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Jan. 14, 1947.
N. BREWER
2,414,086
FLUID METER
Filed Nov. 25, 1943
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
#2294
'1 VEN TOR.
Brewer
8?’
remedies. 14, 1947 * 1
2.414.086 '
UNITED ,sra'rizs ‘PATENT orrlcs
__ 24141086
.rwmmrran"
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_
_
Nathaniel Brewer, Hat?eld, l’a., assignor to
Fischer & ‘Porter Company, Hatboro, Pm, a cor
poration of Pennsyl
Application November 25, 1943, Serial No. 511,019
1
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9 Claims.
(01. 73-209)
The present invention relates to meters respon
sive to‘variations in a variable condition and it
relates more particularly to meters for remote
indication, recording and integration of a varia
ble condition, such as, for example, ?uid flow.
‘An object of the present invention is to pro
vide means for accurate remote indication, re
cording and integration oi.’ rate-of-?ow of a ?uid.
2
and an upper outlet fitting 14 adapted for con
nection to an outlet pipe-line or’ the like, the
ends of the metering tube l2 being held. in ?uid
tight sealing relationship with stu?lng boxes I!
and ii of said ?ttings l3 and 14 respectively, by
means of lower and upper packing rings I1 and
I8 and lower and upper adjustable stu?lng glands
i9 and 20 respectively.
'
Other objects and advantages oi.’ the present
A metering ?oat 21 includes an uppermost coni
invention are apparent in the following detailed 10 cal ?ow-‘constricting head portion 22 adapted for
description, ‘appended claims and accompanying
free up-and-down movement within said meter
drawings.
K
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.
' ing tube l2 and an elongated closed tube 23 ex
For the purpose of illustrating the invention,
tending downwardly from said head portion 22.
there is shown in the accompanying drawings one
A well 24 of suitable corrosion-resistant non
form thereof which is at present preferred, since 15 magnetic‘ material extends downwardly from the
the same has been found in practice to give sat
lower‘ end of the metering tube l2 and through v
isfactory and reliable results, although it is to i the inlet ?tting l3, a drain valve25 being pro
be understood that the various instrumentalities
vided in the lower end of the well 24.
. '
,
of which the inventionconsists can be variously
The well 24 is open at its upper end, so that
arranged and organized and that the invention 20.it is, at all times, ?lled with the ?uid being
is not limited to the precise arrangements and or-_
metered. The extension tube 23 of the meter
ganizations of the instrumentalities as. herein
ing ?oat 2! extends downwardly within the well
shown and described.
24, the tube 23 carrying a. soft iron armature 2B
Referring to the accompanying drawings in - within its lower end.
'
which like reference characters indicate like parts 25 Cutside the well 24 and around it are wrapped '
throughout:
’
,
upper and lower sets of balanced impedance trans
Figure 1 represents a schematic view of one
embodiment of the present invention.
Figure 2 represents a view, on an enlarged.
mitter coils 21 and 28.
,
The position of the impedance coils 21 and 28
may be vertically varied by means of lowermost
scale, showing the magnetic switch mechanism of 30 screw-threaded adjusting nuts 29 working against
the embodiment of Figure 1.
the uppermost coil spring 30.
'
Figure 3 represents a vertical cross-sectional
A-case 3| surrounds the impedance coils 21
view of the rotameter indicating and transmit
and 28 and is provided with a box 32 from which
ting unit of the, present invention.
.
‘
Figure 4 represents an elevational view of the 35
the lead wires to the coils emerge.
I
An outer removable casing 33 having a win
dow 34 therein surrounds the metering tube l2,
‘ invention, parts being broken away better to re
a scale 35 being positioned alongside the tube I2
veal the construction thereof.
whereby the position of the metering ?oat may
Figure 5 represents a wiring diagram illustrat
be read o? against the calibrations/on the scale.
ing the manner of connecting the transmitting 40 The impedance transmitter coils 21 and 28 are
. and receiving coils of the impedance bridge.
electrically connected to a pair of balanced im
In the embodiment shown in the drawings, a
pedance receiver coils 36 and ‘31 as shown in
'rotameter, indicated generally by the reference ’ the wiring diagram of Figure 5.
impedance bridge receiving unit of the present
character I0, is adapted to indicate rate-of-?ow
The ~ laterally-disposed receiver coils 36 and
of ?uid through a pipe-linear the like and is also 45 31 are identical in construction, the coils being
adapted electrically to transmit the rate-of-?ow
wound about cores 38 and 39 which are hard glass
to a remote receiving unit shown in Figure 4
tubes having mirror-smooth cylindrical inner
which is adapted continuously to record the rate
bores of extreme accuracy.v
»of-?ow and also to indicate total ?ow of ?uid
iron armatures 40 and.“ are disposed
passing through the rotameter during a predeter 50 forSoft
free
up-and-down movement within the cores
mined period of time.
38 and 39 respectively, the armatures 40 and 4|
The rotameter It, as shown in Figure 3, in
being supported from opposite ends of a balance
cludes avertical downwardly tapered transparent
beam 44 by ?exible cords 42 and 43 respectively.
metering tube I2, a lower inlet ?tting i3 adapted
for connection to an inlet pipe-line or the like 55 The ends of the beam 44 are formed as verti-‘
cal arc segments 45 and 46, the cords 42 and 43
‘2,414,030
3
4
being connected to the tops of the segments 45 '
bores reduces this friction and resulting error
and 46 and extending downwardly over the seg
to a minimum.
ments so that the armatures 49 and 4|. always -
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-
Furthermore, the use of glass cores together
hang in the same vertical lines. there being no . with the vertical arc‘segments 45 and 46 on the
lateral movement or the armatures with tilting 5 ' balance beam 44 (the vertical arc segments 45 and
of the balance beam 44.
_
The balance beam 44 is provided with an invert
ed V-groove 41 which rests upon knife edges 48
to permit tilting of the beam. The beam 44 is
provided withv an adjustable weight 49 for bal-' 10
ancing the beam.
46 maintaining the'armatures 40 and 4| at the
same-vertical line regardless of tilting of the beam
44) permits the use‘ of smaller diameter cores
which, in turn, allows-more windings to be placed
upon a core of a given axiallength. This increase
in the number of windings possible increases the
'
A pen arm 50 is pivoted as at 5| and is con
‘ strength of the magnetic ?eld created by the
nected to the beam 44 by suitable linkage 52
coils and thus increases the sensitivity of the im
pedance bridge.
'
whereby the pen arm 56 will be moved upon tilt
ing of the beam 44,‘ a pen 53 on' said arm 50 being 15
The balance beam construction of the present
adapted to record said movement upon \a chart
invention has a further ‘advantageover conven
54 which is rotated by a synchronous electric tional constructions in that the use of inverted
motor 65.
>
V-grooves 41 on the beam 44 restingv upon knife
The operation of the present invention in re
edges 48 on the beam support protects the ‘knife
cording r'ate-of-?ow of ?uid will now be described. 20 edge from dust or other foreign matter which
When there is no upward ?ow of ?uid through V ' would cause deterioration or loss of sensitivity (as
the metering tube l2, the metering ?oat 2| , being
~ distinguished from conventional beam construc
somewhat greater in speci?c gravity than the
tions in which exposed knife edges are carried
?uid being metered, remains in its lowermost
by the beam and are supported from underneath).
position. As rate-of-?ow increases, the ?oat rises 25 , The mechanism thus farf described has for its
within the‘metering tube l2, the height of the
, purpose the-remote indication and recording of
?oat indicating rate-of-?ow in a manner well
known in the art.
,
the rate-of-?ow of ?uid passing through the rota
meter |ll.~ The present invention also includes
means for integrating the ?uid flow so as to reg
Movement of the metering ?oat 2| responsive
to changes in rate-of-?ow causes corresponding 30 ister the total amount of ?uid which has passed
through the rotameter l0 during any elapsed peri
changes in the position ‘of the armature 26 rela
od of time.
tive to the impedance transmitter coils 21 and 28;
the higher the metering ?oat, the greater is the
This mechanism, which is shown particularly
in Figures 1 and 2, includes a conventional elec
proportion of the armature. 26'within' the upper
impedance coil 21 and correspondingly less is the 35 trical counter 56 which is adapted to make one
numerical count in the unit digit column with
proportion of the armature 26 within the lower
each break of the electrical circuit following a
impedance coil' 28. As is well known in the art,
the impedance of the upper coil 211s thus in- ' make of the circuit; the'period of time during
which the circuit remains open or closed being
creased while the impedance of the lower coil 28 is
correspondingly decreased.
40
In the balanced electrical circuit shown vin Fig
ure 5 this variation in impedance will vary the
current in the receiver coils 36 and 31 and will ‘
immaterial.
'
The make and break of the circuit is accom
plished by means of a magneticallyeactuated mer
cury switch 51 which is operated by a permanent
bar magnet 58 in a manner to be hereinafter
tend to move the armatures 40 and 4| to corre
sponding positions within their respective coils.
45 described.
_
The mercury switch 51, as shown particularly in
Figure 2, includes a sealed glass body 59 having a
That is, as the armature 26 moves upward rela
tive to' the transmitter coils 21 and 28, the greater
impedance of the upper transmitter coil 21 de
creases the current‘in the left hand receiver coil
small lowermost well 60 which contains a bead of
mercury 6|. A ?xed electrode 62'extends down
31, while the lesser impedance of the lower trans 50 wardly from the top of the body 59 and into the
mercury bead 6|.
mitter coil 28 increases the current in the right
hand receiver coil 36. In this way, upward move
An arm} 63 is mounted at the top of the body 59
and supports one end of a spiral hair spring 64,
ment of the armature 26 will cause a downward
the other end of which extends downwardly and
movement of the armature 40 and an upward
movement of the armature 4| to result in a clock 55 terminates in a plate or ?ag 65 of iron or the like
which is sensitive to magnetism. Extending gen-'
wise tilting-of the balance beam 44. Similarly,
erally horizontally from the lower edge of the
downward movement of the armature 26 will re
sult in a counterclockwise tilting of the balance
?ag 65 is a wire 66 the other end of which termi
beam 44.
nates in a generally vertically extending mova
It is ‘apparent, therefore, that movements of 60 ble electrode 61. The horizontal wire 66 is sup- ‘
the metering ?oat 2| responsive to variations in
ported intermediate its'ends by a looped rod 68
rate-of-?ow will be duplicated by movements of
descending from the arm 63.
the pen 53 upon the rotating chart 54 to give a
In its normal position the mercury switch 51
continuous record of the rate-of-?ow.
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v
is open; the movable. electrode 61 being held
The use-of hard glass cores 38 and 39 for the 65 clear of the mercury bead 6| as shown in dotted
coils 36 and 31 affords‘ distinct advantages over
lines in Figure 2. When, however, either pole of
conventional constructions.
the bar magnet 59 is brought adjacent the right
Thus, it is well known that, in an impedance
hand side of the mercury switch 51, the magnetic
coil,‘ the armature is pulled up‘ against the side’ , attraction will move the ?ag 65 to the right
of the .core by the magnetic ?eld so that a cer 70 against the tension of the-hair spring 64 until the
tain amount of friction results which, in conven
,- switch assumes its closed position, shown in solid
tional constructions, constitutes a serious factor
lines in Figure 2, in which the movable
in determining the sensitivity and accuracy of ‘electrode 61 enters the mercury bead 6|. So
the unit. The use of glass cores having extremely long as the magnetic ?eld from the magnet 58 is
hard and smoothly accurate cylindrical inner 75 uninterrupted the mercury switch 51 will remain
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5.
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closed; the upper end of the ?xed electrode‘ 82 and - and'a correspondingly'greater rotation of ‘the to
the upper end of the arm 88 (which is in electri
talizer wheel 13.
' ‘
cal connection with the movable electrode 81‘
through the spring 84, the flag 88 and the wire 88)
passing‘ through the body 88 of the mercury’
switch and connecting with a cable 88 leading to
the counter 88.
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,
'
- The calibration cam '82 is mounted upon a shaft
.84, the other end of which carries a pinion gear
. 88. which is in engagement with a rack 88, the
rack 88 being connected to the beam 44 by means
,
01' an arm 81 so that tilting. of the beam 44 causes '
Immediately upon interruption of the magnetic
?eld from the magnet 458, the movable electrode
rotation of the pinion 85 and of the calibration
cam 82. This connection‘is so effected that clock
81 will ‘be moved to its open position by the spring 10 wise
tilting of the beam 44 upon increase in rate
84 to breakthe electrical circuit and to operate
of-?ow
produces a counterclockwise rotation of
the counter 58.
,
.
a
_
a
the calibration cam 82 and vice versa.
\an interruptor wheel 18, which is of steel or
The shape ofthe calibration cam is the same
' other magnetic material, is positioned interme
as, the calibration curve of the rotameter as
diate the bar magnet 58 and the mercury switch
51. The interruptor wheel 18 is provided with a
plotted on polar coordinates, so that the length
of the upsweep‘ of the pen 83 and the extent
plurality of radial slots 1| whose function will be
hereinafter described. The interruptor wheel. is ‘ of the upward movement of the actuator 11 bear
the same proportion to the ,maximum upsweep
keyed to' a rotatable shaft 12, the shaft 12 having
and extent of movement 'as the instantaneous
a totalizer wheel-18 keyed to its other end.
-20 rate-of-?ow reading bears to themaximum rate
The totalizer wheel has a hardened knurled
of-?ow reading. Accordingly, the rate of rota
periphery 14 which is adapted to be engaged
tion (R. P. M.) of thetotalizer wheel 13 and
upon upward movement of a pawl 15 mounted up
on one arm 16 of a V-shaped actuator 11 which-v
_ of the interrupter wheel 18- bears the same rela- ,
is loosely pivoted to the shaft 12 as at 18. The 25 tion to the maximum rate of rotation as the in
stantaneous rate-of-?ow reading bears to the
actuator 11 is swept upwa‘rd at‘ regular intervals
maximum rate-of-?ow reading. J _ _
by an eccentric crank 18 hearing against the other
It is apparent that, as the interruptor wheel
arm 88 of said actuator 1.1, the eccentric crank be;
10 is rotated, the magnetic ?eld of the magnet
ing driven by the synchronous motor 55 through
a shaft 8|.
,
58 is intermittently interrupted. That is,'when
'
30 ever an unslctted portion of the wheel 10 is inter
While the uppermost limit of travel of the ac
mediate the magnet 58 and the mercury switch
tuator 11 is ?xed, its lowermost or starting posi
51, the metal of the wheel will de?ect the mag
netic ?eld from the switch so that the switch
of a calibrati n cam 82. That is, they actuator
open. When, on the other hand, one of
11 is supported in its lowermost position by a pin 35 remains
the slots 1| of the wheel 18 comes in line with
83 carried at the outer end of the arm 16 and rest
the magnet 58 and the switch 51, the magnetic
ing upon the periphery of the calibration cam 82. . ?eld of the magnet is free to actuate the switch
. tion is variab e_ and‘ is governed by the position
During upward movement of the eccentric ' and to close the electrical circuit.
"crank 18, the actuator 11 is moved upwardly and
From the foregoing explanation, it is apparent
the knurled periphery 14 of the totalizer wheel 40 that the mercury switch 51 will automatically
?3‘is engaged by the pawl 15 to rotate the totalizer ' close the moment after the leading edge of each
wheel counterclockwise as in Figure 1. ‘During a slot comes in alignment with the switch and the
downward movement of the eccentric crank 18,
magnet and will remain closed as long as the
following each upward sweep, the pawl 15 is dis
slot 1| remains in such alignment and that, as
engaged from the knurled periphery "so that the 45 soon ‘as the leading; edge of each unslctted seg
totaiizer wheel 13 does not rotate, the actuator 11 .' ment of_ the wheel 10 comes intermediate the
descending until the pin 83 strikes the periphery
magnet and the mercury switch, the switch will
i
oi‘ the calibration cam 82.
.
It can be seen that the‘ pin 83 will prevent the
actuator 11 from following the eccentric crank to
the bottom of the latter’s travel and, therefore,
the upward movement of the actuator 11 on the
next succeeding stroke will not begin until the ec
- centric. crank 18 has moved upwardly su?icient
automatically open to register one numerical
count on the counter 56. Thus, the number of
0 counts registered on the counter 56 will be equal
to the rate of rotation of the interruptor wheel
18 multiplied by the number of slots or segments
onthe wheel.
It follows, therefore, that the number of counts
1y to again contact the arm 88 and to lift the pin 55 bears the same proportion to the maximum
83 from the periphery of the calibration cam 82. '
number of counts as the given rate-of-?ow read
ing bears to the maximum rate-of-fiow reading
It is obvious, therefore, that the extent of trav
of the rotameter.
_
el of the actuator 11, and consequently the extent
Since the total flow (?gured as gallons or
of rotation of the totalizer wheel 13, is dependent
upon the starting point of the pin 83 as deter 60 pounds or any other convenient unit) passing
through the rotameter during any elapsed period
mined by the position of the calibration wheel 82.
' of time at the maximum rate-of-?ow can read
That is, if the calibration cam 82 is in the posi
ily be determined, it is a simple matter to calcu
tion shown in Figure 1, the pin 83 will be sup
ported at a relatively high resting position so that 65- late the total flow actually passing through the
rotameter during the same period of time by mul
the actuator 11 will be engaged much after start
tiplying the maximum rate of flow by an in
ing of upward movement of the eccentric crank 18
so as to give a relatively small movement of the
actuator 11 and a relatively small angle of rota
tegrator'factor; the integrator factor being the
ratio of actual counts to maximum counts- for
the elapsed period.
tion of the totalizer wheel 13. If, on the other 70
By way of illustration, if it is known that, at
hand, the calibration cam were rotated counter
maximum rate-of-flow, 500 gallons of ?uid will
clockwise from the position shown in Figure 1 it
pass through the rotameter in one hour and/that
is apparent that the starting position of the pin
the total number of counts at such maximum
83 would be moved downwardly to give a corre
rate-of-flow is 320, and if it is found in actual
spondingly greater. movement of the actuator 11 75 operation
that only 160 counts were registered
9,414,086 v
1
during the hour. it is apparent that the total ?ow
beam responsive to movements of said ?oat, said
last-mentioned means comprising an alternating
currentv impedance circuit including a pair of
'end-to-end co-axial transmitter coils disposed
about said extension tube, an armature carried
by saidelongated member and adapted to be
indicate a total ?ow of 450 gallons.
The integrating mechanism of the present in- , moved with said transmitter coils by said ?oat,
which actually passed through the J rotameter
during that hour was 250 gallons. Similarly, an
actual count of 80 would indicate a total ?ow of
125 gallons, while an actual count of 288 would
'vention has several distinct advantages over
a pair of generally vertical 7 laterally-disposed
parallel cylindrical receiver coils, and a pair of
totalizers heretofore employed. Thus, for exam
ple, the counting is done 'without imposing any 10 armatures carried by said beam and extending
within said receiver coils and adapted to be pulled
appreciable load whatever upon the metering
thereby so as to exert opposite moments upon
?oat. Furthermore, since the totalizer "‘feels
said beam, the relative impedance of said trans
out” the instantaneous rate of ?ow several‘ times
mitter coils being varied upon movement of the
a minute (for example, the totalizer can be set
to make four sweeps per minute), the mechanism 15 ?oat-carried armature thereby to vary the cur
rent ?owing in the respective receiver coils so as
adjusts its rate ‘of counting with sufficient fre
to vary the pull onthe respective beam armatures
quency to ensure high accuracy.
. Another advantage of the integrator of the ‘
and thus totilt said beam.
,
. v '
2. In a system for remote indication of ?uid
or more electrical counters at any convenient 20 rate-of-?ow having a rotameter including a ver
.tical metering tube and a ?oat‘ada-pted for free
location by simply connecting them in parallel
up-and-down movement responsive to variations
with the mercury circuit.
in rate-of-?ow of ?uid through said tube and
Furthermore, electrical ticket- or tape-printing
having indicating means remote‘ from said rotam
counters of conventional construction can be used
eter; an extension tube disposed in‘axial align
in place of, o'r'in addition to‘ the counter de
ment with said metering .tube, an elongated mem
scribed hereinabove.
ber extending from said metering ?oat into said
,As shown particularly in Figures 1 and 3, the
extension tube, a balanced beam connected to
remote rate-of-ilow recorder and the integrator
said indicating means, and means for tilting said
can be combined in a single unit for convenient
30 beam responsive to movements of said ?oat, said
last-mentioned means comprising an alternating
While, for purposes of illustration, the inte
grator mechanism of the present invention has . current impedance circuit including a pair of
end-to-end co-axial transmitter coils disposed
been described in connection with measurement
about said extension tube, an armature carried
of ?uid ?ow wherein it constitutes a. preferred
embodiment, it is apparent that the integrator 85 by said elongated member and adapted to be
moved within said transmitter coils by said ?oat,
mechanism could be used equally well in con
present invention is‘that it permits the use of 2
reading.
_
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nection with measurement of other variable con-_
ditions, such as temperature, pressure, etc. That I
is, it is apparent that the calibration cam could
be rotated by the action of elements sensitive to
variations in other conditions. For example, the
calibration cam could be rotated by a tempera
a pair of generally vertical laterally-disposed
parallel cylindrical receiver coils, and a Pair of
armatures carried by said beam and extending
within said receiver coils and adapted to be
pulled thereby 'so as to exert opposite moments
upon said beam, the relative impedance of said
transmitter coils being varied upon movement of
ture- or pressure-sensitive 'element such as a
the ?oat-carried armature thereby to varythe
Bourdon tube.
