close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US3021133

код для вставки
Feb. 13, 1962
G. R. MORTON
3,021,123
CARBURETOR AND MEAN§ FOR CONTROLLING THE SAME
Filed Sept. 16, 1959
men 42 . Warren
l9 77 W261i
ice
3,021,123
Patented Feb. 13, 1962
2
3 021 123
CAURETOR AND MEAT‘IS FOR CGNTROLLING
THE SAME
Glen R. Morton, 7025 Sarpy Ave., Omaha, Nebr.
Filed Sept. 16, 1959, Ser. No. 840,389
4 Claims. (Cl. 261-—39)
This invention relates to carburetors for internal com
bustion engines and more particularly to a barometric con
on line 2-2 of ‘FIG. 1 and more fully illustrates its con
struction, and
FIG. 3 is a horizontal cross sectional view of my ca "
buretor and control means taken on line 3—3 of HG. 1.
As herebefore indicated, the purpose of my carburetor
when in use is to furnish to the engine the same amount
of air by weight instead of the same amount of air by
volume such as carburetors herebefore have been doing.
By operating in air by weight instead of by volume, my
trolled carburetor.
10 carburetor will not only automatically compensate for
The use of carburetors for furnishing an explosive
different densities of air due to di?erent altitudes, but also
charge to gasoline engines is old. in general, the pur
will compensate for the varying densities of air caused by
pose of a carburetor is to mix the liquid fuel, such as
climatic conditions, such as hot and cold days and like.
gasoline, with air and thereby produce an ignitable gas.
In the drawing I have used the numeral 11) to designate
Obviously, the e?iciency of an internal combustion engine 15 an ordinary air filter on a down draft carburetor. The
will depend on the proper mixture of the air and gasoline.
Substantially any standard carburetor may be adjusted to
peak e?iciency for a given atmospheric pressure' The
numeral 11 designates the fuel intake manifold of an in
ternal combustion engine. I mount my carburetor and
its control means between the air ?lter 10 and manifold
problem, however, is that atmospheric pressures are con
11 as shown in FIG. 1. The numeral 12 designates the
stantly changing and this is particularly true in the case of 20 usual carburetor conduit having one end communicated
airplanes that well may be operating from sea level to
with the inside of the air ?lter 1t} and its other end com
many thousands of feet above ‘the earth surface and where
municating with the inside of the manifold 11. This con
the atmospheric pressure is greatly reduced. Some at
duit has the usual diameter restricted or Venturi area 13.
tempt has been made to compensate for this great varia~
The carburetor bowl is designated by the numeral 15, and
tion of atmospheric pressures by the use of super-chargers. 25 has the usual pipe 16 adapted to communicate with a
However, super-chargers are of set capacities and are
source of liquid fuel. The numeral 17 designates the car
neither ?exible nor automatic. Besides this problem for
buretor fuel inlet needle valve controlled by the usual
aircraft, it also is a problem for other automotive vehicles
?oat 19. The numeral 29 designates the usual fuel in
such as automobiles, trucks, vbuses and like, inasmuch as
jector spout extending from the inside bottom of the car
they may be traveling intermittently in valleys or over 30 buretor bowl and terminating within the restricted area
mountains. Furthermore, climatical conditions change
13, as shown in FIG. 1. The numeral 21 designates an
barometric pressures from day to day even though the
operation is of a common altitude above sea level.
air pressure passageway having one end communicating
with the inside top of the carburetor bowl and its other
Therefore, one of the principal objects of my invention
end communicating with the inside of the conduit 12
is to provide a carburetor for internal combustion engines 35 below the diameter restricted area 13. The numeral 22
that will automatically compensate for different air pres
designates an ordinary butter?y throttle valve rotatably
sures and thereby make possible a highly e?icient engine
mounted in the upper end portion of the conduit 12 and
regardless of whether or not it is operating in heavy or
which is manually controlled by the rod 23. The car
light atmospheric pressures.
buretor thus far described is standard and it is to such
More speci?cally, the object of this invention is to pro 40 or similar carburetors that I apply my auxiliary control
vide an auxiliary carburetor control means that is actu
ated by changing barometric pressures.
A further object or" this invention is to provide a sim
pli?ed lightweight automatic carburetor for gasoline or
like engines.
A still further object of this invention is to maintain
full compression of an internal combustion engine at vary
ing altitudes and without producing too high a compres
sion ratio when the engine is operating in high atmos
pheric pressures.
=
A still further object of this invention is to provide a
carburetor means for internal combustion engines that
makes possible the reduction in the sizes of its combustion
chambers.
means and which I will now describe in detail.
The numeral 25 designates a barometric housing se
cured to the side of the conduit 12. This housing has an‘
enlarged inside area 26 and a cylindrical area 27 com
45 municating with the area 26, as shown in FIG. 1. The
numeral 29 designates a piston slidably mounted in the
cylindrical area 27.
The numeral 30 designates a rod
shaft secured to the piston 29 and slidably extending into
the conduit 12 at a point above its diameter restricted
50 area 13. The numeral 31 designates a vertical slot in the
free end portion of the rod shaft 30 that extends into the
conduit 12. The numeral 32 designates a rotatably
mounted butterfly valve in the conduit 12 and which is
positioned below the butter?y valve 22. The numeral 33
designates an arm extending from the butter?y valve 32
and which has a pin 35 slidably extending into the slot
so efficient in operation as to reduce the pollution of the
31. By this construction of parts, when the rod shaft
air by the exhaust from the engine.
.
30 is slidably moved further into the conduit 12, the
Still further objects of my invention are to provide a
butte?y valve 32 will be opened accordingly, as shown
carburetor means that is economical in manufacture and 60 by broken lines in FIG. 1. Conversely, when the rod
durable in use.
p
_
~
shaft 30 is slid outwardly from the conduit 12, the butter
These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled
~?y valve 32 will be rotated toward a more closed posi
in the art.
tion within the conduit 12. The numeral 36 designates
an ordinary bellows type barometer positioned within thev
My invention consists in the construction, arrangements,
and combination, of the various parts of the device, where 65 area 26 of the housing 25 and having a shaft 37 connected
A still further object of this invention is to provide a
carburetor means for internal combustion engines that is
by the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter <
more fully set forth, speci?cally pointed out in my claims,
and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:
to one of its ends and also connected to the piston 29.
On the other or outer end of the barometer is a bearing
39. The numeral 40 designates a screw threaded through
the outer end of the housing 25 and having a ball bearing
FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional view of my carburetor
70 41 on its inner end and in engagement with the bearing
and its control means,
39 of the barometer. This screw 40 acts as an adjust—
FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view of my device taken
ing screw for setting the barometer 36. The numeral 42
enemas
"3
4
carburetor exterior of said conduit and in communication
designates a lock nut on the screw bid for preventing its
with the outside atmosphere, a mechanical linkage means
accidental rotation.
The numeral 43 designates a passageway in the housing
slidably extending into said conduit between said second
butter?y valve and said diameter restricted area,-one end
of said mechanical linkage means hingedly secured to
said second butter?y valve and its other end rigidly
secured to said barometric bellows, said mechanical link~
age means directly connecting said second butter?y valve
and said barometric bellows whereby as the variations in
25 communicating with its inside area 26 and the outside
atmosphere. The numeral 45 designates a passageway in
the conduit 12 having one end communicating with the
inside area 27 back of the piston 29, and its other end
communicating with the inside of the conduit 12, above
the restricted area 13 and below the butter?y valve 32.
the outside atmospheric pressure respectively exp-and and
The operation of my device is as follows. In starting 10 contract said barometric bellows, said second butter?y
the internal combusion engine, the butter?y throttle
‘valve is yieldingly actuated respectively open and closed,
valve 22 will be opened in the usual manner. With the
and means for adjusting the force of said barometric
engine turning over, air will be drawn past the butter
bellows.
?y valve 22 and through the conduit 12. Normally,
2. In combination, a carburetor having a conduit, one
and especially if the engine is at near sea level, the 15 end of said conduit operatively communicating with the
butter?y valve 32 will be substantially closed but its
outside atmosphere, the other end of said conduit oper
closed position will only be held yieldingly so by the
atively communicating with the intake manifold of an in
operation of the barometer and therefore with the air
ternal combustion engine, a diameter restricted venturi
current passing through the conduit‘12, the valve 32 will
area within said conduit, a fuel nozzle in communication
be partially opened by the downwardly moving column
with a source of fuel and disposed so as to discharge said
fuel into said diameterrestricted area, a manually actu
of air past the throttle 22. The tendency of the barometer,
however, will be to yieldingly hold the butter?y valve 32
vated butter?y throttle valve disposed within said conduit
in a nearly closed position. However, this yielding
action of the valve 32 by the barometer will automatically
.near said end ,operatively.communicating with the out
:side atmosphere, :a-second butter?y valve disposed within
decrease in force as the atmospheric pressure becomes 25 said‘conduitbetween said ?rst mentioned butter?y valve
thinner. With the barometer exerting less yielding force
andsaid diameter restricted area, a housing secured to and
on the butter?y valve 32, it ‘will automatically assume
vextending horizontally from the exterior wall of said
a relatively more openpositiomthereby permitting more
.conduit, a horizontally elongated barometric bellows
air by weight to pass through the conduit 12. Con
having two ends and disposed within said housing and in
versely, if the vehicle is'moving into heavier airdensity, 30 communication with the outside atmosphere, one of said
the barometer 36 will‘ tend to collapse and thereby pro
:ends of said barometric bellows operatively secured to the
duce greater yielding force for holding the valve 32
end of said housing farthestfrom said conduit, a me
toward a closed position. Thus, as heavier air is en~
chanical linkage means slidably extending into said con
countered, the buter?y valve 32' will be yieldingly moved
35 .duitbetween said second butter?y valve and said diameter
toward a more'closed position and when less air ‘pressure
is encountered, the butter?y valve 32 will move to a
relatively more open position, and thereby automatically
compensate for the varying air densities encountered.
Thus, the air pressure actuated barometer will permit
more air to pass through the conduit 12 as less air pres
sure is encountered and will move in the opposite di
restricted area, one end of said mechanical linkage means
40
rection when greater air'pressure is encountered. Further
more, the mechanism will be both aided and dampened by
the forward side of the piston 29‘ being incommunica
hingedly- secured to said second butter?y valve and its
other end rigidly secured to said barometric bellows,
said mechanical linkage means directly connecting said
secondbutter?y valve'and said other end of said baro
metric bellows whereby as the variations in the outside at
;mospheric pressure respectively'expand and contract said
barometric bellows, said second butter?y valve is yield
ingly actuated respectively open and closed, and means
. for adjusting the effective force of said barometric bellows.
tion with theinside of the conduit 12 at a pointabove the 45
3. In combination, a carburetor having a conduit, one
restricted area 13, and the other side of the piston being
--end,of said conduit. operatively communicating with the
in communication with-the outside atmosphere.
The
outside ,atmosphere,v_the other end of said conduit opera
tively communicating with the intake manifold of an in’
operation that I have-found it possible to eliminate the
zternal
combustion engine, a diameter restricted venturi
?oat l9 and fuel pump. Also, the combustion chambers 60 area within said conduit, ;a fuel nozzle in communication
carburetorv and, its control means is so highly efficient in
of the internal combustion engine 'may ‘be reduced in
‘area. The automatic operation of the barometer makes
super-chargers unnecessary.
Some changes may be made in‘the constructionand
arrangementb?my carburetor‘and means for controlling
the same ‘without departing from thermal spirit and-pur
pose of my invention, and it is my intention to cover by
my claims, any modi?ed forms of structure'or use of
mechanical equivalents which may be reasonably included
within their scope.
1 claim:
1. In combination; a carburetor having-a conduit, one
end of said conduit operatively communicating with the
outside atmosphere, the other end of saidconduit oper- ‘
with a source of fuel and disposed so vas to discharge said
fuel into said diameter, restricted area, a manually actu
ated butter?y throttle valve disposed within said conduit
said endoperatively communicating with the outside
55 ‘.near
atmosphere, a second butter?y valve disposed within said
conduit ‘between said first mentioned butter?y valve and
said diameter restricted area, an air pressure actuated
barometric bellows operatively secured to said carburetor
exterior of said conduit and in communication with the
60 outside atmospheraa mechanical linkage means slidably
extending into said conduit between said second butter?y
'valve and its other end rigidly secured to said barometric
bellows, a cylinder communication atone end with the
interior of said conduit between said second butter?y
atively communicating with the intake manifold ‘of an 65 valve and said diameter restricted area and its other end
internal combustion engine, a diameter restricted venturi
communicating with the interior of said housing and the
area within said conduit, a fuel nozzle in communication
outside atmosphere, a pistonslidable in said cylinder, said
~with~a source of fuel and disposed so as to discharge
, piston adapted to be rigidly concentrically secured to said
~said fuel into said diameter restricted ‘area, a manually
mechanical linkage means, said mechanical linkage means
actuated butterfly throttle valve disposed within said 70 directly connecting said second butter?y valve and said
'conduit near said end operatively communicating with
barometric bellows whereby as the variations in the out
the outside atmosphere, a second butter?y valve disposed
within said conduit between said ?rst mentioned butter?y
side atmosphere pressure respectively expand and con
tract said barometric bellows, said, second butter?y valve
v,isl
yieldingly actuated respectivelyopen and closed, and
76
actuated barometric bellows operatively secured to said
valve and said diameter restricted area,.an air pressure
3,021,123
5
means for adjusting the effective force of said barometric
bellows.
,
4. In combination, a carburetor having a conduit, one
end of said conduit operatively communicating with the
outside atmosphere, the other end of said conduit opera
tively communicating with the intake manifold of an in
ternal combustion engine, a diameter restricted venturi
6
diameter restricted area and its other end communicat
ing with the interior of said housing and the outside at
mosphere, a piston slidable in said cylinder, said piston
adapted to be rigidly concentrically secured to said me
chanical linkage means, said mechanical linkage means di
rectly connecting said second ‘butter?y valve and said
other end of said barometric bellows whereby as the
area within said conduit, a fuel nozzle in communication
variations in atmospheric pressure respectively expand
with a source of fuel and disposed so as to discharge said
and contract said barometric bellows, said second butter
fuel into said diameter restricted area, a manually actu 10 ?y
valve is yieldingly actuated respectively open and
ated butter?y throttle valve disposed within said conduit
closed, and means for adjusting the effective force of said
near said end operatively communicating with the outside
barometric bellows.
atmosphere, a second butter?y valve disposed within said
conduit between said ?rs-t mentioned butter?y valve and
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
said diameter restricted area, a housing secured to and 15
UNITED STATES PATENTS
extending horizontally from the exterior wall of said con
duit, a horizontally elongated barometric bellows having
two ends and disposed within said housing and in com
munication with the outside atmosphere, one of said ends
of said barometric bellows operatively secured to the end 20
of said housing farthest from said conduit, a mechani
cal linkage means slidably extending into said conduit be
tween said second butter?y valve and said diameter re
stricted area, one end of said mechanical linkage means
hingedly secured to said second butter?y valve and its 25
other end rigidly secured to said barometric bellows, a
cylinder communicating at one end with the interior of
said conduit between said second butter?y valve and said
1,582,239
2,155,950
2,159,173
2,239,305
2,264,869
Barbarou ____________ __ Apr. 27,
Nallinger ____________ __ Apr. 25,
Mennesson ___________ __ May 23,
Tacconi ______________ __ Apr. 22,
Beardsley _____________ __ Dec. 2,
1926
1939
1939
1941
1941
2,284,687
2,362,346
2,626,789
Schimanek ____________ __ June 2, 1942
Blake ________________ ._ NOV. 7, 1944
Mock ________________ __ Jan. 27, 1953
361,868
623,249
Italy _________________ __ Aug. 6, 1938
Germany ____________ __ Nov. 28, 1935
FOREIGN PATENTS
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
535 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа