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Патент USA US2412071

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Dec- 3, 1945-
A
D. F. WARNER EI'AL
‘ 2,412,071
CABIN SUPERCHAKGING MEANS HAVING AUTOMATIC PRESSURE
AND TEMPERATURE CONTROL MEANS
Filed July 22, 1944
/
‘Fi 3.1’.
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52 Sheets-Sheet 1
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26'
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066"
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‘Inventor-5:’
Donald F: Warner,
Earl L. Auger‘,
My 61/
Their- Attorney.
2,412,071
. 3, 1946.
. D. F. WARNER ET AL
CABIN SUPERCHARGING MEANS HAVING AUTOMATIC PRESSURE
AND TEMPERATURE CONTROL MEANS '
Filed July 22, 1944
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Donald F Warner‘,
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Auger,
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Their- AttorT-‘leg
Patented Dec. 3, 1946
* 2,412,071
UNITED ‘STATES? PATENT oer-"ice ?
2,412,071
CABIN SUPERCHARGING MEANS HAVING
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE AND TEMPERA
' TURE CONTROL MEAN S-
-
Donald Fl Warner and Earl L. Auyer, Swamp
scott, Mass., assignors to-General Electric Com
pany, a corporation of New York
Application July 22, 1944, Serial _No. 546,717
,~ 13>Claims. (CI. 98-15)
.
1
-
e
The present invention relates to cabin super
and has for its- object to provide an improved
system for supplying supercharged air to a cabin
and regulating its pressure, temperature and rate
_
For a consideration of what we believe to be
novel and our invention, attention is directed to
the following speci?cation and to the claims ap
pended thereto.
.
10 On one end, it is provided with a bevel gear l6
In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a side view of a cabin
supercharger structure embodying our invention,
it being shown attached to a cabin wall of an
aircraft cabin; Fig. 2 ‘is a diagrammatic view
illustrating our system; Fig. 3 is a perspective
exploded view of a portion of the structure shown
in Fig. l, and Fig. 4 is a detail view of a modi?ca
tion.
'
2.
type and may utilize air from the slip stream of
the aircraft for cooling medium. It is shown
diagrammatically as comprising cooling tubes
through which the air ?ows to the cabin and over
which the slipstream air ?ows. Air?ow from ‘the
mixing chamber through conduits II and I2 is'
apportioned between them by a flap valve I4 car
ried by apshaft I5 pivoted in walls of ‘easing 2.
charger systems such as are used on aircraft
of ?ow.
_
duit l2 to the cabin. It may be of any suitable
'
Referring to the drawings, I indicates the cabin
of an aircraft which is to be supercharged, ven
tilated and heated. As shown in Fig. 1, our im
proved mechanism comprises a unitary structure
which‘meshes with a bevel gear I‘! on‘ the shaft
of a reversing electric motor l8, the two ?eld _
windings of which are indicated at l9 and 20.
Motor I8 is carried by a suitable bracket depend
ing from and securedv to housing 2 as ‘shown
clearly in Figs. 1 and 3.
‘
,
.
'
Air?ow through conduit 6 ‘is controlled by a
rotary valve 2| mounted in a casing 22. Valve 2|
rotates in a counterclockwise direction as indi- ‘
cated by the arrow in Fig. 2 and the arrange
ment is such that it must rotate through .a pre
determined angle before it starts to open. It is
‘mounted on a shaft 23 pivoted in walls of con
which is bolted directly to a wall of the cabin
duits'B and ‘I. Also, in conduit 6 beyond valve
as a unit. It comprises a rectangular casing'2
2| as regards the ?ow of .air through conduit
which forms a mixing chamber, is'open at its
‘ 6 is a valve 24 which is manually operated,'it
‘two ends and is provided with end bolting ?anges
being normally in open position, as shown in Fig.
3 and 4. Attached to bolting ?ange 3 is an end
2. The arrangement is such that it may be oper
wall 5 formed integral with the adjacent ends
‘ ated from within the cabin. To this end, it may
of two conduits 6 and 1 which at their other ends 30 be connected by suitable links and levers 25, as
are integral with a second end wall 8. Attached
indicated particularly in Fig. 1, tov an- operating
to end Wall 8 and communicating with conduit
rod 26 which terminates at a suitable point with
6 is a "pipe line 9 which leads from a'source
' in the cabin.
of hot pressurized or supercharged air. For ex
Flow of air through conduit 1 is controlled by
ample, it may be a branch pipe line connected
two'valves
21 and 28. Valve 21 is mounted on
35
with the discharge side of the compressor of a
shaft 23 so that it rotatesi in unison with valve
turbosupercharger or of a gas turbine power
2|. The shaft 23 is provided on its outer end
plant. Thus there is supplied through pipe 9
with
da gear 29 which meshes with _a gear 38
air of a temperature and pressure both higher
mounted on the shaft 3| ‘of a reversing electric
than that desired for the cabin. Attached to end
wall 8 and communicating with conduit 'Iis a 40 motor 32, the ?elds of which are indicated at 33
and 34. Valve 28 is mounted on a shaft 35 piv-‘ ‘
pipe line 10 which terminates in an open end
oted in the wall of conduit 1. On its outer end,
facing into the aircraft slip stream or communi
it is provided with an arm 36 connected by a link _
' cates with a plenum chamber having an open
ing facing into the slip stream. Thus there‘is 45 31 to an arm 38 fixed on shaft l5. Thus, it will
be seen that valves l4 and 28 are both con
' supplied through pipe line I0 to conduit 1 rammed
nected to motor [8 and are operated by it.
atmospheric air, the pressure and temperature
‘The reversing ?elds 33 and 34 of motor 32 are
of which may vary widely with the speed and alti
connected‘ through limit switches 39 and 48 to
tude of the aircraft.
'
the stationary contacts 4| and 42 of a vacuum
Connected to bolting ?ange 4 are walls which 50 switch 43. The movable contact '44 of vacuum
de?ne two conduits H and i2 which at one end
switch 43, which is pivoted in the end wall of the
communicate with the mixing chamber of casing
vacuum‘switch,
is connected at its outer end to a
2 and at the other end are connected to the
lever '45 carried by a pivot‘ pin 45 ‘mounted in
‘cabin.
They serve toj convey air from the mix-' I
ing chamber to the cabin.
a casing 41. Mounted on a wall of casing 41 on
In- conduit I2 is a‘ 55 opposite sides of pivot pin 46 are two corrugated \ -
cooler l3 for cooling the air ?owing through con
V
7
2,412,071
bellows 48 and 49. The movable end of bellows ;
48 is pivotally connected to lever 45 as is indi
cated at 58 (see Fig. 3). Its interioris con
nected by a pipe 5| to the mixing chamber formed
by easing 2. Thus, bellows 48 is subjected on
4
18 to atmosphere. For use in effecting flow of
air from the cabin to atmosphere under certain
operating conditions, there is provided an ejector
which utilizes as operating ?uid supercharged air
' its interior to the pressure in the mixing chamber '
_ taken preferably from conduit 8 in advance of
. valve 2|. To this end, there are provided in con
which pressure is used as a measure of the pres
" nection with the outer of the walls 11, walls 19
sure in the cabin. Bellows 49 is evacuated and
- which de?ne a pressure air chamber 88.
is provided on its interior with a spring 52 which ‘
Air
chamber 88 is connected by a pipe 8| to conduit 8
acts normally in a direction to distend the bel 10 in advance of valve_2|.v Connected with cham- ‘
lows. Bellows 49 and spring 52 have a charac-V/
ber 88 is a discharge nozzle 82 which'projects
teristic such that below a certain altitude the
across air chamber 16 and terminates at the
movable end of the bellows is not in engagement
throat of discharge nozzle 18 to form with the
with lever 45, ‘but after reaching a certain alti
discharge nozzle an ejector of known construc
tude the movable end engages lever 45 and is
tion. Flow of air from chamber 88 to discharge
adapted to eifect movement of the lever. Bellows
nozzle 82 is controlled by a sliding valve 83 which
48. and 49 are both subjected on their outsides
controls ports 84 located in a cylinder 85 which
to ambient pressure. Bellows 48 and 49 form
extends across chambe'r80. Valve 83 isprovided
means ‘responsive to the pressure in the cabin
with a stem 86 which projects out through wall"
which means. controls motorv 32 to effect adjust 20 19 and is connected to the movable end of- a cor
ment of valves 2| and 21. On motor shaft 3| is
rugated bellows 81 supported in a housing cap 88.
