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Nov. 5, 1946.
R, M, KNlGHT
2,410,507
TRACK FOR TRACK LAYING VEHICLES
Filed April 14, 1944 Y
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5 Sheets-Sheet 1
£75
"
‘
- Wilmer/W 2zv’j%f
NOV.’ 5, 1946.
I
R, M_ KNlGHT
I
2,410,507
TRACK FOR TRACK LAYING VEHICLES .
Filed April 14, 1944
3 Sheets-Sheet s
Q
7%
//E’.L_7..- ER
127%
Patented Nov. 5, 1946
Z,4l0,507 '
UN 1 TED STATE S
Y
“OFFICE
2,410,507
~
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TRACK FOR TRACK LAYING VEHICLES
‘Robert M. Knight, Chicago, Ill.
’ Application April 14, 1944,tsenarNossaasoii
(o1. 305_10>
' 34 Claims.
"1
friction,thusgdepreciating the track and shorten—
' ‘This -.invention relates ..to improvements in
'inggitsjlife.
tracks forjtrackala'ying vehicles. and more par
Articulated steel tracks have certain advan
ticularly- to vcrav'vler _- tracks f highly desirable .for
' tages overinarticulated rubber tracks, and vice
versa. Articulated steel tracks may be repaired
use in connection ‘with ‘tractors, half-tracks,
tanks,.trailers,v trucks, and. substantially any ,type
by the .removal and replacement of shoes ‘or
sections and‘ an injury to one portion of ‘the
track ‘does not result in the necessity of replac
ing‘the entire track. Inarticulated rubber tracks
ofovehicle-either. self-propelled or towed iortravel
over , highways .or .unpaved terrain, although the
invention may. have‘. other. uses and purposes _ as
will. ‘be t apparent toone-iskilled. in. the art.
and supplants {my ., -co:pending application. en
have ‘the_,_advantage ‘of cushioning a 'load, being
less. injurious tojhighways, permitting more ‘flex
titled “Tracklior track layingvehicles,” ?led
‘~ibility,‘ ‘requiring the use ‘of less power in opera
'fThisfapplicatiomis . a .lcontinuationéin-part of 10
tion, and'being better able torwithstand abrasive
voctobenis, 1941, Serial rid-414,805.
' ‘Injl'the, pastnmanyand various types of crawler
1tracks_have"'_b,ecn developed. In Qne'arly every
‘instance; these iformerly .knowntracks were .ob
wear.
‘
'
'
15' ,The instant invention seeks the provision or
'
-a ‘crawler‘trackembodying all of the advantages
o‘i-‘the articulated steeltrack-and the inarticu
lated rubber track'with the elimination .of'their
disadvantages. That is an important ‘object of
'jejctionable sin that they were ‘not satisfactory in
voperation or couldnot'be commercially produced
‘by virtue of prohibitive cost or .‘fo'r-otherreasons.
Insofar as ,I am aware,,on1y two types of come 20 “this invention.
*Anotherjimportant ‘object ‘of v"this invention .is
mercially practical “crawler tracks have been I. de
'thez~?>provision of an economical, durable, and
veloped. ilOne offthe'se'typesis the articulated
highly *flexble articulated crawler, track compris
steel‘track usedon Army tanksandsimilarequip~
ingl‘separable shoes or sections of reinforced rub
ment. " The othertypeis the endless‘,.ine'aning.in—
articulated, ,siin‘gle'piece .reinforce,d_.rubber track.
‘jWhile articulated steel tracksomay 1be,satis
'factory‘for military equipment, Lthey-are‘open to
, her or equivalent material.
-A further object is-the provision of" an'articu
vlated-crawler track comprising'separable shoes
a multitudeq'of objectionsfor civilian-usage. For
example, steel tracks are ‘heavy andclumsy thus
‘necessitating,relatively .slow speed,fthe'y are ob
jectionably noisy, they .offer no _-cushion .to the
equipment ,on. which theylare used thus.causing
‘orsections, and designed for ‘high speed ‘opera
'tion' either on paved highways'or over unpaved
excessive vibration, ,andia're yerydestructiVe to
which ' ‘tension members extend ‘through each
‘paved or hardsur'facedhighways tosuch anex
.tentjthat' theinuse upon highways is forbidden
shoe, and are directly connected to transverse re
inforcing '.members .of ‘the same vshoe as well as
bylaw, and by- virtue .of .their . relatively- little
‘?exibility an“ objectionable amount of . power’ is
adjacent shoes.
A, further feature of the invention, resides in
the provision of an articulated reinforced rubber
terrain.
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‘
,It is also a feature of this invention to provide
‘an articulated reinforced rubber crawler track in
requiredltooperate them. Further, they, are
crawlertrack. comprising individually separable
'di?icult of repair when injured. ‘
‘jlnarticulated ,rubber tracks, even _ though so 40 shoes so constructed ‘that when the shoes are as
interiorly reinforced-as ,to take the,;tension load ,. sembled thereis continuous metal reinforcing in
side ,fthe ‘rubber “covering ,of the track ‘extending
inajistraight line, throughout the length of the
track parallel withthe axistof the trackso that
the tension load .ofthe‘ track is carried by such
:off the rubber» covert-ares‘objectionable ?intthe
extreme cost of: production-since the, :entire itrack
- must beiha-ndled :in i production‘ routine .as a single
unit. :Such tracks-.arelikewise expensive inup- ‘
metal , reinforcing under a ,. straight line pull 4 and
.keep bysreason .of 'the' fact ‘that ‘if a rupture oc
ours :in any one portion of lthe‘track; the" entire
track‘must be replaced, -repair of an ‘inarticu
latedrubber track not as'fyet‘ being practical.
Rubber tracks or sectional construction, which
have beencommercially attempted ‘in, several in
such ‘tensionj'load ,is entirely removed .from the
rubbercovering.
'
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lapping.portionsthereof.
stances; are not as ‘flexible as is desired and, are
“subject to the‘ generation of .an undesirable. or
injurious amount of heat resultingirom "internal
_
“Also anobiect ofthel-invention resides in the
50 ‘,provisionioian articulated crawler track embody
ing separablejshoes ,orsectionsand in which ad
jacent shoes .are joined_..together through over
Another ‘object , .of. the invention resides in the
55
provision ofcanart'iculated. crawler’ track in which
3
4
each individual shoe or section carries means by
which it is connected to the next adjacent shoe.
Still another feature of the invention resides
in the provision of an articulated reinforced rub_
ber crawler track so arranged as to provide metal
Figure 10 is a fragmentary side elevational VieW'
of a crawler track of slightly different construc
tion than the showing in Figure l, but also em
bodying principles of the instant invention;
Figure 11 is a fragmentary end elevational view
of the structure in Figure 10;
Figure 12 is a fragmentary top plan view of
one of the reinforcing elements used in the struc
to-metal contact between adjacent" shoes, the
metal being rubber covered except for openings
to permit access to the connecting means,
It is also anobject of this invention to provide
ture of Figure 10;
‘
an articulated reinforced rubber crawler track in ll)
Figure 13 is a fragmentary vertical sectional
which tension members extend through each in
view, with the tread rubber omitted, illustrating
dividual shoe, and the shoes are so constructed ‘ a somewhat di?'erent form of tension holding
that the holding means for the tension members 7 means and transverse reinforcing elements; and
are clamped between overlapping parts of adja
Figure 14 is a fragmentary plan view of a pre
cent shoes.
‘ ‘
ferred form of tension member.
Asshown on the drawings:
A further object of the invention resides in
the provision of an articulated reinforced rubber
In the illustrated embodiments of the present
crawler track embodying shoes having transverse
invention only a small portion, namely, two shoes
reinforcing members therein, the arrangement
or sections, of an articulated crawler track are
being such that the transverse reinforcing mem
shown. It will, however, be understood that the
bers of adjacent shoes have complementalpor
entire articulated crawler track is built up in
tions extending beyond the rubber covering at
similar manner to form a complete track loop of
the sides of the track to provide a base for bogey
desired size. The completely assembled track in
wheel guides, or sprocket wheel contacting'ele_
general embodies a metallic skeleton having con
tinuity throughout the track in a line parallel
Still a further object‘ of the invention is to
ing the longitudinal‘ axis of the track, so that
provide an articulated crawler track formed of
this skeleton is enabled to carry the full tension
shoes or sections, in which the ends of the shoes
load placed upon the track during use. When
ments.
,
'
?t together in such- a manner as to minimize the
the track is assembled, the skeleton is completely
openings ,tlierebetween when the track is flexed‘
around asprocket wheel or the like, permitting
sufficient ‘separation "between adjacent ‘shoes in
such case to provide some ventilation to assist in
encased in tread rubber or equivalent substance,
except for portions of the skeleton projecting at
the sides of the track to accommodate bogey
wheel guides or sprocket engaging members, and
cooling thetrack, but effectively prohibiting such
except for suitable openings providing access to
separation ‘when the track is in contact with ‘the 'Cu Ll the connecting means for joining adjacent track
ground so as to prevent the entrance of dirt-or
‘shoes. With this arrangement, no tension load is
other ‘foreign material between the shoes or see
tio'n‘s’of the track.
-
’
’
While some of the more salient features, char
acteristics, and advantages of the instant inven
placed upon the rubber covering of the track,
such rubber covering being subjected only to a
compression load.
'
_ Figure. 2'is substantially a central vertical sec
Hereinafter, the skeleton of each shoe or‘ sec
tion of the track will bereferred to as a, metal.
lic skeleton, and it preferably is so. However, it
will be appreciated that in the case of a relatively
light crawler track of a, type for use upon motor
cycles, scooters, or vehicles of equivalent light
ness and small size, fabric cords or ropes might
be used as tension members in the skeleton.
With reference to that embodiment'of the in
tional view, with parts shown in elevation, of the
vention illustrated in Figures 1 to 5, inclusive,
tion have above been pointed out, others will be
come apparent from the following disclosures,
taken. in conjunction with the accompanying
drawings, in which:
'
v
Figure 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view,
showing a portion of an articulated crawler track
embodying principles of the instant invention;
structure of Figure 1;
and with. a special reference to the showing in
‘Figure 4, it will be seen that each individual shoe
taken through substantially the mid portion of
comprises a body portion l in the form of a. block
the structure of Figures 1 and 2;
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of tread rubber or equivalent material. The
‘Figure 4 is a substantially central vertical sec_
‘top faceof the tread rubber is preferably smooth
tional view through a single track shoe of the 55 for association with bogey wheels or equivalent
character shown in Figures 1 and 2; ’
guiding means, while the'under face may be
Figure 5 is a fragmentary enlarged vertical sec
grooved as indicated at 2 "or otherwise formed to
tional ‘View, this ?gure being an enlargement of
provide a traction surface. [In the central region
the left central'portion of Figure 2 with part _
thereof, the shoe is of full thickness, but the
. Figure 3 is a fragmentary plan sectional view
omitted;;
.
,
,
'
Figure 6 is a‘ fragmentary partial section of
the same'character as Figure 5, but illustrating
another way of connecting the tension elements
to the tension holding members;
_
, Figure '7 is asomewhat ‘diagrammatic view, i1
60 end portions are of reduced thickness and ex
tend outwardly from the central portion. These
end portions are offset to provide an upper end
.portion 3 and a lower end portion 4. Thus when
the shoe is connected with adjacent shoes in the
65 assembling of the track, the end portion 3 will
lustratin‘gja different methodlof connecting the
tension members to'holding means therefor;
overlap the end portion 4 of an adjacent shoe,
and the end portion 4 will underlie the end
, Figure 8 is also adiagrammatic view of similar
portion 3 of another adjacent shoe. There will,
' character‘ to Figure '7, but illustrating a manner’
therefore, be an overlapping association between
of connecting the tension members directly to 70 shoes at each end of each shoe. As will later
' the transverse reinforcing members; ,
more fully appear, adjacent shoes are connected
Figure 9 is a fragmentary vertical sectional
together directly through the overlapping por
view, with parts shown in elevation, illustrating
'a_ stilldiiferent way of connecting the tension
‘ members to'the transverse reinforcing means;
.tions.v
,
‘
1
The skeleton of a shoe is made up of a pair of
rigid transverse reinforcing members, one such.
2,41 0,507
8
1 of another shoe through the transverse reinforc
ing members 5 and 8, and the tension element
key hole, openings along each side, such open
ings comprising an elongated slot extending'in
holding means or rods I 3 are clamped between
.wardly of the side edge and terminating in a
the transverse reinforcing members of adjacent ' . larger aperture. When two ‘sections of track are
shoes when the nuts I I are tightened down. With
joined together, the tension members, secured to
this arrangement there is a de?nite metal-to
the rods l3 in any suitable manner, are slid
metal continuity throughoutthe length of the
lengthwise into the key hole openings in the side
entire track in a direction paralleling the lon
edges of the transverse member 24. Thereafter,
gitudinal axis of the track. Theentiremetallic
tread rubber 25 may be molded and vulcanized
skeleton is covered by tread rubber with the ex 10 over the skeleton assembly thus formed, and the
ception of openings to permit access to the nuts
sections may be of substantially any desired
H and with the exception of the projections i8
length.
and [9 extending laterally beyond the tread rub
In Figures 10, 11 and 12 I have illustrated a
ber.
If any individual shoe is injured, it is a
somewhat different formation of the projecting
simple expedient to knock o? the bearing rings
20, release bolts II, and remove and replace that
shoe. It will further be noted that between the
joined transverse reinforcing members, the track
. 8 to accommodate a bogey wheel guide as well
' is highly ?exible so that it will bend easily in
_ ture of the shoes is the same as above described
passing around sprocket wheels or other drive
possesses the advantages of being entirely rubber
in connection with Figures 1 to 5, inclusive. In
this instance, however, the members 5 and 8 are
provided with projecting portions 26 and 27 re
covered, having extreme, ?exibility, economy in
spectively each substantially rectangular in form.
members.
Thus, it can be seen that the track
ends of the transverse reinforcing members 5 and
as a sprocket wheel engaging portion. In these
?gures, with the above noted exception, the struc_
manufacture and use, and any portion of the track
These portions, of course, project beyond the
may be readily repaired when needed.
25 tread rubber on each side of the track. When
In Figure 6 I have illustrated another manner
adjacent shoes are assembled, the portions 26
of connecting a tension element 12 to the trans
and 21 come together in superposed overlapping
verse rod l3. In this instance, the tension ele
v relationship as seen clearly in Figure 10.
ment is looped around the rod, and the free end
A combination bogey wheel guide and sprocket
of the element after looping may be attached to 30 engaging member generally indicated by numeral
the body portion of the element in any suitable
28 is connected to these projections. This mem
manner. If so desired, the tape may be used in
ber 28 comprises a sleeve portion 29 embracing
a continuous manner so that between the rods
the projections 26 and 21 over the top and down
|3,-the tape will extend in double thickness, one
wardly over the sides, the sleeve portion having
layer on top of the other.
,
35 an open bottom and the side wings of this sleeve
In Figure 7 I have indicated diagrammatically
portion preferably terminating flush with the
another way of attaching the tension elements
lower surface of the projecting member 21, The
12 to the transverse reinforcing members. In this
sleeve 29 may entirely surround ‘both members
instance, the tape ends are disposed in a groove
26 and 21 if ‘so desired,- but it is preferable to
in a substantially ?at bar 2| in the same man
ner above described in connection with the show
make a three-sided sleeve so as to keepthe metal
ing in Figure 5. These ?at bars 2| are prefer
ably provided with serrated upper and lower faces
as indicated at 22. The transverse reinforcing
members are identical in construction with those
above described with the exception that they have
openings of sui?cient size to accommodate the
bars 2| and the inside faces of these openings
are serrated complementally to the serrations on
lic portion of the track as high above ground
surface as possible.
On the inner end of the member 28, the sleeve
merges into an upstanding wing 30, preferably
' having downwardly diverging side walls. The
Wing is of sufficient height to project beyond the
inner face of the tread rubber of the track, and
the inner portion of the wing is beveled out
wardly as indicated at 3| so as to insure entry
For purposes of convenience, these 50 of the bogey wheel between oppositely disposed
transverse members are designated 5a and 8a
Wings on the track. The sleeve portion 29 serves
in Figure 7. It will be noted that the ends of
as a bearing surface for contact with the drive
the bars.
the members 5a and 8a as Well as the end por
sprockets.
.
tions of the bars 2| are curvate to provide a flar
The element 28 is readily attached to the pro
ing opening permitting free and easy bending 55 jecting portions 26 and 21' by means of a suitable
of the tension members l2.
~
In Figure 8 I have shown a-still different form
of skeleton assembly wherein the tension mem
bers 12 are connected directly to the transverse
.
bolt and nut connection 3! and 32, the bolt 3| ex
tending through suitable apertures 33 in the pro
jection's.
In Figures 13 and 14 there is shown a still dif
reinforcing members 5b and 8b. The transverse 60 ferent manner of connecting the tension members
members are offset on their interior faces as in
l2 with the transverse reinforcing means. This
dicated at 23, and the tension members extend
arrangement provides a much easier assembly of
into grooves in each of the transverse members
the tension members and the means for holding
wherein they are held by brazing, welding, or
them at the ends. In this instance, a pair of
some equivalent operation. The offsetting of the 65 superposed transverse bars 34 and 35 are provided
transverse members maintains the tension mem
having complemental serrated or tortuous interior
bers from adjacent shoes in direct alignment so
surfaces as indicated at 36. These members are
that the pull load upon the track is always taken
brought into superposed relationship with the
up by the skeleton in one direction.
ends of the tension elements l2 disposed there
In Figure 9, I have shown a construction de
between, the ends of the tension elements being
sirable for a trackhaving relatively long sections
bent in a tortuous manner as indicated at 31
rather than relatively short individua1 shoes.v In
when clamped between the bars 34 and 35. The
this instance, a transverse reinforcing member 7 bars are secured together by a series of stud bolts
24 is utilized which is vpreferably asingle solid
38 extending therethrough and therealong. The
piece of metal. The member is provided with 75 outer faces of each of the bars 34 and 35 are
2,410,507
11
12
of'reduced thickness withsaid reinforcing means
an adjacent shoe, and connecting means join
ing adjacent shoes directly through said verti
exposed on the innerface of said end portions.
9. A shoe for a crawler track, including a tread
cally overlapping portions.
rubber body, and metallic reinforcing means ex
tending entirely through said body and being
partially exposed at the ends of said body for
direct connection to similar means in adjacent
7
1'7. An articulated crawler track including a
plurality of separable shoes,'each shoe having
end portions reduced in thickness for vertical
overlapping association with complemental por
shoes,’ said body being formed with offset end
tions of adjacent shoes, and rigid connecting
portions of reduced thickness to permit one end
portion to overlie a complemental end portion on
an-adjacent shoe and the other end portion to
underlie a complemental end portion on‘ another
means joining adjacent shoes directly through
adjacent shoe;
,
'
the overlapping DOrtions thereof.
' '
18. An articulated crawler track including a
plurality of shoes, each shoe being shaped for
overlapping associationv with an adjacent shoe;
'
510. In a track for track laying vehicles, a plu
rality of individually separable shoes, ‘each shoe
15
including metallic tension members, ’ metallic
and connecting means joining adjacent shoes
through the overlapping portions thereof, and‘
each shoe being of ?exible construction between
transverse reinforcing members‘ holding said ten
its connection points with adjacent shoes.
sion members at each end of the shoe, and tread
rubber encasing said tension and reinforcing
members leaving a part of the reinforcing mem¢
19. An articulated crawler track including a
plurality of separable sections,_ and means form
ing a part of each section and shaped for inter
bersexposed for direct engagement with comple
mental reinforcing members of adjacent shoes.
means on an adjacent section.
’
locking engagement directly with complemental
11. A shoe for a crawler track, including longi
v
_
20. An articulated crawler track including a
plurality of separable sections, and means car
tudinally extending tension means, transverse
members holding said tension means at each end
of the shoe, and tread rubber encasing said ten
sion means and transverse members leaving ‘a
part of each transverse member exposed for
ried by each section for connecting that section’
to an adjacent section, each section comprising
a metallic skeleton, and tread rubber encasing
said skeleton in such manner that the assembled
direct engagement with a complementalmember
track is exteriorly tread rubber except for open
on an adjacent shoe, said tension means being 30 ings permitting access to said connecting means.
?exible.
‘
V
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‘
'
a
21. In a crawler track, a skeleton formation
'
12. A shoe’ for a crawler track, including longi
tudinally extending tension means, transverse
members ‘holding said tension means at each end
of the shoe, and tread rubber encasing said ten
sionfmean‘s and transverse members leaving a‘
includinglongitudinally extending ‘tension mem
bers, transverse reinforcing members holding said
tension members, and said transverse reinforcing
members having flared side edge portions to per
mit easy and free ?exing of said tension, mem:
bers relatively to said transversemembers, and
tread rubber enclosing said skeleton formation
part. of each transverse member exposed for ,
direct engagement'with a complemental member
on an adjacent shoe‘, said tension‘ means com
prising substantially ?at flexible metallic ‘strips
disposed side by side transversely of the shoe.
‘ 13. A' shoe for a crawler track, including ‘lon
gitudinally extending tension-means, transverse
members holding said tension means at each end
of theshoe, and tread rubber encasing said- ten
sion." means and transverse members leaving a
part‘ "of each transverse member exposed for
direct ‘engagement with a' complemental member
on an adjacent shoe,.said tension means compris
ing ?exible ‘substantially ?at strips of metallic
braid disposed side by side transversely of the
shoe.
'
'
14. A track for track laying vehicles made up
of a pluralityjof individually separable shoes,
each of said shoes comprising a tread rubber
block, ?exible metallic tension means extending
through said block,“and a vtransverse reinforcing
member embedded ineach end portion of said
block and holding said tension means, said mem
and embracing said tension members inside the
40
?ared edges of the transverse members to cushion
the ?exing of the tension members.
22. An articulated crawler track comprising a
number of individually separable shoes, each shoe
including a tread rubber block, a transverse rein
forcing member embedded in each end portion
of said block, and tension means extending lon
gitudinally through said block and secured di
rectly to said transverse reinforcing members,
said block being so shaped as to leave a part of
the transverse member exposed at each end of
the shoe for direct engagement with a comple
mental member on an adjacent shoe.
23. An articulated crawler track comprising
separable shoes, each shoe including a tread rub
ber block, a transverse reinforcing member em
bedded in each end portion of said block, and
tension means extending longitudinally through
said block and secured directly to said transverse
reinforcing members, said transverse reinforcing
bers being partially exposed for direct connection 60 members being partially exposed for direct con
with complemental membersof adjacent shoes to
nection with complemental members on adjacent
establish a ‘complete metallic continuity through
out the assembled track ina line paralleling the
24. An articulated crawler track comprising
longitudinal axis'of the track and capable of car
separable shoes, each shoe including a rubber
65 body, a metallic reinforcing member embedded
rying the full tension load on the track.
, 15. An articulated crawler track including a
in said body and extending transversely of said
plurality of shoes, each shoe being shaped for
shoe at each end thereof, tension elements ex
ve'rticali overlapping association with an adja
tending longitudinally through said body, means
cent shoe, and connecting means of a releasable
holding the ends of said tension elements and
type directly joining the vertical overlapping por
said transverse members having recesses therein
tions of adjacent shoes. '
‘
‘ '
'
for the partial reception of said means, said
'16.‘ An articulated crawler track including a'
means being clamped between transverse vmem
plurality of separableshoes, each shoe having a
bers of adjacent shoes.
_
’
portion reduced in thickness for vertical overlap
25.,An articulated crawler track comprising
.ping association with-a complemental portion Of >
separable shoes, each shoe‘including a rubber
shoes.
..
;.
..
f
.
2,410,507
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14
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31. An articulated crawler track including a
body, a metallic reinforcing member partially
embedded in‘ said body for exposed face to face
plurality of separable sections, each said section
association with a complemental member on an
including a ?exible skeleton which skeletons
when connected together carry the tension load
adjacent shoe, tension means extending through
said body and into association with the exposed
part of said reinforcing members, said tension
means being clamped between reinforcing mem
bers of adjacent shoes.
26. An articulated crawler track including sep
arable shoes, each shoe including a rubber body,
a transverse reinforcing member at each end of
a shoe for face to face connection with a com
plemental member on an adjacent shoe, tension
means extending through said body between said
reinforcing members, said reinforcing members ‘
having portions extending beyond said body at
each side of said track, and a bogey wheel guide
secured to the complemental extensions of ad
jacent shoes.
.
of the track, tread rubber encasing each said
skeleton except for an exposed portion at each
end of each section, and said exposed parts of
each skeleton being shaped for direct interlock
ing engagement with a complemental part on an
adjacent section.
32. In a crawler track, a ?exible metallic skele
ton capable of carrying the full tension load of
the track, said skeleton including rigid trans
versely extending reinforcing means at spaced
intervals, a series of ?exible substantially flat
tension means each held ?rmly at the ends by
said reinforcing means and extending only from
one set of reinforcing means to the next longi
tudinally of the track, and a tread rubber cov
27. A shoe for an articulated crawler track, in 20 ering substantially encasing said skeleton, cer
tain portions of said skeleton being free of said
cluding a rubber body, tension members extend
covering for engagement by a driving member
ing through said body, means having serrated
when the track is in use.
surfaces holding the ends of said tension mem
33. A shoe for an articulated crawler track,
bers, and a transverse reinforcing member at
including a tread rubber body having reduced
each end of the shoe having a face complemen
end portions, rigid metallic reinforcing means
tally serrated for engaging said means.
embedded in said body at each end thereof and
28. A shoe for an articulated crawler track, in
extending transversely thereof, said means be
' cluding a rubber body, tension members extend
ing partially exposed at the reduced end portions
ing through said body, means having serrated
of said body, the exposed portion of said means
surfaces holding the ends of said tension mem
at each end of said body being shaped for direct
bers, and a transverse reinforcing member at
interlocking engagement with a complemental
each end of the shoe having a face complemen
portion ofanother shoe, and tension means in
tally serrated for engaging said means, said rein
the form of flat metallic braid embedded in said
forcing members being arranged for connection
body and extending longitudinally thereof and
with complemental members on adjacent shoes
connected to said reinforcing means at each end
with said means clamped between complemental
of said body.
reinforcing members.
34. A shoe for an articulated crawler track, in
29. A shoe for an articulated crawler track, in
cluding a tread rubber body having reduced end
cluding a rubber body, a transverse reinforcing
member at each end of said body, substantially 40 portions, rigid metallic reinforcing means em
bedded in said body at each end thereof and ex
flat tension members extending through said
body, and confronting bars having complemental
tortuous faces secured together over the ends of
said tension members and engaged with said
transverse members.
30. A shoe for an articulated crawler track,
including a rubber body, a transverse reinforc
ing member at each end of said body, substan
tially ?at tension members extending through
said body, and confronting bars having comple
mental tortuous faces secured together over the
ends of said tension members and engaged with
said transverse members, said tension members
being in the form of braided wire tapes, and a
metal foil around the ends of said tension mem 55
bers to enhance the grip of said bars thereon.
tending transversely thereof, said means being
partially exposed at the reduced end portions of ‘
said body, the exposed portion of said means at
each end of said body being shaped for direct
interlocking engagement with a complemental
portion of another shoe, and tension means in
the form of ?at metallic braid embedded in said
body and extending longitudinally thereof and
connected to said reinforcing means at each end
of said body, said reinforcing means projecting
laterally beyond said body for association with
complemental means on another shoe to jointly
support bogey wheel guiding means.
ROBERT M. KNIGHT.
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