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Dec, 17,1946.
J_ CAESAR
, -
2,412,714
BASEBALL GAME
‘Filed April 17, 1944'
s Sheets-Sheet 1
.
I’:
'
'
‘
‘
»
BY
INVENTOR.
'
Ju/fus Caesar‘
.
_
. 17, 1946.
2,412,714
J. CAESAR
‘ BASEBALL 'GAME
Filed April 17, 1944
s Sheets-Sheet 2
\ \.
- l‘.
gil‘iudu/ ius Caesar
BY I
IN VEN TOR.
Dec. 17, 1946.
I
J_ CAESAR
'
2,412,714
Filed April 17, 1944
3 Shsets~$heet 3
BASEBALL GAME
_
IINVENTOR.
YJu/u/s C'aesar
Patented Dec. 17, 1946
‘ 2,412,714
UNITED‘ STATES
PATENT ‘ OFFICE \ ‘
“ 2,412,714
BASEBALL GAME
Julius Caesar, Humboldt, Tenn.
Application April 1'7, 1944, Serial No. 531,424 ‘
8 Claims.
(Cl. 273-90)
1
2
This invention relates to games, and more par
erally surrounded by a wall 13, and therewithin
ticularly to a gameboard for playing a game of
an additional or out?eld wall [5, and walls l1.
I9 is the in?eld which is separated from the sur
baseball type.
i
'
,
‘
rounding ?eld by a continuous slot 2! along
To provide a game device including a playing
board which may be manipulated by one of two
which the runners are advanced from home plate
contestants and which is provided‘ with 'addi
tional apparatus which may bemanipulated by
way in which the players on a baseball ?eld ad
The objects of the invention are:
2'3 to the other bases, in manner simulating the
’
vance.
Along this slot and extended therebe
yond, the usual foul lines 24 are indicated.
Positioned at the bases are chair-shaped
accomplish a game simulating baseball; and 10
the other of the two contestants in a manner to
more speci?cally
pockets 25, 21 and 29,'representing ?rst, second
'
and third basemen, and outward‘ therefrom are
positioned two chairs 3| representing short stops,
that it may be manipulated by one of the two
after the manner of soft ball, and three chairs
contestants to propel a ball toward a‘batter, as
in playing baseball, and if the‘ball be hit by the 15 33 representing out?elders, these chairs here
inafter sometimes being referred to as basemen,
batter, may be ‘caught by a ?elder, or if not
To provide a board so mounted or supported
caught ?elded by further manipulation of the
board to put out the batter advancing to ?rst
and ?elders. The chairs which. represent the
three basemen are preferably smaller than those
representing the out?elders. These chairs may
base, or a runner, or runners, on base advancing‘
to other bases, and in which board provision is 20 otherwise be of the same type and are preferably
each provided with loose mesh back portions
made for manipulation by the second contestant
against which the ball if propelledthrough the
of a batter in an endeavor to strike the ball and
air on the fly, may strike substantially without
for further manipulation of a runner, or runners,
bouncing.
.
and their advancement around the bases.
Each of the chairs is provided with a rim 3
The means by which the foregoing and other 25
which assists in trapping the ball, particularly
objects are accomplished, and the manner of
along the side, facing the batter, and with a
their accomplishment, will readily ‘be understood
seat portion having an opening 3'! through
from the following speci?cation upon reference‘
which the ball 39, if trapped by the chair, drops
to the accompanying drawings, in which:
Fig. 1 is a plan view of a game board having 30 on the board for easier recapture andreturn to
the ?elder contestant for the next play. The
a baseball ?eld in miniatureoutlined thereon,
chairs are each supported by two legs 4| which
with a batter, runner and ?elding devices shown.
are spaced well apart to‘ minimize interference
Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation taken on the
with the ball when it is rolling on the board.
line 11-11 of Fig. 1.
Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6 are enlarged fragmentary
views showing various details of construction;
The ?rst, second and third basemen are posi
tioned over their respective bases, the legs MA
or‘ the ?rst baseman being on opposite sides of
Fig. 3 being a sectional elevation taken as on
and at equal distances from the base and ‘so
the line III-III of Fig. 6, showing one of sev
spaced apart that with a runner 43 in the dotted
eral brackets supporting the in?eld or diamond
relatively to the surrounding portion of the 40 position 43A, of Fig. 6, that is, having reached
the base, passage of the ball 39 is blocked whether
board;
Fig. 4 a sectional plan taken on the line IV—IV
it be to the one side‘ or the other of the runner.
of Figs. 2 and 5, showing batter mechanism and
runner advancing mechanism and the manipu~
The third baseman, not shown in Fig. 6, is simi
larly positioned with regard to that base and the
legs MB of ‘the second baseman are positioned
as shown and accomplish similar blocking with
lating means therefor;
-
Fig. 5 a corresponding sectional elevation on
the line V—V of Fig. 4; and
a runner on second base, such blocking indicat
Fig. 2, immediately above the surface of the play
ing board, showing runners approaching ?rst
ing thatthe runner is safe on the plays. The
?rst and third base chairs are preferably addi
tionally provided. on their outer sides with wings
and second base and the ball having been
manipulated to out off the ‘runner at ?rst base.
Referring now to the drawings in which the
ball being ?elded toward first or third base, as
the case may be, and make ?elding of the’ball
Fig. 6 a sectional plan on the line VI-—VI of
various parts are indicated by numerals: .
' H is a board which has a ?at surface periph
25W, 23W respectively, which divert inward the
somewhat easier.
55
‘
Beneath the board is a channelway 45 which
2,412,714
3
4
' extends from an opening 45A in the out?eld end
of the board to a second opening teB in the in?eld,
which may be designated as the pitcher’s box, the
channel being preferably deepened intermediate
its-length to clear other apparatus ‘below the
board, and preferably having its sides d4 con
tinued to the batter end of the board. The ball
39 is dropped into the channelway 65 through
the opening 135A and after traversing the chan
nelway is projected from‘the pitcher’s box 4513
upwardly and rearwardly across home plate 23
in a trajectory or path P, somewhat as shown in
Fig. 2.
The inneror batter’s end of the board has a '
centrally disposed supporting post 41, which pro
jects downwardly from the board and is prefer
ably provided at its lower end with a suction
cup 41A adapted to rest on and adhere as to the
top of a table As. When not in play the outer part
of the board may be lowered to rest on the table,
but in play is supported by the hands, of the
player representing the team in the ?eld.
The in?eld i9 is separated from surrounding
portions of the board I! by the continuous slot
2! and is supported in such position by brackets
or cleats 5!, which are cut away at 55A beneath
the slot. Journalled below the four corners of
the in?eld are sprockets 53,having vertical shafts,
these sprockets carrying an endless chain
"
Disposed
four
open at
topequal
vertically
distances
disposed
along
sockets
this chain
5'! adapt
son of the slope of the channel toward the out
?eld, remains at the outer end of the channel.
He then grasps the two sides of the outer end
of the board in his hands and raises the board
quickly to a position, such as is shown in Fig. 2,
establishing a downward path for the ball 39 to
the pitcher’s box and endeavors to establish such
slope of the channelway that the ball will be de
livered over home plate in. an are or trajectory
path similar to the path P, indicated in such
Fig. 2.
The batting contestant retracts the arm 15 by
‘pull on the grip 15A against action of the spring
Tl and awaits the pitch and delivery of the ball.
As the ball is delivered he endeavors to release
the grip at proper time to swing the bat and hit
the ball, as ‘does the batter when he swings at a
ball thrown in the game of baseball; If he is un
successful a strike is recorded, three strikes, as
usual, constituting an out. If on the other hand
the ?elding contestant fails to‘deliver the ball in
a proper trajectory over the plate, a ball is re
corded, the usual four balls being allowed before
the batter is given his base.
'
' ‘
Should the bat strike the ball and project it
forwardly of the plate and within the foul lines
24, it is, as in a ‘baseball game, a fair ball. If
batted on the ?y, the ball strikes in one of the
basemen’s chairs or ?elder’s chairs and does not
bounce out, it is an out, although obviously there
ed to receive the runners 43, which may be indis
after it drops 'down and rolls through the hole
31 in such chair for recapture for the next play.
criminately placed in or removed from such
If the ball bounces out it is an error and the
sockets as occasion may require.
ball must be ?elded to a base to get the batter
out, or if the ball is hit into the playing ?eld on’
'
The sprocket 53A at home plate is secured on a
shaft 59, on which is also secured a bevel gear 8 I.
Gear 5! meshes with a second horizontally dis
, posed shaft 65 extending through and journalled
in the post Ill. Secured on the outer end of the
shaft 65 is a hand wheel 51 which is adapted for
manual manipulation by the contestants repre
senting the team at bat.
$9 is a batter who carries a bat ‘l l. The batter
the ?y, or an the board, it must similarly be
?elded toward a base. The batting contestant,
having swung the bat and hit the ball, grasps the
hand wheel 61 and turns it to actuate the chain
55 and advance the runner 43 positioned adja
cent home base toward ?rst base. The ?elding
contestant tilts the board laterally and longitudi
nally, as he may see ?t, and endeavors to roll the
ball along the surface of the board toward ?rst
.' base in an effort to roll the ball between the
legs 4IA of the ?rst baseman before the runner,
advanced by turn of the wheel 5?, reaches that
is mounted on,‘and turns with, a vertically dis
posed post '53, suitably journalled. Also secured
to this post is an arm 15 which is urged toward
batting position by a tension spring ‘H, the arm
base.
’
being disposed through slots ‘F9 in the sides 4-’!
of the channelway. The arm 75 extends beyond
In ?elding this ball advantage
be taken’
these slots and is ‘provided with a grip portion 54) of the side walls it, or the wing 25, or even the
15A which is engaged by the ?nger of the operator
wall H’ to assist in getting a ball to the base, in
to retract the arm, turn the batter, and retract
time to head off the runner, it being immaterial
whether the ball approaches ‘the base from, the
the bat which he carries, release of the ?nger
grip allowing the spring to swing the bat toward
out?eld or from some other direction. If the
the ball.
‘
r
ball passes between ithelegs of the ?rst base.
. 8| isa ?exible bumper against which the arm
man before the runner reaches such base, the
is swungby the spring ‘I’! on release of the grip
runner is out, and this out is recorded even
15A. Movement of the arm swings the bat in
though the ball hit the runner after it passes
a horizontal arc, in a path intersecting the usual
between the baseman’s legs and is bounced back
trajectory path of the ball 39 as it is delivered 60 by the runnel~ approaching the base. If, ‘how
from the pitcher’s box 45B.
ever, the runner reaches the base before, the
In using the device the board is placed on a
ball, and passage of the ball is blocked by the
table, as the table 49, with the suction cup 41A
runner and the baseman’s legs, the runner is
engaging the table adjacentone edge thereof, and
safe. Should the ?elder ?nd that he is unable
the outer end of the board rested on the opposite
to make the play at ?rst base and the batting
edge of the table. The contestants arrange them
contestant elects to advance the runner past
selves one as a ?elding contestant, in adjacency
such base toward second, the play may be con
to the outer end of the board, and the other
tinued in an endeavor to head the runner. off at
as a batting contestant, in position to operate the
second, or at third, or at home plate. When a, V
hand wheel 61, and the grip end 15A of the arm
runner has reached ?rst base an additional man
15. A runner 43 is placed in the chain socket 5'!
is placed in the socket at home plate and on the.
adjacent home, plate, the other sockets being left
next hit by the batsman play- may, be made at
empty, and the game begins. The ball 39 is
second base for a forced out and continued to. ‘
dropped bythe ?elding contestant through the
?rst base. for a double play. .Runners being ad
hole 45A into the channelway 45 and‘, by rea
vanced may be returned toward bases they have
5
2,412,714
left, but if out of! in attempting such return are‘
6
porting said board for universal tilting‘ move
ment, means forming a pathway for'advancement
of said runners from base to base, means for
advancing runners along said pathway, means at
ants shift position, the batting contestant chang C21 the batter’s end of said board for actuating said
batter and adjacent means for actuating said ad
ing to ?elding contestant, and the ?elding con
vancing means, a channelway for said ball under
testant coming to the plate and becoming the
lying, and extending from the out?eld and to
batting contestant, these positions being alter
ward the batter’s end of, said board, the out?eld
nated for the usual nine innings.
Strikes, balls, outs, andhits may be recorded, 10 end of said channelway being open to receive said
out, and may be doubled off base if they over
run when a ?y is caught.
When three outs have been made the contest
and runs are scored in the usual manner of base
ball scoring, though in usual practice only the
runs will be scored, and as in a ball game, the
side making the most runs is obviously the win
her.
It will be understood- that the post M might be
moved away from the batter end toward the out
?eld end of the board, So long as the shift toward
the out?eld end he not su?icient to interfere with
ball, and its opposite end curving upwardly
through said board forwardly of said batter for
delivery of saidball to said batter, means at the
bases and additional means in the ?eld for trap
15 ping balls batted on the fly, said trapping means
at the bases, respectively having support mem
bers positioned on opposite sides of their related
said bases, spaced to allow free passage of said
ball over the base when unoccupied, but re
the sharp longitudinal tilting of the board which 20 tricted to cooperate with a said runner advanced
is necessary to deliver the ball in pitching. How
to the base to block passage of the ball.
'
ever, it is distinctly preferable that the post be
2. In a game apparatus, a board, a batter and
adjacent the edge of the board at the batter
runners, carried by said board, and a ball, said
end in order that movement of the control ap
board being marked to simulate a baseball dia
paratus, operated by the batter contestant, be
mond and surrounding playing ?eld, means sup
minimized and such contestant be not seriously
porting said board for universal tilting move
interfered with in his operation of the batter
ment, means forming a pathway for advance
and advancement of the runners.
ment of runners from base to base, means
for advancing runners along said pathway, means
The ball preferably is of soft rubber, but if
not of rubber is of such resiliency that when
for actuating said batter, and means for operat~
ing said advancing means; a channelway for said
struck by the bat it may be driven to the out
ball underlying, and extending from the out?eld
?eld and even occasionally over the wall l5 at
the out?eld end, in which latter case a home run
and toward the batter’s end of, said board, the
out?eld end of said channelway being open to
is scored.
receive said ball, and its opposite end curving up
It will be noted that the legs of the chairs, as
wardly through said board forwardly of said bat
the leg MB of the chair 21, in Fig. 2 shows, are
ter, for delivery of said ball, means at the bases
Should
and additional means in the ?eld for trapping
it be desired, additional holes 83, Fig. l, which
balls batted on the ?y, said trapping means at
laterally are spaced to conform to the leg spacing
of the chairs, may be provided, into which the 4-0 the bases, respectively having support members
positioned to cooperate with a runner occupying
legs of the shortstop chairs 3| may be transferred
a base, to block passage of the ball, but allowing
to shift the positions of these chairs, laterally
free passage when said base is unoccupied.
and/ or forwardly, and similarly holes 85 for shift
3. In a game apparatus, a manually manipu
of the out?elder chairs 35, such shift being op
inserted in holes in the board surface.
tional with the ?elder contestant, as where a bat
ting contestant consistently hits to the left or
right, or short.
latable board carrying a batter, a runner, and a
interfere with ?elding the ball.
and ?eld, said board carrying means for trap
ball, said board being marked to simulate a base
ball ?eld, means supporting said board for uni
versal tilting movement, means forming a path~
The pitcher’s box 455 is preferably surrounded
way for advancement of runners from base to
by a wall 8? which, as seen in Fig. 2, extends
above the board surface, this wall preventing the (.1) base, means for advancing runners along said
pathway, manual means for actuating said batter
ball, while being rolled along the board, from
and means for operating said advancing means,
dropping through the board and also assisting
and means forming part of said board operable
in forming a. pocket, in addition to the ?elder
by longitudinal tilt of said board for delivery of
chairs, into which, if the ball on the ?y drops,
said ball to said batter, means at the bases and
the batter is out.
additional means in the ?eld for trapping balls
At home plate the corners 89 of the walls ll
batted on the ?y, said trapping means at said
couoperate with a runner crossing home plate, as
bases respectively having support members posi
do the legs of a baseman with the runner at the
tioned to cooperate with a runner on base to
related base in blocking passage of the ball across
block passage of the ball, but permitting free
the base and indicating that the runner is safe.
passage of said ball when said base is unoccupied.
The sockets 51, Fig. 3, which carry the run
4. In a game device, a ball, and a playing
ners 43, do not project above the board surface so
board marked to simulate a baseball diamond
that when not carrying a runner. they do not
It will be understood also that the use of the 65 ping ?y balls, a batter, and removable runners
on the base lines; means, at the batter end of said
tension spring ll to e?iect the batter’s swing is
board respectively for actuating said batter and ‘
typical only of means for this purpose, and that
means for advancing said runners from base to
except where set out in a claim, it is not my in
base, means adjacent the batter end of said
tent to limit myself to the speci?c detail set out.
70 board effecting universally tiltable support there
I claim:
of, said board being adapted for manual support
1. In a game apparatus, a manually manipu
lable board, a ball, a batter, batting means, and , at its out?eld end to eifect pitching delivery and
subsequent ?elding of said ball, certain of said
runners, carried by said board, said board being
trapping means being respectively placed at the
marked to simulate a baseball diamond, and ?eld,
means adjacent the batter end of said board sup 75 bases and each including supports spaced apart
7
2,4,12,714
to allow free passage of the ball across the re
lated base when unoccupied, but to. block passage
of the ball when a runner occupies the related
said base.
5. In a game apparatus, a manually manipula
ble board, a ball, batting means, and means
8
having mounted on one end thereof, means man
ually operable by one of said contestants, for
batting said ball, and beneath said end a single
downwardly extending post supporting said board
end in raised position for universal tilting move
ment, said boards being manually tiltable by the
adjacent the batting end of said board supporting
other said contestant to deliver and ?eld said
said board for universal tilting movement, means
ball, said post being immediately adjacent said
at the batter’s end of said board for actuating
batting means, whereby to minimize movement of
said batting means, a channelway for said ball 10 said manually operable means with respect to the
underlying, and extending from the out?eld and
contestant operating said means, while said board
toward the batter’s end of, said board, the out
is being tilted by the other said contestant to
?eld end of said channelway being open to re
accomplish delivery of said ball.
,
ceive said ball, and its opposite end curving up
8. A baseball game device for operation by two
wardly and opening through said board forward 15 contestants, said device including a board marked
'13; of said batting means for delivery of said ball
to simulate a baseball ?eld, a ball, and runners,
upwardly and rearwardly past said batting
said board having mounted on one end thereof
means, under manual raising movement of the
means for batting said ball, and adjacent means
end of said board opposite said batting means to
for advancing said runners, both manually oper
propel said ball.
able by one of said contestants, and beneath said
6. A game device including a ball, runners
end a single downwardly extending post support
and a board mounted for manual tilting to ?eld
ing said board in raised position for universal
said ball along its surface, said board having out
\ tilting movement, said board being manually tilt
lined thereon a baseball diamond, including
able by the other said contestant to deliver and
bases; means for advancing runners from base
?eld said ball, said post being immediately ad
to base, and means, respectively each at a said
jacent said batting and advancing means, where
base, spaced to permit free passage of said ball
by to minimize movement of said manually oper
across an unoccupied said base, but adapted to
able means with respect to the contestant operat
block passage when said base is occupied by a
ing said means, while said board is being tilted
runner.
7. A baseball game device for operation by two
contestants, said device including a board marked
to simulate a baseball ?eld, and a ball, said board
30 by the other said contestant to accomplish de
livery and ?elding of said ball.
JULIUS CAESAR.
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