent upon the ñeld strength-between the said grids. 60 lector 31’. Gaps 24' and 25' exist between the
The electrons. modified as to velocity, continue
grids, and for tuning purposes it is desired to be '
their travel through the ñeld-free space 22 with ‘ .able to change the gap distance or spacing of the
the electrons having normal or unaiîected speed
grids of each pair.
overtaking previously dispatched somewhat slow
As a means `for accomplishing the tuning by
er electrons and in turn being overtaken by some
change of grid relationship, I have shown both
what sp‘eeded-up electrons started at a later mo
cylindrical walls I4’ and I5' flexible and resilient,
ment» The proportional length, or radius, in di
this being accomplished by corrugating those
rection of flow of the electrons, of the field-free
walls in a direction parallel to the cylinder axis.
vspace is such that the proper concentration or
bunching of electrons takes place between the
smaller. pair of grids 33 in the gap area 25. The
electrons accordingly representl a concentration
of energy in the said gap area 25 and are capable
.of giving up energy to the second resonator cham
ber 29 when acted on by‘oscillating electric fields 75
I likewise prefer to taper these cylindrical walls,
that tapering being exaggerated in the drawings
in order to emphasize its presence. The outer
edges of these cylindrical walls are vacuum sealed,
as before, to the end wall of the resonator cyl
inder I2’.V Tuning is obtained by compressing the
flexible walls in a direction toward the deñning
-7
plates 23’ of the held-free space 22' or >by per
mitting the flexible walls to move away from those
plates by virtue of the resiliency of the said cy
lindrical walls.
Appropriate means for compressing or releas
ing the ,flexible walls is provided, and for fob
taining delicacy of tuning, the means vhere illus
trated enables each ilexible >wall to be ñexed ir
respective `of flexing of any other cylindrical wall
portion. As shown, a protruding cylindrical neck
53, externally threaded as at 52, is provided ñxed
with respect to the end wall of the resonator cyl
inder and ¿forming substantially a .continuation
of cylindrical wall I4’. A smaller collar 54 of
similar nature but internally threaded at 55 is l;
provided ñxed to the end wall of the resonator
cylinder and protruding vtherefrom substantially
as a continuation of cylindrical wall I5’.
sociated with the ,particular knob. As a result,
very'ñne tuning .may -be obtained and maintained.
Equal manipulation `of corresponding knobs at
opposite ends .of the device keeps the grids ypar
allel, butit will vbe found that fractional tuning
can lbe obtained by turning only-one knob a short
ways and thus have .the grid very slightly out of
parallel with its companion grid. Theknobs .are
preferably suitably marked, as `by notches 68 in
their peripheries in order that they may be ori
ented to correct position, or, if preferred, the
knobs may be geared together for operating the
same in unison and thereby adjust the grids and
maintain them constantly in parallelism.
I claim:
l. An electron discharge device comprising a
cylindrical cathode, cylindrical and coaxial grids
within and coaxial to the cathode, means be
collars, as well as associated parts about to be
tween said -grids for providing a ñeld-free »space
described, appear at both ends of the device, but
therebetween, and said cathode .being spaced ra
for simplicity of description the construction at
dially outward from said means so the electrons
one end only will be given in detail. An adjust
from the cathode pass therethrough as a radially
ing knob `56 internally threaded at 51 to .mesh
converging beam, and a collector coaxial within
with threads 52 of the collar 53 is provided in
said grids for receiving said electrons.
the form of a ring concentric with the axis of the 25
2. An electron discharge rdevice comprising ey
device. Similarly, adjusting knob 58 of smaller
lindrical means for producing an electron stream
diameter and having external threads v59 to mesh
in a path converging substantially perpendicular
with threads 55 of collar 54 is also provided con
to the axis of said cylindrical means, a second
centric with the axis of the device.
cylinder constituting a resonator and of less di
A flat ring 6B is carried at its inner periphery 30 ameter than and coaxial with the first said cy
in an appropriate peripheral groove in knob 5B,
lindrical means, said resonator having a radial
said knob being shown as of split nature for en
passage for electrons therethrough radially in
abling the ring 60 to be inserted and retained
ward from said first cylindrical means and hav
These
`
within the groove. The knob may be rotated
ing radially extending means therein shielding
with respect to the ring, but since rotation of the 35 a part of said electron path through the res
knob moves the knob axially by virtue of the
onator and adapted to provide a ñeld free pas
threaded mounting thereof, rotation of said knob
sage for the electrons through said shielded part
will accordingly move the ring laterally without
of the path, said resonator and said radial means
necessitating rotation of said ring. Similar to
adapted to cooperate for bunching electrons from
the provision of outer ring 60, an inner `ring 6| 40 said cylindrical means and extracting energy
is provided in conjunction with smaller knob 58.
therefrom, a collector centrally disposed about
Around the .outer cylindrical wall M' of the res
onator in engagement with the peaks of the cor
rugations thereof is a band 62 vparallel to and
of substantially the same diameter as the afore
said axis and in the path of convergence of said
electrons, and means extending from and for cool
ing said collector.
3. An electron discharge device comprising cy
mentioned adjusting ring 60. At suitable inter
lindrical means for producing an electron stream
vals are provided slidable posts 63 perpendicular
in a path converging substantially perpendicular
to and interconnecting said yband and ring. Con
to the axis of said cylindrical means, a second
sequently movement of the ring in a direction
cylinder constituting a resonator and of less
longitudinally of its axis also moves the band and 50 diameter than and coaxial wtih the iirst said
since the band engages the sloping surface of
cylindrical means, said resonator having a radial
the resonator cylindrical wall, such movement in
passage for electrons therethrough radially in
an inward direction willcompress that Wall and
ward from said ñrst cylindrical means and having
move its grid inwardly, whereas movement of the
radially extending means therein shielding a
band axially outward Will enable ,the resonator 55 part of said electron path through the resonator
wall to resiliently expand radially and thus adjust
and adapted to provide a ñeld free passage for
the grid to a new position. It is to be under
the electrons through said shielded part of the
stood that the grid in this instance is composed
of transverse stays and wires secured directly to
the resonator wall so that the expansion and con
traction above mentioned may take place.
Sim
path, said resonator and said radial means adapt
ed to cooperate for bunching electrons from said
80 cylindrical means and extracting energy there
from, a collector centrally disposed about said
ilarlyy the inner resonator wall I5' has a band f
axis and in the path of convergence of said elec
trons, said collector having a plurality of out
wardly opening cavities for collection of elec
eter as inner adjusting .ring 6|. This band and 65
trons therein, and means extending from and for
ring are connected at intervals by posts 65 thus
cooling said collector.
enabling the inner resilient wall I5’ of the reso
4. An electron discharge device comprising a
nator to be adjusted and to obtain adjustment of
cylindrical cathode, a heater next said cathode,
its grid 33'.
said heater comprising a plurality of heater coil
All of said posts 53 and 65 are slidably mounted 70 sections
end to end and electrically spaced apart,
in rigid bearings 66 and are rendered vacuum
said sections beingr connected in parallel for si
tight and yet movable by virtue of appropriate
multaneous use, and a central collector within
flexible diaphragms 61. It is intended that each
said cathode, whereby electrons from the cath
revolution of the respective knob shall transmit
ode converge radially therefrom to the collector.
very slight movement to the end of the grid as 75
5. An electron discharge device comprising a
64 in engagement therewith, said .band being
parallel to and of substantially the same diam
2,409,694
resonator cylinder of annular cross-section hav
ing two fixed coaxial cylindrical walls forming a
resonator cylinder of annular cross section, said
cylinder being divided medially by a third co
axial cylinder thereby forming outer and inner
resonators of which one is larger than and en
circles the other, parallel plates in said annular
resonator cylinder supported by said third cyl
inder and vleaving gap openings of fixed dimen
sion at the peripheries of said plates between
said plates and the said two fixed coaxial cylin
drical walls, and cathode means outside of the
outer one of the said two fixed concentric cylin
drical walls for producing converging streams of
electrons through said two cylindrical walls and
through the region between said plates, whereby
electrons in most separated relation pass the gap
10
the region between said plates for enabling en
ergy to be derived“ from said stream by one of
said resonators, and adjustable means connected
to said walls for flexing said ñexible walls and
thereby turning the device, said means for flexing
said flexible walls providing knobs on the ex
terior of the device and pressure-applying means
on the flexible walls operatively connected to said
knobs.
8. An electron discharge device comprising a
resonator cylinder of annular cross-section hav
ing two coaxial cylindrical walls of flexible and
resilient material and of which one is within the
other, said cylinder being divided medially by a
third coaxial cylinder thereby forming outer and
inner resonators each of which has one of said '
flexible walls as a wall thereof, parallel plates in
said annular resonator cylinder supported by said
of the larger resonator and the electrons in more
third cylinder and leaving gap openings of var
concentrated relation pass the gap of the smaller
resonator and whereby the larger one of said res 20 iable dimension at the peripheries of said plates
between said plates and the said two flexible and
onators aiîects the electron velocity to bunch the
resilient walls, cathode means girdling said cyl
electrons while in separated relation and the
inder for passing a modulated stream of elec
other resonator absorbs more energy from the
trons through the said cylinders and through
more concentrated and bunched electrons.
6. An electron discharge device comprising a 25 the region between said plates for enabling energy
to be derived from said stream by one of said
resonator cylinder of annular cross-section hav
resonators, and adjustable means connected to
said walls for flexing said flexible walls and there
by tuning the device, said means for flexing said
the other, said cylinder being divided medially
by a third coaxial cylinder thereby forming outer 30 flexible walls providing bands on the flexible
walls movable axially and adapted thereby to flex
and inner resonators each of which has one of
said walls, and said means for flexing said ilex
said flexible walls as a wall thereof, parallel
ible walls also providing exterior rings connected
plates in said annular resonator cylinder sup
with vacuum seal to said bands.
ported by said third cylinder and leaving gap
9. An electron discharge device comprising a
openings of variable dimension at the peripheries 35
resonator cylinder of annular cross-section hav
of said plates between said plates and the said
ing two coaxial cylindrical walls of flexible and
two ilexible and resilient walls, cathode means
resilient material and of which one is within the
girdling said cylinder for passing a modulated
other, said cylinder being divided medially by a
stream of electrons through the said cylinders
and through the region between said plates for 40 third coaxial cylinder thereby forming outer and
inner resonators each of which has one of said
enabling energy to be derived from said stream
flexible walls'as a wall thereof, parallel plates in
by one of said resonators, and adjustable means
said annular resonator cylinder supported by said
.connected to said walls for flexing said flexible
third cylinder and leaving gap openings of vai'
walls and thereby tuning the device.
i
45 iable dimension at the peripheries of said plates
7. An electron discharge device comprising
between said plates and the said two flexible and
resonator cylinder of annular cross-section hav
resilient walls, cathode means girdling said cyl
ing two coaxial cylindrical walls of flexible and
ing two coaxial cylindrical walls of flexible and
resilient material and of which one is within
resilient material and of which one is within the
inder for passing a modulated stream of elec
inner resonators each of which has one of said
ñexible walls as a wall thereof, parallel plates in
to be derived from said stream by one of said
trons through the said cylinders and through the
other, said cylinder being divided medially by a
third coaxial cylinder thereby forming outer and 50 region between said plates for enabling energy
resonators, and adjustable means connected to
said walls for flexing said flexible walls and there
said annular resonator cylinder supported by said
by tuning the device, and threaded knobs having
third cylinder and leaving gap openings of var..
iable dimension at the peripheries of said plates 55 grooves receiving said rings and adapted to move
ksaid rings and bands axially by rotation of said
between said plates and the said two flexible and
knobs.
resilient walls, cathode means girdling said
ALFRED H. LAIDIG.
cylinder for passing a modulated stream of elec
trons through the said cylinders and through
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
1 097 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа