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Nov. 5, 1946.
F. LANQGE ' '
2,410,509
APPARATUS FOR-MAKING GUT STRINGS
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Filed May 8,
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5 Sheets-Sheet 1 ~
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Nov. 5, 1946.
F. LANGE
2,410,509 "
APPARATUS ‘FOR MAKING GUT STRINGS
Filed May 8, 1945
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
Nov. 5,1946.
F.LANGE
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2,410,509
APPARATUS FOR MAKING GUT STRINGS
F_‘iled May s. 1945
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F, LAN'GE
2,410,509
APPARATUS FOR MAKING'GUT ‘STRINGS
Filed May 8, ‘1943 ‘
5 Sheets-Sheet .4
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' Nov. 5,‘ 1946.
‘ F. LANGE
‘2,410,509
APPARATUSFOR M'AKJENG GUT STRINGS
Filed May 8, 1943
5 SheIetS-Sheet 5
2,410,509
Patented Nov. 5,v 1946
UNITED ‘STATES PATENT ' orricef I
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‘2,410,509
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APPARATUS FOR MAKING GUT STRINGS '
' Felix Lange, Chicago, IlL, 'assignor to Carl G.
Bjorkmaii, Chicago, vIll.
Application May 8, 1943, Serial No.'486,184
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.1
11 Claims.
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'- In making gut strings for various purposes,‘ in
accordance with Bjorkman Patent No. 2,104,730,
successive skeins of ?ne gut strands are strung
between successive pairs of hooks, one hook in
each pair rotating to twist the skein. The ro
tating hooks, or spindles as they are more com
monly called, are motor driven. The motor is
started after allthe skeins are strung and is
automatically turned o? after it has turned the
spindles a predetermined number of revolutions.
The number of revolutions through which the
spindle is turned must be adjustable since the
skeins vary widely in length, depending upon
(01. 57-25)
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2
single slide is latched in operative position by a
handle and is released automatically after an
adjustable number of revolutions of the spindles,
turning off the motor and at the same time dis
engaging the drive worm from the counter wheel
so that the latter may return to its starting po-v
sition under the influence of a weight.
Additional advantages and objects of the in-_
vention will become apparent from the following
description and the drawings, inv which
Fig. 1 is a plan view of the apparatus chosen
for illustration of this invention;
.
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the structure in
Fig. 1;
K
their purpose and a short skein must not be
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary end view of the struc—;
twisted asv many revolutions as along skein.
ture showing particularly an elevation of the
In the Bjorkman apparatus, the spindle-driv
ing gears and avery. complicated counter have
counter mechanism;
‘
Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken approximately
accounted for an undue proportion. of the total
on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;
cost and maintenance dif?culties, even though
Fig. 5 is a view taken approximately on the
the remainder of the apparatus has been so in. 20
expensive and trouble ‘free that_theapparatus
has been eminently satisfactory when considered
line 5—_5 of Fig. 4;
Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken approximately‘
asawhole.
on the line 6-6 of Fig. 4; and
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,_
,.
_.
According to the present invention, the Bjork
man apparatus has been greatly simpli?ed in
these points that have been found troublesome.
In spite of the fact that expertsin the spindle
driving art have insisted that the spindles could
not be driven by chains and sprockets, a satis
factory chain drive has been worked out. Pre
sumably, the experts thought that a‘chain could
_ _
Fig. '1 is a sectional view taken approximately
on the line 1-1 of Fig. 4.
,
a
A preferred form of the invention has been
chosen for illustration and description, in com
pliance with section 4888 of the Revised Statutes,
but persons skilled, in the art will readily per
ceive other means for accomplishing the same re
sults, and theclairns are, therefore, to be con
strued as broadly as possible, consistent with the
not drive a sprocket properly unless it was
prior art.
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wrapped partly around the sprocket, and space
The invention has been illustrated in ‘connec
limitations did not permit this. Applicant has
determined and proved that the chain running 35 tion with a tank ll adapted to contain a body
of water I2 on’ which the skeins I3 being twisted
across the tops of the sprockets is su?icient,
may float.’ The skeins are fastened at one end
partly perhaps because the load on. the spindle
to spindles l4 and'at the other end to hooks It.
is extremely light. Also, according to this in-.
The hooks l6, are biased away from the spindles
vention, a guard is provided for preventing the
chain from jumping o? the spindles under ex 40 14 either individually, or in the illustrated form,
in a group. This biasing applies tension to the
ceptional in?uences, although it does not’ ordi
narily touch the chain and hence represents no
skeins as they are being twisted, the tension
being determined by the weight of the weights
appreciable wear or friction. 7 It may be noted
H which are connected to the tail bar l8 by ropes.
that one of the great advantages of the chain
drive is that with the chain running across the 45 or cables running over .pulleys. The hooks l6
are carried by the bar [8 in .a manner to pre
tops of the sprockets, the spindles all rotate in
the same direction without the need of immedi
vent the hooksfrom turning. . '
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The skeins '13 each include a number of very?
?ne strands of gut.‘ To convert the skein into
» The chain. drive lends itself admirably to the
simpli?ed counter ofthis'invention since the 50 a string,;it is'necessary for it to be twisted‘to
ate reverse gearing or other complications. -
' spindle sprockets are driven by a sprocket twice
their size with the result that the drive shaft
rotates at; anideal speed for the type of counter’
bind the separate strands tightly together. For
highvquality and particularly for uniformity, it
is necessary'that the amount‘ of twisting be
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accurately controlled. 'Of course, the number of
In the simpli?ed counter ofthis invention, ‘a 55 twists will vary proportionately with the length
of this invention.
2,410,509
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4
of the skein and hence it is necessary for the
control mechanism to be adjustable.
The twisting is accomplished by rotating the
hooks or spindles l4, these being driven by a
the oil level without disturbing the relationship
above discussed, and so that the sprockets 28 will
rotate twice as fast as the shaft 22.
This per
mits a convenient driving speed for the shaft
motor 2|. The motor 2| drives shaft 22 through e 22 both from the standpoint of its being driven
V-belts 23. The shaft 22 carries a pair of
by the motor 2| and from the standpoint of its
sprockets 24 keyed thereto. A double chain 25
driving the counter.
runs around these sprockets, which could be con
sidered a double sprocket, and around idler
sprockets‘ or a double “idler sprocket 2']. Be- m
tween the sprockets 24 and 21 is a series of driven .
sprockets 28 each of which is keyed to the shaft '
29 of one of the spindles l4. These- shafts are
rotatably journalled in the casing 3! as clearly
seen inFig. 4.
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.
It is commercially necessary for the spindles
M to be spaced quite closely together‘sd that
a relatively large number of them may be with
Counter
The shaft 22 is provided with a worm 36 there
on, this worm driving a worm wheel (not shown)
which is keyed to shaft 38.
Shaft 33 drives a
shaft 39 through universal joints 4| telescopically
associated. This permits the shaft 39 to be
'lf'glls?d‘ and lowered without interfering with its
driving relationship with the shaft 38. The shaft
‘ 39 is .journalled ‘in lugs 42 on slide 43, the slide
being slidably mounted on the main counter
bracket 44. The slide 43 tends to drop by gravity
in the reach of the operator from the‘ side-of
the tank H. To drive the spindles which are 20 to the position shown in Fig. 3 in which a worm
thus-closely spaced, the sprockets 28:0.v'erlap one
‘46 carried. by shaft 39, is out of engagement with
another. astseen in Figs. .5 and 7. Accordingly,
a worm wheel 41' whichmay be called the counter
wheel. The slide “may be raised by bell crank
thereis. not room for the chains to run around
lever 48 having a handle portion 49. When
the sprockets and» around intervening idler
sprocketsso as to have the arcuate engagement 2;, raised, it may assume the position shown in‘Fig.
with the sprocketsv generally considered neces
Gin which the worm 46 engages and drives the
counter wheel 31. The slide 43 is automatically
sary. According to the. present invention, the
chain merely rests on. top ofv the. sprockets as
latched in this position by a latch 5| forming
seen best in Fig. v'7. vA double chain is used so
one arm of a bell crank lever pivoted at 52 to
that one half of. it may drive the. sprockets an the main bracket 44.
The counter wheel 41 has a drum 53 mounted
closer to the skein. while the‘ other half drives
onits hub and keyed thereto. The weight 54 is
the sprockets moreremote from. the skein.
suspended from a, cable 56, wound on the drum
Actual use has demonstrated the fact-that this
53 sothat the weightv tends to rotate the count
driving connection in which the chain merely
rests on, top of the sprocket. is entirely satis- 35 ing wheel 31in a clockwise direction as seen in
factory with the small'driving' load herein in
Fig. 3.. vThe movement, of'the counter wheel in
this direction is limited, by a pin .51 carried by
volved. Of course, it is important that thevteeth
of‘ the sprocket-be soshaped that they do not
the, wheel which engagesga stop 53 carried by an,
arm 59 which is fast. on shaft 6!. A handle 62
exert very much of an upward; thrust on the‘
chain by. reaction,- but.v conventional sprocket 4ov is. also fast. on shaft 61 so that the angular posi
shapes, such as that shown, are satisfactory. ‘ In
tionofthestop 58; aboutthe shaft 6| may be
case there might occasionally; be some abnormal
condition to cause a-Ychain to’ jump from’ the
adjusted. ' Thehandle 62 may be held in an ad
sprockets, guard bars 33 are provided extending
justed position in any suitable manner as by
_ spring detent engagement with an arcuate plate.
along the length of the series 40f sprockets 28. 4” The. plate 63¢,is_ preferably calibrated so that the
handle62: maybe set to a position corresponding
These guard bars are normally spaced along their
lengthfrom' the chain 26v as seen in Fig. 4 so
that they do-not introduce-any friction or any
to ‘anygiven number of turns.
. Whenthehandle 49 is shiitedto raise the worm
lldintogengagement with counter wheel 4?, the
wear. ‘ In'spectionafter- long periods of operation
of. the device have- indicated that there is- no 5‘l counter wheel‘ is, rotated in a. counter-clockwise
appreciable wear if‘ any; and so it may be con
direction as seen in Fig, 3 so that the pin 5'_I'leaves
cludedthatmost of the time. the apparatus would
function satisfactorily without the guard bar
even. though-it maybe highly desirable for‘ pre
ventingoccasional trouble.
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the stop 58. As the rotation of counter wheel 41
continues, the pin 51 will" ultimately strike the
arm 640i, the bell crank lever on the other arm
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‘i of. which is: found the. latch 51. As the-pin .51- is
Sprockets 24 and 21 are substantially- larger
than sprockets 28 so that the lower run- of the
chain 26. will fall below sprockets ~28. This-avoids»
furtherrotated by; the counter wheel,“ it-_.de-_
properly between the teeth of thesprockets;
torest: against the stop v58, ready tobegin another
presses the arm 641and hence releases the latch
5!: so that, the slide 43 will .drop by gravity and
the possibility. oiwearing the sprockets by‘im
disengage worm 43 from counter wheel 41 so
proper engagement between them andsthe lower‘ 60 that weight ‘.i4willv rotate counter wheel 41 back
run of the chain. which would not be~seated>
in: a. clockwise direction until the pin Slcomes.
The. casing 3| . comprises an oil-reservoir, the
countingoperation.
oil leve1 preferably being- below-the level'of the’
In order thatthe counter-clockwise, movement
bottoms. of the sprockets 28 but‘ above the level‘, 65' of thecounter. wheel 4.7.may be assimilated to. the
of; the; bottom of :the sprockets“.v and’ 21.- In
drivingof the spindles .l4, provisionisxmade for
this way, most of the sprockets rotate entirely
iii-air ,so-,.;that their. rotation. is: not . opposed, by
controlling the. driving1motor . 21.. through the
slide 431. Thus asthe slide 43. iszraised'to engage
thepilibut thoroughly lubricated. eitheriby the»
that/form 4.6; with the counter wheel “to start
splash, from; the sprockets 2l'or. by oil.carried.70v the, counting; operation, the, motor. 2| will'be
by; the chain from the IOWGILDOl'tiOILOi the-casing
startedxtoastartthe.operation which ».._is:being.
3|; togthe, topsof the, sprockets; 'It has, been
counted, namely, therotations ‘of the ‘spindles-14..
found‘convenient to have ‘the sprockets“. andi
When the latch 5| lreleases the sli'de;43,.the.mo—_
21; of twice the, diameter of;.the_.sprockets.,28,; tor will be stopped as the spindleswwill'have.
both; so as. to. permit considerable.- Variatiomin; 75. reached'the 'desirednumber of rotations. '
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12,410,509
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idler? SProcket‘means of larger diameter than the
spindlesprockets positioned'at the other-end of
the ‘series,’ endless chain-means extending: around
YA convenient _ form. of ,;motor 1 controlvinvolves
the use of a mercury switch;. This switch maybe
pivoted at 61- as seen best in -Figs'.'-;4_ and- 6v tojthe
main bracket 44 insucha way ‘that itsweightwill
normally tilt itt'o its f‘oil” positiony A pin168 is
carried by slides 43 and disposed to strike the
mounting 69 for the mercury: switch 56 in such
the. larger , sprockets; and; having itsv upper ‘run
resting -.on the tops-Lof the driven sprockets, and
its lower run spaced ~ below. the ; driven sprockets,
aguard bar; normally out oflcontact withfthe
chainbut positioned close enough above its upper
away as to tilt the mercury switch. tothe “on?!
position when the slide 431s raised. The mer
cury switch 66 is, of course, connected in vthe cir
run to‘ prevent the chain means from jumping
off= ofztheispindle sprockets under‘ abnormal con
cuitofthemotor 2|.
ditions.
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The main bracket 44 may be carried, by; the
casing 3i as illustratedinvh‘igs. grand-6.. Any
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to
v , 3.-?Skein winding apparatus including a'plural
ity; of. closely spaced spindles, each adapted to
suitable movement-limitingjrneans may be pro
have one end of .a. skein fsecured theretopa
videdfor the various parts,,_as for example-the .
sprocket on each spindle with the sprockets of
pinfll for limiting themovement of the bell crank
adjacent spindles overlapping, drive’ sprocket
lever 48. Likewise any suitable springs may be
means of larger diameter than the spindle
sprockets positioned at one end of the series, and
idler sprocket means‘ of larger‘diameter' than
provided although the leaf spring 12- for urging
the'latoh 5| to the latching position is believed
to be the only one required.
Q20 the spindle sprockets positioned at the-other end
separability
of' the series, endless chain Zmeans extending
aroundthe larger-sprockets and having its upper
It will be observed that the spindle I4 is jour
nalled in the casing 3| and that it extends over
the low top 14 of the tank ll instead fOf extend:
ing through the ends of the tank, as has been
the practice in the past. This permits the entire
driving and counting unit to be shifted from one
run resting on the tops of the driven sprockets,
and its lower run spaced- below the driven
tank to another or to be removed to a convenient
dle, chain means having- one run resting ‘on the
sprockets.‘
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14., A skein winding apparatus including a plu
rality of spindles each adapted to' have a1 skein
attached thereto, a small sprocket on each spin
place for servicing in the rare event that, such 30 sprockets and one runIspacedtherebelow, a driv-‘
servicing is necessary.
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ing' sprocket around} which said chain run's,~=a
.
Separating partitions 16 between the hooks of
spindles l4 and the endportion of vthe skeins may
be hinged to the casing}! or__ to the tank; at .14.
These partitions are desired. at this position to
prevent interference between the loose portions
shait'ior driving said driving ‘sprocket, a1 worm
on the shaft, a gear drivenlby the worm,ra second
worm connected‘ to the gear through a‘ universal
35 joint, meansrfor moving the second worm1be-‘
of the skeins where ‘the free endslofl the strands
project beyond the tying point.
I ; v 1' ,
From the foregoing, it is seenlthat a'greatly
simpli?ed rotating and countingmechanism is
provided for twisting skeins into gut strings. The
driving mechanism uses aminimum number of
parts, which are standard parts easily. obtained.
The counter likewise uses very few parts, some of
which may be standard, but in spite of its extreme
simplicity, it is easily adjustable for any given
tween two positions, a gear driven byethe second
worm in one position ‘thereoffa switch and a
latch controlled by said last-named gear, ainotor
controlled by the switch for driving the entire
system/said latch maintaining the worm moving
meansin engaged position.
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5. Av counter comprising a‘ counting wheel;
means‘for biasing the wheel in'one direction‘and'
an adjustable-,stop'for limiting ‘itsmovement in
this direction to provide a variable starting posi
tion, a drive member, a gear driven by the drive
number of turns. Both units are designed so
member through a universal joint and movable
that they are substantially free from trouble since
between engaged and disengaged positions in the
there is very little that can get out of order except
?rst of which it drives the counter wheel‘, a slide
with years of wear.
50 in which said gear is mounted for movement
I claim:
between the two positions, a latch for locking
1. Skein winding apparatus including a plural
ity of closely spaced spindles, each adapted to
have one end of a skein secured thereto, a
sprocket on each spindle with the sprockets of
adjacent spindles overlapping, drive sprocket
means of larger diameter than the spindle
sprockets positioned at one end of the series, and
idler sprocket means of larger diameter than the
spindle sprockets positioned at the other end of
the series, endless chain means extending around
the larger sprockets and having its upper run
resting on the tops of the driven sprockets, and
its lower run spaced below the driven sprockets,
the slide in the engaged position, the slide being
biased to the disengaged position, a handle for
raising the slide, a motor driving the drive shaft,
means operable by the counting wheel when it
rotates to a predetermined position for releasing
the latch, and a switch controlled by said slide
to connect said motor when in said engaged posi
tion and disconnect it when in the disengaged
position.
.
6. A control meter comprising a counting wheel,
means for biasing the wheel in one direction and
an adjustable stop for limiting its movement in
, and a reservoir for oil having its oil level above 65 this direction to provide a variable starting posi
the bottom of the larger sprockets whereby oil
is supplied by the chain and sprocket means to
all of the working parts.
2. Skein winding apparatus including a plural
ity of closely spaced spindles, each adapted to 70
tion, a drive member, a gear connected to the
drive member through a universal joint and mov
have one end of a skein secured thereto, a
for movement between the two positions, a latch
for locking the shiftable member in the engaged
position, the shiftable member being biased to the
sprocket on each spindle with the sprockets of
adjacent spindles overlapping, drive sprocket
able between engaged and disengaged positions
in the ?rst of which it drives the counter wheel,
a shit‘table member on which said gear is mounted
disengaged position and manually operable to the
sprockets positioned at oneend of the series, and 75 other direction, and means operable by the count
means of larger diameter than the spindle
2,410,509
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ing wheelwhen it reaches a: predetermined posi;_
means "of larger diameter than the spindle
tion for releasing the latch.
sprocketspositioned at the other end of the series,
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a
a
7.. A control meter comprising a- counting‘wheel,
means for biasing the wheelinfone direction and
an adjustable stop for limiting its movement in
thisdirection to provide avariable starting posi
tion, a drive member, a gear‘ connected to .the
.drive member through a universal joint and, mov
able between engaged and disengaged'positions in
endless chain means extending around the larger
sprockets and having a'?rst run resting on» the
driven sprockets-and biased to this position other
than mechanicallyrand its other run spaced from
the driven sprockets, a guard bar normally out
of contact with the chain but positioned close
enoughto its ?rst run to prevent the chain means
the ?rst of which it drivesithe counter wheel, a 10 from jumping o? of the spindle sprockets under
shiftable member on which said gear is mounted
abnormal conditions.
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for movement between; the two positions, a latch
' 10.. Material treating apparatus including a
for locking the. shiftable member in the engaged
plurality of- closely spaced spindles, each adapted
position, the shiftable member being biased to
tohave material secured thereto, a sprocket on
the disengaged position and manually operable 15 each spindle with the sprockets of adjacent spin
to the other direction, means operated by the
dles overlapping, drive sprocket means of larger
shiftable member forv eontrolling‘the operation'of
diameter than the spindle sprockets positioned
associated mechanism, and means operable by
at one end of the series, and idler sprocket means
the counting wheel when it reaches. a, predeter
of larger diameter than the spindle sprockets
mined position for releasing the latch.
20 positioned at the other end of the series, endless
8. Material treating apparatus including a plu
chain means extending around the larger
rality of closely spaced'generally horizontal spin
sprockets and having its ?rst run resting on the
dles, each adapted to have material secured
tops of. the driven sprockets and biased to this
thereto, a sprocket" on each spindle with the
position-other than mechanically, and its lower
sprockets of adjacent spindles overlapping, drive 25 runspaced below the driven sprockets.
sprocket means of larger diameter than the spin
11. A- control meter comprising a counting
dlesprockets positioned at one end of the series,
wheel, means for biasing the wheel in one direc
and idler sprocket means of larger diameter than
tion and an adjustable stop for limiting its move
the spindle sprockets positioned at the other end
ment in this direction to provide a variable start
of the series, endless chain means extending 30 ing position, a drive member, a gear connected to
around the larger sprockets and having its upper
the drive member through means maintaining the
run resting by gravity, on the tops of the driven
connection as the gear is shifted and movable
sprockets, and its lower run ‘spaced below the
betweenengaged and disengaged positions in" the
driven sprockets, a guard bar normally out of
?rstof which it drives the counter wheel, a shift
contact with the chain but positioned close 35 able member on which said gear is mounted for
enough above its upper run to prevent the chain
movement between the two positions, a latch for
means from jumping off of the spindle sprockets
locking the shiftablemember in the engaged po
under abnormal conditions.
sition, the shiftable member being biased to the
9. Skein winding apparatus including a, plu
disengaged position and manually operable to
rality of closely spaced spindles, each adapted to 40 the other direction, means operated by the shift
have one end of a skein secured thereto, a sprocket
able member for controlling the operation or as
on each spindle with the sprockets of adjacent
sociated-mechanism, and‘ means operable by the
spindles overlapping, drive sprocket means of
counting'wheel when it reaches a‘ predetermined
larger diameter than the spindle sprockets posi
position for releasing the'latch.
tioned at one end of the series, and idler- sprocket 45
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FELIX LANGE.
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