The integrator of the present invention could 45 current ?owing in the respective receiver coils
so as to vary the pull on the respective beam ar
also be used, for examplevto integrate, into total
miles covered, the readings of a speedometer in
dicating miles per hour. Again, it could be used
to integrate, into total pounds carried, the read
ings of a continuous weigher measuring pounds 50
matures and thus to tilt said beam, said receiver
coils being provided with cores of hard glass tub
ing having an extremely smooth and accurate cy
lindrical inner bore whereby the beam-armatures
per minute carried by a belt conveyor or the
like.
little friction.
The present invention may be embodied in
other speci?c forms without departing from the
will move within said receiver coils with very
' ‘
3. In a system for remote indication of ?uid
' rate-of-?ow having a rotameter including a ver
tical metering tube and a ?oat adapted for free
55
spirit or essential attributes thereof, and it is
up-and-down movement responsive to variations
therefore desired that the present embodiment
be considered in all respects as illustrative and not
in rate-of-?ow of ?uid through said tube and
having indicating means remote from said ro
restrictive, reference being had to the appended ‘ tameter; an extension tube disposed in axial
claims rather than to the foregoing description 60 alignment with said meteringv tube, an elongated
to indicate the scope of the invention.
Having thus described the invention, what I
' ‘claim as new and desire to protect 'by Letters
Patent is:
1
member extending from said metering ?oat into
said extension tube, a balanced beam connected
to said indicating means, and means for tilting
said beam responsive to movementof said ?oat,
1. In a system for remotev indication of fluid 65 said last-mentioned means comprising an alter
nating current impedance circuit including a pair
~ rate-of-?ow having a rotameter including a ver
of end-to-end co-axial transmitter coils dis
tical metering tube and a ?oat adapted for free
posed about said extension tube, an armature car
upeand-down movement responsive to variations
in rate-of-?ow of ?uid through said tube and
ried by said elongated member and adapted to be.
having indicating means remote from said rotam 70 moved within said transmitter coils by said ?oat,
a pair of generally vertical laterally-disposed par
eter; an extension tube disposed in axial align
allel cylindrical receiver coils, and a pair of ar
ment with said metering tube, an elongated mem
matures carried by said beam and extending with
, ber extending from said metering ?oat into said
in said receiver coils and adapted to be pulled
extension tube, a balanced beam connected to
said indicating means, and means for tilting said 75 thereby so as to exert opposite moments upon
2,414,086 ‘
said beam, the relative impedance oi said trans
mitter coils being varied upon movement of the
?oat-carried armature thereby to vary the cur
rent ?owing in the respective receiver coils so as
-
10
for free up-andvldown movement responsive to
variations in rate-of-?ow through said tube, and
having an electrical counter; a magnet, a mag
netically-operated switch adapted to actuate said
.to vary the pull on the respective beam armatures
counter, means for periodically interrupting the
and thus to tilt said beam, said beam having
magnetic ?eld of said magnet thereby periodically
means at its opposite ends for supporting said
to operate said switch, and means actuated by
armatures generally in the same vertical lines re
said metering ?oat for controlling said interrupt
gardless of tilting of said beam.
ing means for varying the rate of interruption
4. In- a system for remote indication and in 10 of said magnetic ?eld, thereby to vary the total
tegration of ?uid rate-of-?ow having a rotam
registered by said counter during said elapsed
eter including a vertical metering tube and a ?oat
time period.
adapted for free up-and-down movement respon
7. In a system for measuring total ?uid ?ow
sive to variations in rate-of-?ow of ?uid through
during a predetermined elapsed time period, said
said tube, and having indicating means remote 15 system having a rotameter including a vertical
from said rotameter, and electrical counting
metering tube and a metering ?oat adapted for
means; an extension tube disposed in axial
- free up-and-down movement responsive to varia
alignment with said metering tube, an elongated
tions in rate-of-?ow through said tube, and hav
member extending from said metering ?oat into
ing an electrical counter; a magnet, a magneti
said extension tube, a balanced beam connected 20 cally-operated switch adapted to actuate said
to said indicating means, means for tilting said
counter, means for periodically interrupting the
~beam responsive to movements of said ?oat, said
magnetic ?eld of said magnet thereby periodi
last-mentioned- comprising an alternating cur
cally to operate said switch, said last-mentioned
rent impedance circuit including a pair of end
means including a slotted interruptor wheel ro
to-end co-axial transmitter coils disposed about 25 tatably mounted adjacent said switch, and means Y
said extension tube, an armature carried by said v actuated by said metering ?oat for varying the
elongated member and adapted to be moved with
rate of rotation of said interruptor wheel, there
in said transmitter coils by said ?oat, a pair of
by to vary the total registered by said counter
generally vertical laterally-disposed receiver coils,
during said elapsed time period.
and a pair of armatures carried by said beam and 30
8. In a system for measuring total ?uid ?ow
extending within said receiver coils and adapted
~ during a predetermined elapsed time period, said
to be pulled thereby so as to exert‘opposite mo
ments upon said beam, the relative impedance of
said transmitter coils being varied upon move
system having a rotameter including a vertical
metering tube and a metering ?oat adapted for
free up-and-down movement responsive to varia
ment or the ?oat-carried armature thereby to 35 tions in rate-of-?ow through said tube, and hav
vary the current ?owing in the respective receiver
ing an electrical counter; a magnet, a magneti
coils so as to vary the pull on the respective beam
cally-operated switch adapted to actuate said
armatures and thus to tilt said beam, and means
counter, means for periodically interrupting the
connected to said beam for varying the rate of
magnetic ?eld of said magnet thereby periodi
counting of said counting means responsive to 40 cally to operate said switch, said last-mentioned
variations in the rate-oi-?ow of ?uid.
means including a slotted interruptor wheel ro
5. In a system for remote indication and in
tatably mounted adjacent said switch, and means
tegration of ?uid rate-oi-?ow having a rotameter ' for varying the rate of interruption of said mag
including a vertical metering tube and a ?oat
netic ?eld thereby to vary the total registeredby
adapted for free up-and-down movement respon 45 said counter during said elapsed time period, said
sive to variations in rate-oi-?ow of ?uid through
last-mentioned means including a balanced
said tube, and having indicating means remote
beam, an electrical impedance circuit for tilting
from said rotameter, and electrical counting
said beam responsive to movement of said meter
means; a balanced beam connected to said indi
ing ?oat, and means actuated by tilting of said
cating means, means for tilting said beam re 50 beam for varying the rate of rotation of said
. sponsive to movements 01' said ?oat, said last
interruptor wheel.
mentioned means comprising an alternating cur- '
9. In a system for measuring total ?uid ?ow
rent impedance circuit including a pair vof end
during a predetermined elapsed time period, said
to-end transmitter coils co-axial with said meter;
system having a rotameter including a vertical
ing tube, an armature carried by said ?oat and 55 metering tube and a metering ?oat adapted for
adapted to be moved within said transmitter
free up-and-down movement responsive to varia
coils, a pair of generally vertical laterally-dis~
tions in rate-of-?ow through said tube, and hav
posed receiver coils, and a pair of armatures
ing an electrical counter; a, magnet, a magneti
carried by said beam and extending within said
cally-operated switch adapted to actuate said
receiver coils and adapted to be pulled thereby 60 counter, means for periodically interrupting the
so as to exert opposite moments upon said beam,
magnetic ?eld of said magnet thereby periodi
the relative impedance of said'transmitter coils '
cally to operate said switch, said interrupting
being varied upon movement of the ?oat-carried
means including a slotted interruptor wheel ro
armature thereby to vary the current-?owing in
tatably mounted adjacent said switch, and means
the respective receiver‘ coils so as to vary the 65 for varying the rate of interruption of said mag
pull on the respective beam armatures and thus
netic ?eld thereby to vary the total registeredby
to tilt'said beam, and means connected to said
said counter during said elapsed time period, said
beam for varying the rate of counting of said
' last-mentioned means including a cam, means for
counting means responsive to variations in the
rotating said cam responsive to movement of said
rate-of-?ow oi ?uid.
"
70 metering ?oat and means for varying the rate
6. In a system for measuring total ?uid ?ow
of rotation of said interruptor wheel responsive
during a predetermined elapsed time period,
to rotation of said cam.
said system having a rotameter including a ver
tical metering tube and a metering ?oat adapted
NATHANIEL BREWER.
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