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432-6.
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2,414.06@
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Jan. 7, 1947.
R. R. sNow
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2,414,069
SOAKING PIT AND METHOD OF OPERATING THE SAME
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Filed Sept. 2l. 1943
2 Sheexs-Sheet 1
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Jan. 7, -1947.
R, R_ SNOW
2,414,069
SOAKING PIT AND METHOD 0F OPERATING THE SAME
Filed Sept. 21, 1945
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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INVENTOR:
/Q/CH10/QD /E «5A/0W,
BY:
5
ORNEY.
2,414,069`
Patented Jan. 7, 1947
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,414,069
SOAKING PIT AND METHOD OF
‘
OPERATING THE SAME
Richard R. Snow, Lakewood, Ohio, assigner to~->
The American Steel and Wire Company of New
Jersey, a corporation of New Jersey
Application September 21, 1943, Serial No. 503,252
11 Claims. (Cl. 263-43)
l
2
This invention relates to an improvement in
soaking pit furnaces and to a method of oper
ating the same. These furnaces are commonly
used to heat steel ingots to the proper tempera
ture for rolling, and the invention is more partic
the reference numeral 2 indicates the walls of
a soaking pit furnace. Located on opposite walls,
near the top thereof, are two burners 4. Directly
beneath these burners there may be provided
ports 6 for admitting preheated air to the com
bustion chamber. Near the bottom of the walls,
directly below the burners 4. are exit ports 8 for
ularly adapted to shallow soaking pits of the
recuperative type, although not limited thereto.
It is well known that the time necessary to heat
ingots to the proper rolling temperature far ex
ceeds the theoretical time based on the thermal
conductivity of the steel. This is chieñy due to
the fact that the distribution of temperature
throughout the pit is not uniform, and the rate
of firing must be governed by the temperature
of the hottest part of any ingot. In some fur
naces the common method of heating the ingot
is to fire the furnace for short periods and then
soak the ingots for short periods alternately; and
in other types of furnaces, the fuel rate is cut
materially to prevent overheating and to allow
continuous firing. In many instances the tem
perature rises rapidly at certain points in the
ingot resulting in “hot spots.” In many types
of furnaces the flame impinges directly on the
pit walls or cover at one or more points, causing
excessive damage to the refractory. Due to the>
poor distribution of heat throughout the fur
nace, the thermal efficiency of the furnace is low
and the fuel consumption, therefore, high. Spe
cial types of soaking pit furnaces have been de
veloped which improve the uniformity of temper
3
the waste gases. It will be seen that the burn
ers and ports on the opposite walls are located
adjacent diagonal corners, the distance between
each of the burners and the adjacent corner be
ing such that a row of ingots I0 may be placed
along the adjacent wall without danger of direct
flame impingement thereon. Any suitable pit
cover of conventional design may be used on the
pit.
The method of operating the soaking pit fur
nace is as follows:
Ingots I0 are placed around the periphery of
the pit with a free space directly in front of the
burners. The ingots are spaced from each other
and the wall a distance sufficient to enable them
to be grasped by means of ingot tongs, and to
provide some circulation of gases completely
around the ingot. A second group of ingots I2
may be placed in the center of the pit, this pro
viding a path I4 of suflicient width to enable the
hot gases to pass freely therethrough, and prefer
ably at least two feet wide. The flow of gases is
clearly shown in Figures 1 and 2 by means of
arrows. The velocity of the flame and the stack
ature distribution, but do so at the expense of
draft are so regulated that the hot gases circulate
simplicity of _design, and this results in increased
repairs and less available operating time for the
freely in both vertical and horizontal planes
through the path I4, the direction of flow being
pit.
35 indicated by the arrows. With the ingots ar
It is an object of this invention to accomplish
ranged as shown, at least one side of each ingot
more uniform temperature distribution through
is directly exposed to the hot gases and the flames
out a soaking pit furnace of simple design by pro
cannot impinge upon the pit walls.
viding for better circulation of the hot gases.
The soaking pit of Figures 3 and 4 is quite simi
A further object is to provide a soaking pit in 40 lar to that disclosed in Figures 1 and 2, and the
which there is no direct impingement of the
method of operating it is also similar. Burners
flames on either the pit walls or pit cover.
34 are located near the top of the pit wall 28 at
A still further object is to employ such an ar
two points diametrically opposite. Directly be
rangement of ingots in the furnace and to con
neath the burners may be located preheated air
trol the velocity of the flame s0 that the hot gases 45 ports I5. The burners are directed in essentially
will circulate freely in both a horizontal and ver
parallel planes with the distance between their
tical plane.
center lines being suflicient to cause considerable
These and other objects will be more apparent
circulation of the hot gases in a horizontal plane.
after referring to the following description and
50 Exit ports I8 are located near the bottom of the
attached drawings, in which:
Figure 1 is a plan view of the soaking pit of
the invention showing the arrangement of the
ingots and the direction of ñow of the hot gases;
Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on the line
II-II of Figure 1;
v
Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 1, but show
ing a circular soaking pit; and
Figure 4 is a sectional view taken on the line
pit wall directly under each burner.
In operation, a plurality of ingots 20 are ar
ranged around the circumference of the pit with
a free space in front of each burner. A second
group of ingots 22 may be placed in the center
of the pit, this providing a path 24 similar to the
path I4 in the rectangular soaking pit of Figure
1. The circulation of the heating gases is con
trolled in the same manner as the circulation of
.IV-_IV of Figure 3.
Referring more particularly to the drawings, 60 the hot gases in the rectangular soaking pit, the
n
2,414,069
3
direction of movement of the gases being clearly
shown by the arrows in Figures 3 and 4.
While two embodiments of the invention have
been shown and described, it will be apparent
that other adaptations and modifications may be
made without departing from the scope of the
following claims.
4
the adjacent wall to permit a row of ingots to be
placed along the adjacent wall without danger of
direct flame impingement thereon and exit ports
for the waste gases directly below said burners
near the bottom of the pit, the arrangement of
said ingots being such that a free path is pro
vided for circulation of hot gases both in a hori
I claim:
zontal and vertical plane.
1. A shallow soaking pit furnace for reheating
6. A method of heating ingots in a soaking pit
ingots comprising a pit, oppositely disposed fuel
having two oppositely disposed fuel burners near
burners near the top of the walls of said pit and
the top of the walls of said pit and exit ports di
exit ports through said walls directly below said
rectly below said burners which includes ar
burners, the distance between the center lines of
ranging ingots around the periphery of said pit
said burners being sufficient to cause circulation
with the exception of a space in front of each
of the combustion gases in a horizontal plane, 15 burner so that there is no danger of direct flame
the flame from each of said fuel burners extend
impingement on said ingots, and circulating gases
ing into said pit a sufficient distance from the
from said burners in horizontal and Vertical
adjacent wall to permit a row of ingots to be
planes through a path between said ingots.
placed along the adjacent wall without danger
7. A method of heating ingots in a soaking pit
of direct flame impingement thereon,
20 having two oppositely disposed fuel burners near
2. A shallow soaking pit furnace for reheating
the top of the walls of said pit and exit ports di
ingots comprising a pit, fuel burners disposed
rectly below said burners which includes ar
near the top of opposite walls of said pit and exit
ranging ingots around the periphery of said pit
ports through said opposite walls adjacent the
with the exception of a space in front of each
bottom thereof, the burner in each of said walls
burner so that there is no danger of direct flame
being disposed directly above said exit port, and
impingement on said ingots, arranging other in
at sufficient distance from the corner to permit a
gots in the center of said pit to form a path be
row of ingots to be placed along the adjacent wall
tween the two groups of ingots and circulating hot
`without danger of direct flame impingement
gases from said burners in both horizontal and
thereon and the burner and exit port of one wall 30 vertical planes through said path.
being disposed diagonally with respect to the
8. A method of heating ingots in a soaking pit
burner and exit port of the other wall.
having two oppositely disposed fuel burners near
3. A shallow soaking pit furnace for reheating
the top of the Walls of said pit and exit ports di
ingots comprising a pit, two oppositely disposed
rectly below said burners which includes arrang
burners near the top of the walls of said pit, said 35 ing ingots around the periphery of said pit with
burners being directed in essentially parallel
the exception of a space in front of each burner
planes with the distance between their center lines
so that there is no danger of direct ñame im
being sufficient to cause considerable circulation
pingement on said ingots, and controlling the ve
of the combustion gases in a horizontal plane, the
locity of flame propagation and the stack draft so
flame from each of said fuel burners extending 40 that the hot gases will circulate in horizontal and
into said pit a sufficient distance from the ad
vertical planes through a path between the
jacent wall to permit a row of ingots to be placed
ingots.
along the adjacent wall without danger of direct
9. A method of heating ingots in a soaking pit
flame impingement thereon and exit ports for
having two oppositely disposed fuel burners near
the waste gases directly below said burners near 45 the top of the walls of said pit and exit ports di
the bottom of the pit. the arrangement of said
rectly below said burners which includes ar
ingots being such that a free path is provided for
ranging ingots around the periphery of said pit
circulation of hot gases both in a horizontal and
with the exception of a space in front of each
vertical plane.
burner so that there is no danger of direct ñame
4. A shallow soaking pit furnace for reheating 50 impingement on said ingots, arranging other in
ingots comprising a pit, burners through two op
gots in the center` of said pit to form a path be
posite walls of said pit near the top thereof and
tween the two groups of ingots, and controlling
_ at a sufficient distance from two diagonally op
the velocity of flame propagation and the stack
posite corners to permit placing a row of ingots
draft so that the hot gases will circulate in hori
along the adjacent wall without danger of direct 55 zontal and vertical planes through said path.
flame impingement thereon, and exit ports for
10. A method of heating ingots in a soaking pit,
the waste gases directly below said burners near
which comprises arranging the ingots in rows in
the bottom of said pit, the arrangement of said
the pit so as to provide a combustion zone be
ingots being such that a free path is provided for
tween the ingots, directing a flame from a burner
circulation of hot gases both in a horizontal and
into the furnace, and circulating the gases in a
60
vertical plane.
U-shaped path in a vertical plane through the
5. A shallow circular soaking pit furnace for
said zone.
reheating ingots comprising a pit, burners
11. A method of heating ingots in a soaking pit,
through the walls of said pit at two points diamet
which comprises arranging the ingots in rows in
rically opposite near the top of the pit wall, said 65 the pit so as to provide combustion zones between
burners being directed in essentially parallel
planes with the distance between their center
lines being suiîicient to cause considerable circu
the ingots, directing flames into the pit from
diagonally oppositely disposed burners, and circu
lation of the combustion gases in a horizontal
lating the hot gases from said burners in both
horizontal and vertical planes through the said
plane, the flame from each of said fuel burners
extending into said pit a suñìcient distance from 70
zones.
RICHARD R. SNOW.-
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