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Патент USA US2411559

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Nev. 26, 1946. `
F. soNlN Erm.
METHOD FOR FORMING FUR FILLED YARN
2,411, 559
Filed Oct. l1, 1943
«24 _ @om
Patented Nov. 26, 1_946
2,411,559
UNITEDy STATES einem ori' ici:
' 2,411,559»
.
METHOD EUR FORMING FUR FILLED YARN
Frances Sonln and Mor?is II. Siegel,
`
l
New York, N. Y.
Application-October 11, 1943, Serial No. 505,716
i8 Claims.
.
The invention relates to a method and appara
tus for forming filled or core yam to- be woven into
a fur filled fabric in making artificial fur from_
which may be-fashioned coats and other articles
usually made from natural fur.
.
symbolic outline, with the contents of the hopper
at the vleft side of Fig. 2 omitted, Vand which
machine'in its operation discloses one way in
which the method aspects ofthe invention may
be practiced; in this showing the driving mecha
nism for actuating the several movable parts have
<The primary objectof the invention is to utilize
and thus provide a new market for a presently .
cheap form of waste fur hairs which, due primarily
to the extremely short length of most of the hairs, .
are of no practical use and can thus be purchased
cheaply from the fur industry. 'I‘his waste comes
from clipping, cutting; shavings, combings and
dyeing in the treatment of fur skins and exists
- been omitted to avoid confusion of showing con
ventional drive mechanism; S
,
Fig. 2 isa vertical sectional view taken in the
as an indefinite fluffy mass oi’ entangled hairs
medial longitudinal plane through Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is an enlarged plan view of the top of
the treating compartment at the upper right
of varying lengths but mostly of short lengths.
This waste material is at present being thrown '
away bythe furriers as a useless by-product of
hand portion of Fig. 2 showing the parallel rela
their work. Thepresent‘disclosure contemplates
tion oi' the core forming thread to the discharge
the formingoi’ an end _product from this waste
slot;
material and which end product is a woven fabric @il
which will have most of the visual characteristics
of the fur side of a natural skin.
ì
In actual practice, it has been found possible
vto mix the hair from. different kinds of animal
Y
.2
In the accompanying drawing:
_
’_
Fig. `l is a plan view of a machine forming a
preferred embodiment of the apparatus aspect
of the disclosure with parts shown largely in
'
'
Fig. fi is an enlarged detail view in axial sec
tion of the ironer shown in smaller form in ad
vanceoí the slot in Figs. l and 2;
Fig. 5_is a view of a short length of the finished
yarn as it comes od the'machine, highly magnified `
skins in practicing the method herein featured 2% in an attempt to show its details and shown partly
and in this way to give a wide variety of novel
in longitudinal section; and
y
and beautiful eiîects to the resulting fabrics not
Fig.
6
is
a
transverse
sectional
view of the yarn
known with the natural skins.y
y
shown in Fig. 5 taken on the plane indicated by
Considering the method aspect of the present
the line @-â of Fig. 5.
' e
disclosure, the object is to provide an improved ad The machine i0 may be divided for purposes
technique for utilizing the fur waste> asa coating
of description into a measuring device il, a com
' for a thread or similar filament to form a fur
iilled »yarn capable of being used conventionally
in a fabric weaving machine. The method par-' ticularly contemplates the'forming of the yarn 35
by a ‘sequence of steps including a disintegrating
and opening out of the mass of indeñnitely inter
A meshedV hairs in which this waste is available;
bined disintegrating and hair applying device l2 .
and an organization i3 of thread treating ele-l
ments.
'
The measuring device il comprising an open
top hopper it -provided in lan inside wall and
midheight thereof with a discharge port I5. ‘Posi
tioned in order from left to right in the hopper
the prelayin-g of the hairs at least somewhat in i -»is‘a feeder i3 and a measuring drum I] for
parallelism; a gentle lifting of the. hairs ony to a 40 receiving the Awaste from the feeder. Between
. travelling thread, in distinction from blowin
the drum il and the port l5 is a stripper I8 for
them on to the thread, and which thread is prefer-r
dipping a layer of waste off the drum, through
ably rotating about its own axis and sometimes
port i5 and thus into the first or receiving com
coated with an adhesive.
v
-
Various other` objects and advantages of the 45
_invention will be in partobvious from a consider
ation of the method -features of the disclosure
andfrom an inspection of the :accompanying> '
drawing and in part will be more fully set forth
in the following -particular description of one 50
method of practicing the invention, and the inven..
tion also consists in certain new and novel modi
ñcations of the preferred method and other fea
tures' 'of construction and combination of parts
hereinafter set forth and claimed.
»
partment i9 of the device i2.
~
~
The feeder I6 comprises a broad bladed up
standing pusher plate 20 slidably mounted for
reciprocatory movement along the inclinedouter
side 2| of the hopper I4._ The pusher is hung
from a lever 22 so as to swing therefrom and the
lever is operatively connected to the drive mech
anism of the machine (not shown) to operate with
suflicien't activity to maintain the fur waste
against the measuring drum I1 as it is introduced
into thefhopper.
The pusher in its elevating
55 movement permits the waste to fall between itself> '
i
2,411,559
3
4
drum!
'
Within the compartment 3| are journalled
three picker -rollers 4I, 42 and 43 intergeared with
_
The measuring drum is a metal wheel mounted
to be driven from shaft 23 connected to the
main driving mechanism. The periphery of the
drum is a narrow band 26 in one _form of the
drive about one and one-half inches wide andI
provided with a plurality of `circumferentially
spaced apart short ledges 25 extending-trans
versely of the band 2d. Each ledge is provided at
its outer edge with .a flange 25’. All of the
flanges extend in the direction of rotation of the
drum, that is in a clockwise direction.. A doctor
23, provided with outwardly projecting wire spring
fingers 26’ is mounted for rotation above the drum
to feed the material thereto.
The flanged ledges 25 on the drum act as the
drum rotates from left to right about its top to
coact with the doctor to withdraw from the mass
of hair in the hopper ‘a- measured amount of the
mass per rotation of the drum and doctor and
,
tane aperture 32 and hence into the compartment
and the drum I1 and in its lowering movement
packs the waste against the perimeter of the
Ul
each other and with the main drive to rotate
counter-clockwise. lThe several picker rollers
act on the matted hair to disintegrate the same.
They tear the hair particles apart, open up the
mass, or differently expressed, reduce the specific
density of the original stock until it assumes a
light, fluffy cloud -like effect as it accumulates
in the upper portion. of the compartment 3i.
In one practical operation‘and where a ñne
grade of fur hair was used, the hair particles were
separated so that the mass might be said to be
translucent when light was directed~t\- ough a
thickness thereof of about one foot.
> he fur
» material follows the path indicated by the lìarrows
moving upwardly through the constricted\throat
31 into _the lower part of portion 36, then‘laterally
through aperture 32 and then upwardly in the
compartment 3 I.
'
The top wall 44 ofthe casing 29 is provided
draws it out into a long, thin ribbon-like form
having the width of the drum.v The ledges are
very small extending -beyond the drum about 312
with a long, narrow slot 45 providing a discharge
of an inch so that-the resulting ribbon of matted
hair has about that thickness as it leaves the
is particularly noted that there is no fan or other
air pressure or blower means acting on the mass
of hair as it moves through the casing 29 to
opening from the- top of the compartmentl 3i. It
drum. As the drum- rotates it advances this rib
wards the discharge slot. The pickers and par
bon over the top of the drum, past the stripper I8
and as a freely floating streamer on through the 30 ticularly the terminal pickers `4I---43 are revolv
ing at high speed and'. they may generate a gentle,
port I5 and into the compartment I9.>
barely perceptible updraft which assists ln mov
The stripper I8 includes a shaft 21 geared ex
ing the disintegrated and flocculent mass of hair
ternally of the hopper to thedrum shaft 23 and
in a foam-like stream through the slot. The final
extending from the shaft 21 is a plurality, shown
to be four, of blades 28 of somewhat stili and yet ~ discharge through the slot appears to be more of
a pushing action of the advancing mass than a
slightly flexible leather, The stripper rotates
blowing action. The resulting fluff simply moves
counter-clockwise and the outer edges of its
upwardlyv and thus against the actionof gravity
blades engage the ribbon of matted hair and
as would a foam from beer or other gas charged
bodily raises it off the drum so that very little,
if any, of the hair which has so passed as a rib 40 liquid. A11 that is visible is that a cloud of loose
hai;` rises up out of the slot in a fairly uniform
bon over the top of the drum is ever carried about
rate per unit of length along the entire length
After the ledges 25
of the slot.
pass the point I5 they begin to pick up the waste
In those cases where the waste hair used is of
which accumulates in the bottom of the hopper
and the pusher plate tends to pack the waste 4: the straight, non-curling type a peculiar phe- .
nomena takes place in the upper portion of the
somewhat so that there is a fairly uniform density
.compartment 3| just below the slot. 4The ñnal
to the ribbon. The thin ribbon of hair iloats away
picker 43 exerts an orientating action on the
from the stripper and moves gently into the com
mass to lay the hairs in the same direction. The
partment I9 as indicated by the arrows.
hairs for the most part arrange themselves in
understood that at this point the hair while it
, the under side of the drum.
is in ribbon form is still in an indefinitely matted
parallelism with their original outer or pointed
condition and_still has about the density of the
>original stock as it is fed into the hopper.
The device I2 comprises an upstanding metal
casing 29 provided with a dividing wall 30 form
ing two compartments, the first or receiving com
ends pointing in the direction of travel of the
upper portion of the top picker roller 43, that
is pointing to the left4 in the showing in Fig. 2._
Of course, this means that the hairs so point
ing have their thiol; end, base or root ends point
ing to the right of the showing as they are
lifted through the slot. While all of the hairs
Communication is provided be-v
are not so orientated, and as a matter of fact
tween the compartment by an aperture 32 about
mid-height of the wall 30, Just below the aper 60 all of them are not even brought into parallelism
but remain intertwined with each other, still most
ture 32, roller 33 coacts with a guide piece 34
of the hairs‘and particularly the long, thin fur
to divide the compartment I9 into a lower receiv
hairs are so arranged with their pointed ends
ing portion 35 and an upper discharging portion
pointing in the same direction. The extremely
36 and to form a constrictive throat» 31 between
partment I9 and a second or discharging com
partment 3|.
the roller 33 and guide piece 34.
.
`
Journalled within the portion 35 and located
one above the other are two picker rollers 38 and
39 intergeared exteriorly of the casing t`o rotate
in the same direction, that is, counter-clockwise
short hairs in theI mass have a tendency to
remain in a more or less matted form but, of
course, not so matted as in the original stock.
In those cases where a curling, screw-like or
wavy type of fur hair is used, as in the case of
as indicated by the arrows. In the lower part of 70 sheep’s wool, the hair is disintegrated and dis
the upper portion 36 is journalled a single picker
roller 40 intergeared to rotate counter-clockwise
and thus in a direction to receive the material
discharged> through the throat 31 and advance
the same with an undersweeping action through 75
charged through the slot as previously described,
but in these cases there is no noticeable arrange
ment of the hair particles in parallel relation and4
no unidirectional pointing of the original outer
endsvof the hairs. This is presumably- due to the
2,411,559»
fact that m sheep's wool, for instance, the hair
_
»
.
~
e
-
is circumferentially compacted; the hair more
is, interlocked by its screw or spiral construction.l
and thus resists'the action of the pickers to sep- Ä' thoroughlyintertwined and pressed ilrmly into
the adhesivecoating. The resulting yarh is of
arate and arrange it in parallel relation.
much
less diameter than when fed into the
The thread treating device> i6 includes a set of
drawing rollers ‘it for drawing a single thread t
ironer.
_
‘
`
Itis noted that the thread andsubsequent yam
under tension from a supply spool (not shown) I
is advanced in the same direction, that is from
and across the slot ¿it in position to receive the
right- to left in the showing in> Figs. 1 and 2, in
discharge from the same. The slot is quite nar
row and dimensioned so that the thread almost 10 which the lstraight _hairs point as they were dis
charged through the slot. This means, of course,
- but not quite acts as a closure for the same as
that
most oi' the hairs are laid _on the thread with
shown in Fig. 3. Differently expressed, the thread
is centered over the slot and there. is provided , their pointed ends in advance and due to the
-twist 'of the yarn as it passes through the ironer
on opposite sides of the thread long clearances
these hairs> will be formed in the yarn with a
of extremely narrow width.
’
Considered from right to left of the showing
in Figs. l and 2„- there is disclosed a spring
15 screw-like or spiral lay'and with their pointed
ends in advance, that is, pointed to the left.
pressed presser fooi-,161 for restraining the free
dom of movement of the thread under the pull
In this operation all of the hairs do not so lie
within the outlines of the matted hair covering on
the core forming thread. A certain percentage-
fróm the ‘revolving thread. From the block- 60
-The- resulting yarn y isdifiicult to show pie
.
ing action of the rollers 46. It is suggested that 20
ofthe threads, and usually the longer threads,
in some cases the thread be coated with glue or
' having their inner, wider or base-ends embedded
other suitable adhesive and for »this purpose
in the adhesive and in the closely matted coating, v
there is shown an adhesive pot 48 mounted with
. but theseY pointed hair ends. extend freely out
the presser foot on a bracket 49 carried by
wardly from the coating in somewhat spaced
’ the casing 29. The thread is passed over and’in
25 apart relation `along the entire length of the illn-v
engagement with the flat top of a steel block- 50
ished yarn.
.,
which acts to prevent the hairs from flying loose
-toriallydue to the iìneness of the hairsjbut ref
the covered yarn is passed through bore 5i of an
erence to Figs. 5 and 6 will show the yarn aty
- ironer 52 mounted on top of the casing 29. The 30
least in a crude way. In these ngures the cen
. bore El is of conical form as shown in Fig. 4 with
the larger endv forming the intake end for receiv
ing the `coated thread or yarn.
The disclosure contemplates the twisting of
the thread and resulting yarn about its own axis
during the period while it is receiving the hair"
over the slot and while being drawn through the ‘
tral core is formed by the twisted -thread t,tcoated_with a. thin layer ofadhesive g and into which
adhesive the coating c of matted hairs is more or
less embedded. The ~ free outwardly pointing
hairs are shown at h. By the time the yarn has
reached th drawing rollers 46 it Vhas passed along
a stretch suñicient to insure an‘air drying and
lis delivered to the take up spool inA a commer
cially dry condition. Incidentally, no more ad
iron‘er. For this purpose,v the yarn is passed
through the ‘este as of rotary twister es includ-,
ing a tubular shell mounted for rotary movement
hesive is used than is just suilicient to insure the
about its own axis in a bearing 56 carried by 40 sticking of the hair- to the thread.
bracket 5l in turntcarried by casing is.
By means of a driving connection with a source
Within the bore 5t are mounted four grooved
of power the speed of the measuring drum l'i
spools 59 each free to turn about its own axis,
and pickers 38-43 is so synchronized with the
two on each side of the thread. The spool axes
travel of the thread t `and resulting yarn y under
extend in parallel relation and transversely of
the pull of the drawing rollers 46 that the requi- .
the axis of rotation of the twister. The two
site amount of fur covering is located on the
middle spools are arranged so‘that their adja
thread per unit length to sive the requisite extent
cent peripheries are each inset slightly beyond , of covering. For the purpose of controlling the
the path of the thread thereby to cause the 50 relative speeds of the ‘different drawing rollers,
thread as it passes through the rbore to assume
drum and picker rollers to meet the varying con
the wavy or undulated offset form shown in Fig.
ditions imposedy by different types of fur in use
`2. Di?ferently described, the plane tangent to
for the time being, the machine will include con
>the spools of one set is offset inwardly beyond
ventional change speed mechanism.
the plane tangent tothe spools of 'the other
While this disclosure features the use of a. sin
set. The twister is provided with a driving pulley
gle thread, and which in practice is a strong cot
59 belted to the drive mechanism and intended
ton thread, it is within the scope ofthe disclo
to be" driven at high speed. _The twister acts
sure to use two threads parallel to each other
on the yarn to give it a definite tortional twist
and which threads become twisted one on the
and this twist extends` from the presser footñ'i 60 other conventionally. In this case, theadhesive
to the drawing rollers d6, the twist being clock
-may be omitted or> materially reduced as the
wise between the twister and rollers and counter
i twisting of two threads one> on the other is sufclockwise between the twister and presser foot.
ficient in most 'cases' to hold the fur coating in
During the movement of the twisted thread in place until it reaches the ironer. As the coated
its `advance along the slot, it is dragged through 65 core, either of the single or double thread, passes
the long narrow stream of loosely matted cloud
of hair rising out of the slot and acts to pick up
the hair. It is understood that as it passes
through the mass of hair the thread is rapidly ro- .
through the ironer the coating will be rather
firmly packed into' place.
The iìnished yarn y formed is wound on to a
take up spool 60 replaceably mounted on shaft .
tating so that the hair for the most part is twisted 70 6i operatively connected to the drive mechanism.
on to the thread to form a closely matted inner
layer with many of the hairs sticking outwardly
from the hair coating.
`
The spool 601s used conventionally in a fabric '
weaving machine and the yarn'thereon is woven
into a cloth which on both sides looks very much
As the coated thread is advanced through the
like‘the fur side of a natural fur skin. It par->
ironer 52 the more or less loose short hair coating 75 takes of the appearance of the hair of the animal
o
¿4111559
which supplied the waste cuttings. For instance,
waste hair from a gray squirrel can-be made into
a yarn, the yarn into a fabric and the fabric into
an artificial gray squirrel coat which looks as if
' it were made from natural gray squirrel skins.
Fabrics made from the waste hair cuttings from
a long haired animal like a fox produce a beauti
ful black or brown soft glossy surface which with
its ñne hair ends produces the silky effect of a
high price skin of fox.
By suitably mixing in the hopper the waste
hair from different kinds of fur an indeñnite
number of diñerently appearing forms of result
ing fabric may be obtained.
,
While fur hair of both the straight and curled
variety has been speciñcally described herein, it
is within the scope of the disclosure to use other
forms cf waste material such, for instance, as
picking actions to distintegrate the material of
the ribbon progressively to form the same nnally
into a light fluffy mass and with the’hair par
ticles sufficiently separated so that the mass is
translucent and gently lifting, in distinction from
blowing or throwing or hurling, the same gently
and while causing it to assume a unilateral dimension as it is caused to be transferred on to a
thread passed therethrough and along the path
defined by said .unilateral direction.
‘
5. In the'art of forming a. ßlling for a yarn,
the method which consists in withdrawing from
a mass of matted fur hairs a limited amount of
- the same per unit of time in the forming of a
thin ribbon, subjecting the same while exposed
tov the environmental air condition to successive
picking actions to'distintegrate the material of
-the ribbon progressively to form the same finally _
into a light fiuffy mass and with the hair par»
20 ticles more or less adhering to an extremely lccse
We claim:
matted lform but sufñciently separated so that
l. In the art of forming a fur covered yarn,
the mass is translucent and causing the mass
the method which consists in drawing from an
while in such translucent form. to assume a
indefinite matted mass of fur Waste hairs a thin
lengthwise form and causing the mass to be
V layer of the same in measured amounts per unit
of time, discharging the layer into a confined 25 moved by the pushing action of the advancing
space; progressively disintegrating the material so
mass and causing the translucent mass to rise
discharged to separate the same into a ñne ñoat
upwardly direct from the last picking step to a
ing fluff, causing the nud at the end of the dis
discharge point while maintaining its translu
integrating step to move gently upwardly and
cent condition.
`
thus against the action of gravity and in_to a nar 30
6. In the art of treating a matted mass of
row, long- path and causing an adhesively coated
straight fur hair, the method which consists in.
thread to traverse along the length of said path
subjecting the mass to a picking action to dis
and closely above the same to pick up the fur
integrate the mass and to cause the hairs for
fluff as it rises on to the thread, the travel of the
the most part to assume a substantially parallel
thread and the amount of fur waste advanced in
relation, and subjecting the resulting hair to the
the layer per unit of time being synchronized to
effect of a lifting pressure while carrying the
provide the requisite degree of fur coating on the
mass of carded hair to assume a unilateral form
thread per unit of length.
' extending in the direction in whichA the hairs for
feathers.
f
-
2. In the art of forming a fur covered yarn,
-the most part lie at theßtermination of the pick
the method which consists in drawing from an 40 ing action.
indefinite. matted mass of fur waste hairs a thin
7. In the art of treating a matted mass of
layer of the same in measured amounts per unit
straight fur hair, the method which consists in
of time, discharging the layer into a confined
space, progressively disintegrating the material so
discharged to separate the same into a fine float
subjecting the mass to a picking action to dis
integrate the mass and to cause the hairs for the
J most part to assume a substantially „parallel re
lation and causing those'hairs which are in such
parallel relation to pass upwardly through a nar
row slot extending in the direction of such par
ing fluff, causing the :duif at the end of the dis
integrating step to move gently upwardly and
thus against the- action of gravity and into a nar
row, long path and causing .an adhesively coated
thread to traverse along the length of said path
and closely above the same to pickup/the fur
allel relation.
.
fluff as it rises on to the thread, while twisting
the threadv about its own axis as it passes along
8. In the art of filling yarn the method which
consists in drawing a thread through a. mass of
fur hairs where the hairs extend for the most
part in the direction of the length of the thread
said path.
while twisting the thread and subjecting the
.
3. In the art of preparing lfrom an indefinite 55 thread with its layer of hairs thereon to an iron
matted mass of waste fur hairs a fur coating for
ing action, said ironing action progressively
a yarn, the method which consists in forming a
drawing the yarn radially inwardly, thus causing
Athin layer from the original matted mass, dis
the h'air to become condensed and matted cir
charging the layer as formed into a confined
cumferentially about Ythe twisting thread.
space free of any fan or other air pressure or UU
9. The method of producing from a matted
blower action, subjecting the same while in said
mass of fur hairs a thin flat ribbon of the same,
space to a distintegrating action to reduce the » and separating its hairs into a fluffy mass caus
original density to a light ñuffy mass and causing
ing the ñuify mass to assume a unilateral form
and applying said fluffy mass to a travelling
the iinal mass to float from its point of disinte
gration to its point of discharge in substantially
thread when> the thread and unilateral mass are
quiescent air upwardly and thus rcontra to the
in parallel relation.
action of gravity as it is discharged from said
10. The method of feeding yarn filling mate
rially upwardly in a long narrow sheet, drawing
, confined space directly into the atmosphere and
substantially without assistance from any kinetic
a yarn thread _across said sheet in position to
pick up the filling, ironing the filling on to the
force inherent in the air in said space.
thread, while rotating the resulting yarn.
4. In the art of forming a filling for a yarn,
11. The method of drawing. yarn under ten- `
the method which consists in withdrawing from
sion first through an ironer to compact and re
a mass of matted fur hairs a limited amount of
duce the diameter of the yarn and them through
the same per unit of time in the forming of a,
thin ribbon, subjecting the same to successive 75 a' twister to twist the yarn about its own axis
2,441,559
.
"10
~ 9
and thus give it a tortional twist as thefyarn
in a fixed plane, and directing thañuñ while in .
is drawn through the ironer.
said plane on to a thread travelling in said plane -
l
4
12. In the art of forming a fur covered yarn,
the method which consists in drawing from an
and thus through the layer of small thickness
of fluff while twisting the thread.
t
indefinite matted mass of fur waste hairs a thin
15. In the art of forming a fur ñlled yarn, the
layer of the same in measured amounts per unit
method whichconsists in forming in-space a thin
of time, discharging the layer into a conñned
layer of fur hair fluff disposed in a plane, pass
space, disintegrating the material so discharged
ing an adhesively coated thread under tension
to separate the same into a flneiloating nuff,
through said ñuii" while in such plane to cause the
causing the ñuff at the end of the disintegrating 10 thread to pick up particles of the ñuff and twist
step to move gently into a narrow, long path and
ing the thread in one clockwise direction while
causing an adhesively coated thread to traverse
passing along the place where the thread picks
along the length of said path to pick up the fur
up the ñuñ’.
t
'
.iiulî 4as it moves on to the thread, the trave1 of
16. The method of claim 15 and> wherein the~
the thread and the amount of fur wasteadvanced 15 thread is twisted in the opposite direction after
4in the layer per unit of time being synchronized
it has passed said place there-by tending to release
to provide the requisite degree of fur coating on
the tension on the thread after the ñufi has been I
the thread per unit of length.
applied thereto.
13. In the art of forming a fur covered-yarn,
17. The method of claim 15 _and in which the
the method which consists in drawing from an 20 resulting yarn is ironed to circumferentially com
indefinite matted- mass of fur Waste hairs a thin '
layer of the same in measured amounts per unit
of time, discharging the layer into a confined ‘
space, progressively disintegrating the material
pact the hair into the adhesive coating.
18. In the art of forming a fur ñlled yarn with
a closely matted inner layer, which consists in
causing an originally more or less matted mass of
so discharged to separate the same into a finel 25 fur hairs to assume the form of a light fluffy
floating fluff, causing the ñuiî at the end of the
mass with at least some of the hair orientated
disintegrating step to move gently into a narrow,
into parallel relation with their pointed ends
-long path and causing an adhesively coated
pointed in the same direction, advancing the
thread to traverse along the length of said path
mas's by a pushing action of the advancing mass
and closely adjacent to the same to pick up the 30 in distinction 4from a blowing action on to a
fur fluff as it advances on to the thread, while
thread under tension and travelling in the direc
twisting the thread about its own axis as it passes
tion in which the pointed ends of the hairs point
along said path.
,
i
and twisting the thread _in one rotary direction as
14. In the art of_ forming a filled yarn, the v it advances across the place where it receives
method which consists in drawing from a mass 35 the hairs and twisting the resulting 'ñlled yarn
of ñlling material a layer of the same, disinte
grating the layer to separate the same into aìoose -
mass of ñne floating ñulî with its particles sub
stantially separated, causing the ?luñ to assume
a. layer of relatively small thickness and disposed
in the opposite rotary direction immediately after
it has passed said space.
.
'
’
' ‘
FRANCES SONIN.
MORRIS H. SEGEL.
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