an arm .53 which operates the limit-switches 39
Corrugated bellows 81 is evacuated and is pro
and 48. To give width of regulation-to bellows
vided on its inside with a compression spring 89
48 and 49 so as to obtain stable .operation of
which acts in a direction to distend the bellows.
the control mechanism, there is provided a spring 25 The interior of cap 88 is‘ connected to atmosphere
54 which at one end is connected to lever 45 and
through one or more openings 90. Thus, corm
at the other end is connected to an arm 55 piv
gated bellows 18 is subjected onits outside to
oted' on a ?xed support58 and having its other
ambient ‘pressure and, as the ambient pressure
' end provided with a notch which engages a pin
decreases, sliding valve 83 is moved toward a po- _
51 carried by gear 30. Thus turning of gear 38 30 sition wherein it covers ports 84. When ports 84
to adjust valves 2| and 21 serves also to adjust
are covered, ?ow of supercharged air to the
the tension of spring 54. At 58 and 59 (see Fig.
ejector nozzle 82 is cut off, thus putting the
.3) are adjustable stops for limiting turning move- _
,ment of lever 45.
ejector out of operation.
'
'
Over the discharge end of conduit 1 is a ?ap \
The ?elds l9 and 28 of motor |8 are connected 35 valve 9| pivoted on a pin 92 and biased toward
through limit switches 68 and GI and relays 62v
and 63 .to the ?xed contacts 64 and 85 of a tem
perature responsive device located in the cabin
closed position by its weight and by a spring 93
(Fig. 3). It serves to prevent back ?ow of air
through'conduit '|.
'
and responsive to the temperature therein. In
Referring to Fig. 1, it will be seen that motor ‘
the present instant, the temperature responsive 40 32 is fastened to the sides of conduits 6 and '| by
device is shown as being in the ‘form of a bi-metal
suitable straps 94 and that casing 41 which
strip 88 ?xed at one end 61 and provided with a
contact 68 at its other end adapted to engage
?xed ‘contacts 84 and 65. Connected with link 31
is a pivoted arm 69 which functions to operate
the limit switches 60 and GI. Arm 69 is pivoted
houses bellows 48 and 49 and associated parts
likewise is fastened on the sides of these con
on a ?xed support as indicated at 18 and is con
Rheostat l3 iscarried by a bracket 95
Thus the entire mechanism
is a unitary structure which is attached to the
cabin well through the intermediary of the three
nected to link 31 by a suitable pivotal connection
as indicated at ‘H (see Fig. 3). To give width of
regulation to the temperature responsive device
conduits ||, l2 and 15.
In Fig. 2 of the drawings, the various parts are
shown in the positions they might occupy with
so as to eifect‘stable operation, there is provided
in connection with ‘it an electromagnet 12 the
the aircraft on the ground and the ejector not
armature of which is attached to bi-metal strip
66. The Winding of electromagnet '|2 isin cir
duits.
'- attached to flange 5.
operating, the cabin being open to atmosphere
Valves 2|, 2'! and 91 are shown
‘ ‘for example.
closed and valves l4 and 28 are shown in positions
cuit with a rheostat 13, the operating arm 14 of '
they might occupy at some certain temperature
which is attached to shaft 35. Operating arm 14
is moved along with valves l4 and 28 to vary the
amount of resistance in circuit with the winding
of electromagnet ‘l2 asthe valves are adjusted,
sealed and the ejector is put into operation, the
ejector will function to partially open valves 21
and 9| and effect flow of air through the cabin
thus varying the strength of the electromagnet
and hence its effect on the thermostatic bimetal
strip.
‘
Flow of air from the cabin is through a conduit
_ 15 which leads to an air chamber 18 formed by
in the cabin.
However, as soon as the cabin is
_for ventilating the cabin while the aircraft is on -
the ground, is taxiing, or is at low altitude, as‘
will be clear from the following description.
,
As soon as the cabin is sealed and air supplied
to the ejector, the ejector functions to‘ pump‘ air
walls 11 which in turn are bolted to the side of
" from the cabin thus lowering the pressure in the
casing 2 and form a part of one side wall thereof.
Projecting from the one wall ‘I1 is a discharge
nozzle 18 which extends across the mixing cham
cabin which'means that the pressure supplied to
the interior of bellows 48 is decreased. At this
time, sliding valve 83 is open and since the air
craft power plant. is operating, compressed air
is supplied to the ejector.
‘
‘Decrease of the pressure in bellows 48 will ef
fect movement of lever 45 to bring the movable
contact 44 of vacuum switch 43 into engagement‘
with'?xed contact 4|, thus closing a circuit on
ber formed by easing 2 and projects out beyond
casing 2 to communicate with atmosphere. This
is best shown in Fig. 3. In the diagrammatic
showing in Fig. ‘2, these ports are shown sepa~
.rated from Casing 2 for purposes of illustration.
Thus air from the cabin 'may ?ow through con
duit 15 to chamber 18 and thence through nozzle 75 ?eld 33 of motor 32, effecting operation of the
_ 2,412,071
i
‘
5
effect stable operation. ' When the valves H and
motor in a direction to move valves2| and'21 '
- 28 are moved in one direction or the .other, the
toward open positions. The valves 2| and 21 will
assume positions such that there is supplied
through conduit 1 or through conduits 8 and 1
air of a pressure to restore lever 45 to its position
of equilibrium wherein movable contact 44 stands
amount of resistance in series with the'winding
of electromagnet 12 is increased or decreased,
thus varying its‘ effect on the thermostatic ele
ment. This is a known arrangemena It forms
no part of our present invention. Any suitable
between ?x'ed contacts “and 42. Depending on
- arrangement for giving droop to the thermostatic
operating conditions, this may boa-position in
regulator to effect stable operation may be uti
which valve 2| is still closed and 'valve 21 is partly
open or one in which both valves 2| and 21 are 10
partly open. The pressure of the air ?owing in
conduit ‘I will be su?icient to hold valve 8| open.
lized.
'
'
In connection with the operation at lower alti
tudes, the supercharged air supplied through con
duit 8, in a case where the air is being supplied
of the valves 2| and 21, the tension of spring 54 ' from the discharge side of the compressor of a .
is adjusted to increase its pull on lever 45 which 15 gas turbine power plant, may have a tempera
ture of the order of 250° F. and a pressure of
means that to restore lever 45 to a position
1 the order of 60 pounds per square inch absolute.
wherein movable contact 44 is moved out of en
And the air supplied through conduit I0 may
gagement with ?xed contact 4|, the pressure in
have a‘pressure a few pounds higher than at- '
the cabin, i. e., in' bellows 48', need not be re
stored to its former value but tow-a value some 20 mospheric pressure and a temperature substan
tially equal to'ambient temperature. In the cab.
what less‘ than its former value. Thus, there is
in, it may be desired to hold a. pressure equal to
introduced into the control a droop to give sta
ambient pressure less a predetermined amount
bility of operation. This condition of voperation
‘up to a certain altitude after which it may be
will obtain while the aircraft is on the ground
desirable to hold a pressure for each altitude a
and is taxiing, thus insuring ventilation of the
When gear wheel 30 moves to effect movement _
cabin at these times.
predetermined amount higher than ambient pres- ,
'
sure. As to temperature, it may be desirable to
decrease the cabin temperature with increase in
Now when the aircraft gets under way and
.gains altitude, the pressure responsive device will .
altitude. The desired results may be obtained
operate after the manner described to adjust
valves 21 and 2| to maintain the desired cabin 30 by selecting suitable ‘characteristics for the con
trol members.
_
'
pressure. After the aircraft gets under way,
At lower altitudes, and as long as flap valve 8|
rimmed air becomes available through conduit
is open, the temperature control is effected pri
marily due to the adjustment of valve 28. At
The temperature responsive device in the cabin
operates to position valves l4 and 28 to effect ' lower altitudes, the cooler I3 has but limited ef
fect on the temperature of the air ?owing through
regulation of the cabin temperature. Valve 28
it so that the exact position of valve l4 and the
affects the rateof ?ow of air through conduit 1.
division of the air between the two conduits -II
If the temperature is too low in the cabin, ther
' mostatic member 56 willbe moved to engage con
'tact 65 to effect operation of motor I8 to move
valve 28 toward closed position to reduce the ?ow
through conduit 1 and to move valve l4 down
ward (as- shown in Fig. 2)' to decrease the ?ow
through conduit l2 and cooler l3 and increase the
flow through conduit ||. Decreasing the ?ow
through conduit ‘I by closing valve 28 somewhat
serves to reduce the pressure in mixing chamber
and I2 is not of major importance.
40
2 and such reduction in pressure serves to effect -
‘
As the aircraft ascends, an altitude is reached
at which flap valve 9| is closed, the cold rammed
air having no longer su?lcient pressure tohold
it open. ‘When this occurs, all the air for super
charging the cabin is supplied through conduit
9 from the hot supercharged air supply. With
?ap valve 9| closed, valves 21 and 28in conduit
1 no longer have any effect on the air ?ow. The
pressure and temperature of the air is then con
' trolled by the two valves 2| and HI, valve2|
operating to increase and decrease the supply
adjustment of valves 2| and 21 in the manner
already explained ‘in an opening direction. Thus,
valve 2| is opened to admit a greater amount of. , of supercharged air to the mixing chamber and
valve |4 operating to effect a division of air be
hot air to increase the temperature. ___At the same
tween the two conduits H and I2 sot'that the air
. time, the pressure in mixing chamber 2 is re
supplied to the cabin will have the desired
stored. If the temperature in the cabin is too
temperature. At these higher altitudes,‘ the am
high, thermostatic member 86 engages ?xed con
bient temperature is lower and therefore cooler
tact 64' to effect operation of motor l8 and the
|3 has a greater effect on the temperature of the
adjustment of valves l4 and 28 in the opposite
directions. This then results in an increase in ‘ air ?owing through it.
At-lower altitudes, the; difference in pressure ‘
pressure in mixing chamber 2 which in turn efbetween
the-inside and outside of the cabin is
til
fects a readjustment of valves 2| and 21 in the
opposite direction to decrease the pressure and
hence decrease the temperature.
,
.
There results that for any altitude, valves 2|
relatively small so that‘ the ejector is'needed to
effect circulation of air through the cabin. Howe
ever, as the altitude increases, the‘di?erence in
pressure between the inside and outside of the
to supply tothe cabin air of the desired pressure 05 cabin increases‘ so that less and less ejector ‘ac
tion is needed to effect circulation through the
and temperature and such pressure. and.tem
- and 21 and valves l4 and 28\become positioned
perature will be held by readjustment of the
valves. It will be understood that if the pressure
in the mixing chamber decreases, an operation
similar to that already described in connection,"
with an increase in pressure will effect opera
tion of motor 32 in a direction to move valves 2| ,
and 21 toward open positions.
13 is to give a droop- .
- cabin.
The function of valve 83 is to begin to
decrease the ejector action after a predetermined
altitude is reached and ?nally at some altitude
cut the ejector o?altogethe'r. The bellows 81
connected to ejector valve 83 and its spring 89 .
have characteristics such that after a predeter
mined altitude is reached, the bellows begins to
disténd; due to decrease in ambient pressure, thus
The function of resistance
moving valve 83 toward closed position." The
ing characteristic to the thermostatic control to 75
2,412,071
7
8
valve is moved gradually toward closed position‘
the other end by a link L05 to the temperature
, with increase‘ in altitude and eventually at some
control mechanism.
desiredaltitude, the valve is entirely closed thus
shutting oftthe ejector. The circulation of air
through the cabinis now effected by the ?ow of
airthrough conduit ‘15 and nozzle 18 due to dif-'
ierence in'pressure between the inside and out
side of the cabin.
,
,
In accordance with the provisions of the pat
ent statutes, We have described the principle of
operation of our invention, together with the
apparatus which we now consider to represent
the best embodiment thereof, but we desire to
have it understood that the apparatus shown is
only illustrative and that the invention may be
Nozzle 18 may have the ca
pacity and be so designed ‘thatfor the intended ‘
altitudes, the How through the cabin after the 10 carried out by other means.
’
ejector is shut oil will be satlsfactory'for venti
What we claim as new and desire to secure by
lating purposes and at the highest altitude will
Letters Patent of the United States, is:
not be excessive. Also, the ~ejector functions to
1. In a cabin-superchargersystem, the com
ventilate the cabin while the aircraft is on the
bination of an air mixing chamber, a ?rst'dis
ground, particularly while taxiing, since at this 15' charge conduit connecting the mixing chamber
time sui?cient air from the propeller slip stream
to the cabin, a second discharge conduit connect
is not available. While I now prefer to utilize - ing the, mixing chamber to the cabin, an air
an ejector as described, it will be understood that
cooler in the second conduit, valve means‘ for ap
if desirable an ejector-may be omitted. ~
portioning flow of air from the mixing chamber
It will be noted that the cabin discharge noz v20 to said two conduits, a ?rst supply conduit for
'zle 18 extends ‘across the mixing chamber 2 so
that it is surrounded by warm air. This serves
supplying hot supercharged air to the mixing
chamber, a second supply conduit for supplying
to prevent frosting of ‘the nozzle.
.
rammed air to the mixing chamber,- a valve in
As stated above, the pressure and temperature
each supply conduit, means responsive to cabin
control devices may be selected and adjusted to 25 pressure for adjusting said two valves, a second
have characteristics such that they maintain the
valve in said second supply conduit, and means
desired cabin pressures and temperatures for the
responsive to cabin temperature for adjusting said
altitude range ‘of the aircraft. In the case of
secondvalve and said valve means.
the pressure control device, at lower altitudes
2. In a cabin supercharger system, the com
the control is effected by bellows 48 alone or 30 bination of an air mixing chamber, a ?rst dis
modi?ed by spring 54. At a predetermined alti
charge conduit connecting the -mixing chamber
tude, ambient pressure reaches a low- value such
to the cabin, a second/discharge conduit connect
that bellows 49 distends to a point where its mov
ing the mixing chamber to the cabin, an air cooler
able end engages lever 45. It then serves to af
in the second conduit, valve means vfor apportion
fect the control device by an amount dependent
ing ?ow of air from the mixing chamber to said
upon the altitude, the'force acting on lever 45
two conduits, a ?rst supply conduit for supply
being that of bellows 48 as modi?ed by spring
ing hot supercharged air to the mixing chamber,
, 54 and bellows 49.
By way of example, but not
a second supply conduit for supplying rammed air '
by way of limitation of our invention, the pres
sure control device may have characteristics such
that after takeo? and below an altitude of about
15,000 feet; the regulator will maintain the cabin
pressure at one-fourth to three-fourths pounds,
per square inchabove ambient pressure; and
to the mixing chamber, a valve in each supply
conduit, means responsive'to cabin pressure for
adjusting said two valves, the valve in said sec
ond supply conduit being partly opened in ad
vance of the valve in said first supply conduit,
cabin temperature responsive means, and means
above 15,000 feet altitude, at which time bel 45 including said valve means adjusted by said tem
lows 49 may come into action, the regulator will
perature responsive means to regulate the tem
perature in the cabin.
maintain the cabin pressure at one-half ambient
pressure plus 5' pounds. This means a continu
3. In a cabin supercharger system, the com
ously decreasing cabin pressure with increase in
bination of a mixing‘ chamber, a pipe for convey
altitude. However, if desired, constant or sub 50 ing air from the mixing chamber to the cabin,
stantially constant cabin pressure may bemain
a ?rst conduit for supplying hot pressurized air
to the‘ mixing chamber, a second conduit for sup
tained.
‘
.
Suitable manual means may be provided for
adjusting the setting of the thermostat as is well
understood.
'
-
plying rammed air to-the mixing chamber, valve
- means for regulating the ?ow through the sec
55 ond conduit, means responsive to cabin pressure
Valve 24 is in the nature of an emergency valve
which may be closed to shut off all hot air, a
_ thing which, at higher altitudes when ?ap valve
and to cabin temperature‘ for positioning said
valve means, other valvemeans for regulating
the ?ow through the ?rst conduit and means re
BI is ,closed, would put the entire system out of
operation.
Its operating means 25 may bev lo
cated at any suitable point where itvis readily
sponsive to cabin pressure for positioning said
60
other valve means.
,
.
'
‘
4. In a, c..'oin supercharger system, the com
bination of a mixing chamber, a ?rst pipe for con
' veying air from the mixing chamber to the cabin,
accessible to the‘ aircraft operator.
‘Referring to valves 21 and 28 which control
"flow through conduit 1, it will be seen that they
a second pipe for conveying air from the mixing
vmutually cooperate in regulating such flow and 65 chamber to the cabin, a heat exchanger in one
in substance form a single valve means positioned
by cabin pressure and temperature. If found
desirable, a single valve may be used instead of
the two valves 2‘! and". Such a modi?cation
is shown in Fig. 4 wherein I00 indicates acon
duit corresponding to conduit ‘I of Figs. 1 to 3
in which is located a single valve |0l connected
by a link I02 to an intermediate point of a ?oat
of ‘ said. pipes, valve means in the mixing cham
ber for apportioning ?ow of air from the mix
ing chamber through said two pipes to the cabin, '
a ?rst conduit for supplying hotpressurized air, to
70 the mixing chamber, a second conduit for sup
plying rammed air‘ to the mixingchamber, valve
means in said conduits, means-responsive to cabin
pressure for positioning the valve means in said
ing lever I03 one end of which is connected by a ‘ ?rst conduit, and means responsive to cabin tem
link I04 to the pressure control mechanism and 75 perature for positioning the valve means in saidv ‘
2,412,971
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9
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’ by cabin temperature for regulating the cool- '
ing e?ect of said cooling means on the air ?owing
through said conduit means to the cabin.
10. In ‘a cabin supercharger system, a sealed
second conduit and the valve means in the mix
ing chamber.
_
,
5. In a cabin supercharger system,»the ,com
bination of a mixing chamber, ‘a, ?rst pipe for
conveying air from the mixing chamber to the
cabin, a second pipe for conveying air from the
mixing chamber to the cabin, a heat exchanger
cabin, a mixing chamber, ?rst conduit means
including air cooling means, for conveying air
from the mixing chamber to the cabin, second
conduit'means for conveying hotsupercharged air
in one or said pipes, valve means in the mixing
~ chamber for apportioning ?ow of air from the
to said mixing chamber, third conduit means for
cabin, a ?rst conduit for supplying hot pressurized
automatic’ valve means associated with said sec
mixing chamber through said two pipes to the 10 conveying rammed air to said mixing chamber,
ond and third conduit means and ‘actuated by a ' _
air to the mixing chamber, a second conduit for
device responsive to cabin pressure for modiiy- ..
- ing the ?ow to the mixing chamberot both super
, means responsive to cabin-pressure for position- 15 charged air and rammed air, and automatic
valve means associated withsaid ?rst and third ‘
ing said last-named valve means, means respon
supplying rammed air to the mixing chamber,
valve means in said‘?rst and second conduits,
conduit means and actuated by a device respon
sive' to cabin temperature for modifying the ?ow.
sive to cabin temperature for positioning both
the valve means in said second conduit and said
valve .rneans in the mixing chamber, and a check
. oi rammed air to the mixing chamber and regu
the cooling e?ect of said cooling means on
valve for preventing back ?ow through said 20 lating
the air ?owing through said ?rst named conduit
rammed air supply conduit._
6. In a cabin supercharger system, _ a sealed
means.
-'
»
-
.
11. In. a cabin supercharger system, a sealed
cabin,- means for supplying supercharged air to
the cabin, means responsive to cabin pressure and
cabin, a mixing chamber, conduits for supplying
to cabin temperature ‘for regulating said air sup
plying means, a conduit communicating with the
cabin, an ejector in said conduit for eiiecting flow
of air through ‘said sealed cabin, a conduit for
supplying supercharged air from the ‘supply
said mixing chamber, conduit means for convey
ing air from the mixing chamber to the cabin,
cabin pressure and cabin temperature responsive
means to: regulating the air ?ow in said conduits,
‘ means to the ejector for the actuation
air of diiierent ' pressures and ‘ temperatures to
and means ‘for discharging air from the cabin
thereoi so including
a nozzle arranged in heat exchange re
and means associated with said last-named con
lation with the mixing chamber so as to prevent
‘
ting o? the supply of supercharged air to said _ frosting oi the nozzle.
12. In a cabin supercharger system, a sealed
ejector when a predetermined altitude is reached.
7. In a cabin supercharger system, a sealed 35 cabin, a mixing chamber, conduits for supply
ing air of di?erent pressures and temperatures
cabin, means for supplying supercharged air to
to said mixing chamber, conduit means for con
the cabin, means responsive to cabin pressure
veying air rrom the mixing chamber to thecabin,
' duit and responsive to altitude pressure for shut
and to cabin temperature .for regulating said -
cabin pressure and cabin temperature respon
air supplying means, a ‘conduit communicating
sive
means for regulating‘ the air flow in said
with the cabin, an ejector in said conduit for ei 40
_ conduits, means for dischargingair from the
‘ tecting ?ow of air through said sealed Tcabin, a
cabin including a nozzle arranged in heat e'x-,
conduit for supplying supercharged air from the
change relation with the mixing chamber so as
supply means to the ejector for theactuation
to prevent frosting oi the nozzle, and ejector
thereof, and means associated with said last
named conduit and responsive to altitude’ pres - means-tor e?ecting ?ow oi.’ air through the cabin
and out said discharge nozzl .
sure for gradually shutting oi! the supply of
supercharged air to said ejector.
.
13..In a cabin supercharging system, a sealed
v
cabin, a mixing ‘chamber, a source of hot super
8. In a cabin supercharger system,- conduit
a
means includirm air cooling means and a' mixing -‘ charged air, ?rst conduit means connecting the
chamber for conveying air to the cabin, a pipe 50 hot air source to the mixing chamber, a source
of cold rammed air, second conduit means con
‘for supplying hot supercharged air to the mixing
necting thecold air source to the mixing cham
I chamber, a pipe for supplying rammed air .to the
ber, third conduitmeans connecting the‘mixing
mixing chamber, valve means in said pipes, means
chamber to the. cabin and including .air cooling
responsive to cabin pressure for positioning said'
valve means, and means responsive to cabin tem
perature for regulating the cooling e?ect of said
55
air cooling means on the air ?owing to the cabin.
9. In a cabin supercharger system, a ‘sealed
cabin, a mixing chamber, conduit means inolud»
‘ing air cooling means for conveying air from the‘ so
mixing chamber to the cabin, a ?rst pipe for con
veying hot supercharged air to the mixing cham
diet‘, a second pipe for conveying rammed air 'to
the mixing chamber, valve means in said pipes,
means, a‘ ?rst control mechanism responsive to
cabin pressure, a second control mechanism re-‘
sponsive .tolcabin temperature, valve means asso
ciated with said ?rst conduit means and posi
tioned by said ?rst control mechanism for regu
lating the now of pressurized air, valve means
associated with said second conduitvmeans' and
positioned by said second control mechanism ior
regulating the ?ow of cold air to the mixins
chamber, and third. ‘v ‘ve means positioned by
‘an actuating device “1' said "1“- meal'ns cm‘ ii?v’said second control mechanism for regulating the
- trolled by-cabin pressure, other valve means in :3 wcoolmgmem_
said second pipe, an actuating device for said J}
other valve means controlled by cabin tempera- “
ture, and condition-responsive means controlled -
norms) r. WARNER.
_ near. 1.. AUYER.
'
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