close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2411175

код для вставки
Nov. 19, 1946.
A_ L_ WAGLER
2,411,175
ELASTIC FABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME
Filed Aug. _22, 1939
3 Sheets~Sheet l
I Jfgi.
1
a; 2as
354
0/3 fun/5%
gwi?gymd
Ag‘
Nov;v 19, 1946.
A. L. WAGLER
2,411,175
ELASTIC FABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME
Filed Aug. 22, 1959
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
D!
C’
if.)
L,
xI)
HVVENTOR.
%
I
.\
Nov. 19, 1946.
A. L. WAGLER
2,411,175
ELASTIC FABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING’THE SAME
Filed Aug. '22, 1939
3 Sheeté-Sheet 5
Mia-1"
now,
Smnntor
?éGeJZL/Zyér
E3»
'
a cute
12,411,175
v Patented Nov. 19,1946
? ‘UNITED-STATES‘ PATENT OFFICE‘
ELASTIC FABRIC AND METHOD or MAKING
THE SAME
Alfred ,L. Y .Wagler, North Hills, Pa.; Antonio
Wagler, executrix'of said Alfred L. Wagler, de
‘ceased, assignor, by direct and mesne assign
ments, to William F. Geibel, Philadelphia, Pa.
, ' Application August 22, 1939, Serial No. 291,285
23 claims. (01. 66-193)
2
My invention‘is a novel method of warp knit!
some of which are marketed under the‘ name,;
ting fabric containing elastic threads‘ and‘ in
“lastex.”
elastic yarns, so thatasingle set of elastic warp
threads will impart to the fabric‘ maximum
stretch transversely of- the elastic threads‘ as well
l »
,
In accordance with my invention, a fabric hav-:
ing a two-way stretch may be made by using only
two bars. One bar has its eyes threaded with in-'
elastic yarns and is moved lendwise while! the bar
as longitudinally thereof over at_ least a portion
of‘ the fabric area, and the products resulting
is in back of‘the row of needles, the bar being
from such method. a
moved a distance sufiicient, to moveeach yarn
l
r
‘
r 3
__
My method further‘ permits the incorporation,‘
carried thereby from one ‘side?to‘the‘ other of a
in portions of the fabricyof‘inelastic yarns pre 10 corresponding needle so that, the yarns arepre
venting two-way‘ stretch of such portions of the
sented to the hooks of such needle to form ‘a, se-,
fabric but permitting one-way stretch’ thereof
ries of parallel warp chains. The other 'bar has
equal to the stretch in that direction‘ of the two-‘
its eyes threaded with stretched elastic thread,
way stretch portion of the fabric. ‘
‘ ‘
under tension, and‘ is‘ moved "endwise ,Whenthe,
\ My new fabrics are particularly adapted for
use as elastic single rplyzwelts for silk hosiery;
bars are in front of ‘the row of‘needle‘s; 'suchbar
being sometimes moved a distance sufficient to
move each thread carried thereby from one side,
to the other of a needle, to effect looselooping
of the thread in the ‘chain formed by such needle,
and sometimeslmoved ‘a distance‘ suf?cient to
move each thread, carried,‘ thereby past’ and" in‘
back of one or more adjacent needles, to 'e?ectj
such welts being connected with the stocking
leg above the knee and absorbing the stresses
resulting from knee-bending when the welt has
supporter clasps connected therewith; such con
nections “being preferably with‘ one-Way stretch
portions of the fabric.
‘ r
‘
~The method of .my invention ‘is preferably
practiced on'a warp‘knitting machine of‘the
Raschel type having a single row or bank ofv
the loose looping 'of-the'threadin spaced chains,
which are secured together by ‘such‘t‘hreads only.‘
The threads are so laid in the‘two-way ‘stretch,
latched ‘needles or bearded needles movable, en
‘fabric that adjacent‘threads ‘contract ‘in, straight.
masse alternately up-and down, viz., rectilineally
parallel lines whenthe tension isjrel'eased,
of the needles; a‘plurality of thread or yarn ‘car
rying eye needle bars which may be individually
Each'presentationjof- the‘ inelastic yarns‘ to the;
needle" hooks which results ‘from ‘each ,endwise
shogged endwise. viz., shifted rectilineally rela
130
,
,
movement of the bar?rst'referred to" is followed
tively to one another and to the row of‘ needles,
by a rectilineal orfknittingifmovement of - the
by means of suitable pattern‘ chains or cams,‘ and
needles en masse. This results in the formation,
either in front of or in back of, such row; the bars
from the inelastic yarn, of a series ‘of parallel ‘in?
being swung as a group transversely to the row
dividual chains, each' chain being composed of
of needles so'as to‘move the'yarns and threads 3: needle IOODS andof, ?oats ortails each paralleling,
carried thereby from‘ the 'front or plain side ‘of ‘the
the leg of a needle loop and connecting‘ the ter4
needles ‘to the back or hooked side thereof, and
vice versa; and yarn let-off’ and fabric‘ take-up
mechanism which ‘maybeijso adjusted asto' hold‘
the knitted ‘chains’ ‘andjrubber threads, stretched
taut during and immediately after knitting.
To. differentiate between substantially‘ non~,
stretching materials, suchas silk, rayon, ‘cotton,
linen and synthetic linear polyamides, andread
ily stretching material, such as caoutchouc, rub
ber, dried or coagulatedlatex, and the like, I have
minus thereof ,With‘ the ‘beginning‘of 'thanéiit '
needle
loop
of
that
chain,"
,
a
, ,
l
l
I
_,
During the formation of eachfclours‘e of needle,
loops by such knitting movement,‘ thebars are in,
front of the needles and the ,bar carrying ‘elastic
thread is shifted endwisevsorth’aton thel‘n'e’xt
swing backward of thebars the {inelastic yarns
are bent over the elastic ‘threads. Hence when
45 the next course of needle loops is formedifrom
the inelastic yarns, the stretched .elasticfthreads,
are ‘caught between the l'?rstscou‘rs‘e' of needle‘
herein designated yarns ‘primarily- composed‘ of,
and having the inelasticcharacteristics of. the
loops and the floats or tails ‘whichfconnectthe
herein designatedyarnsprimarily composed of
and having the characteristic stretchof thevlate
course. ‘The stretched , elastic threads ,folrm‘ _ slip
I termini of the needle loops of the ?rst oourselfwith
former materials as. ‘,‘inelastic yarns}? ‘and have so the. beginning of the‘ needle‘ loops of 'thesecond,
ter materials as “elastic ‘threadsf?including in
the latter designation, however, cut or extruded
wise movementlof the elastic-thread-carrying bar
during ‘the knitting of , a subsequent ‘course 5 of
elastic filaments wrapped "jwith'gcotton or silk,‘ : needlevloops, 1 ,The extentof vsuch?movement-will
2,411,175
3
4
between the lines x-—:n, the fabric in Fig. 4 being
' determine whether the elastic threads will be
caught, during the subsequent needle 100p forma
longitudinally tautened to its maximum stretch
tion,'in a float of the same chain or of a differ
and the yarns and threads occupying the rela
tions occupied thereby during the knitting there
ent chain.
The points of connection between each,
'Of instead ofhcing laterally. distorted
5
in Fig.
3; Fig’. 5 is a sectioned diagrammatic view illus- '
trating the knitting of a ‘modified form'of fabric
embodying my invention, the yarns and threads
being in the positions occupied thereby during
stretched elastic thread and any given chain are
so spaced along such chain that when the tension
on the elastic threads is relaxed and the elastic
threads become slack, the chains will be so bent
as to form openings between them and form an
openwork fabric. In the fabric as knitted or
stretched to its maximum, each elastic thread
zigzags from one chain to another and back to
knitting-Fig. dis a diagrammatic fragmentary
the ?rst, and the elastic threads lie parallel to
trated in Figs. 5 and 6 attached to the top of
view of a section of the fabric shown in Fig. 5
when the tension thereon is relaxed; Fig. 7 is a
fullsized plan view of a section of the fabric illus- .
one another so that each elastic thread has op.
a weft knitted stocking; Fig. 8 is a slightly en
pos'itely projecting apexes connected with spaced
larged plan view of the lower portion of the fabric
embodying my invention shown in Fig. 6; Fig. 9
is a slightly enlarged inverted section of the fabric
embodying my invention shown in Fig. 7 stretched
chains and there is a space in each chain be»
tween the points of connection of the different
elastic threads therewith.
'
When the fabric is slack and flat, the rows of
straightened elastic thread lie parallel, to one
another and distort the chains to form open
spaces between the elastic threads, and the points
of connection of an elastic thread with the chain
on one side thereof are staggered with respect to 25
the points ‘of connection of such elastic thread
with the chain on the opposite side thereof.
1 When it is desired to provide a fabric having a
list or border section with straight rows of elas
tic threads parallel with an edge, a further end- .
wise movable bar,.preferably located between the
bars above referred to, may be threaded with
elastic thread under tension slightly greater than
the tension of the elastic threads above described,
and this third name-d bar is moved back and forth I
in ‘front of the needles forming the ?rst few
chains of the fabric so that each such chain has.
an elastic thread looped under the ?oats of that’
‘ chain only. Each such edge elastic thread bends
sinuously back and forth across its chain during
longitudinally and laterally; and Fig.‘ 10 is an ele
vation of a stocking provided with a, weltformed
of the fabric shown in Fig. '7.
~ "
‘
In Fig. 4 of the drawings, there is diagram
matically indicated the yarn carrier bars A, B, C
and D o‘f'a, Raschel warp knitting machine, the
bars being provided with spaced eyelets through
which are threaded the'yarns and threads to be '
warp knitted into a fabric in accordance with my
invention by means of hooked needles, of which
a portion only are indicated vnumbered Ito 5,
inclusive, l27to IT, inclusive, and 33 to 35, inclus
sive; the intervening needles, and the fabric’ por
tions formed thereby ‘shown in Figs. 1 and 2, being
omitted in Fig. 4. r
‘ The bars ‘A, B, C and D are mounted in a usual
frame which swings back‘ and forthiover the‘tops
of the needles I to‘ 35 in-the usual manner. The
bar- A_ may be shifted endwise in’ either direction
while the bars are at the back of the bank of '
needles adjacent the hooks thereof so as to present
knitting and when ‘the chain is stretched to the ' the yarns ‘a1 to a35 carried thereby to the hooks
of the respective needles. The bars B, C and D
1 maximum extent, but such thread retracts to
may be shifted endwise in either direction when
form a straight thread which crimps the chain
the bars arein front of the needles, so that the ;
when tension onv the elastic thread is'relaxed.
threads 1‘ and'yarns carried thereby are not ordi
The. spaced chains and elastic threads of the list
permit the, topping on, to the fabric of yarn for
narily presented to the hooks of the‘ needles. The
knitting a weft knit "stocking leg or ‘permit my
improved fabric to be sewed to a weft knit stocking
leg by multiple rows of sewing machine stitches.
If desired, certain of the chains comprising my
fabric may be secured together by inelastic yarns
zigzagging ‘from one chain to ‘another by providing
individually moved endwise in the‘ different posi
5%) tions of the ‘frame, and the tension on the yarns
a foiirth bar behind the bar second described and
threading inelastic yarn in certain eyes thereof.
Such bar is moved endwise ‘when the bars are in
front of the needles so that these inelastic yarns
are looped under the floats or'tails of consecutive.
courses of adjacent chains so as to prevent lat
eral stretch between such chains ‘while permitting
lengthwise stretchthereof.
fI‘he characteristic featuresand advantages of
my improvements will further appear from the‘
bar frame ‘may be swung back and forth across
the top- of the row of needles, the bars may be
and on‘ the fabric may bye-controlled manually-or
by any suitable mechanisms which form no part
of the present invention.
'
.
i
V
'
The various positions of each bar, and hence
the extent of the shift thereof relative to the leftwardmostof the needles in action, with respect to.
the leftwardmost-yarn or thread carried by sueh
bar, Will be herein-indicated by the. symbols 0, LII
and III.
When a bar’ is in the position 0 its
leftwardmost yarn or thread lies in its leftward
,most position and to the left of the datum needle
for such bar; whena bar is in the position I its
View of a fabric embodying a preferred form-and
leftwardmost yarn or thread lies to theright of
the datum needle for such'bar but to the left of.
the second needle; when a' bar is in ‘the position
II its leftwardmost yarn or thread is to the right
made in accordancewith the preferred practice
. of the second needle but to the left of the third
of my inventionrFig. 2 is an enlarged fragmen
taryvliew of afew of the wales and courses of the
fabric of Fig. ,1; Fig. 3 is a fragmentary plan view
needle; and when a bar-is in position III its left-h
wardmost yarn or threadis to the right'of the
'thirdneedle. It will, of course, be'understood
following ‘description and the accompanying
drawings in illustration thereof. 7
In the drawings; Fig. 1 is a fragmentary plan
‘ of; eel-laterally, stretched section of the fabric shown
that the other. yarns'orthreads connected With‘
in Fig.1; Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic sectional View
the respective barsfoccupy such relation‘ to the. ' '
illustrating the knitting of the lowermost “repeat"
of the, fabric shown in,Fig.~3 and approximately
needles complementary thereto as the leftward-:
rmost yarn or thread bearsv to the datum needles in
indicated in Fig. 3 by the fabric section embraced 75 the respective positions.
‘
5
2,411,175
A series of inelastic yarns, such as silk, are fed
from individual spools through suitable tensions,
not shown, through the eyes of the bar A, and are
sometimes herein referred to as A-bar yarns. The
number of A-bar yarns employed will depend upon
the width and density of the fabric desired, and
for purposes of'illustration I have shown thirty
?ve such yarns, from a1 to 0.35, typical examples of
which are shown in Fig. 4. Each eye of the bar
A is complementary to a needle, and the A-bar
yarns may be fed through every A-bar eye so
that every needle knits a chain, or may be fed
through every other eye so that alternate needles
are idle, or the yarns may be fed through every
eye for a part of the width of the fabric and
through every other eye for the remaining width
of the fabric. In the example shown, the A-bar
yarns are fed through every A-bar eye, and where
the A-bar yarns are otherwise spaced the thread
ing of the yarns and threads through the remain- .
ing bars are varied correspondingly.
- A series of elastic threads, such as ?ne cut
or extruded rubber strands wrapped with cover
ing yarns throughout their lengths so as not to
impair their stretchiness, are fed from individual
spools through suitable tensions, not shown,
through the eyes of the bar B and are sometimes
herein referred to as B-bar threads. The num
ber of B-bar threads employed will depend upon
6
the barD in the position II. Oh the completion
of the backward swing, the bar A was shifted
endwise to its position 0, thereby presenting the
respective yarns a1 to ct35 to the hooks of the re
spective needles I to 35 and the ‘bar frame was
then swung toward the front of the needle bank.
During this forward swing of the bar frame,
the bar A occupied position B, the bars B and C
occupied position I, the bar D occupied the po
sition II, and the needles descended to knit the
hooked sections of the bar-A yarns through the
loops of course H2 to form the needle loops of
course I I3. During this knitting movement, and
while the bar frame was in front of the needles,
the bars B, C and D were each shifted to position
0. Consequently, on the next swing backward of
the bar frame the bar A yarns were bent over
bar B threads, bar C threads and bar D yarns in
the paths thereof respectively. For example, the
yarn a1 was bent over the thread 121 ‘and yarn (P;
the yarn a2 was bent over the thread b2 and the
yarn d2; the yarn a3 was bent over thethreads
b3 and 03; the yarns a4 to a.14 inclusive were bent
over the threads 04 to e14 inclusive; the yarn (1.15
was bent over the thread 015 and yarn d”; the
yarn a16 was bent over the thread 0,16 and yarns
d1? and d"; and so on to the last wale or chain
where the yarn a35 was bent over the yarn d“.
When the bar frame reached its rear position,
the desired width of the topping on or sewing 30 the bar A was shifted from position 0 to position
selvage. For the purpose of illustration I have
I to present to the needle hooks the yarns a1 to
shown in this example three such yarns from
(135 to permit the formation of the needle loop-s
b1 to b3, all of which are shown in Fig. 4.
of the course I I4 by the next descent of the nee
A series of elastic threads, similar to the B-bar
dles. The beginnings of the needle loops‘ of
threads, are fed from individual spools through 35 course I I 4 are connected with the termini of the
suitable tensions, not shown, through the eyes of
needle loops of course “'3 by the floats. or tails
the bar C, and are sometimes herein referred to
as C-bar threads. The numberof C-bar threads
which were bent over B, .C and D bar yarns as
above described, the B, C and D bar yarns being
will depend upon the desired width of the fabric
bound in by the ?oats when the needle loops of
beyond the topping on or sewing selvage and 40 course I I4 were knit through the needle loops of
particularly upon the desired width of the two
course II3.
way stretch portion of the fabric. For the pur
During the knitting of the needle loops of
pose of illustration I have shown thirty-two such
course H4 and while the bar frame is in front
yarns numbered from c3 to 034, inclusive, typical
of the needles, the bars B and C were moved from
examples of which are shown in Fig. 4.
position 0 to position I and the bar D was moved
A series of inelastic yarns, such as cotton or
from position 0 to position II. Upon the com
silk, are fed from individual spools through suita
pletion of the knitting of the needle loops of
ble tensions, not shown, through the eyes of the
course I I4, the bar frame was again swung back;
bar D and are sometimes herein referred to as
ward carrying A-bar yarns over the threads and
D-bar yarns. The number of D-bar yarns em
yarns which had been shifted by the Ioars B, C
ployed will depend upon the width of the fabric
and D so that, for example, the yarn a1 was bent
sections which it is desired to render stretchable
over the thread 211 and yarn til; the yarn a2 was,
in one direction only. For the purposes of il
bent over the thread 122 and the yarns d1 and d2;
lustration I have shown two such yarns for
the yarn a3 was bent over the thread b3, thread
preventing lateral stretch of the ?rst three 55 03 and yarn 112; the yarns a4 to 4214 were bent over
chains and numbered d1 and (Z2, and have shown
the threads 04 to 014; the yarn (115 was bent over
twenty additional such yarns numbered from
the thread 015 and yarn (Z15; the yarn a1“ was
d15‘to 0134, inclusive, for preventing lateral stretch
bent over the thread 016 and the yarns (Z15 and
between the chains formed by yarns a,15 to e35, in
(116; and so on to the yarn a35 which was bent over
clusive. The group of D-bar eyes through which
‘
.
60 the yarn (13*
the yarns c115 to d35 are threaded are spaced some
When the bar frame reached the back of the
distance from the D-bar eyes through which the
needles the bar A was shifted from position I to
yarns d1 and d2 are threaded.
position I] so as to present to the needle hooks
As the fabric is knitted, it is gripped between
the yarns a1 to n35 for knitting the needle loops
draw-off rolls which maintain constant tension
of the course I I5. While these needle loops of
thereon so that the tensions on the various yarns
the course I I5 were being knitted and the bar
and threads may be controlled by their respective
frame was in front of the needles, the bar B
tensions.
was shifted from position I to position 0. The
The cycle of operations involved in the fabri
bar C was shifted from position I to position 0,
cation of the fabric shown in Figs. 1 to 4 involves 70 and the bar D was shifted from position II to
a “repeat” of twelve courses.
position 6. Consequently, when the bar frame
Following the completion of the course “2,
was again swung backward, the yarns a1 to a35
forming the end of ‘one repeat, the bar frame
were bent over the same yarns and threads re
was, swung toward the back of the needle bank,
with the bars A, B and C in their position I and 75
spectively that they were after’ the knitting of
course
“3.
'
‘
l‘
2,41 1,175
7
‘ After this backward swing of the bar frame,
the bar A was shifted from position 9 to position
I to present to the hooks of the needles the yarns
all to 0035 for knitting the needle loops of course
IIG. During the knitting of the needle loops
of course H6 and while the bar frame was in
front of the needles, the bars B, C and D were
shifted as they were after the formation of the
needle loops of course H4 and on the neXt back
ward swing of the bar frame the yarns a1 to n35
were bent over the same yarns and threads re
spectively as they were on the backward swing
following the formation of the needle loops of
the course I14.
8
as they were on the backward swing following
the knitting of the, needle loops of course H9.
Thus the threads 03 to 034 are bent backcand
forth through the ?oats of the chains formed by
the yarns a4 to (135 respectively.
'
" ‘.
After such backward swing of the barframe,
the bar A is shifted from‘position I to position 6
to present to the hooks of the needles the yarns
a1 to n35 to form the needle loops of course I25.
During the knitting of the needle loops of this
course, ‘and while the ‘bar frame is in front of
the needles, the bars B, C and D are shifted as
they were during the knitting of course H9 and
on the next backward swing of the bar frame the
yarns a1 to a35 are bent over the same threads
After this backward swing of the bar frame,
and yarns that they were bent over respectively
the bar A was shifted from position I to position
on the backward swing of the bar frame follow
0 to present to the hooks of the needles the
ing the knitting of the needle loops of course I I 9.
yarns a1 to (1,35 to form the needle loops of course
After such backward swing of the bar frame‘,
Ill, and while these loops are being knitted and
while the bar frame is in front of the needles, 20 the bar A is shifted from position 0 to position
I to present to the needle hooks the yarns a1
the bars B, C and D are shifted as they were
to a35 for knitting the needle loops of course I22.
during the knitting of the needle loops of course
During the knitting of ‘these needle loops and
I I5,>and on the backward swing of the bar frame
while the bar frame is in front of the needles,
the yarns a1 to 1135 were looped over the same
yarns and threads respectively as they were on 25 the bars B, C and D are shifted as they were
during the knitting of course I26, and on the next
the backward swing after the knitting of the
backward swing of the bar frame the yarns a1
needle loops of course I I5.
. ‘
to a35 are bent over the same threads and yarns
After this backward swing of the bar frame,
that they were on the backward swing following
the bar A was-shifted from position E! to position
I to present to the needle hooks the yarns a1 30 the knitting of the needle loops of course I20.
After such backward swing of the bar frame,
to 1135 for knitting'the needle loops of course I I8,
the bar A is moved from position I to position
and during the knitting of these loops and while
0 to present to the needle books the yarns a1
the‘bar frame was in front of the needles, the
to e35 to form the needle loops of course I23.
bars B, C and D were shifted as tliey'were after
During the knitting of these needle loops ‘and
the knitting of course H6 so that, on the next
backward swing of the bar frame, the yarns (:1
while the bar frame is in front of the needles,
to (1,35 were looped over the same threads and
yarns as they were by the backward swing fol
lowing the knitting of the needle loops of course
the bars B, C and D are shifted as they were dur- '
loops of vcourse II'I, but the bar C threads 03
yarns respectively as they were on the backward
of the needles, the bars B and D were shifted as
distorted by being housed partially in the chain
ing the knitting of course I2! and upon the next
backward movement of the bar frame the yarns
40 a1 to e35 are bent over the same threads and
IIB.
,
yarns that they were during the backward swing
After this backward swing of the bar frame,
following the knitting of the needle loops of course
the bar A was shifted from position I to position
I2 I.
‘
I‘ '
'
0 ‘to present to the needle hooks the yarns a1
After such backward movement of the bar
to e35 for the knitting of the needle loops of course
frame, the bar A is shifted from position 0 to po
H9. During the knitting of the needle loops of
sition I to present to the hooks of the needles the
course I I9, and while the bar frame was in front
yarns a1 to £435 for forming the needle loops of
of the needles, the bars B and D were shifted as
course I25. During the knitting of the needle
they were ‘during the knitting of the needle loops
loops of course I24 the bars B, C and D are shift
of course Ill but the bar C was shifted from
ed to the positions shown, and which they oc
position I to position 11. Consequently, on the
cupied during the backward swing following the
next backward swing of the bar frame, the bar-A
knitting of the needle loops of course I22, so that
yarns are looped over the same bar B threads
on the backward swing of the bar frame the yarns
and bar D yarns that they were on the backward
alto (135 were looped over the same threads and
movement following the knitting of the needle
swing following the knitting of the needle loops
to e34 have looped thereover yarns a4 to 1135 re
of course I22.
spectively, so that these bar C threads make slip
Course I24 corresponds to course H2, and fol
loops with chains to the right of the chains in
lowing the completion of course I24 the bars are
which they had been slip looped during the pre
60 all shifted to their 0 positions and the sequence
ceding six courses, as above described.
is repeated for an inde?nite length.
,
After this backward swing of the bar frame,
When the fabric so formed is relieved of ten
the bar A was shifted from position 0 to position
sion it contracts to form the fabric shown in Figs.
I to present the yarns a1 to a35 to the hooks of
1 and 2. In such fabric the threads b1 to b3 and
the respective needlesto form the needle loops
the threads 64 to e34 are straight and parallel and
of course I26. During the knitting of such nee
the thread 03 is subtantially so but is slightly
dle loops and while the bar frame was in front
formed by the yarn a3. The threads b1, 2)2 and b3
they were during the knitting of course H8, and
are sheathed in the contracted chains formed by
bar C was shifted from position 11 to position I.
On the next backward swing of the bar frame, 70 the yarns a1, a2 and a3 and these chains are con
nected by the cross stitches or lattice work
the yarns a1 to a35 are respectively looped over
formed by the yarnsdl and d2.
the same bar B threads and bar D yarns as they
. The threads 223 to b‘? inclusive are each housed
were on the backward swing following the knit
partially in contracted sections of a chain on one
ting of the needle loops of course H8 but are
looped over the same bar C threads respectively 75 side thereof, and partially in contracted sections
2,411,175
10
of a chain on the other‘ side thereof; the hous
elastic thread being slip looped with only two
ing sections of one chain alternating along each
elastic thread with housing sections of the other
chain.
consecutive courses of a chain before being
shifted into engagement with another chain.
In knitting this fabric, as shown in Fig. 5, the
bars A’, B’, C" and D’ and needles 4!] to 50 may
be used similar to those shown in Fig. 4. Inelas
as illustrated particularly in Fig. 2. Hence the
respective chains formed ‘by the yarns a4 to a35
are bent zigzag by the straightening of the bar
C rubber threads.‘ The apexes of the zigzags 10
secutively. spaced eyes of the bar A’, elastic
The section of a chain on one thread is
connected by one or more chain loops with the
next'section of such chain on an adjacent thread,
formed by the chains are so connected with the
rubber threads that the‘ apexes of the chains on
one side of each rubber are staggered relatively
to the apexes of the chains on the other side
tic yarns a4° to a“ are threaded through con
threads 1240 to 2142 are threaded through consecu
tively spaced eyes of the bar B’, elastic threads
0“, e46 and e48 are threaded through alternately
spaced eyes of bar C’, and the inelastic yarns
(Z40 to (143 are threaded through consecutively
_ spaced eyes‘ of bar D’ and inelastic yarns r145, d4’!
of each rubber, hence the section embraced be 15 and 0149 are threaded‘through alternately spaced
tween the chains formed by the yarns a3 to a15
eyes of bar D’.
'
has a two-way stretch as shown in Fig. 3.
In the knitting of fabric shown in Figs. 5 to 10,
' The parallel substantially straight rubber
a “repeat” involves a cycle of six courses of nee
threads 015 to c34 'of the contracted fabric are con
dle loops, and the fabric maybe made of any
nected by chains formed by the yarns a16 to e35
desired width by multiplying the number of nee
inclusive similarly to the connection of the rub
dles, yarns and threads in action to increase the
ber threads c3 to 015 by the chains formed by the
number of wales to a desired extent.
yarns a4 to 1115. But the chains formed by the
On the ?rst backward swing of the bar frame
yarns a16 to (r35 are connected by the zigzag yarns
following the completion of the needle loops of
(Z15 to d“, forming lattices which prevent the 25 course I30 in Fig, 5, which may be considered as
transverse stretching of this section of the fabric, ‘
while , permitting the longitudinal stretching
the last needle course of a repeat, each of the bars
A’, B’, C’ and D’ occupied its 0 position.
thereof.
It will be noted that the chain formed by the
While the bar frame was in back of the en
masse movable bank of needles, the bar A’ was
- yarn e35 is free to form a looped or picot edging 30 shifted endwise to its I position so as to present
along the selvage opposite to the selvage formed
inelastic yarns a“ to £050 to the hooks of the re
by the thread b1.
spective needles to permit the formation of the
Such a fabric is suitable for the welt of silk
needle loops of course l3| by moving the needles
hosiery since its selvage formed by the threads
downward to knit the hooked yarn sections
b1, b2 and b3 can be attached by topping or sew
through the previously formed needle loops of the
ing to the weft knitted fabric of a stocking leg
and the one-way stretch fabric adjacent to the
opposite selvage provides a secure anchorage for
course I39.
wise movement of the bars B, C and D while the
elastic thread (:46 and the inelastic yarn (145; the
During the knitting of the needle loops of
course IN, the bar frame was swung to the front
a garter fastening.
of the needles, and while in front of the needles
The relative widths of the one-way stretch 40 the bars B’ and C’ were moved endwise to their
sections and two-way stretch sections of the fab
respective I positions and the bar D’ was moved
ric may be varied as desired; the one-way stretch
endwise to its position II so that, on the next back
sections may be given greater flexibility by omit
ward swing of- the bar frame, the bar A’ yarns
ting alternate elastic threads therefrom; the fab
were bent over the bar B’ threads, the bar C’
ric may be made entirely of two-way stretch ma
threads and the bar D’ yarns in the path thereof;
terial, and may be divided into sections longitudi
for example, yarn a40 was bent over the elastic
nally after knitting by pulling one or more of
thread b40 and over the inelastic yarn d“; the in
the elastic threads from the two-way stretch fab
elastic yarn (#1 was bent over the elastic thread
ric since these threads are not knitted by the
b‘n and over the inelastic yarns 114° and d‘tl; the
needles into the chains but merely slip looped 50 yarn e42 was bent over the elastic thread 1242 and
into the ?oats of such chains.
over the inelastic yarns c241 and 1142; the yarn 1143
Should it be desired to lock the yarns and
was bent over the inelastic yarns d‘12 and d“; the
threads carried by the bars B, C and D into the
yarn c444 was bent over the elastic thread 044 and
chains at spaced intervals along the length
the in elastic yarn 0143; the yarn 0.45 was bent over
thereof, this may be done by an occasional end
the inelastic yarn d“; the yarn (1.46 was bent over
bar frame is in back of the needles so as to pre
sent ‘to the hooks of the needles the yarns and
yarn a“ was bent over the inelastic yarn d“; the
yarn a‘18 was bent over the elastic thread 0‘13 and
threads carried by the bars B, C and D, as well
the inelastic yarn (147; the yarn n49 was ‘bent over
as the yarns carried by the bar A.
60 the inelastic yarn c149; and the yarn a5° was bent
over the inelastic yarn (Z49.
The number of consecutive courses of a chain
with‘ which an elastic thread makes a slip loop
After such backward swing, and while the bar
connection before being shifted to another chain,
frame was in back of the needles, the bar A was
and the number of chains between the consecu
shifted endwise to its il position so as to present
tive apexes of a zigzag elastic thread may be
the inelastic yarns a4‘) to 115° to the hooks of the
widely varied to provide different designs and
di?erent degrees of stretch in the fabric.
needles to permit the knitting of the needle loops
of course I32 through the previously formed
needle loops of the course I3! by the downward
An embodiment of my invention providing a
modi?ed form of two-way stretch fabric is illus
movement of p the needles during the forward
trated in Figs. 5 to 10 of the drawings. In this 70 swing of the bar frame.
embodiment of two-way stretch fabric embody
During the knitting of the needle loops of course
ing my invention, the chains are connected in
I32 and while the bar frame was swung to the
pairs by lattice work formed of inelastic yarns,
front of the needles, the bars B and D were
and a chain of one pair is connected by elastic
moved to 0 positions, and the bar C was moved
threads with a chain ofan adjacent pair, each 75 to its II position, so that, on the next backward
2,411,175
I 1?
12
movement of the bar frame, the bar A’ yarns were
bent over the bar B’ threads, bar C’ threads and
its position I, and the bar D was moved to its
position II. Hence upon the next backward swing
of the bar frame the yarn (#5 was bent over the
crossed thread 044 and yarn (145 but these were in
reverse positions from that occupied by them
when crossed by the yarn 0,45 in course I32; the
bar D’ yarns in the respective paths thereof, viz.,
the yarn at‘lo was bent over the thread b4‘) and
over the yarn 014°; the yarn ail was bent over the
thread Z141 and the yarns 01‘10 and 0341; the yarn (142
yarn d46 was bent over the yarn (Z45; the yarn a4"I
was bent over the crossed thread 046 and yarn
(Z41 and (W; the yarn 0.43 was bent over the yarn
d“, but these were. in reverse positions from
(Z42 and (243; the yarn a44 was bent over the yarn
(243; the yarn e45 was bent over the crossing 10 those occupied by them when crossed by the yarn
or" in course I32; the yarn a43 was bent over the
thread 044 and yarn 0145; the yarn (:46 was bent
yarn It“; the yarn (#9 was bent over the crossed
over the yarn (Z45; the yarn a“ was bent over the
thread 048 and yarn (I49 but these were in re
crossing thread 046 and yarn d“; the yarn (148
verse positions from those occupied by them when
was bent over the yarn d“; the yarn a49 was bent
crossed by the yarn (1,49 in course I32;'the yarn
over the crossing thread e48 'and yarn (149; and the
a5“ was bent over the yarn (149; and the yarns
yarn (15° was bent over the yarn d‘l9.
was bent over the thread Z142 and over the yarns
n40 to a‘14 were bent over the same threads and
After this last named backward swing of the ‘
bar frame and while it was back of the needle
bank, the bar A’ was shifted endwise to its I po
sition so as to present inelastic yarns a“ to a50 to
the hooks of the needles to permit the knitting of
the needle loops of course I33 through the previ
ously formed needle loops of’ course I32.
During the knitting of the needle loops of course
I33, and after the bar frame had been swung to
the front of the needles, the bar B was shifted to
yarns that they were respectively bent over' on
the backward swing following the knitting of the
needle loops of course I33.
After the last backward swing, and while the
bar frame was in back of the bank of needles, the
bar A was shifted to its 0 position so as to present
to the, hooks of the needles the yarns a“ to 115°
' to permit the knitting of the needle loops of the
course I33 through the needle loops of the pre~
viously formed course I35. During the knitting
of the needle loops of course I36 and while the
three steps to the right of its 0 position, and which
bar frame was in front of the needles, the bars
is herein designated as position III, and the bar
30 B, Cv and D were all shifted to their 0 positions
D was shifted to its II position.
which they occupied at the end of the knitting
On the backward swing of the bar frame fol
of the needle loops of course I30 and, on the
lowing the completion of the needle loops of the
next backward swing of the bar frame, the yarn
course I33 the yarn (144 was bent over the yarn
a“ was bent over the thread 044 and the yarn
(Z43, the yarn a‘16 was bent over the thread 044 and
yarn (Z45; the yarn a48 was bent over the thread on $1 (Z43; the yarn (145 was bent over the yarn (145;
the yarn 0:‘16 was bent over the thread C46 and
046 and yarn d“; the yarn a50 was bent over the
the yarn (145; the yarn (147 was bent over the yarn
thread 048 and yarn 0149; and the yarns a4‘), a“,
d“; the yarn (148 was bent over the thread 048
a”, (143, a“, a“, and 0:49 were bent over the same
its I position, the bar C was shifted to a position
and the yarn d“; the yarn a49 was bent over the
yarns and threads that they were bent over re
spectively by the backward swing following the 40 yarn (149; the yarn a50 was bent over'the yarn
knitting of the needle loops of course I3 I,
After the last named back swing, and while the
bar frame was at the back of the needles, the
c149; and the yarns 114° to (143 were bent respec
tively over the same threads and yarns that they
bar A’ was moved endwise to its I) position, so as
swing following the completion of the knitting of
- to present the inelastic yarns a40 to a“ to the
were respectively bent over on the backward
5; Or the needle loops of course I34.
hooks of the needles to permit the knitting of the
needle loops of the course I33 through the previ
ously formed needle loops of course I33. During
the knitting of the needle loops of course I34,
and after the bar frame had been swung to the
front of the needles, the bars B and D were moved
endwise to their I) positions and the bar C was
moved endwise to its II position. Hence, on the
next backward movement of the bar frame, the
yarn (L45 was bent over the yarn (145; the yarn (146
was bent over the thread e44 and the yarn (245;
the yarn at47 was bent over the yarn d“; the yarn
(143 was bent over the thread 046 and the yarn d“;
the yarn 1149 was bent over the yarn 0249; the yarn
aim was bent over the thread 048 and yarn i149; 60
and the yarns a“ to a44 were bent over the same
threads and yarns as they were bent over during
the backward swing following the knitting of the
needle loops of course I32.
'
The course I36 is a repetition of the course
I33 and the continued knitting of the fabricwill
be a repetition of the sequence of needle loop .
formations of the yarns a“ to (15° and of the
slip loops engagement of the other threads and
yarns by the floats connecting the needle loops of
one course with the needle loops of the next
course, as hereinbefore described.
During all of the knitting of the fabric, the
yarns and threads threaded through the bars
are held under tension; the bar B'threa'ds and
bar C threads being stretched nearly to (their
limits, and the bar 13‘ threads being under slight
ly greater tension than the bar 0' threads. I The
bar B threads are engaged by a greater number
of consecutive loops of the same chain than are
the bar C threads and hence the bar C threads
have the greater freedom to contract than the
bar B threads. When the tension is released,
Following this last backward swing, and while 65 the contractions of the bar B threads and bar’ C
the bar frame is at the rear of the needles, the
threads contract the respective chains to the same
bar A is moved endwise to its I position to pres
lengths and form a flat fabric, as. shown in Figs.‘
ent the inelastic yarns a40 to 115° to the hooks of
6 to 10, inclusive.
the needles to permit the knitting of the needle
As indicated in these ?gures, the contraction
loops of the course I35 through the previously 70 of the rubber threads causes them to lie in par
formed needle loops of the course I34.
allel straight rows anddistorts the chains into
the form of zigzag ‘rows between the elastic
During the knitting of the needle loops of
course I35, and after the bar frame‘had been
swung to the front of the needles, the bar B was
threads. Each contracted rubber thread is con
nected with a contracted rubber thread on each
moved to its position I, the bar C‘ was moved to 75 side thereof by knitted chains.
The points of
2,411,175
13
connection between a contracted elastic thread
and a knitted chain on one side thereof are stag
gered relative to the points of connection of such
thread with the knitted chain on the opposite
side thereof and each contracted elastic thread
has a chain sinuously connected therewith and
connected by latticed threads with a chain which
zigzags back and forth between points of con
nection with two adjacent contracted elastic
threads. For instance, when the elastic threads
of the fabric section shown in Figure 5 are con
tracted to form parallel straight rows, the clas
tic thread 044 has the chain formed by the
14'
My improved fabric may be given a pico ?nish
along each edge thereof by forming chain bights
along the elastic threads at opposite edges of the
fabric.
'
Having described my invention, I claim:
1.‘ The combination with a weft knitted fabric
of non-elastic yarns, of a warp knitted fabric con
taining non-elastic yarns and having an edge
connected with said ?rst named fabric, said warp
knitted fabric having elastic threads interlaced
therein and imparting a one-way stretch to the
edge and a two-way streetch to the body thereof.
2. An elastic fabric comprising a body section
yarn a‘14 connected therewith at spaced points,
‘ having a two-way stretch and an edge section
has the chain formed by the yarn a45 sinu 15 having a one-way stretch, and a sinuous knitted
ously bent along such thread from side to side
chain having alternate bights connected with an
thereof, and is connected with the thread 046
edge of said fabric to form a loopd edging.
by the chain formed by the yarn or46 which is
3. An elastic fabric comprising a body section
bent zigzag between the threads 044 and 046, the
having a two-way ‘stretch and an edge section
chain formed by the yarn or46 being connected
having only a one-way stretch, both of said sec
with the chain formed by the yarn 1145 by the
tions comprising parallel elastic threads and knit
lattice work formed by the yarn d45.
ted chains, and a sinuous knitted chain having
Since the only connection between the chains
alternate bights connected with an edge of said
formed from the yarns 1144, a“ and 1148 and the
fabric to form a looped edging.
chains to the right thereof is through the elastic 25
4. A warp knit fabric comprising warp knit
threads 044, e46 and 048, the fabric will readily
chains and chain-connecting yarns each of which
stretch longitudinally and laterally, due to the
is ?rst looped around a ?oat of one of said chains,
stretching of the elastic threads 0“, c46 and e48
then around a ?oat of another of said chains, and
and the spacing of the points of connection there
then around a ?oat of the chain in which it was
of with the respective chains, as shown in Fig. 9.
?rst looped each looping of each chain con
When the threads 1740 to Z142 contract, they are
necting yarn being in a course different from the
sheathed in the respective chains formed by the
course in which the other loopings thereof occur,
yarns (14° to 0.“, and these chains are transverse
said chains and yarns forming hexagonal open
ly connected by the inelastic yarns 114° and ($41,
ings when said fabric is laterally stretched.
hence there is no lateral stretch between these
5. A warp knit fabric comprising a plurality of
chains, but longitudinal stretching of the rubber
walewise extending parallel chains forming
threads is permitted by the extension of the
course-wise extending rows of needle loops, the
chains to the original form in which they were
needle loops of each course-wise row being con
knitted.
nected by ?oats with corresponding needle loops
‘ It will, of course, be understood that if a one
of the next course-wise row, and serpentine chain
way stretch garter clasp section is desired at the
connecting yarns each having reversely disposed
opposite side of the fabric from the selvage formed
bights spaced along its length and substantially
by the chain knitted from the yarn a4‘), a section
straight sections between said bights, straight sec
may be knitted in which all the chains are con
tions aforesaid of each yarn being engaged be
nected with one another by yarns laid in similarly 45 tween the ?oat and needle loop in one course of
to the yarns d40 to 1243
one chain and then between a float and needle
Fabric made in accordance with my invention
loop of a subsequent course of another chain, and
may be sewed or topped on to a weft knitted
hosiery fabric as shown in Figures 7 and 10 to
' provide a welt above the knee which will stretch
laterally and circumferentially, as shown in Fig.
9, to absorb ‘the stresses incident to the bending of
the knee when the welt is held by a supporter
clasp.
‘
. It will therefore be seen that my invention pro
vides open-work elastic fabrics having, when slack
and flat, spaced parallel rows of substantially
straight elastic threads which are connected by
inelastic yarns at spaced points along their
all of the yarn sections connecting a course of
one chain with a subsequent course of another
chain being substantially parallel with one an
other.
.
6. An elastic warp knit fabric having a two
way stretch and comprising warp knit chains of
inelastic yarns and elastic threads each of which
is ?rst looped in one of said chains, then in an
other of said chains, and then in the chain in
which it was ?rst looped, said chains and threads
forming hexagonal openings when said fabric is
laterally stretched.
lengths, so that the yarns on opposite sides of an 60
7. An elastic fabric comprising rows of parallel
elastic thread are connected therewith at stag
straight
elastic threads and rows of chains zig
gered points, and the points at which an elastic
zag‘ging back and forth from one to another of
thread is connected with inelastic yarn on one side
such straight threads, the chain lying on one side
thereof are free from any connection with inelas
tic yarn on the opposite side thereof. The con 65 of a thread having apeXes connected with such
thread at points‘intermediate the points: of con
necting inelastic yarns are knitted into stretch
nection with such thread of the apexes of the
able warp chains, through the ?oats of which the
chain lying on the opposite side of the thread.
elastic threads may slide. Preferably the spacing
8. An elastic fabric comprising rows of straight
between the points of engagement between an
elastic thread and the apexes of a zigzag chain on 70 parallel elastic threads and rows of knitted chains
zigzagging back and forth from thread to thread
one side thereof approximates the distance be
and having apexes connected with said threads.
tween adjacent rows of elastic thread and the
points of connection between an elastic thread
9. An elastic fabric having a body section with
‘and the chains connected therewith are sufficient
a two-way stretch comprising elastic threads and
ly spaced to .permit free stretching of the elastic.
knitted chains and an edge section with a one
2,411,175
16
-
knitted chains, lattice stitches connecting cer
the needle bank, each endwise movement present
ing the warp-chain yarns to the needle hooks,
moving the warp-chain yarns to the front of the
needle bank and moving the needle bank to knit
tain of said. chains, parallel straight elastic
threads covered continuously by certain of said
chains. and parallel straight elastic threads con
nected by other of said chains zigzagging from
loops after each endwise movement of such warp
chain yarns, the needle loops formed from each
warp-chain yarn forming a chain, and the
way stretch only comprising elastic threads and
knitted chains.
» 10. An elastic fabric comprising a plurality of
the warp-chain yarns into a course of needle
one to another thereof.
terminus of the needle loop of one course of a
11. An elastic fabric comprising pairs of knit
ted chains connected by lattice threads, said
chains being bent zigzag to form spaced apexes,
chain being connected by a float with the begin
ning of the next needle loop of such chain, and
moving said chain-connecting yarns endwise of
and elastic threads each laced through the apexes
of a pair of chains in alternation.
the needle bank and across said warp-chain yarns
when the latter are in front of the needle bank,
a 12. An elastic fabric having a two-way stretch
and comprising rows of elastic thread having
spaces between them, a plurality of chains
in. each of said spaces, 'one chain in each
space being connected with both rows of elastic
on the opposite sides of said space, and lattice
stitches connecting with one another the chains
in each space.
13. An elastic fabric having two-way stretch
and comprising when flat and slack a plurality
of rows of straight elastic thread with spaces be
tween them, a zigzag chain in each of said spaces
and having apexes connected with the elastic on
the successive endwise movements of each chain
connecting yarn being sometimes in opposite
directions and across sequentialsections of the
same warp-chain yarn, and being sometimes step
by step in the same direction and across succes
sive sections of different warp-chain yarns, said
chain-connecting yarns being thereby sometimes
engaged by successive ?oats of the same chain
and at other times by ?oats of successive courses
of different chains.
18. The method of knitting elastic fabric hav
ing a two-way stretch which includes warp knit
ting a plurality of spaced parallel chains of loops
under tension and interlacing elastic yarn from a
the opposite sides of the space, the zigzag of the
loop in a course of one chain to a loop in a suc
chain in one space being staggered relative to the
ceeding
course of a different chain by passing a
30
zagzag of the chain in an adjacent space and
stretched
elastic thread back and forth between
apexes of adjacent chains being connected with
the row of elastic between them at spaced dis
tances from one another along said elastic thread.
14. An elastic fabric having a section with a
two-way stretch and a section stretchable in one
‘direction only and comprising, when slack, paral
lel rows of substantially straight elastic threads
with spaces between them, chains circumcluding
some of the rows aforesaid from end to end there
of, lattice stitches connecting the chains afore
said, and chains lying in the spaces between
others of the elastic threads aforesaid and con_
nected therewith at spaced distances along the
same.
15. A two-way stretch elastic fabric having, un
der maximum stretch, parallel rows formed of
inelastic yarns, parallel rows of zigzag-elastic
chains aforesaid and forming a running con
nection between such thread and the respective
chains during the knitting thereof.
19. The method of knitting elastic fabric hav
ing a two-way stretch which includes knitting a
plurality of tensioned spaced parallel chains each
comprising inelastic yarn warp knitted into
courses of needle loops and ?oats connecting the
terminus of the needle loop of one course With the
beginning of the needle loop of the next course,
and interlacing elastic yarn from a loop in a
course of one chain to a loop in a succeeding
course of a different chain by passing a stretched
45 elastic thread back and forth between chains
aforesaid and looping the ?oats of different chains
over said stretched thread between the knitting
of courses of needle loops.
threads connecting said yarns, the zigzag threads
20. The methodof knitting an elastic fabric
on opposite sides of each yarn having apexes con 50
having a two-way stretch from a set of inelastic
nected with such yarn in alternating and spaced
yarns and a set of elastic threads on a bank of en
relation to one another, and said fabric when
masse movable hooked needles which includes
slack having parallel substantially straight rows
moving the yarns and threads back and forth
ofelastic threads and parallel rows of zigzag in
between the front and back of the needle bank,
elastic ‘yarns connecting the rows of elastic
55 moving the yarns alternately in opposite direc
threads, the zizag rows of inelastic yarns on op
tions endwise of the needle bank on alternate
posite sides of each elastic thread having apexes
movements thereof to the back of the needle bank,
connected with such elastic thread in alternating
each endwise movement presenting the yarns to
and spaced relation to one another.
the needle hooks, moving the yarns to the front
16. A warp knit elastic fabric having a two-way
60 of the needle bank and moving the needle bank to
stretch and comprising parallel elastic threads
spaced by parallel Warp knit chains, the adjacent
knit the yarns into a course of needle loops after
each endwise movement of such yarns, the needle
elastic threads being straight when the fabric is
loops formed from each yarn forming a chain,
slack, and said chains having sections devoid of
and the terminus of the needle loop of one course
elastic threads extending crosswise between said 65 of a chain being connected by a float with the
parallel threads when the fabric is slack.
beginning of the next needle loop of such chain,
.17. The method of knitting warp-knit fabric
and moving said elastic threads while stretched
from a set of warp-chain yarns and a set of chain-v
endwise of the needle bank and across 'said yarns
connecting yarns on a bank of en masse movable
when the latter are in front of the needle bank,
, hooked needles which includes moving the warp 70 the successive endwise movements of each thread
chain yarns and chain-connecting yarns back and
being sometimes in opposite directions and across
forth between the front and back of the needle
sequential sections of the same yarn, and being
bank, moving the warp-chain yarns alternately in
sometimes in the same direction and across suc
opposite directions endwise of the needle bank
cessive sections of different yarns, said stretched
onv alternate movements thereof to the back of 75 threads being thereby sometimes engaged by sue;
2,411,175
17
18
cessive ?oats of the same chain and at other times
by ?oats of different chains.
21. In the making of warp fabric from two sets
of ends,‘one set being composed of elastic yarns
and the other set being composed of substantially
inelastic yarns, the steps which include simul
taneously knitting a set of ends to form a course
of needle loops and ?oats in a plurality of spaced
chains and interlacing said elastic threads respec
loops in chains further laterally spaced from the
?rst chains to which the respective ends of the
second set were originally respectively connected
and forming a new course of loops; laying, over'
D
the respective stretched ends of the second set,
?oats of the last named‘course in the chains with
which the ends of the second set were second
connected and forming a new course of loops;
and laying, over the respective ends of the second
tively from a loop in a course of one chainto a 10 set, ?oats of the last mentioned course in chains >
loop in a succeeding course of a different chain
with which the ends of the second set were ?rst
by looping ends of said elastic set around ?oats of
connected and forming a new course of loops.
the respective chains formed by the ends of the
23. In the knitting of Warp fabric from a
?rst set, looping ends of the second set around
plurality of sets of ends one of which comprises
?oats subsequently formed in chains aforesaid 15 elastic threads, the steps which include knitting
laterally spaced from the chains to which they
inelastic ends of one set into spaced parallel
were respectively originally looped, and looping
chains each composed of needle loops and ?oats,
ends of the second set around ?oats of the chains
and interlacing said elastic threads respectively
in which they were originally looped, such last
from a loop in a course of one chain to a loop in
named ?oats having been formed subsequently to 20 a succeeding course in a different chain by laying
the second looping of said second ends.
stretched elastic ends of said elastic set back and‘
22. In the making of warp fabric from two sets
forth in the paths of ?oats of the respective chains
of ends, one set comprising stretchable yarns the
and engaging such elastic ends between needle
steps which include knitting ends of a ?rst set to
loops and ?oats of the chains during the knitting
form a course of needle loops in a plurality of 25 thereof, then shifting the stretched elastic ends
spaced chains; laying, over respective ends of a
into the paths of ?oats of chains laterally spaced
second set of ends, respective ends of said ?rst set
from the chains in which the elastic ends were
to form ?oats of said ?rst course, and knitting a
initially respectively engaged and engaging such
second course ofloops; thereafter laying, over the
elastic ends between the needle loops and ?oats
respective stretched ends of the second set, ?oats
of said laterally spaced chains, and then shifting
of the second formed course of loops in chains
the stretched elastic ends into the paths of ?oats
laterally spaced from the ?rst chains to which
of the chains in which they were initially con
the ends of the second set were originally respec
tively connected and forming a new course of
nected and engaging such elastic ends between
the needle loops and ?oats of the last named‘
loops; laying, over the respective stretched ends 35 chains respectively.
of the second set, ?oats of the third course of
ALFRED L. WAGLER.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
2 288 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа