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Oct. 29, 1946.
A. w. FRANCE
2,410,361
METHOD FOR MAKING PLASTIC ARTICLES
Filed Dec. 6, 1943
3 Sheets-Sheet 1
IN VEN TOR.
FTTdF/VZVS
Oct. 29, 1946.
A. w. FRANCE
2,410,361
METHOD FOR MAKING PLASTIC ARTICLES
Filed Dec. 6, 1943
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
BY
Cr €-JUR
H rm 1: NE ya.
Oct. 29, 1946.
A. w. FRANCE
2,410,361
\iEi'Ii-LQD FOE H‘IAHING PLASTIC ARTICLES
Filad Dec.
1943
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
INVENTOR.
2,410,361
Patented Oct. 29, 1946
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,410,361
METHOD FOR MAKING PLASTIC ARTICLES
Alvin W. Prance, Royal Oak, Mich, asslgnor to
’
Briggs Manufacturing. Company, Detroit, Mich"
a corporation of Michigan
Application December 6, 1943, Serial No. 513,080
12 Claims. (Cl. 18-475)
,
1
This invention relates to the iabrication of
plastic articles and particularly articles prepared
from materials in which the principal constit
uent is a resinous composition or substance of
the thermosetting type, an important object of
the invention‘being to produce an article from
plastic materials carrying any predetermined de
2
Another problem encountered with plastic ar
ticles carrying an inked pattern or design, re
sides in the fact that after usage of the article
the design becomes marred, defaced or partially
worn o?’, impairing the appearance of the article.
One suggestion to overcome this diiiiculty has
been to apply a thin coating or ?lm of lacquer
to the surface of the ?nally formed article. This
’ sign or pattern which will be permanent in na
has proved undesirable since the lacquer film
ture, will remain relatively undistorted during
readily wears off and does not materially pro
forming operations, and will not readily become
tect the inked design or pattern against scratch
defaced 0r marred during use of the article.
ing
or marring. Another suggestion has been to
In the manufacture of articles from sheet ma
print the surface of the resinous blank and by
terial containing a thermosetting resinous sub
heat and pressure forcing the resin, which must
stance it has been the practice to form the sheet
or blank into the desired shape by the applica 15 be of a transparent or clear nature, around and
over the inked pattern to provide a layer of the
tion of heat and pressure, this being usually ac
resin covering the printing. This proposal, how
complished in a press having heated die members
ever, has encountered the difficulty or prevent
or platens. The resinous sheet or blank is in
ing the resin ?owing to the surface around the
troduced into the press when in an intermediate
inked pattern from distorting or disturbing the
stage of polymerization and as the blank is
pattern since the resin, as it ?ows through and
shaped to form in the press it is heated to a tem
around the pattern, will dislodge and carry por
perature and during a period of time suiiicient
tions of the ink of the pattern with it. Avoid
to complete the polymerization of the resin. In
ance of this difficulty, if possible, requires ex
the fabrication of articles in this manner from
resinous materials, it becomes frequently desir 25 ceedingly precise and exact controls raising bar
riers to large scale production.
able to impart or apply to the surface of the ar
An object of the present invention is to elim
ticle a design or ornamental pattern so as to en
inate the above mentioned diiiiculties or mini
hance its appearance.‘ It is usually desirable that
mize them to an important extent so that ar
the design or pattern be in color and it may take
any form. As an illustration it may be desirable 30 ticles of the kind herein contemplated may be
produced with greater accuracy and permanency
to produce an article, such as a panel, carrying
in respect to the patterns or designs carried
an imitation wood graining pattern. In the
thereby.
present embodiment of the invention such a pat
A further object of the invention is to provide
tern is produced on the articles, although it will
be understood that the invention is in nowise 35 a method whereby the printed or inked pattern
on the article will not become appreciably dis
limited thereto.
torted or impaired during the forming operation
Considerable difficulties have been encountered
under heat and pressure.
in producing articles from thermosetting res
Another object of the invention is to provide
inous materials, which articles are provided with
surface designs or patterns. One principal dif 40 an improved method in which a thermosetting
resinous article may be produced, carrying an
?culty lies in maintaining the accuracy of the
inked or printed design or pattern which will be
design, or ?delity of reproduction of a pattern, or
completely buried or enveloped in the surface
distinctness and clarity thereof, on account of
resin while at the same time being maintained
the tendency to change, distort or obliterate the
design during the forming operations when the 45 more nearly free of distortion or disturbance as
a result of ?owing of the resin during the form
printed blanks are subjected to pressure and heat
ing operation.
causing ?ow of the resin and polymerization
thereof.
Thus, where the resinous blank or
Still a further object of the invention is to pro
vide an improved method for forming a thermo
sheet material is printed with the desired design
or pattern and thereafter formed under heat and 00 setting resinous article carrying a printed de
sign, characterized by the fact that the design
pressure, it frequently happens that the flow of
is substantially ?xed in position against disturb
resin will disturb the inked pattern and change,
ance or distortion during the forming operation
smudge or distort it and. in many instances.
when the resin is brought to a final stage of re
nearly obliterate it or at least render the pattern
action or polymerization.
indistinct and of little ornamental value.
3
2,410,861
Other objects of this invention will appear in
the following description and appended claims.
reference being bad to the accompanying draw
which is adapted to transfer the inked design to
the sheet I! as it travels beneath the roller 20
and in contact therewith. It will be understood
ings forming a part of this speci?cation wherein
that the several rollers of the printing unit may
like reference characters designate correspond
be driven in any suitable manner and that this
ing parts in the several views.
unit may be 01' conventional type for applying
Fig. 1 is a perspective view, partly in section
continuously any desired pattern or design to the
and partly broken away, of a portion of an appa
moving sheet l5. In the present instance the
ratus for carrying out the present invention in
printing unit is adapted to apply a wood grain
accordance with certain embodiments thereof.
10 pattern 2| to the sheet.
Figs. 2 and 3 are views, similar to Fig. l, illus
After the sheet I! emerges from the printing
trating the remaining principal portions of the
unit which applies the inked design or pattern
apparatus.
'
_
thereto, it is fed on the conveyor ll beneath a
Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic view, partly in section
drying unit which is adapted to subject the sheet
and partly broken away, illustrating the steps 15 to su?lclent penetrating heat to dry the ink of
of the process which may be carried out by the
the pattern or design. The drying of the inked
apparatus of Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive.
pattern may be accomplished in various ways
Figs. 5 and 6 are diagrammatic views, partly in
section and partly broken away, illustrating an
apparatus and also the steps of a, method in ac
cordance with another embodiment of the in
vention.
but I prefer to subject the sheet to penetrating
heat produced by radiant energy from a source
20 of infra-red rays or electronic heating in order
to produce rapid and thorough drying of the
inked pattern. In the present instance this is
Before explaining in detail the present inven
accomplished by means of a heating unit 22 com
tion it is to be understood that the invention is
prising a hood or reflector 23 carrying a suitable
not limited in its application to the details of 25 number of lamps 24 energized to direct infra
construction and arrangement of parts illustrated
red heating rays upon the entire surface of the
in the accompanying drawings, since the inven
printed sheet as it travels beneath the unit.
tion is capable of other embodiments and of be
When the sheet emerges from beneath this heat
ing practiced or carried out in various ways. Also
ing unit the inked pattern is thoroughly and
it is to be understood that the phraseology or 30 completely dried.
terminology employed herein is for the purpose
In accordance with the next step of the process
of description and not of limitation.
the printed sheet i5 is fed into a tank or con
Referring to Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive, the appara
tainer 25 containing a bath of liquid resin var
tus therein illustrated, by way of example, is
nish. In the present instance the resin varnish
adapted to be utilized for the purpose of carrying 35 within the tank 25 is clear or substantially color
out the present method in accordance with cer
less. The sheet is guided through the tank by
tain embodiments thereof. This apparatus com
means of guide rollers 26 and is completely im
prises spaced longitudinally extending side frames
mersed in the bath of resin varnish so as to ap
ply a coating of this material upon opposite sides
endless conveyor belt H travels between the side 40 of the sheet which covers the printed pattern
frames and is supported upon suitable guide roll
or design and also thoroughly impregnates or
ers l2 extending between and carried by the
saturates the sheet with the resin. I prefer to
frames l?, the conveyor belt being driven in any
use a suitable thermo-setting resin in the prep
suitable manner at proper speed. Mounted upon
aration of the bath, such as a phenol-formalde
the side frames Ill adjacent the front end of 45 hyde resin, a urea formaldehyde resin, or a mel
the conveyor are upstanding brackets l3 which
amine resin with the resin in an intermediate
revolubly support a roll ll of sheet material IE
stage of polymerization. The impregnated sheet
to be treated in accordance with the present in
as it emerges from the resin bath in the con
vention. The sheet material I5 is preferably of
tainer 25 passes between squeegee rollers 21
a ?brous nature and in the present embodiment 50 which are adapted to remove excess liquid var
to be described is unpigmented. As an example
nish from the surface of the sheet.
of a suitable sheet material to be treated I may
The coated and impregnated sheet passes from
use alpha bleached sulphite wood pulp paper or
the tank 25 and the squeegee rollers 21 to a suit
it) supported upon a suitable base or bed.
An
equivalent paper having the desired thickness
containing a reinforcing ?brous filler. The sheet
able endless conveyor 28 supported upon guide
rollers carried by the side frames M. This con
veyor feeds the sheet beneath a drying unit 28
material I5 is fed from the roll ll onto the con
veyor II and thence to a printing unit adapted
which may also be a source of radiant energy,
to apply a. suitable design or pattern continu
such as‘ infra-red rays, similar to the drying unit
ously on the upper surface of the sheet as it is
22. The rays emitted from the lamp unit 29
fed forwardly on the conveyor. This printing 60 penetrate the sheet and thoroughly dry the
unit is carried by spaced brackets l6 mounted
resinous coating thereon. From the drying unit
on the side frames Ill and may comprise a con
29 the sheet is carried by the conveyor 28
ventional set of offset printing rolls. 1n the pres
beneath a friction pressure roller so which in
ent instance the printing unit comprises an ink
cooperation with the conveyor belt is adapted to
trough ll at the upper ends of the brackets it,
grip the sheet somewhat and exert a pulling ac
this trough adapted to contain the printing ink
tion thereon e?’ective to assist the feeding action
which is pigmented to provide an ornamental de
of the conveyor. This roller 30 is driven in any
sign of the desired color. The printing ink from
suitable manner and at the proper speed to main
the trough I1 is fed to an ink feeding roller l8
tain the sheet taut as it travels on the upper run
rotatably supported on the brackets it. The ink 70 of the conveyor 28. The roller also serves the
from the roller I8 is transferred by contact to a
purpose of assisting in feeding the sheet to a
copper engraved design or printing roller Ill. The
shearing unit 3| which carries a cutting knife
inked design on the roller 18 is transferred to an
or blade adapted to sever the sheet into blanks
applicator or transfer roll 20 which may be of
22 of proper size. The blanks which are cut'from
the usual gelatin or rubber covered type and 75 the sheet by the shearing unit ll are stacked up
2,410,881
>
on a table 01' platform 33 positioned beyond the
end of the conveyor 28. It will be understood
that the length of the blank to be severed from
the sheet will be predetermined by timing the
cutpo? mechanism or shearing unit 3| so as to
synchronize with the speed of the conveyor and
also the gripping roller 30. These, of course, will
also be synchronized with the conveyor II and
the offset printing rolls.
'
6
as it passes beneath the infra-red lamp unit 33
so that the blank, when it emerges from beneath
this heating unit, will be heated to a point very
nearly the temperature of the dies 39a and 391:.
By virtue of this method it is possible to speed
up the production, increase the output of the ap
paratus and also produce ‘formed or molded ar
ticles of considerably better quality. After the
?nal forming operation in the press 39 the fin
ished blanks or articles All are transferred to a
At 34 there is illustrated a suitable press car 10 conveyor II which carries them to a suitable de
rylng a lower die 34a and an upper die 34b
livery station or to any point where further op
adapted to cooperate therewith to preform the
erations are to be carried out.
blanks 32. The upper die is carried by the usual
In addition to the foregoing method or process,
vertically reciprocating ram of the press and this
out by the apparatus illustrated in Figs.
press may be either mechanically or hydraulical 15 carried
1 to 4 inclusive, the following modi?ed method
ly operated. The dies 34a and 3412 are prefer
or process may also be performed by the same
ably unheated and are adapted to impart an in
apparatus. The roll I4 may carry a sheet of
itial shape or form to the blank approaching the
paper or thin board stock comprising a reinforc
?nal shape or form thereof. The blanks 32 are
ing ?brous ?ller or binder and a thermo-setting
successively fed into the press 34 which is op 20
resin, such as the resin hereinbefore described.
erated to successively preform the blanks and
This resin preferably has a pigment incorporated
thereafter the preformed blanks 35 are deposited
therein in order to provide a basic or ground color
upon an endless conveyor 36 supported upon
to the sheet. The resin in the sheet is in an
guide rollers 31 and driven at proper speed in
intermediate stage of reaction or polymerization,
25 such being commonly known as the B-stage, and
any conventional manner.
The preformed blanks 35 are carried by the
this sheet is fed from the roll M on the conveyor
conveyor 36 beneath a heating unit which pref
il to the offset printing unit l‘|—2ll which ap
erably comprises a source of penetrating heat
plies the inked design or ‘pattern thereto, such
rays capable of partially polymerizing the resin
as the wood grain pattern 2|. The pigment in
in the sheet so as to bring it up to approximately 30 corporated in the ink preferably a?ords a con
molding temperature. Either electronic heating
trasting color to the ground color of the sheet.
may be used for this purpose or heat produced by
After emerging from the printing unit the inked
radiant energy from a source of infra-red rays.
pattern or design is dried by means of the infra
In the present instance the heating unit 38 is
red
drying unit 22 and thence the sheet is fed
similar to the units 22 and 29 comprising a bat 35 by the conveyor into the tank 25 which con
tery of infra-red lamps adapted to emit pene
tains a bath of clear or transparent liquid resin
trating rays of su?iciently greater intensity to
varnish. As in the previous embodiment, the
bring the resin in the blanks to approximately
resin of this bath is of the thermo-setting type,
molding temperature while also carrying forward
similar
to or compatible with the resin which
the polymerization of the resin. The blanks may 40 forms a constituent of the resinous sheet car
attain a temperature of from 250° F. to 300° F. as
ried by the roll II. By immersing the sheet in
a result of the action of the heating unit 38.
the bath contained in the tank 25 a coating of
When the blanks emerge from beneath the heat
clear resin is applied to the sheet and from this
ing unit 38 and at the end of the conveyor 36,
tank the sheet passes through the squeegee rollers
they are immediately introduced in succession
21 and thence is fed on the conveyor 28 beneath
into a press 39 which is adapted to ?nally form
the drying lamp unit 23 which functions to dry
the blanks under heat and pressure.
the resinous coating applied to the sheet in the
The press 39 is of generally conventional con
tank 25. Thus, the inked design or pattern on
struction having a lower heated die or platen 39a
the sheet is completely covered by a coating of
and an upper heated die or platen 3% carried
transparent resin similar to the resin in the
by a vertically reciprocable ram. The press may
sheet. After the sheet has been dried by the
be either mechanically operated or hydraulically
lamp unit 29, it passes beneath the feed roller
operated and the dies 39a and 39b cooperate to
30 and is cut into blanks 32 by the shearing
press the preformed blank 35 into ?nal shape
unit
3|. From this point the blanks 32 are
under predetermined pressure which is main 55 processed in a manner similar to that described
tained a sufficient interval of time to enable the
above in connection with the previous embodi
heat from the dies to penetrate the blank and
ment. As therein described, the blanks are pre
complete the polymerization of the resin therein.
formed in the press 34 and thence conveyed in
The polymerizing temperature produced by the
succession on the conveyor 36 beneath the heat
heated dies 39a. and 39b may be on the order of
ing unit 38 which brings the resin in the sheet
from 275° F. to 300° F. and the required pres
as Well as in the resin coating covering the
sure is used during this ?nal forming operation
printed design to approximately molding tem
such as pressures ranging from 250 to 500 pounds
perature. After leaving the conveyor 36 the
per square inch.
blanks are ?nally formed in the press 39 under
65
The preforming operation carried out in the
heat and pressure which not only molds or forms
press 34 is preferably accomplished under lower
the blanks to ?nal shape but also completes the
pressures than the ?nal forming operation in the
polymerization of the resin in the body of the
press 39. The preforming dies 34a and 34b may
sheet as well as in the coating applied thereto
be maintained at substantially room temperature
in the tank 25.
70
or if desired they may be heated to an annealing
The clear or transparent resinous coating,
temperature less than the temperature necessary
which is applied to the sheet over the ‘printed
to cause any substantial polymerization of the
design, not only has the advantage of protecting
blank during the preforming operation. The
the design or pattern against marring 0r deface
preformed blank, however, is brought up to sub
75 ment in use but also stabilizes the inked pattern
stantially or approximately molding temperature
2,410,861
to the extent of preventing the resin in the body
of the sheet from being forced through or around
the printing tending to distort or obliterate it
while the blanks are being ?nally formed in
the press 99. It will be understood that during 5
operation of the heated dies of the press 99 on
the blanks there is a tendency for the resin in
the body of the sheet to flow toward the surface
of the sheet. However, by superimposing the
clear resinous coating on the printed sheet the
design or pattern is, in effect, anchored in place
and this coating prevents the ?ow of the resin
in the sheet through and around the printing
and the consequent distortion or blurring thereof.
It will be understood that any combination of
colors may be utilized in connection with the
pigmentation of the resinous sheet on the roll “I
and the printing ink used in connection with
the pattern or design applied to the sheet. 0r
dinarily the basic color will be incorporated in
the sheet carried by the roll l4 and any con
trasting color may be used in connection with
the printing ink used in applying the design or
pattern to the sheet. A further combination
effect may be produced by pigmentlng the resin
varnish‘in the tank 25 which is utilized to apply
a thin continuous coating over the inked design
or pattern and through which coating the pat
tern is visible or revealed.
With reference to the embodiment illustrated in
Figs. 5 and 6, the apparatus in this instance
also comprises suitable longitudinally extending
spaced supporting side frames 42. An endless
conveyor 43 is mounted through the medium of
guide rollers at the front end of the side frames,
the conveyor being driven in any suitable man
ner and properly timed for conducting a con
tinuous sheet 45 from a roll 44 to a tank 49
8
on the conveyor beneath a heating unit 53 which
may be similar to the unit 22 previously de
scribed and the inked pattern or design is dried.
Continued travel of the sheet on the conveyor 49
will cause it to be fed beneath a spray gun or
nozzle unit 54 carrying a battery of nozzles or
jets 55 adapted to spray a thin coating of resin
varnish entirely over the surface of the sheet
and thus completely cover the printed design
10 or pattern.
The resin varnish used for the pur
poses of this coating is preferably clear or trans
parent and is composed principally of a thermo
setting resin similar to or compatible with the
resin used in the resinous bath 41.
15
Further travel of the sheet on the conveyor 49
will cause it to pass beneath a drying unit 56
which functions similar to the unit 29 to dry the
resin coating applied to the sheet by the spray
gun unit 54. The coated sheet thereupon passes
20 on the conveyor 49 beneath the friction feed
roller 30 and the sheet is cut into blanks 59 of
suitable size by the shearing unit 51, the con
struction of which is similar to the unit 3! pre
viously described. The blanks 59 after leaving
25 the conveyor 49 are stacked on a table or plat~
form 59 preparatory to the preforming operation
carried out in the press 50. The preformlng of
the blanks is accomplished in the same manner
as described in connection with the operation of
the press 34. The blanks are preformed in the
press under lower pressure than used in the final
forming operation and the preforming dies may
be either maintained at substantially room tem
perature or may be heated to a temperature lower
than that necessary to effect any material poly
merization of the resin in the sheet or in the
coating on the sheet.
The preformed blanks 8| are transferred from
the press v[5|] to an endless conveyor 81 which
feeds the blanks at a predetermined rate or speed
beneath a heating unit 63 which may be similar
to the heating unit 98 previously described. This
supported by the side frames. The sheet ma
terial 45 carried on the roll 44 may be unpig
merited and of ?brous stock similar to that de
scribed in connection with the ?rst embodiment.
The sheet 45 as it passes through the tank 46
heating unit subjects the blanks to penetrating
is entirely immersed in a bath 41 containing a
heat and brings them to approximately molding
pigmented thermo-settlng resin, such as the resin
temperature, such as a temperature between 275°
mentioned above. This resinous varnish 41 is
F. and 300° F. At the end of the conveyor 82
pigmented to provide the basic color for the
the blanks are successively fed to a press 64, sim
?nally formed blanks and as the sheet passes
ilar to the press 39, which ?nally molds or forms
through the resinous bath 41 it is impregnated
the blanks under heat and pressure. The ?nally
or saturated with the resin to the extent that 50 formed blanks 65 are transferred from the press
the sheet, as it emerges from the bath and after
to a conveyor 66 which conducts them successive
passing through the squeegee rolls 48, will con
ly to a delivery station or other point where
tain preferably approximately thirty to forty
succeeding operations may be carried out on the
percent of resin by weight. The resin impreg
blanks or articles 65.
nated sheet then passes onto a moving endless
It will be understood that variations in the
conveyor 49 and is conducted thereby beneath
sequence of steps of the method may be made
a drying unit 5|, which may be similar to the
without departing from the spirit and scope of
unit 22 above described. The sheet is preferably
the invention. For example, where the shape
dried by the heating unit 5i at a temperature
of the article permits and depending upon the
insu?lcient to effect any material polymerization 60 nature and location of the pattern applied to the
of the resin in the sheet, a suitable temperature
article, the it ‘lowing change in the sequence of
for the drying operation being between 150° F.
steps may be .aade. Referring to Fig. 5, after
and 250° F. The sheet is not only dried by the
the coating on the sheet has been dried by the
heating unit 5| but, in addition, moisture, gases
drying unit 5|, the sheet may then be sheared
and volatiles are also eliminated.
into blanks 59 by the shearing or blanking unit
The sheet 45 passes from the drying unit 5|
51. Thereafter the blanks may be preformed
on the conveyor 49 beneath an offset printing
in the press 60 as previously described. The pre
unit 52 which may be similar to that previously
formed blanks may then be printed by unit 52,
described and the sheet is printed with a design
the ink of the printed design dried by unit 53,
or pattern, such as the wood graining 2|. With 70 a clear or transparent resinous coating applied
this printing unit the design or pattern is pref
by the spray unit 54, then dried by the unit 56,
erably applied utilizing a colored or pigmented
after which the preformed blanks III may be car
ink which will have a. different color than the
ried by the conveyor 52 beneath the polymerizing
basic color used in the resin bath 41. Passing
heating unit 89 and thence into the press 54 for
from the o?set printing unit 52 the sheet travels 75 the ilnal molding or forming operation.
2,410,301
Any suitable or desired plastic article 65 may
be made in accordance with the present inven
tion such, for example, as the instrument ‘panel
of an automobile body or airplane.
In cases
10
steps of applying an inked design or pattern to
the surface of a cellulosic sheet, drying the ink
of said pattern, treating said sheet with a
thermc-setting resin in an intermediate stage of
where the article has sharp bends at certain
localities or requires a relatively deep draw in
the press, I have found it advantageous to ?rst
soak in warm water such areas of the blank
where these sharp bends or deep draws are neces
polymerization to leave a ?lm of said resin as a
tant feature of the invention a sheet of fibrous
stock containing a thermo-setting resin in an
to the surface of a cellulosic sheet, drying' the
ink of said pattern, treating said sheet with a
coating over said pattern, drying the sheet, pre
forming said sheet in a press to approximately
the shape of the ?nal article, removing the sheet
from the press, heating the sheet, and ?nally
sitated. Thereafter the preforming step may be 10 forming the sheet in a second press by the simul
taneous action of heat and pressure.
carried out without danger of cracking or split
2. In the method of making plastic articles
ting the blank at such areas.
the steps of applying an inked design or pattern
Thus, in accordance with one important fea
to the surface of a cellulosic sheet, drying the
ture of the invention a sheet oi’ ?brous stock is
ink of said pattern, treating said sheet with a
15
printed with a suitable pattern or design, dried
thermo-setting resin in an intermediate stage of
and then immersed or otherwise coated with a
polymerization to leave a ?lm of said resin as a
thermosetting resin in the intermediate stage
coating over said pattern, drying the sheet, pre
which completely covers the printing and pene
forming said sheet in a press under pressure to
trates the sheet. This resin may be either col
approximately the shape of the ?nal article and
20
orless or pigmented but is sufficiently transpar
in the absence of heat su?lcient to cause any ap
ent to permit the pattern or design to show
preciable polymerization of the resin, heating the
through the covering ?lm of resin. The resin
sheet to bring the resin therein to a tempera
coating ?xes the pattern in place and assists ma
ture approximating molding temperature, and
terially in preventing distortion or “running”
?nally forming the sheet in a second press by
thereof during the ?nal molding operation under 25 the simultaneous action of heat and pressure.
heat and pressure.
3. In the method of making plastic articles
Further, in accordance with another impor
the steps of applying an inked design or pattern
intermediate stage is printed, dried and then 30 thermo-setting resin in an'intermediate stage of
coated with a clear or transparent thermo-set
polymerization to leave a ?lm of said resin as a
ting resin in an intermediate stage. Thus, the
coating over said pattern, heating the sheet to
sheet or blank before the ?nal forming thereof
bring the same to a temperature approaching
comprises a base or foundation layer of resin and
molding or polymerizing temperature, and then
?bers in intimate relation, a layer comprising an 35 introducing the sheet into a press or mold while
inked pattern or design, and a layer or ?lm of
at substantially said temperature and subjecting
resin superimposed thereon. The thermo-setting
the sheet in said press to heat at a higher tem
resins in the top and bottom layers are similar
perature and also pressure to ?nally form the
or compatible. When, therefore, this laminated
sheet and complete the polymerization of the
sheet is molded under heat and pressure, all of 40 resin.
the resin will be polymerized to the ?nal stage
4. In the method of making plastic articles the
of reaction and, of course, the layers of resin
steps of applying an inked design to the surface
will ?ow together and intimately mix and unite
of a sheet containing a polymerizable resin, dry
into a homogeneous layer.
However, no appre
45 ing the ink of the design, applying a polymeriz
ciable disturbance or distortion of the interme
able resinous ?lm or layer over said design, pre
diate printed design will occur as the layers of
forming the sheet under pressure to approxi
resin at opposite sides of the printing tend to
mately the shape of the ?nal article and in the
bond the printing lines or characters in ?xed po
absence of heat sufficient to cause any apprecia
sition.
50 ble ?ow of the resin, heating the resin of the
It will be understood that the sheet of ?brous
sheet and film, and further forming the sheet
stock may be impregnated or saturated with the
under pressure and also heat su?icient to poly
resin either before or during the carrying out
merize said resin.
of the process and the printing may be applied
5. In the method of making plastic articles the
either to a resinous ?brous sheet or to a ?brous
steps of applying an inked design to the surface
66
sheet containing no resin. In any case, it is im
of a sheet containing a polymerizable resin, dry
portant that a layer Or ?lm of the resin com
ing the ink of the design, applying a polymer
pletely cover the printing before the ?nal poly
izable resinous ?lm or layer over said design,
merizing step by which all of the resin is con
pre-forming the sheet under pressure and in the
verted or reacted to the ?nal stage under heat
60 absence of heat su?lcient to cause any appreci
and pressure.
able ?ow of the resin, heating the resin of the
Although in carrying out the present process
sheet and ?lm with heat from a source of ra
it is preferred to conduct many of the steps on
diant energy, and further forming the sheet un
a continuous sheet of material, such as a cel
der pressure and also heat su?lcient to polymer
lulosic material containing a quantity of rein 65 ize said resin.
forcing ?bers, it will be understood that all of
6. In the method of making plastic articles the
the important steps of the process may be car
steps of applying an inked design to the surface
ried out in connection with blanks of the sheet
of a sheet containing a reactive resin, drying the
material previously cut to size. Hence, unless
ink of the design, spraying a liquid reactive resin
speci?cally stated in the claims, it will be under
ous ?lm or layer over said design, molding the
70
stood that the terms “sheet” or "blank” are to
sheet to partial shape in the absence of heat
be construed interchangeably as referring to
su?icient to cause any appreciable ?ow of the
either a continuous sheet or parts or blanks of
resin, and molding the sheet to ?nal shape under
predetermined size.
pressure and heat sui?cient to react the resin.
I claim:
'1. In the method of making plastic articles the
75
1. In the method of making plastic articles the
11
2,410,301
steps of treating a sheet of ?brous material with
a pigmented reactive thermo-setting resin 0! one
color, printing a design on said sheet with ink
pigmented to provide a contrasting colOr, cover
ing the ink of said design with a transparent re
active resinous ?lm, partially forming said sheet
under pressure and at a temperature below the
12
varnish to cover said design or pattern with a
?lm, partially drying said ?lm, forming said sheet
in a press so as to mold the same to approxi
mately the ?nal shape 0! the article and at a
temperature insu?icient to cause any appreciable
reaction of the resin, and thereafter completing
the ?nal forming of the article in a second press
under pressure and heat sumcient to react the
resin.
reactive temperature 01' the resin, and ?nally
forming said sheet under pressure, and heat sui
ncient to react the resin.
10
11. In the method or making plastic articles.
8. In the method or making plastic articles the
the steps 01' applying an inked design or pattern
steps of treating a sheet of ?brous material with
to the surface oi‘ a sheet or cellulosic material,
a pigmented reactive thermo-setting resin or one
coating said sheet with a liquid reactive resinous
color, printing a design on said sheet with ink
varnish to cover said design or pattern with a
pigmented to provide a contrasting color, cover 15 ?lm, partially drying said ?lm, forming said
ing the ink of said design with a transparent
sheet in a press so as to mold the same to ap
reactive resinous ?lm, partially forming said
proximately the ?nal shape of the article and
sheet under pressure and at a temperature below
at a temperature insu?icient to cause any appre
the reactive temperature of the resin. and mold
ciable reaction of the resin, heating said sheet
ing said sheet to ?nal form under heat su?icient 20 to bring the temperature or the resin therein to
to simultaneously react the resin or the sheet and
approximate reactive temperature, and there
?lm.
after molding the sheet in a second press into
9. In the method of making plastic articles the
?nal form while subjecting the sheet to the tem—
steps of treating a sheet of ?brous material with
perature of reaction of the resin.
a pigmented reactive theme-setting resin 01' one 25
12. In the method of making plastic articles
color, printing a design on said sheet with ink
the steps of applying an inked design to the
pigmented to provide a contrasting color, cover
surface of a sheet containing a polymerizable
ing the ink oi’ said design with a transparent re
resin, drying the ink 01 the design, applying a
active resinous ?lm, pre-forming the sheet under
polymerizable resinous ?lm or layer over said
pressure at a temperature below the reactive tem 30 design, pre-torming the sheet in a press under
perature of the resin. heating the sheet, and
pressure to approximately the shape of the ?nal
molding the sheet while reacting the resin or
article and in the absence 0! heat sumcient to
the sheet and ?lm.
cause any appreciable ?ow ot the resin, and fur
10. In the method of making plastic articles,
ther forming the sheet in a second press under
the steps of applying an inked design or pattern 35 pressure and also heat sumcient to polymerize
to the surface of a sheet of eeiluiosic material,
said resin.
coating said sheet with a liquid reactive resinous
‘ ALVIN W. FRANCE.
Certi?cate of Correction
Patent No. 2,410,361.
October 29, 1946.
ALVIN W. FRANCE
It is hereby certi?ed that errors appear in the rinted speci?cation of the‘ above
numbered patent requiring correction as follows: . olumn
_ 12, lines 2 and 15, strike
out “partiall ” and insert the same_before “formmg” 1n same_ lines; and that the
said Letters atent should be read with these corrections therein that the same may
conform to the record of the case in the Patent O?ice.
Signed and sealed this 4th day of February, A. D. 1947.
LESLIE FRAZER,
First Assistant Commissioner of Patents.
11
2,410,301
steps of treating a sheet of ?brous material with
a pigmented reactive thermo-setting resin 0! one
color, printing a design on said sheet with ink
pigmented to provide a contrasting colOr, cover
ing the ink of said design with a transparent re
active resinous ?lm, partially forming said sheet
under pressure and at a temperature below the
12
varnish to cover said design or pattern with a
?lm, partially drying said ?lm, forming said sheet
in a press so as to mold the same to approxi
mately the ?nal shape 0! the article and at a
temperature insu?icient to cause any appreciable
reaction of the resin, and thereafter completing
the ?nal forming of the article in a second press
under pressure and heat sumcient to react the
resin.
reactive temperature 01' the resin, and ?nally
forming said sheet under pressure, and heat sui
ncient to react the resin.
10
11. In the method or making plastic articles.
8. In the method or making plastic articles the
the steps 01' applying an inked design or pattern
steps of treating a sheet of ?brous material with
to the surface oi‘ a sheet or cellulosic material,
a pigmented reactive thermo-setting resin or one
coating said sheet with a liquid reactive resinous
color, printing a design on said sheet with ink
varnish to cover said design or pattern with a
pigmented to provide a contrasting color, cover 15 ?lm, partially drying said ?lm, forming said
ing the ink of said design with a transparent
sheet in a press so as to mold the same to ap
reactive resinous ?lm, partially forming said
proximately the ?nal shape of the article and
sheet under pressure and at a temperature below
at a temperature insu?icient to cause any appre
the reactive temperature of the resin. and mold
ciable reaction of the resin, heating said sheet
ing said sheet to ?nal form under heat su?icient 20 to bring the temperature or the resin therein to
to simultaneously react the resin or the sheet and
approximate reactive temperature, and there
?lm.
after molding the sheet in a second press into
9. In the method of making plastic articles the
?nal form while subjecting the sheet to the tem—
steps of treating a sheet of ?brous material with
perature of reaction of the resin.
a pigmented reactive theme-setting resin 01' one 25
12. In the method of making plastic articles
color, printing a design on said sheet with ink
the steps of applying an inked design to the
pigmented to provide a contrasting color, cover
surface of a sheet containing a polymerizable
ing the ink oi’ said design with a transparent re
resin, drying the ink 01 the design, applying a
active resinous ?lm, pre-forming the sheet under
polymerizable resinous ?lm or layer over said
pressure at a temperature below the reactive tem 30 design, pre-torming the sheet in a press under
perature of the resin. heating the sheet, and
pressure to approximately the shape of the ?nal
molding the sheet while reacting the resin or
article and in the absence 0! heat sumcient to
the sheet and ?lm.
cause any appreciable ?ow ot the resin, and fur
10. In the method of making plastic articles,
ther forming the sheet in a second press under
the steps of applying an inked design or pattern 35 pressure and also heat sumcient to polymerize
to the surface of a sheet of eeiluiosic material,
said resin.
coating said sheet with a liquid reactive resinous
‘ ALVIN W. FRANCE.
Certi?cate of Correction
Patent No. 2,410,361.
October 29, 1946.
ALVIN W. FRANCE
It is hereby certi?ed that errors appear in the rinted speci?cation of the‘ above
numbered patent requiring correction as follows: . olumn
_ 12, lines 2 and 15, strike
out “partiall ” and insert the same_before “formmg” 1n same_ lines; and that the
said Letters atent should be read with these corrections therein that the same may
conform to the record of the case in the Patent O?ice.
Signed and sealed this 4th day of February, A. D. 1947.
LESLIE FRAZER,
First Assistant Commissioner of Patents.
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