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Патент USA US2411342

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Nov. 19, 1946.
R. M. SHERMAN
2,411,342 '
HYDROCARBON ‘COMBUSTION TUBE BURNER
3 Sheet's-Sheet 1
Filed March 17, 1944
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Nqv. 19, 1946.
2,411,342
R. M. SHERMAN
HYDROCARBON ‘COMBUSTION TUBE BURNER ~
Filed March 17, 1944
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Nov. 19, 1946.
R. M. SHERMAN
2,411,342
HYDROCARBON COMBUSTION [TUBE BURNER
Filed‘ March 17, 1944
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
‘97
77
83
97
a)?’
F913
Inveni‘or:
Patented Nov. 19, 1946‘
- 2,411,342
Wires 3
e
TENT ‘ OFFICE
2,411,342
HYDRUCARBON COMBUSTIOhl TUBE
BURNER
.
Rallston M. Sherman, Glastonbury, Conn.
Application March 1'1, 1944, Serial No. 526,884
12 Claims.
(Cl. 158-.-86) ‘
1
My invention relates to hydrocarbon combus
2
-
,
responding to Fig. 2, on an enlarged scale of two
tion tube burners.
Heretofore much difficulty has been expe
further modi?ed burners;
rienced in providing a combustion tube burner .
showing a further modi?ed form of burner;
Fig. 12 is a plan of a further modi?ed form of
that will permit a wide range of fuel consump
‘
Fig. 11 is a; section, corresponding to Fig. 2,
tion and operate satisfactorily and e?iciently
throughout such range particularly at the lower
end thereof. This is markedly true of combus
tion tube burners designed to utilize low density
gases such as those customarily supplied by city 10
gas mains. Further, heretofore much dif?culty
has been experienced in securing a satisfactory‘
burner with parts in, section and parts broken
uniform distribution of ?ame about the combus- \
In the embodiment of the invention shown by
Figs. 1, 2 and 3 the burner is designed for burning
light weight gaseous fuel, that is to say, fuel
tion chamber when it is attempted to use such
low density gases as fuel, the ?ame in burners as
heretofore constructed, when supplied with such
fuel, tending to be localized at various points
away and with the combustion tube covers re
moved;
v12
Fig. 13 isa section on the'line |3-l3 of Fig.
with parts broken away; and
Fig. 14 is a fragmentary section on the line 14
M of Fig, 12,
_
which has a speci?c gravity less than that of
air.
As illustrated, the perforated combustion
tubes l' and 3, which are preferably formed of
refractory sheet metal such as stainless steel, are
chamber instead of being uniformly distributed
20 cylindrical and are carried in spaced relation to
along it.
form between them an annular combustion
The present invention has among its objects
chamber 5. The base supporting the combustion
the elimination of the defects of prior burners in
tubes is formed with a bottom wall ‘I having a
‘ the respects above mentioned, burners according
central opening 9 for admitting air to the space
to the invention being capable of a wide range
of fuel consumption and operating satisfactorily 25 surrounded by the inner combustion tube I. As
shown, the base has a peripheral upstanding wall
and efficiently throughout such range, and when
' II, and an upstanding wall l3 surrounding the
employing low density gases as fuel securing a
opening 9, these walls forming between them a
uniformly distributed ?ame.
fuel groove and being of suf?cient height to pre
The invention however-will be best understood 30 vent overflow of oil from the base in case it is de
from the following description when read in the
sired to convert the burner to one which burns ‘
light of several embodiments of the invention
oil.
submitted for illustrative purposes, while the
As shown in Fig. 2, the two combustion tubes
scope of the invention will be more particularly
extend into the space between the upstanding
pointed out in the appended claims.
35 walls H and i3, the outer combustion tube 3
In the drawings:
'
contacting with the upstanding wall H so that
Fig. 1 is a plan of a combustion tube burner
said wall positions the tube. Carried by the up
accordingto the invention with the combustion
per edge of the upstanding wall i3 is an annular
cover It, preferably formed of thin refractory
chamber cover omitted;
Fig. 2 is a section on the line 2—2 of Fig. 1 40 sheet metalv such as stainless steel, which cover
with parts broken away;
is secured at its inner edge by screws I‘! to said
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary section on the line 3-3
wall, a, compressible gasket I9 of refractory ma
of Fig. 1 on an enlarged scale illustrating the I
terial such as asbestos being provided for render
?ame, and gas and air ?ow, under low fuel con~
' ing gas-tight the joint between the cover and the
wall. As shown, the cover is provided with a
sumption conditions;
peripheral ?ange fl which ?ts and is welded to
Figs. 4 and 5 are fragmentary sections, cor
the inner side of the inner combustion tube i,
responding to' Fig. 2, of two modi?ed forms of
along the horizontal extent of the combustion ,
burners;
so as to form a gas-tight joint between them. In
this way an endless fuel. chamber 23 is formed
Fig. 6 is a section, corresponding to Mg. 2, of a
50 in the base, into which chamber the gaseous fuel
modified form of burner;
may be admitted through the opening 25 in the
Fig. '7 is a fragmentary section, corresponding
base, this opening communicating‘ with the gas
to Fig. 6, on an enlarged scale showing a detail
supply pipe El which it will be understood is pro
of a modi?ed burner;
‘
vided with a valve (not shown) for regulating
Fig. 8 is a section on the line 8—-8 of Fig. 7;
Figs. 9 and 10 are fragmentary sections, cor- (1:1 Ul the amount or” gas supplied to the chamber.
2,411,842
As illustrated, at the bottomof the combustion
chamber 5 is a sleeve 29 in spaced relation to each
4
omitted such space is too wide to permit the sup
ply of fuel to be diminished very much, the gas
of the combustion tubes l and 3, this sleeve be
‘under such conditions becoming so attenuated 1
ing positioned on the base by the three upstand
that at localized points the mixture of it and the
lng lugs 3|, the sleeve, like the combustion tubes, CI air passing through the perforations of the com
being formed of perforated sheet metal prefer
bustion tubes above the cover l5 becomes over
ably stainless steel.
lean and burns either ine?iciently or» not at all;
A pilot burner in the form of a tube 3.3 is
However, when the sleeve 29 is present the gas
shown as positioned in the space between the
entering the combustion chamber tends to be
sleeve 29 and combustion tube l_ for initially lg 10 confined between the sleeve and the combustion
niting the gaseous fuel, this pilot burner being
tube I so that the upper portion of that space
supplied with gas through a valve controlled pipe
in effect forms a jet delivering the gas upward
35 leading from the source which supplies the
_ly into the body of the combustion chamber
pipe 21.
'
where it burns in the form of a ?ame F (Fig. 3)
In practice, the gaseous fuel supplied the 15 uniformly extending about the combustion
chamber 23 passes from that chamber through
chamber. Air entering the perforations of the .
the perforations in the combustion tube I which
outer combustion tube 3 slightly above the upper
lie below the cover is into the adjacent portion
edge of the upstanding wall H tends to ?ow
of the combustion chamber 5. The cover iii,
downwardly into the space between that ‘com
when the screws i‘? are tightened, presses ‘the
bustion tube and the sleeve 29, as indicated by the
lower edge of the combustion tube i againstthe 20 arrows in Fig. 3, and passes through the perfora
upper surface portion of the bottom wall of the
tions in the sleeve to mix with the gas entering
base with su?lcient tightness to insure that all
the space between the latter and the combustion
the gas will pass into the combustion chamber
tube i so that a carbureted mixture discharges
through the perforations 31 of the lower end por
25 from this last mentioned space, it having been
tion of the combustion tube, or at least enough of
found that where the sleeve .29 is imperforate
the gas to insure that the gas distribution in the
satisfactory results cannot be secured, the ?ame
combustion chamber will be controlled by the size
in such case burning with a so-called “dirty
and number of the perforationsin said portion of '
the combustion tube and will not be adversely
a?’ected by passage of an uncontrolled material
amount of gas between the base and the lower
edge of the combustion tube.
It has been found that when gaseous fuel hav
yellow" ?ame.
Satisfactory results have been secured with the
burner ‘described, when supplied with ordinary
city gas having a. B. t. u. value of about 550 per
cubic foot, in which the two combustion tubes and
sleeve 29 are provided with perforations 31 about
ing a density less than that of air, for example 35 0.07 inch in diameter‘ arranged in rows 1/; inch
ordinary city gas, is employed in a combustion
apart and spaced 1A inch apart in these rows.
tube burner as heretofore constructed, the gas
Thenumber of rows of perforations establish
because of its pronounced tendency to escape up
lug-communication between the chamber 23 and
wardly tends to produce an extremely streaky
the combustion chamber will vary with the sizev
?ame, this commonly resulting in an excess of 40 of the burner. For burners of the ordinary size
?ame at localized points about the horizontal ex
suitable for domestic cooking ranges two or three
tent of the combustion’ chamber with a. very
rows will su?‘lce. The number of perforations in
meager ?ame or no ?ame at all at other points.
the sleeve 29 is not critical, and with the perfo
By causing the gas to‘ enter the combustion
rations spaced the distances mentioned ordi
chamber through the perforations of the com
narily three or four such rows will suffice. It
bustion tube I a uniform distribution of the fuel
has been found, however, that best results will be
admitted to the combustion chamber is secured
secured when the sleeve extends upwardly to‘ at "
and the ?ame is uniformly distributed about the
least the top of the portion of the cover i5 welded
combustion chamber.
- It also has been ‘found that with ‘combustion 50
tube'burners as heretofore constructed it is im
possible to secure satisfactory and ef?cent oper
ation when the burner is “turned down” to any
material extent, the diminished supply ~of gas
under such conditions causing the ?ame to ?ick
er, and to wander about the horizontal extent of
the combustion chamber. This commonly causes
the ?ame to be extinguished, and aside from that
does not result in satisfactory or e?‘icient opera
tion of the burner. In the present burner, how
ever, the presence of the perforated sleeve, 29
avoids these defects and permits the burner to
operate satisfactorily and e?‘iciently when the
supply of gas is much‘dirfiinished. For example,
it has been found that when the sleeve 29 is pres
ent the minimum e?icient fuel consumption may
be about one-eighth the maximum e?icient fuel _
' _ consumption, whereas with the sleeve omitted it
can be only about one-third.
to the combustion tube I. '
'
It will be understood that the combustion tube
3 need not be positioned interiorly of the up
standing wall Ii, but may be supported at its ex- >
terior as shown'in Fig. 4. Similarly, the combus
tion tube I need not extend to the extreme bot
tom of the chamber 23, as, for example, the tube,
which being welded to‘ the cover I5 is supported
thereby, may adjacent its lower end fit an up
standing circumferential ?ange 39 projecting up
wardly from the bottom wall 1 of the base as
shown in Fig. 5, so that as in the construction
shown by Fig.v 2 the lower end portion of the tube
and the base have cooperating portions prevent
ing substantial communication ‘between the
chamber 23 and combustion chamber other than
by way of the perforations in the tube.
If desired, for admitting‘ additional air to the
space between the sleeve 29 and combustion tube
3, the upstanding wall ll of the base may be
‘formed-on its interior with an annular groove 4|
In the above connections it will be observed 70 (Fig; 9) opening on the upper edge of said wall,
that the space between the two combustion tubes
so that air will be admitted into said groove and
must be great enoughv to afford a combustion .. pass therefrom into said space through the ad
chamber of sumcient transverse width properly
to take care of the higher fuel consumption, and
it has been found that when the sleeve 28 is
.iacent perforations'in the combustion. tube. Simi
larly, the cover is need not be ?at, but may take
the form of the cover I! (Fig. 9), the peripheral
2,411,842
portion 45 of which is frusto-conical and extends
non than u omitted. It has been found, i'or ex’
downwardly so as to expose sumclent perforations
ample, that in an ‘oil burner, in which emcient
of the inner combustion tube l to admit an in
operation can be secured with no less than about
creased amount of air into the space between that
Vs the maximum eiiicient' fuel consumption, by‘
tube and the sleeve 29 for admixture with the 5 use of the sleeve e?icient fuel consumption can
gas in such space.
be" secured with about $41 the maximum e?lcient
The burner according to Figs. 6 to 8 is de
fuel consumption.
,
signed for burning either gaseous‘or liquid fuel
In the modi?cation shown by Fig. 11 the an
selectively. The burner shown by these ?gures is
nular fuel chamber 6! is positioned at the outer
in general identical with that shown by Figs. 1 10 side of the outer combustion tube 3, the space
and 2 except that an'annular wick't'l is provided
between the upstanding wail II and said tube
in the space between the sleeve 29 and outer com
being closed by the annular cover 63.. As shown,
bustion tube 3, the wick being spaced from the ' the cover is secured to the upper edge of the
sleeve to provide an air space 49 between the two
wall Ii by screws 65, the cover having an inner
so that air may pass through the perforations of 15 peripheral ?ange 61 welded to the tube 3. Also,
the sleeve into the space between the latter and
as shown, the inner combustion tube I is posi
the inner combustion tube I for the reasons here
tioned against the inner upstanding wall i3 of
inbefore described. The wick may be spaced from
the base, and the inner peripheral portion of the
the sleeve byproviding a su?icient number of lugs
cover 63_ is depressed at 69 to secure the same
iii. More conveniently, however, a number of
effect as the depressed portion 45 of the cover
spaced clips 5i may be secured at their lower ends
according to Fig. 9. Further, as shown; the in
by welding to the combustion tube 3 for holding
ner upstanding wall i3 is provided with an arr
the wick in such spaced relation.
nular groove ‘ll corresponding to the groove 41
As shown in Fig. 6, the gas supply pipe 2'! com
of Fig. 9‘for securing the same effect :as the
municates with an opening 53 in the upstanding
latter. It will also be understood that in the
boss 56 formed integrally with the bottom wall 1
construction shown by Fig. 11 the outer oom
of the base so as to prevent ?ooding of the pipe
bustion tube 3 may terminate above the base in
during the ‘starting period of the burner by the
the same way as the inner combustion tube i of
oil admitted to the chamber through the open
Fig. 10 for securing the ‘same effect as the latter.
ing 57 of the base, with which latter opening com 30 In the modi?cation shown by Figs. 12 and 13
municates the oil supply pipe 59, this latter pipe,
like the pipe 2?, being controlled by a valve (not
shown) for regulating the amount of ‘oil supplied
the burner.
'
two annular combustion chambers 13 are pro
vided, respectively positioned between the pairs
of combustion tubes i and 3. As shown, the
base is provided with‘ a bottom wall 15 provided
with pairs of upstanding walls ‘l1, 19, the pairs
of combustion tubes being positioned between
the walls of these pairs and being arranged with
n; will be understood that the lowermost per- ;
forations 31 of the inner combustion tube | and
sleeve 29 of the burner according to Figs. 6 to 8
will be positionedclose enough to the base to per
relation to said walls as hereinbefore described.
mit sufficient oil to reach the wick for the start
‘As illustrated, the spaces between the upstand
ingqof the burner. After the burner has started
ing walls 19 and combustion tubes 3 are closed
the oil will be vaporized in the chamber 23, the
by covers 8!! welded to said tubes and resting on ,
cover it of which is highly heated by heat re
?ected against it from the combustion tube l and
compressible gaskets 82 positioned on the upper
edges of'said walls. As shown, the ‘covers are
by heat conducted to it by said tube with which
it makes intimate contact. Also, the time con
sumed in starting the burner when using oil as
clamped to the upper edges of said walls by clips
83. connected by clamping screws 85 to lower
clips 81, all these clips bridging the spacebe
. fuel is much reduced by reason ofthe inner com
tween said walls 19. The walls 19 being in
bustion tube l extending into the ‘oil space, the
spaced relation permit air to enter the space
lower portion of the tube being highly heated by
between the combustion tubes 3, while air enters
heat conducted to it from the cover i5 and from 50 the- interior of thefinnner combustion tube I
the portions of the tube above that cover, at
through the opening 89 in the base.
‘
which portions the ?ame exists.
‘
As shown, the burner according to Figs. 12,
It will be understood that, although the sleeve
13 and 14 is arranged for burning either gas or
2% may with advantage be ‘used when burning
oil selectively, gas being admitted through the
oil, the vapors of which are heavier than air, 55 valve controlled pipe ill and oil through the valve
the distribution of the fuel tended to be eifected
controlled pipe 93 for supplying regulated
by the perforations of the combustion tube I be
amounts of gas or oil thereto. At spaced points
low the cover it is then of no importance, for such
, heavy vapors or gases tend to ?ow like water and
distribute themselves, that is t5 say, like water
would if admitted through the pipes 59 or 21, they
tend to lie at the bottom of the chamber 23.
When using such heavier fuels, therefore, it is
the fuel chambers 95 below thecovers 8| are
connected by spoke-like parts 91 integral with
the upstanding walls 19, which parts are jperfoe
rated as shown at 99 for admitting the oil va
pors 'or gas from the inner fuel chamber 95 to
the outer fuel chamber 95. As shown, a wick
47 is provided at the bottom of the inner com
not necessary to have the lower end of the inner
combustion tube i in close proximity to the bot 65 bustion chamber which serves to start the burner
tom wall 7 of the base, but it may be spaced
therefrom say about 0.1 inch as shown in Fig.
1.0 so that the oil vapors or the heavier gases will
flow beneath i'he lower end of the tube into the
space between that tube and the sleeve 29. With
these oil vapors or heavier gases the effect of the
sleeve 29 is not so pronounced as when burning
the lighter gases. However, with such vapors and
heavier gases the sleeve secures a useful effect in
that it permits a greater range of fuel consump
' when oil is supplied as the fuel.
It will be understood that, within the scope
of the appended ‘claims, wide deviations may
-be made from the forms of the invention de
scribed without departing from the spirit thereof.
I claim:
'
‘
1. A. gas burner for gas having a density less
than air having, in combination, a base carrying
a pair of perforated combustion tubes one of
which surrounds the other in'spaced relation
, 2,411,342
7
.
' thereto to form a combustion chamber between
> them, said base having an opening for supply
ing'air to the side of one of said tubes opposite
said ‘combustion chamber, means cooperating
with said base and one of said combustion tubes
to form a gaseous fuel chamber positioned later
ally of that tube adjacentv its lower end coex
_
8
I
.5. A burner according to claim 3 having, a
, perforated sleeve within the combustion cham
ber at its bottom in relatively widely spaced re
lation to each of the combustion/tubes for divid
ing the bottom portion of said chamber into _
two relatively wide open top chambers,‘ the fuel
chamber, communicatingwith the chamber be~
tensive with the peripheral extent of said tube,
tween said sleeve and the combustion tube‘adja
which latter forms one of the walls of said fuel
cent the fuel chamber.
chamber‘ whereby the two chambers are placed
said' tube, the end portion of the latter and said
6. A burner according to claim 3 having a
perforated sleeve within the combustion cham
ber at its bottom in relatively widely spaced re
base having 7 cooperating portions preventing
other substantial‘ communication between said
lation to each of the combustion tubes for divid
ing the bottom of‘ said chamber into two rela
-in' communication solely by the‘ perforations of
chambers.
2. A burner according to claim 1 having a
perforated sleeve within the combustion cham
her at its bottom in relatively widely spaced rela
‘. tion to each of the combustion tubes for divid
ing the bottom portion of said chamber into
two relatively wide open top chambers, the fuel
chamber communicating with the chamber be
tween said sleeve and the combustion tube ad
jacent. the fuel chamber.
3. A gas gurner for gas having a density less
_ than air having, in combination, a base having ‘
a central-air opening, and, surrounding said »
opening, spaced upstanding walls extending from
.
v
tively wide open top chambers, the fuel cham
ber communicating with the-chamber between
that sleeve and the combustion tube adjacent
the fuel chamber, and a wick in the space at
theopposite side of said sleeve surrounding the
latter in spaced relation thereto‘.
.
7. A burner according to claim 4 having a
wick in the chamber at the side of said sleeve
opposite the fuel chamber, said wick surround- _
ing the sleeve in spaced relation thereto.
8. A burner of the character‘ described having,
in combination,‘ a base having a central air
opening, and, surrounding said ‘opening, spaced
upstanding walls extending from a bottom ‘wall
a bottom wall of the base to form an endless
of the ‘base to form an endless fuel groove, .a pair
gaseous fuel groove, a pair of perforated com 30 of perforated combustionv tubes one of which
bustion tubes one of which surrounds the other _ surrounds the other in spaced relation thereto
in spaced relation thereto to form a combustion
to form a. combustion chamber between them,
chamber between them, which tubes are carried
which tubes are carried ‘by said base with the
by said base with the end portion of one of said ' end portion of one of said tubes contacting one
tubes contactingone of said upstanding walls 35 of said upstanding walls and the other tube»
and the other tube extending into said groove in
extending into said groove in- spaced relation
spaced relation to the other of said upstanding
to the other of said upstanding walls, a cover
walls, a cover member above the bottom of said
member above the bottom of said groove extend-'
groove ‘extending'from the last mentioned up
ing from the last mentioned upstanding wall to
standing wall to the combustion tube spaced 40 the combustion tube spaced therefrom so as to
therefrom so as to form an endless gaseous fuel
chamber communicating with the combustion
chamber solely through the perforations of the
last mentioned tube, the end portion of the
.latter and said base having cooperating portions
preventing other substantial communication be
tween said chambers'
-
‘
I
4, A burner of the character described having
form. an endless fuel chamber communicating
with the combustion chamber solely through the
perforations of the last mentioned tube, the end
portion of the latter and said base having co
operating ‘portions preventing other substantial
communication between said chambers, a perfo
rated sleeve within the combustion chamber at
its bottom in relatively widely spacedirelation to
in combination, a base having a central 'air
said combustion tubes for dividing the bottom
opening, and, surroundlngsaid opening, spaced 50 portion ‘of said chamber into two relatively wide
upstanding walls extending from a bottom wall
open top chambers, means for admitting
of the base to form an endless fuel groove, a pair '
vaporizable liquid fuel or gaseous fuel to said
of perforated combustion tubes one of which
fuel chamber, and a wick within the chamber
surrounds the other in spaced relation thereto
between said sleeve and the combustion tube
to form a combustion chamber between them, 55 remote from said fuel chamber for initiating op
which tubes are carried ~by said base withthe
eration of the burner when said fuel chamber is ‘
end portion of one of said tubes contacting one
supplied with liquid fuel.
of said upstanding walls and the other tube ex
9. A burner of the character described having,v
tending into said groove in, spaced relation to.‘ in combination, a base having a central air
the other of' said upstanding walls, a cover mem 60 opening, and, surrounding said opening, spaced
ber above the bottom of said groove extending
upstanding walls extending from a bottom wall
from the last mentioned upstanding wall to the
I of the base to form ‘an endless fuel groove, a
combustion tube spaced therefrom so as to form _
pair of perforated ' combustionv tubes one of
an endless fuel chamber. the end of the last
‘which surrounds the other in spaced relation
mentioned tube being supported in slightly 65 thereto to form a combustion chamber between
' spaced relation to the bottom of said groove to
them, which tubes are carried by said base with
establish communication between said- fuel
the'_end portion of one of said- tubes contacting
chamber and the combustion chamber, a perfo
one of said upstanding walls and the vother tube
rated sleeve within the combustion chamber at
extending into said groove in spaced relation to
its bottom in relatively widely spaced relation ‘to 70 the other of said upstanding'\:wal1s, a cover
each of the combustion tubes ‘fol-‘dividing the
bottom of said chamber into two relatively wide
open top‘ chambers, the fuel chamber communi-_
eating with the chamber between said sleeve and
member above ‘the, bottom of said groove ex
tending from the last, mentioned upstanding
wall to the combustion tube spaced therefrom so
as to form an endless fuel chamber communi-‘ ,
the combustion‘ tube adjacent the fuel chamben', ‘lo catin! with the combustion chamber through‘
'
2,41 1,842
the perforations of the last mentioned tube, the '
end portion of the latter and said base having
cooperating. portions preventing other substan
tial communication between said chambers, a
10
portion of said combustion chamber into two
relatively wide open top non-liquid ?uid con
ducting chambers communicating with the por
tion of the combustion chamber above them;
and means for supplying‘ non-liquid ?uid‘ fuel to
one of said open top chambers for discharge into
perforated sleeve within the combustion cham
bar at its bottom in relatively widely spaced
relation .to each of the combustion tubes for
dividing the bottom portion of said chamber into
the ‘portion of the combustion chamber above
10. A burner of the character described hav?
established solely by the perforationsln the
it through the open top oi.’ said open top cham
‘ her, which means comprises walls forming an an
two relatively wide open top chambers, a pilot
light device within the chamber between the 10 nular fuel chamber adjacent said lower portion
of said combustion chamber, the last mentioned
sleeve and the combustion tube adjacent the
combustion tube constituting a portion of said
fuel chamber, a wick in the space at the oppo
walls and de?ning a side of said fuel chamber.
site side 01 said sleeve surrounding the latter
11. A burner according to claim‘10 in which
in spaced relation thereto, and means for admit
ting‘vaporizableliquid fuel or gaseous fuel to 15 the'communication between‘the annular fuel
chambem and one of the open top chambers is
said fuel chamber.
'
combustion tube de?ning a portion of the walls
of said fuel chamber.
_
extending perforated combustion tubes 0pera-‘
12. A ‘burner according to claim 10 having
tively carried at their lower ends by said base 20
an annular wick in the open top chamber at
with their walls in laterally spaced relation to
the side of the sleeve opposite the open top
form between them an annular combustion
chamber which communicates with the annular
chamber: a vertically extending perforated
fuel chamber, said wicl'r being in laterally spaced
sleeve operatively carried by said base within
the combustion chamber at its lower end por 25 relation to said sleeve.
ing, in combination, a base; a pair of vertically
- tion in relatively widely spaced relation to each
- of the combustion tubes for dividing said lower
RALISTQN M. SHERMAN.
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