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Патент USA US2411562

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}_Nov. 26, 19-46. ,
2,411,562
R. s. THOMPSON ,
SEGMENT vTYPE RESILIENT ENGINE MOUNT
Filed Feb. 23, 1944
4 Sheets-Sheet l
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Nov. ‘26, v1914-6.
'
‘
R. s. THOMPSON
' 2,411,562
SEGMENT TYPE RESILIENT ENGINE MOUNT
Filed Feb. 23, 1944
'
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Nov. 26, 1946.
R. s. THOMPSON
2,411,562
SEGMENT TYPE RESILIENT >ENGINE MOUNT
Filed Feb. 23, 1944
‘ '
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
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' Patented Nov. 26,
' 2,411.56? §_
- UNITED» STATES --PA:TENT. OFFICE,
SEGMENT an:2351mm Enema
'
Ransom S. Thompson, East Hartford,.Conn., as
signor to United Aircraft Corporation; East
Hartford, Conn., a corporation of Delaware
Application February 23, 1944, Serial No. 523,543
14 Claims.
This invention relates to 'resllient mounting
means for a vibratory body and particularly to a
vibration damping and isolating head or support
' primarily adapted- for mounting an aircraft en
(Cl. ‘248-5)
dividual mounts so that, an engine may be conven
iently assembled on a fuselage with one of the
halves of each mount already connected to its
struts and with the opposite ends of these struts
secured to the engines, theopposite halves of the
gine of the radial type on the forward portion of
an aircraft fuselage.
'
,
‘
2
proportioned individually as required to resist
the forces‘ in the direction of the three axes.
And ?nally it is an object of the present inven
tlon to form the opposed halves or parts of the in
g‘
A primary object of the invention is to provide
an improved vibration isolating and absorbing
mount or support for a vibratory body to sup
mounts being connected to the halves on'which
press or dampen vibrations of the body, and its
the struts are mounted to- attach the mounts to
associated parts, and isolate them from a sup
the fuselage mounting member.
porting structure to which the body is attached.
Other objects and advantages will be apparent
Another object of the invention is to provide
from the speci?cation and claims and from the
head,
a
an improved form of resilient mounting
drawings which illustrate what is now considered
plurality of which are provided angularly spaced 15 to be a preferred embodiment of the invention.
and attached by suitable brackets extending from
In the drawings:
'
i I
an engine or other vibratory body to. a bulkhead
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a complete'resilient
or mounting ring at or adjacent the forward end
of an aircraft fuselage or other supporting
mounting assembly for an engine of the radial
type shown connected to a mounting ring at the
structure, each mount preferably being attached
forward ‘end of an aircraft fuselage.
Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the form of 'mount
to the body by a groupof struts extending an
gularly from a portion of the mount-and attached
at their opposite‘ ends to different widely spaced
lng assembly shown in Fig. 1.
.
Fig. 3 is a front elevation showing mounts made
.
'
‘
in accordance with the present invention applied
Another object of the invention is to provide a 25 to a plurality of brackets provided on .a fuselage
partsof the body.
resilient mount primarily designed for aircraft
bulkhead.
engines in each of which are housed opposed seg
mental pads of compressive resilient material
such as semi-vulcanized rubber, each mount com
-
'
\
Fig. 4 is an enlarged front elevation of one *of
the resilient mounts.
Fig. 5 is a central sectional view on an enlarged‘
prising two opposed halves and each half having
scale taken on the plane of lines 5-5 in Fig. 1.
one of the resilient pads therein, the two parts of
Fig. 6 is a detail view, partly in section, of one
the ‘mount being clamped together so that they
of the resilient mounts forming part of the as
hold the resilient pads in compression against the ' - sembly shown in vFigs. 1 and 2, upon an enlarged
30
surface of a mounting ring or series of brackets.
,Another object of the invention is to provide
opposed friction members within the mounts,
each friction member being adapted to press
?rmly against the fuselage mounting member,
these‘ members being in the form of curved plates
positioned opposite each other and forced toward the fuselage mounting member by springs
scale ;, and
.
.
Fig. 7 isa sectional view of a part of the mount _
‘taken on the plane of line 1-1 in Fig. 6 on an
_ enlarged scale.
-
In its preferred form and as shown in .the draw
40 lngswthe invention may include the following '
- principal parts: First, a plurality of similar two
surrounding a part of the mount and engaging
part ‘mounts attached in angularly spaced rela~
tion to each other to a ring, 'or series of brackets,
provided on the forward end of, an aircraft
'
fuselage; ‘second, struts extending from each of
inner ends of which bear against and force the 45
members radially slidable within the mount, the
friction members or curved plates against the
said mounts and attached at their opposite ends
to di?erentportions ofthe engine casing; third, '
resilient pads housed within the mounts in op
Another feature of importance is that the re
posed
relation to each other and bearing against
silient pads housed within the mounts are of sea
mental form and are mounted diametrically op V50 the surface of the ring or brackets; fourth, clamp
fuselage mounting member.
-
‘
posite each other in the heads or mountings the
proportions and angular disposition of the pads
being proportioned so that the stiffness rates of
the heads in the di?erent directions of the three
principal axes of the heads may be different and 65
ing' means for drawing together and retaining
the two parts of a mount‘in cooperative relation
to each other and with the .resilient padsv com
pressed against the mounting member; and ?fth,
friction members<within the mounts forced re- -
2,4l1,662
siliently against and movable over the surface of
the mounting memben?
'
- '
,
during
An aircraft
operation
engine/
constitutes
and its aassociated
vibratory body
which sets up force impulses in various direc
tions which in turn are transmitted to the sup
4
in thedrawings, an engine is shown having struts
attached thereto by means of which the engine
is attached to the aircraft fuselage by being sup
ported from a mounting ring, or series of brack
ets, extending from or forming a ‘part of the fu
selage of a plane. The struts at one end are at
port for the engine, that is, to the fuselage of
tached to the engine and at their opposite ends
the aircraft; If the natural frequency of vibra
are attached in groups to the mounting. ring. or
tion of the engine is synchronous with the fre
brackets by means presently to be described.
quency of the force impulses, the vibrations be 10 Referring more in detail to the figures of the
come greatly increased and may reach amplitudes
. drawings and first to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, it will be
great enough to be objectionable and injurious to
seen that the supporting assembly for mounting
the engine or aircrai't.
’
the engine on an aircraft fuselage (not shown) ‘
The principal force impulses set up by the vibra_ ‘ includes a plurality of struts.‘ These struts are
tions of an engine and its associated parts com-' 15 of two series, one series as indicated at It being
prise forces acting along the axis of the engine
and also comprise force couples acting in various
directions. The principal vibratorymotions to be
' elongated and attached at one end to a portion of
the engine II by means of suitable pads l3 at
tached permanently, as by welding, to‘ the struts
l0 and detachably attached to the engine casing
considered are; ?rst, oscillations of the engine
about its longitudinal central axis, which may be 20 II, as by means of suitable bolts or screws I 4.
called the torsional vibration; second, angular
These struts at their opposite ends are attached
oscillations of the engine about an axis normal
individually to the heads Ii there preferably being
to the central longitudinal axis and passing
but one of these struts l0 connected to each head
through the center of gravity of the‘ vibratory
I5. Each strut III is preferably provided with
mass; and third, linear movements-on an axis 25 a hinged joint I‘ closely adjacent the head l5 ex
normal to the crankshaft axis.
tending transversely of the strut and substantial
To suppress or diminish vibrations of these
ly parallel with the fuselage support. A second
types, elastic mounting devices having the neces
vseries of struts l1 shorter than struts ID are at
sary sti?ness .or resiliency in the various direc
at one end to the engine casing I I at por
tions of the vibratory force are disposed equi 30. tached
tions spaced a material distance from the ends
distantly about the mounting member for the en
of struts I0. As shown in Figs. 1, 2.and 3, two of '
gine. These devices are generally disposed in a
these struts H are attached to each head l5 and
plane normal to the engine axis and at a distance
preferably are made adjustable as to their length
laterally from the center of gravity of the engine.
by suitably threaded members indicated-in Figs.
The torsional vibrations as de?ned above are
1, 2 and 3.
taken and absorbed by the resilient pads directly
As will be seen in the drawings, the struts l0
in shear.
The vibrations of the second type, such as
extending from the mounts or heads I5 are at
tached to an intermediate portion of the engine
pitching vibrations, are absorbed in the rubber
and'the
second or shorter series ll, two from
in the pads partly in shear stresses and partly in 40 each mounting,
are attachedto the engine at
compressive stresses, while the vibrations of the
points spaced a substantial distance axially from
third type, which may be called radial vibrations,
the ?rst series and closer to the mounting ring
are taken up and suppressed by the resilient pads
or members. Both series of struts l0 and I‘! have
acting largely in compression, the dimensions of
their opposite ends attached to the same half
_ the pads being so proportioned that the vibrations- 45 member of the mounts or heads IS.
of the principal types are substantially equally
The heads l5 are formed of two opposed mem
suppressed.
'
.
bers each having a part of a cylindrical or other
The plane of the mounting ring or bulkhead in
surface adapted to ?t about the supporting mem
standard forms-of aircraft engine installations bers or mounting ring- It‘ on the fuselage of the
v is offset laterally a considerable distance from
airplane.
.
the center of gravity of the engine and its at 50
It, will be noted from an inspection of the
tached parts. This distance between the center
of gravity of'the engine and the plane of the
supports or mounts introduces force couples which
must be suppressed to absorb the vibrations of 55
the second and third types as de?ned above. In
dividual elastic ,Ymountings for the engine for
absorbing all vibrations preferably are in the form
drawings particularly Fig. 6 that the part of the
heads or mountings l5 attached to the above '
referred to struts I 0 and I‘! does not extend to
a diametrical plane of the fuselage support mem
ber but that the two parts of the head are un
equal. The companion or cap member l8 of each
head I5 is extended beyond this diametrical
of semi-vulcanized rubber cushions of segmental
plane. This division of the parts of the heads
form and suppress vibrations in the different di 60 is provided for a purpose presently to be de—
rections as stated above, the torsional vibrations
scribed.
'
as stated above being taken in shear and the re
To retain the companion or cap member it of
maining vibrations in either combined shear and
the heads inoperative position'bolts 19 may be
compression or largely in compression.
provided, four being used for each head rigidly
- The primary object of the invention, therefore, 85 holding the two halves of the heads closely to
is to provide a convenient and compact resilient
gether. The half of each head l5 to which the
mount or support for an aircraft engine, a num
strut-s
l0 and I‘! are attached includes less than
ber of these mountsbeing secured to the mount
a half circumference .of the mounting ring or
ing ring or other mounting member or members
portion ‘of the bracket member to which the‘
on the aircraft fuselage angularly spaced apart,
and each mounting is so designed that substan 70 heads are attached. The-opposite or cap halves
l8 of the heads l5 are, placed on their heads I5
tially all the vibrations of the three different prin
and the complementalhalves are drawn together
cipal types- may be substantially suppressed and
after the engine H has been moved into position‘
isolated from the plane.
'
relative to the aircraft fuselage. This can be
In the embodiment of the invention illustrated 75 done for the reason that the. strut mounting
9,41 1,562
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_
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-
.
6.
drawings, the springs 28 closely surround, the
outer portion of the head.
halves of the heads have their inner portions re
duced to permit the mounting ring to enter all
> In the modi?cation of the invention shown in
of them in their mounted positions. With these
halves bolted or clamped together the engine and
Fig. 3 cf the drawings the heads formed by the
fuselage are fully coupled together in operative 5 members l5 and [8 are similar to those previ
relation.
-
w
-
ously described except that they fit over sepa
Fig. 3 shows an alternate form for mounting an engine and employing the form of resil- _
rated cylindrical members 30 instead of over por
'tions of the mounting ring l2. The members 30
lent mount shown in connection with Figs. 1 and
may be mounted as shown on brackets 3! in
2. In Fig. 3 the heads are attached to the engine 10 pairs bolted or otherwise secured to a bulkhead
casing H in the same manner; as shown inFigs.
or other part of an aircraft fuselage, a portion
1 and 2, that is by struts l0 and I1.
1 of which is shown at Ma. As indicated in Fig. 3
r The resilient pads are, as shown in the draw-.
the brackets ‘3| are disposed so that each pair
lngs, in the form of segments 20 and are dissupports a single head between them. Each
posed diametrically opposite each other within 15 member 30 may be secured rigidly to its two
each head, with their compressive axes aligned,
supporting brackets vby bolts 32 and may have
and converging toward a point within the engine,
?ange members 33 similar to members 24 to limit
so that when the parts of the head ii are drawn
movements of the heads from a no-torque posi
together the pads 20 are compressed and forced
tion to that of maximum torque.
.
' against opposite portions of the ‘mounting ring 20 It is to be understood that they invention is not
or bracket. As shown these pads 20 are made . limited to the speci?c embodiment herein illus
up of a plurality of arcuate layers of resilient
trated and described, but may be used in other
material 2| such as semi-vulcanized rubber ' ‘ways without departure from the spiritof the
bonded by any suitable means to interposed metal
invention as de?ned by. the following claims.
' strips 22. The inside portion of each of the pads 25
preferably has a metal strip ,23 "bonded thereto
which contacts the. surface of the mounting
length, width and radial thickness of the pads,
,
"
l. Resilient means for mounting a v ibratory .
_ means comprising a plurality of heads each en
- member II or with a bearing strip secured there
on. By choosing the proper proportion for the
I claim: - ,
body on a supporting structure, said mounting
closing a portion of the supporting structure and
30 having opposed segmental‘ resilient pads com
the desired stiffness or resiliency in the different
directions of the principal vibratory forces can
be obtained. Fig. 5 shows the position of the
layers of resilient material in the position as
sumed when the engine is at rest and while there 35
is no'torque applied to the moun . The position
shown in Fig. .4 is ‘that assumed when normal
the successive layers of resilient material are
~ directly superposed upon each other. On either
side of the mounts and secured to the mounting
ring or members are outstanding ?anges 24
which serve as limit stops. These ?ange mem;
'bers 24 are secured directly to the mounting ring
or members as by welding and the ?anges are,
so spaced that. the heads can move from their,
,
‘
The friction members by means of which vibra
tions of the- structure are suppressed and iso
lated from the aircraft may be in the form of
ially and circularly spaced portions of said body.
2. Resilient means for'mounting an aircraft
,engine on a fuselage mounting member, said
which is connected to the engine, the parts of
each head being secured together and having
opposed segmental resilient pads therein com
pressed against said mountin‘ member, and
means for connecting said heads rigidly to said
45 engine including a plurality of struts connecting
the engine connected part of each of said heads >
to the engine at axially spaced points on said
engine.
positions of rest to their normal or running posi
tion.
ity of struts connecting said heads rigidly to ax
mounting means comprising a plurality of angu-V
larly spaced two-part heads, one part of each of
or running torque is applied to the mount during
operations of the engine. In this latter position
pressed within them and bearing against said
supporting structure, and means for connecting
said heads rigidly to said body including a plural
_
3.‘ Resilient means for mounting an» aircraft
50 engine on'a fuselage mounting‘, ‘member, said
mounting means comprising a plurality of angu- ‘
larly spaced two-part heads each enclosing a por
tion of the mounting member and having op- '
curved plates 25 engaging portions of the mount
posed segmental resilient pads disposed within
ing ring or the cylindrical members supported 55 each, of the two opposed parts and compressed
from a bulkhead. These plates 25 may have a
against said mounting member when said op
frictional lining of bearing .material 28 on their
posed parts are drawn together into operative
faces engaging the supporting member and the
position, and means for connecting said heads
on of the supporting member l2 engaged
rigidly to said engine including a plurality» of
by the friction member 25 may be reinforced by 60 struts connecting each of said heads to axially
a wearing strip 21 preferably welded or brazed
and circularly spaced-portions of said engine.
directly to the supporting ring or member and
4. Resilient means for mounting an aircraft
serving to space the resilient pads 20 on the
engine on a fuselage mounting ring, said mount
. cross-sectional periphery of the ring l2. To force
ing means comprising a plurality of two-part
these friction members 25 against the ‘mounting ‘'5 heads, one part of each of whichis conneected
to the engine, each head enclosing a portion of
member or members l2, springs 28 are provided.
The springs 28 shown in the drawings are pref
the mounting ring and having opposed segmental
erably of semi-circular form and extend par-'
tially about the outer portions IQ of the head
thereof and bearing against said mounting ring,
resilient pads compressed within opposed parts -
in vwhich the friction members are mounted. 7o'and means for connecting said heads rigidly to
Pins 28 extending substantially radially through
portions of the head engage within recesses with
in the ends of the spring 28 and at their inner
ends contact the outer surface of the friction ,
members 25. As’shown'in thev ?gures of the 75
said engine including three anguiarly disposed
struts connecting the engine connected parts of
each of said heads to axially and circularly
spaced portions of said engine.
5. Resilient ‘means for m
'
ting an aircraft
_ 2,411,562
8
engine on a fuselage mounting ring, said mount
said ring, struts connecting said heads to spaced
ing means comprising in combination, a plural
portions of the engine, means for clamping the
parts of each head together, a segmental unit
including a pad of resilient material within each
of said parts and compressed vagainst opposed
surfaces of the enclosed portions of said ring
ity of two-part heads disposed at spaced points
about the periphery of said ring and each en
closing a portion of the periphery thereof, the
parts of said heads being rigidly secured together,
opposed segmental resilient pads housed within
by said clamping means, and opposed segmental
said parts and compressed against said mounting
spacers between said units ?xed to the portions
ring, the length of each pad ‘as measured on the
tangent to the outer periphery of the cross-sec 10 of said ring surrounded by said heads, said spac
ers having abutments engaging said unitsand
tion of said ring being less than the diameter
positioning the latter against displacement.
of said cross-section, and elongated struts each
12. In a mounting for. an aircraft engine, a
attached at one end to one part of said heads and
fuselage mounting ring, a plurality of two-part
at their opposite ends to axially spaced portions
of said engine.
'
heads spaced circumferentially of said ring and
,
each surrounding a circumferential portion of
said ring, struts connecting one part of each of
said heads to spaced portions of the engine,
means for clamping the parts of each head'to
6. Resilient means for mounting an aircraft
engine on a fuselage mounting member, said -
mounting means comprising in combination, a
plurality of two-Dart heads, the parts of which
vare rigidly secured together, opposed segmental
resilient pads housed within said parts and com
pressed against the surface of said mounting
20
gether, alternately arranged pads and spacers
within each head, said pads comprising segments
of resilient material compressed against opposed
surfaces of the enclosed portions of said ring by _
member, and members within said heads resil
said clamping means, said spacers comprising
iently forced against said mounting member and
wearing ‘strips ?xed- to said ring between said
frictionally movable thereon.
25 pads, and friction members within said heads
7. Resilient means for mounting an aircraft
bearing against said strips.
engine on a fuselage mounting member, said
13. In a mounting for an aircraft engine, a
mounting means comprising in combination, a
fuselage mounting ring, a plurality of comple
plurality of two-part heads rigidly secured to
gether and having opposed segmental resilient 30 mental two-part heads spaced circumferentially
of said ring and each surrounding. a circumfer
pads, housed within said heads, said pads being
ential portion of said ring, a plurailty of struts
compressed against the surface of said mount
rigidly
connecting vsimilar parts of each of said
ing member and spaced circumferentially of said
heads to the engine at points on the engine lying
engine, and opposed friction members mounted
within said heads and between said resilient pads, 35 in a plane axially spaced from the plane-of said
ring, said struts and the parts of the head car
and‘springs forcing said members against said
mounting member.
-
ried thereby extending inwardly from said ring
in generally frustro-conical formation toward
8. A resilient mount for a vibratory body com-,
the plane of attachment to the engine with the
prising a two-part head adapted to surround a
planes
on which said heads are divided obliquely
portion of a supporting structure, opposed com 40
disposed relative to the axis of rotation of the
pressive and resilient pads housed within said
engine, a segmental pad of resilient material,
head, means forcing said pads against said struc
carried by each head part in position to bear’
ture when said head parts are held together in
against the enclosed portions of said ring with
operative position, friction damper members
mounted within said head between said compres 45 the pads having their major compressive axes
oblique to the axis of rotation of the engine, the
sive pads, and spring means forcing said damper
complemental
parts of each head being divided
members, against said supporting structure. '
unequally with respect to the cross~sectional pe
9. A resilient engine mount for aircraft com
riphery of said .ring enclosed thereby, each en
prising, a two-part head adapted to surround
gine
connected part comprising less than half
an engine mounting member, opposed compres 50
of the complemental structure surrounding the
sive and resilient pads within said head, means
ring portions, whereby the engine with its con
forcing said pads against said member, damper
_ nectcd head parts and the pads carried thereby
members movably mounted within said head be
can be moved axially with respect to said ,ring
tween said compressive pads,‘and spring means
mounted in said head forcing said damper mem 55 into mounted position on the latter, and means
for clamping said complemental parts together
bers frictionally against oppositely disposed por
to compress said pads against opposite surfaces
Lions of said mounting member.
'
10. A resilient engine mount for aircraft com
prising a two-part head adapted to surround a
of said ring. .
14. In a ?exible mount for an aircraft engine,
portion of an engine mounting member, opposed 60 a plurality of head members rigidly attached to
said engine for vibratory movement therewith,
compressive and resilient pads within said head,
means forcing said pads against said member, » an engine supporting structure extending
through said headmembers and spacedthere
opposed damper members movably mounted.
from to form an annular channel between each
within said head and disposed between said com
pressive pads, a spring member partially sur 65 of said heads and said, structure, and a pair of
arcuate segments of resilient material in each of
rounding ‘each of said heads and connected to
said channels, said segments having their inner
and forcing said-damper members frictionally
surfaces ?xed relative to said structure and hav
against said monuting member, and struts ex
ing their outerv surfaces ?xed relative to said
tending from said head and adapted to be at
‘ heads, respectively, said pairs of segments hav
tached at their opposite ends to said engine.
70 ing converging compressive axes, the segments
11. In a, mounting for an aircrait engine, a
fuselage mounting ring, a plurality /of two-part
heads spaced circumferentially of said ring and
each‘ surrounding a circumferential portion ,of
of each pair having gaps therebetween located
tively.
(RANSOM S. THOMPSON.
on lines normal to said compressive axes, respec
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