close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2412869

код для вставки
me@ §17, ma
C. R. FSUHNS
WAR? KNITAFABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING~THE SAME
Original .Filed Jan. 15, 1941
.
N ,
.
a
a
n
~
.
¢
n
.
a~
I
.
.
5
A’.
JUA/3 J0
„s
'
nl V
«
f
4
BY
13d@
l
Patented Dec. 17, 1946
2,412,869
UNITED STATES PATEN T _o1-‘FICE
2,412,869
WARP KNIT FABRIC AND METHOD 0F
‘
MAKING THE SAME ’
Charles R. Burns, West Reading, Pa., assignor to
Vanity Fair Mills, Inc., Reading, Pa., a corpora
tion of Pennsylvania
Original application January
1941, Serial No.,
374,219. Divided and this 13,
application August
26, 1944, Serial No. 551,305
6 Claims. (Cl. (i6-192)
The .present invention relates to warp knit fab
ric and the method of making the same, and has
for `its basic object the provision of stretchable
bar and the front lguide bar. The needle ïbar
warp knit fabric possessing a greater amount of
snap than is usually `present in known fabrics of
number according to the gauge, and `each guide
this kind, and this application is a division of
my application Serial No. 374,219 for Letters Pat
bar has a bank of yarn guides corresponding to
the number of needles in the needle bar. The
ent No. 2,356,819.
guide bars are slidable in reverse
guide bars respectivelyknown _as the back guide
is provided with a bank of needles which vary in
`
ì
directions longi->
tudinally of the needle bar, each guide bar >being
,
‘The invention more particularly contemplates
the provision of a stretchable warp knit fabric 10 controlled by individual cam or f cams.< Both
guide bars, moreover, are swingable transversely
produceable on a usual warp knitting `machine
of the needle bar.
'
`
‘
of the type commonly known as tricot ma
Also, in accordance _with the present invention,
chines; the machine, however, being operated
according to an improved method in order to
every other yarn guide of the back guide bar_i‘s
mal intended `and original form.
inelastic yarns as there are elastic yarns.
produce a fab-ric of usual knit construction which 15 threaded with a warp yarn (preferably‘an elastic
yarn), ,and every yarn guide of the front guide
imparts to said >fabric an increased .ability to
bar is threaded with a warp yarn (preferably `an
stretch and, at ‘the same time, supply the fabric
inelastic‘yarn). Thus there are twice as many
with an inherent ability to snap back to its nor
.
ì It is one of the most important features of the 20
According to one aspectof the invention, the
back andfront guide bars respectively slide longif
the yarns `are so laid as to acquire a particular
tudinally of the needle bar, at times in the same
direction, and at other timesV in the opposite direc,
invention to provide a warp knit fabric wherein
characteristic formation which gives the fabric
an extraordinary degree of stretchabilìty and
tion, `but the sliding motion of one guide bar
snap.
VAnother important feature of the invention is
found in the fprovision of a warp knit fabric
25
of the other guide bar (specifically, the front
guide bar) occurs either in front; of or in back
of the needles. 011V@ guide bar, thatis, the back
wherein‘certain yarns are kso related with cer
tain other yarnsas to assumea zig-zag or accor
dion formation, whereby said fabric, by reason
of the zig-zag or raccordion formation of said
(specifically, the back 4guide bar) occurs only in
front of the needles, whereas the sliding motion
30
guide bar, has a sliding motion longitudinally of
the needle bar a certain number of needles at a
timeV for the distance of .la predetermined?xed
certain yarns, ‘inherently and constructionally
_acquiresan extraordinary degree of elasticity.
,Among‘speciiic objects of the invention is'the
number of needles in onedirection and for the
distance of >a predetermined iixed number of
needles in the other direction, and >the other »
provision „of-a fabric knitted in tricot fashion
guide bar, that is, the front guide‘bar, has a
sliding vmotion longitudinally of the needle bar _a
certain number of needles at a'time for 'the dis,
from a set of inelastic yarnsrand a set of elastic
yarns, the inelastic yarns being knitted into a
base fabric and the elastic yarns being laid in
zig-zag direction and tied within said fabric in
tance> of a predetermined variable number A’of
such ‘a mannervas to produce a finished fabric 40 needles in one direction and forthe distance of
a predetermined variable number of needles "in
of uniform surface `by preventing said elastic
the other direction.
yarns from crawling or creeping which is known
to be" Oilé‘of the primaryoauses of the produc
tion »of` Íal wrinkled effect in such fabrics.
`The invention .is specifically characterized in
that‘it results in the `production of fabric pos
sessingagreat manydesirable advantageous fea
tures such as strength, ,elastic stretchability, and
distinctive surface appearance.
`
`
Thusyto give a specific example: Eachyarn in
the back guide bar laps over rfour needles, one
45
needle at a time, and then drops back `over four
needles, one needle at a time, whereas` eaeh
yarn in the front guide bar laps over'` one needle,
under one needle, and drops back over one needle,
under o_ne needle, and then laps over two needles,l
under one needle,` this relative lapping and drop
Other important objects, features, and advan 50
ping baek of yarns in the `rear and >front guide
tages of --the invention will bein part obvious and
in part pointed out hereinafter.
i
`The 4improved fabric, in accordance with -the
invention,.isñmade on a tricot warp‘knitting
bars being repeated throughout the length of the
fabric.
.
,
As a result of this particular procedure, „there
machine employing a needle bar and two yarn 55 is produced a Warp knit fabric consisting ‘of
courses knitted from the yarns in front of ‘the
2,412,869
3
.
guide bar, certain spaced courses being formed
of non-reversing closed stitches on which the
4
is moved to the right over one needle, under
one needle, so that the yarn is wrapped around
the needle as shown at 23 in Figure 3, forming
yarns in the rear guide bar are hung. Further,
a- reversing closed stitch as shown at 25 (Figure
the particular procedure results in that the yarns
4). Then the inelastic yarn is moved to the
in the rear guide bar are laid in zig-zag or
left over gone needle, under oneneedle, so that
accordionelike _fashion so that said yarns, upon
the yarn is wrapped about the needle as shown
being relieved of the tension under which~ they
at 21 (Figure 3) forming a reversing closed
are laid, tend to straighten out, causing the.
stitch shown at 29 (Figure 4). Thereafter, the
loops of the courses knitted from the yarns in lo inelastic. yarn is moved again to the right over
the front guide bar to gather, accordingly pro
>two needles, under one needle, so that the yarn
ducing a fabric having an increased ability to
is wrapped about the needle as shown at 3I
stretch and snap back, and possessing a charac
(Figure 3) toform _a non-reversing closed stitch
teristic surface appearance.
'
'
as shown at-V 33 (Figure 4), and continues to
In order that the invention and its mode of
move to the right over one needle, under one
operation may be more readily understood by
needle, so that the yarn is wrapped about the
those skilled in the art, I have, in the accom
needle as shown at 35 (Figure .3) forming a
panying drawing and in the detailed description
reversing closed stitch as shown at 31 (Figure
based thereon, set out the speciñc example of ' , 4). Then the inelastic yarn is moved to the
20 left over one needle, under one needle, so that
the invention hereinbefore mentioned.
the yarn is wrapped about the needle as shown
at 39 (Figure 3) forming a reversing closed stitch
frontI and rear guide bars of a tricot machine
as shown at 4Iv (Figure 4). Then the inelastic
operated to produce one fabric construction in
yarn is moved to the right over one needle, under
accordance with the invention;
. Y
one needle, so that the yarn is wrapped about
Figure 2 indicates the motion of the back guide 25 the needle as shown at 43 (Figure 3) forming a
barin the making of said fabric construction;
reversing closed stitch as shown at 45 (Figure
-Figure 3 indicates the motion of the front guide
4). Thereafter, the inelastic yarn is movedto
bar in the making of said fabric construction;
the left over two needles, under one needle, so
Figure 4 illustrates on a greatly enlarged scale
that the yarn is wrapped about the needle as
the loop formation of the fabricconstruction as " shown at 41 (Figure 3) to form a non-reversing
knitted on the machine; and
i »
closed stitch as shown at 49 (Figure 4) and con
. In the drawing:
.
. Figure 1 indicates they combined motions of the
Figure 5 is a diagrammatic representation of
one face of the fabric:> construction upon being
completed.
.
It is pointed out that, for the sake of clarity
inillustration, the motion of the back guide bar
is shown in heavy lines, and the motion of the
front guidey bar is shown in light lines in Figures
1 through 3.
tinues to vmove to the right over one needle,
under one needle, so that the yarn is wrapped
l about the needle as shown at 5I (Figure 3) .form
ing a reversing closed stitch as shown 'at 53
(Figure 4). This constitutes one repeat, which
is duplicated throughout the length of the fabric.
The relative movements of the elastic. yarns
IU and inelastic yarns I2 cause the interknitting
.
Y llëteferring to the fabric construction shown in
Figures 1 to 5 inclusive, it will appear from Fig
ure 1 of the drawing that in the manufacture of
the fabric illustrated, two sets of Warp yarns II)
and I2 `are employed, one set of >Warp yarns I0
being elasticand the other set of warp yarns I2
being inelastic. It will be noted that the elastic
yarns I0 andthe inelastic yarns I2 at times are
laidin front of the needles I4 in opposite direc
` of the inelastic yarns and the tying in of the
elastic yarns in the manner more clearlyillus
trated in Figure 4 of the drawing, from which Y
it will be observed that theelastic yarns lie in
1_ a plane between the chain loops and the floats,
connecting the chains. It will- be further ob
served that the inelastic yarns pass back and
forth _between adjacent needles for several courses
and then pass over to a third needle and that
tions, and at other times are laid in front of the
the number of courses betweenv consecutive
5.0V
needles in the same direction, and that moreover,
bights of elastic yarn is equal to the number of
while the number of inelastic yarns I2 is equal to
chains or wales between such bights.
the number of needles I4, there are only half the
Attention is particularly called to
number of elastic yarns I0.
that the Yelastic yarns I0 vare Vnecessarily laid
the fact
The movement of the guides for the respective
yarns I0 and I2» are represented separately in Fig
ures 2 and 3. As clearly appears in Figurev 2,
each elastic yarn I0 is moved, for instance, to
the right in front of the needles one needle at a
time for a certain number of needles, and then to
the left in front‘of the needles one needle at a
time for a certain number of needles.
In the ex
ample shown, the movement of each elastic yarn
to the right and to the left is overfour needles,
although it will be understood that such move
ment may be 'over a different number of needles
than that specified in either or both directions.
` It is to be noted particularly that each elasticV
yarn, in its movement to the right and to the
lunder tension. Because of this, although the
elastic yarns _are laid in zig-zag directions as
illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, and are hung at
l' staggered points, as indicated at I9 and 2I in
Figure 4, such elastic yarns come out> straight'>
fabric, as is diagrammatically
60 in the completed
' represented in Figure 5. Thus the elastic yarns,
in their straightening, are relieved of theirten-V
sion without crawling and, therefore, do not causea wrinkled effect in thefabric. Moreover, the
straightening out of the elastic yarnsrelatively
shifts and gathers in coursewise VVdirection >>the
loops of Yinelastic yarns constituting ¿the base
fabric, with the result that a considerable in
crease in stretchability and snap is imparted
left, does not lap around any one needle at
to the fabric. Also, as a resultof the straight
any time, but is merely laid in a lengthwise 70 eningV of the elastic yarns and the shifting and
position in front of the needles, the yarn at its
reversal points indicated at I5 and I1 (Figure
2) ' becoming hung, as shown at I9 and 2l in
Figure 4.
Y
gathering of the loopsof the inelastic yarns,
there is produced on one 4face ofthe fabric> a
distinctive grogram-like surface appearance, AVas
diagrammatically illustrated inFigure 5„.1` y
‘ As shown in Figure 3, each. inelastic yal'n‘ l2 75
i
2,412,869
What I claim is:
1. A warp knit fabric consisting of two sets of
Warp yarns, one set being knitted into loops con
stituting successive courses, the loops in certain
of said courses at spaced intervals in the fabric
being of the non-reversing closed type, the loops
in the remaining courses in the fabric being of
the reversing closed type, and the other set of
yarns being laid into the fabric in zig-zag direc~
tions and hung unto said non-reversing closed 10
loops.
mediate each series, by lapping said set of in
elastic yarns in reverse direction to form revers
ing closed loops throughout the courses of each
of said spaced series; and lapping said set of in
elastic yarns in non-reverse direction to form
non-reversing closed loops throughout the course
intermediate each series; and laying in without
knitting into loops the set of elastic yarns by loop
ing said set of elastic yarns continuously in one
direction in relation to one series of multiple
courses of reversing closed loops and continuously
2. A Warp knit fabric consisting of two sets `of
in the reverse direction in relation to the adja
warp yarns, one set consisting of inelastic yarns
cent series of multiple courses of reversing closed
and the other set consisting of elastic yarns, the
set of inelastic yarns being knitted into loops con 15 loops, whereby to hang the elastic yarns onto the
non-reversing closed loops of the course inter
stituting successive courses, the loops in certain
mediate said series.
of said courses at spaced intervals in the fabric
5. A warp knit fabric comprising two sets of
being of the non-reversing closed type, and the
warp yarns, one of said sets forming Warpwise
loops in the remaining courses in the fabric be
ing of the reversing closed type, and the set of 20 extending rows of loops arranged in courses, each
of the yarns of said last named set forming alter
elastic yarns being laid into the fabric in zig
nately reversing and non-reversing loops in con
zag directions and hung unto said non-reversing
closed loops.
secutive rows and successive courses, the loops of
one row being connected with loops of another
3. In a method of making warp fabric from two
row by floats integral therewith, and the other of
sets of yarns, the steps of: knitting one set of
said sets forming zig-zag floats having relatively
yarns into loops for the formation of spaced series
straight sections each extending across a plural-H
of multiple courses and of a course intermediate
ity of rows and a plurality of courses, said sec
each series by lapping said one set of yarns in
tions being connected by bights adjacent to non
reverse direction to form reversing closed loops
throughout the courses of each spaced series, and 30 reversing loops formed by said ñrst set, and the
number of rows and courses traversed by the re
lapping said one set of yarns in non-reverse direc
spective straight sections aforesaid being equal.
tion to form. non-reverse closed loops throughout
6. The method of knitting warp fabric from
the courses intermediate each series; and laying in
two sets of yarns, one of which is elastic and the
Without knitting into loops the other set of yarns
by lapping said other set of yarns continuously 35 other relatively inelastic, which comprises knit
ting from said inelastic yarns a plurality of warp
in one direction in relation to one series of mul
wise extending rows of loops, each such yarn
tiple courses of reversing closed loops, and con
forming alternately reversing and non-revers
tinuously in the reverse direction in relation to
the adjacent series of multiple courses of revers
ing closed loops, whereby to hang the yarns of
said other set unto the non-reversing closed loops
of the course intermediate said series.
4. In a method of making warp knit fabric
from a set of inelastic yarns and a set of elastic
yarns, the steps of: knitting the set of inelastic 45
yarns into loops for‘the formation of spaced se
rows and courses traversed by a straight section
being
equal.
ries of multiple courses and of a course inter
CHAS. R. BURNS.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
629 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа