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Патент USA US3029504

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April 17, 1962
3,029,492
R. w. CUTLER
METHOD FOR TREATING WOVEN FABRIC
Filed June 18, 1958
2 Sheets—Sheet 1
5.1 1
I
NQULI
INVENTOR.
Roar-2a W. CuTLca
‘
4.
,
A
I
ATTORNEY
April 17, 1962
R. w. CUTLER
3,029,492
METHOD FOR TREATING WOVEN FABRIC
Filed June 18, 1958
'2 Sheets-Sheet 2
75/ -----
///l
h
48a.
INVENTOR.
ROGER W. CUTLER
ATTORNEY
United States
'
QC
“ atent
1
3,029,492
Patented Apr. 17, 1962
2
3,029,492
METHGD FGR TREATING WOVEN FABRIC
in some illustrative examples of the invention are shown,
and wherein:
FIGURE 1 is a side elevation showing an apparatus
Roger ‘W. Cutler, Calhoun Towers, Greenvilie, S. C.
Filed Tune 18, 1958, Ser. No. 742,772
7 Claims. (0.26-68)
constructed in accordance with the present invention for
carrying out the method of the present invention,
This invention relates to a method and apparatus for
FIGURE 1,
FIGURE 1-A is a continuation of the left hand endof
treating woven textile materials, and more particularly
' FIGURE 2 is a perspective view at a reduced scale _
to an improved method and apparatus for treating narrow
looking from the right hand rear side of FIGURE 1, and
woven fabrics by impregnating and attenuating the fabrics 10
FIGURE 3 is an enlarged transverse sectional view
in a liquid bath and then drying same.
taken on the line 3--3 in FIGURE 1.
It is well known to those skilled in the art relating to
Referring more particularly to the drawings, woven
the treatment of‘textile yarns and fabrics that the char
material or tape T is shown being fed from a source of
acteristics of such textile material may be improved by
supply and under a partially submerged horizontal trans
impregnation in liquid mediums of various types, usually 15 versely disposed roll A. The fabric T passes between the
in the form of emulsions. Formerly, in such impregnating
bite of the first of a pair of axially oscillating rolls B on the
processes, the textile material is stretched during its pas
forward side of roll A and thence between the bite of the
sage through the ?uid medium or while the yarn still car
second of the submerged axially oscillating rolls B on the
I'lBS an excms of the liquid medium. While such processes
far side of roll A. From thence the tape T passes under the
have proved very advantageous in treating many different 20 ?rst of a second pair of rolls C which are shown above but
types of textile products, it is desired that the strength and
which may also be immersed in the liquid L. ‘The fabric
wearing properties of textile material be improved even
T then passes under the second of the rolls C while being
more than has heretofore been possible. It is particularly
sprayed with the liquid or emulsion with which the fabric
desirable that tape or belting, especially where it is con
is being treated. The fabric T then passes between a plu
structed of ?lament or spun yarn, have its wearing qual 25 rality of squeeze rolls D where a large portion of the
ities and strength improved. It is especially important
excess of liquid is removed from the fabric before the
that the stretch at break of the yarn be controlled within
fabric is passed into the heated drier E. The fabric T
desirable limits.
is passed through and doubled back a suitable number
Accordingly, it is an important object of this invention
of times through the drier E. It is important to note
to improve the wearing qualities especially of narrow
that the rolls F at this point exert suiiicient tension upon
fabrics by an improved process and apparatus for im
the fabric T to retain the attenuation of the fabric T which
pregnating, attenuating, and drying of the fabric.
was attained by pushing the fabric through the immersion
Another object of this invention is the provision of a
process to the squeeze rolls. At no time, prior to the
method of impregnating narrow woven fabrics in which
entry of the fabric into the drier E, is the fabric subjected
the fabric is passed through a ?uid medium and subjected 35 to tension, the fabric being simply advanced by the action
to the rubbing action of submerged rolls, and in which the
of the various rolls, a slight attenuation being imparted
yarn is pushed forwardly by the rolls but which is at
to the fabric by the twisting and untwisting action of the
no time stretched by being subjected to tension.
transversely oscillating rolls B and C in the presence of
An important object of this invention is the provision
the liquid medium. It has been found desirable that a
of a method of treating narrow woven fabrics in which the 40 liquid medium in the form of an emulsion including poly
stretch at break of the fabric is ‘controlled within desir
vinyl acetate in such proportion as to cause the fabric to
able limits.
retain 3% to 6% solids from the emulsion be used.
Another ‘object of this invention is to provide an appa
A suitable frame 10 is shown in FIGURE 1 for sup
ratus for treating narrow woven fabric in which oscillat
porting horizontal transversely disposed guide bars 11
ing rolls are provided for twisting and untwisting the 45 which guide the fabric T as it is being withdrawn from,
waip yarns passing in contact with the rolls While the rolls
the supply box 12. The fabric T is fed by passing same
are immersed in a fluid medium and for drying the fabric
between a plurality of pairs of rolls each having a lower
relatively rapidly while subjecting the fabric to su?ic-ient
driven roll 13 and an upper superposed roll 14. An elon
tension to maintain the attenuation already imparted to
gated rectangular frame broadly designated at 15 is
the fabric.
50 shown constructed of suitable structural shapes for sup
A further important object of this invention is the pro
porting the rolls described above as well as most of the
vision of a method of impregnating, attenuating and dry
various parts of the apparatus described below. Each of
ing narrow woven fabrics in which the fabric is impreg
the rolls 14 is rotatably mounted in bearings 16 carried
nated by the ‘application of a iluid medium thereto while
by bearing stands '17 which have ?xed connection with
subjected to the application of pressure by transversely 55 the frame 15. The lower driven rolls 13 are rotatably
oscillating rolls and the fabric pushed forwardly without
mounted in bearings 18 also having ?xed connection with
tension and in which the fabric is dried relatively rapidly
the frame 15. The lower rolls 13, driven in a manner
while being subjected to tension just suiiicient to main
described below, rotate at a uniform peripheral speed
tain the attenuation imparted to the fabric during the
so that the fabric T will be advanced by these rolls by
steps prior to drying.
.
.
Another object of this invention is the provision of a
60 frictional engagement therewith without the application
of any tension whatever to the fabric T.
A
method of impregnating narrow woven fabrics such as
The lower rolls 13 are shown paitially immersed in
discussed above in which the ?uid medium is an emulsion
the liquid medium L held within a tray 19 which is sup
including polyvinyl acetate in such proportion as to leave
ported by’the frame 15. The tray 19 has an extension
from about 3% to 6% solids in the fabric.
65 thereof in the form of a relatively deep tray 20 in which
Some of the methods provided to carry out the inven~
tion will be hereinafter described.
The invention will be more readily understood from a
the relatively large roll A is partially immersed in liquid
L.
A pair of transverse oscillating rolls B are shown
completely immersed and positioned closely adjacent the
lower portion of the relatively large roll A. The hori
reading of the following description and by reference to.
the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof where 70 zontal rolls are oscillated transversely by cams 21 which
3,029,492
3
are disposed on a driven shaft 22 which is rotatably car
ried by a bearing block. The shaft 22 is driven by a
suitable motor 23 through the chain drive 24. The rollers
B are mounted on shafts 25 which carry cam followers
for contacting the cams 21 which are shown in the form
of eccentrically mounted discs. The shafts 25 are mount—
ed for rotation in a bearing stand 26 on the end adjacent
4
the lower rolls 13 through chain drives 53 and 54 (FIG
URE 2).
The fabric T passes from the squeeze rolls D under
the roll 55 and into the drier E. The roll 55 is rotatably
carried by a suitable bearing 56 having connection with
the frame 15. The fabric T passes through the drier and
over and around the roll 57 and back in through the
drier E and around the roll 59 which is rotatably mount
ed in a suitable bearing 60 having connection with the
so carried by the bearing stand 27 that coil springs 28 nor 10 second bearing stand 42. The fabric T then passes for a
third time through the drier E and over the roll 61 which
mally urge the shafts to the right in FIGURE 2 so as to
is rotatably mounted in the bearing stand 62 carried by
urge the cam followers 25a against the cam surface 25.
the frame 15. The fabric then passes over the rolls
The rolls C are carried on shafts 29 and are oscillated
63 and 64 which are carried in suitable bearing stands
transversely in a similar manner by the cams 30 carried
65 and 66 respectively which have ?xed connection with
by the shaft 31 which is rotatably carried by a suitable
the frame 15. The fabric T is pressed against the upper
bearing stand 31a (FIGURE 2). The shafts 29 are
surface of the rolls 63 and 64 by the roll 67 which is
also mounted for rotation in the bearing stand 26 on one
rotatably carried by the bearing stand 68. The bearing
end adjacent the earns 30, are provided with cam fol
stand 68 has ?xed connection with a support 69 which
lowers 29a and are resiliently mounted on the other end
by the springs 32. The shaft 31 is driven by a chain 20 has pivotal connection with a bracket 70 as at 71. The
free end of the support 69 is spring biased downwardly
drive 24a from the shaft 22.
by the action of the coil spring 72 which is carried by
Referring again especially to FIGURE 1, it will be
the rod 73 which has suitable ?xed connection with the
noted that the fabric T is fed beneath the relatively large
frame 15. The tension of the spring 72 is adjusted by
roll A between the rolls B and the roll A. The rubbing
action exerted on the fabric, particularly the warp yarns ' the wing nut 74 which con?nes the spring 72 between it
and the upper portion of the support 69.
thereof, causes the fabric to open to admit the ?uid so
During the passage of the fabric T through the drier
as to become saturated therewith. The interstices of the
E, su?icient tension is exerted thereon by the various
fabric are ?lled with liquid during this process. The
rolls described above as associated with the drier E to
fabric T is then fed upwardly over the relatively large
roll A passing under the oscillating rolls C and then back 30 maintain the same degree of attenuation which was im
parted to the fabric by the immersion process described
over the oscillating rolls C to the squeeze rolls D. It
prior to the fabric T passing through the squeeze rolls D.
should be noted particularly at this point that at no time
The rolls 63 and 64 are driven by the shaft 48 (FIGURE
during the previously described process has any tension
2) which extends along the frame 15 and is supported
whatever been placed upon the fabric T other than that
by the bearings 48a. The bevel gears 63a and 64a drive
imparted thereto by its own weight. During this time
the shafts 63 and 64 respectively through suitable mesh
the interstices of the fabric have become thoroughly
ing bevel gears 63b and 64b. The rolls 63 and 64 are
?lled with the liquid medium and some attenuation has
driven at a suitable speed relative to the other rolls to
been imparted to the fabric due to the opening and clos
provide the requisite tension to prevent substantial con
ing of the fabric by the rubbing action of the transversely
oscillating rolls B and C in the presence of the liquid 40 traction of the fabric T but without permitting substan
tial further attenuation.
medium L. During the passage of the fabric T between
Referring especially now to FIGURE 3, the drier E
the second pair of superposed rolls 13 and 14 the fabric
which is supported by the frame 15 is shown to be of
is subjected to a liquid bath from the sprayer 33 and
rectangular construct-ion including sheet metal sides 75
again as the fabric is passing under the rolls C it is sub
and a top 76 which is hinged as at 77 for access to the
jected to a bath of liquid from the sprayer 34. The
drier E. The bottom 78 is constructed of suitable sheet
sprayers 33 and 34 are supplied with liquid from the
material and a baffle 79 is provided for receiving heated
line 35 into which the liquid is pumped by the circulating
air which is blown into the duct formed thereby. The
pump 36. The pump 36 is driven by the motor 37 through
hot air is circulated through the drier E by the duct
the belt 38. The liquid flows from the relatively deep
tray 20 as an over?ow into the line 39 which carries the 50 formed by the bottom 78 and the baffle 79 and returns
through the duct 80 (FIGURE 1) where it is reheated
liquid to the circulating pump 36.
by the burner 81. The burner 81 is supplied with fuel
The squeeze rolls D include a ?rst pair of superposed
from the tank 82 ‘through the line 83. The hot air is then
rolls 40 and 41 which are supported in a suitable bearing
projected by the blower 84 into the supply duct 85 which
stand 42. A pair of threadable means 43 are provided
for urging the bearing 44, which rotatably carries the 55 introduces air into the drier E under the baffle 79. The
blower 84 is driven by the motor 86 by the belt drive 87.
upper roll 41 within the bearing stand 42 downwardly
After passing over the rolls 63 and 64 under the roll
so that the roll 41 bears tightly against the lower roll
the cams 21 and are carried by a similar bearing stand
27 on the ends remote from the cams. The shafts 25 are
40 to squeeze the excess liquid medium from the fabric.
67, the fabric then passes over a guide roll 88 which is
the tray 20 extends forwardly as indicated at 45 and ex
91 therein so as to guide the ‘fabric T into suitable re
rotatably mounted in a suitable bearing stand 89 carried
A second pair of squeeze rolls 40 and 41 having similar
mounting devices are shown with similar parts designated 60 by an extension of the frame 15 which is designated at
96 and which is considerably higher than the frame 15
by like reference characters as used in connection with
and substantially box-like so as to rotatably carry rollers
the ?rst pair of squeeze rolls 40 and 41. A portion of
ceptacles 92 provided therefor.
tends beneath both pairs of squeeze rolls B to convey the
It is important to note that at no time during the proc
65
excess of ?uid medium back into the relatively deep tray
ess described does stretching of the fabric by tension
20. Driving means is provided for the various rolls in
take place. The fabric is attenuated somewhat by ad
the form of the motor 46 which by a chain drive 47 turns
vancing the fabric forward by the various rolls and dur
the shaft 48 which carries a bevel gear 49 on the forward
ing the drying step some tension is applied to the fabric
end thereof. The bevel gear 49 drives a bevel gear 50 70 but only sufficient tension is applied to maintain the de
which through a gear train 51 drives the lower squeeze
gree of attenuation which is obtained during the impreg
rolls 40. One of the squeeze rolls 40 drives a chain drive
nating process. The various gears and roll drives men
tioned are adjusted so that the peripheral speed of the
52 (FIGURE 1) carried on the other side of the frame
rolls are all the same with the exception of the rolls which
15 remote from the gear train 51. The chain drive 52
drives the relatively large roll A which in turn drives 75 are described as necessary to maintain the attenuation
3,029,492 "
5
.
of the fabric during the drying process and it is evident
that their peripheral speed must be slightly greater than
that of the driving rolls preceding them to compensate
for the attenuation of the fabric but the same with re
spectrto each other thus taking up and maintaining the
increased length of fabric. The driven squeeze rolls D
feed the fabric into the drier and are thus driven slightly
faster together with the rolls within the drier, the rolls
D and those within the drier turning at the same periph
6
contact with a plurality of driven rolls so that the fabric
travels forwardly in a substantially relaxed state, applying
an excess of liquid with which it is desired to treat the
fabric to said fabric, subjecting the fabric to the action
of transversely oscillating rolls in the presence of the
excess of liquid so as to expose the interstices of the
fabric to the liquid and to ‘attenuate the fabric, moving
said fabric into ‘a drier where ‘a sui?ciently elevated tem~
perature obtains for relatively rapidly drying the fabric
eral speed.
10 ‘but where such temperature is su?iciently low to avoid
While any liquid impregnating agent may be used with
damage to the fabric, and preventing contraction of said
success, it has been found by experiments that a preferred
fabric while the fabric is in the drier to prevent the loss
emulsion consists of about 13% solids according to the
of attenuation of the fabric achieved by treatment with
following composition:
the liquid but without permitting further attenuation by
Lbs. 15 taking up and maintaining the increased length of fabric,
Polyvinyl acetate _________________________ __
9.00
Ammonia (for correcting pH) ______________ ___
.75
A mildew inhibitor _______________________ __ 2.375
Geon
___________________________________ __
A plasticizer for geon _____' ________________ __
Wetting oil
Water
1.00
.605 20
1.25
___
75.00
It has been found that the use of the above emul
sion on a narrow fabric in the form of greige goods re
whereby the stretch at break of the fabric may be reduced
and held within desirable limits.
2. The method set forth in claim 1, in which said
liquid is an emulsion including about 10% to 20% by
weight of polyvinyl acetate.
3. The method set forth in claim 2, in which the tem
perature obtaining in the drier is about 380° F.
4. The method of impregnating, attenuating, and dry
ing narrow woven fabric including, advancing the fabric
sults in the fabric retaining about 4% solids by weight. 25 by contact with a plurality of driven rollers so that the
fabric travels forwardly in a substantially relaxed state,
immersing said fabric in a bath of liquid with which it
by weight by the fabric is desirable because a percentage
is desired to treat the fabric, subjecting the fabric to the
of below 3% is not Sll?lClEIlt to be effective while about
action of transversely oscillating rolls while immersed in
5% requires the use of emulsion which would be too
It has been found that the retention of 3% to 6% solids
pasty and thick for use with the method and apparatus 30 the liquid bath so as to expose the interstices of the
fabric to the liquid and to attenuate the fabric, moving
of the invention. It has been found that the use of emul
said fabric into a drier where a su?ficiently elevated tem
sions containing about 10% solids by Weight in the emul
sion produces about 3% solids in the fabric while the
use of emulsions containing about 20% by weight solids
perature obtains for relatively rapidly drying the fabric
temperature of about 380° F. is a desirable temperature
positioned closely adjacent said relatively large roll while
because it is su?iciently elevated to result in relatively
the fabric is submerged in the liquid so as to twist the
warp yarn from which the woven fabric is constructed
but where such temperature is sufficiently low to avoid
produces a retention of about 6% solids in the fabric 35 damage to the fabric, and preventing contraction of said
fabric while the fabric is in the drier to prevent the loss
and that above 20% solids produces an emulsion which
of attenuation of the fabric achieved by treatment with
is too thick for use in the method. If desired, cellu
the liquid but without permitting further attenuation by
lose acetate, cork or other suitable static inhibitors may
taking up and maintaining the increased length of fabric,
be added to further prevent the attraction of lint.
Using an emulsion as described above on narrow fab 40 whereby the stretch at break of the fabric may be reduced
and held within desirable limits.
rics in the form of greige goods, the stretch at break of
5. The method of impregnating, attenuating, and dry~
spun cotton which is between 18 to 25%, spun nylon
ing narrow woven fabric so as to improve the wearing
which is about 52%, spun Dacron which is about 30%
characteristics of the fabric including, advancing the fab
and mixed blends which is between 18 to 40% were all
reduced to between 3 and 6% with the exception of the 45 ric by contact with a plurality of driven rollers so that
the fabric travels forwardly in a substantially relaxed
spun nylon which was reduced to about 20%. These
state, moving the fabric in the above manner past a sub
fabrics had added strength and wearability and showed a
merged portion of a relatively large roll which is at
freedom from static attraction which normally causes
least partially submerged in a liquid medium with which
lint to adhere thereto. The gauge of the narrow fabric
was also reduced.
50 it is desired to treat the fabric, subjecting the fabric to
the rubbing action of a pair of axially oscillating rolls
In carrying out the process it has been found that a
rapid drying but is not su?iciently elevated to damage
even relatively thin Dacron. It has been found that the 55 to make the fabric accessible to the liquid to thereby
gains in length without stretching were achieved in the
neighborhood of from 5 to 20%.
It is thus seen that a method has been provided for
obtain an attenuation of the fabric, moving said fabric
into a drier where a sufficiently elevated temperature
obtains for relatively rapidly drying the fabric but where
such temperature is within desirable limits sufficiently
rics. The use of the method also results in increased 60 low to avoid damage to the fabric and su?iciently ele
vated to accomplish relatively rapid drying, and prevent
yarn compaction which produces an unusually smooth
effectively increasing the break strength of narrow fab
ing contraction of said fabric while the fabric is in the
surface. When tape for use as spindle drives is treated,
drier to prevent the loss of attenuation of the fabric
the spindle whorl grip is improved so that little or no
achieved by treatment with the liquid but without per~ '
slippage occurs between the tape and the metal surface.
A particularly desirable result of the invention is the re~ 65 mitting further attenuation of the fabric by taking up
and maintaining the increased length of ‘fabric, whereby
duction of stretch of the tape which is especially de
the stretch at break of the fabric may be reduced and
sirable where the tape is being used as a drive.
The foregoing disclosure and description of the in
vention is illustrative and explanatory thereof and changes
held within desirable
6. The method of impregnating, attenuating and drying
and variations will occur of those skilled in the art which 70 narrow woven fabric including, advancing the fabric in a
may be made within the scope of the appended claims
substantially relaxed state, applying an excess of liquid
without departing from the spirit of the invention.
with which it is desired to treat the fabric to said fabric,
What is claimed is:
subjecting the fabric to the action of transversely oscil
1. The method of impregnating attenuating and drying
lating rolls in the presence of the excess of liquid so as
narrow woven fabric including, advancing the fabric by 75 to expose the interstices of the fabric to the liquid and
3,029,492
relatively rapidly drying the fabric but where such tem-.
perature is su?iciently low to avoid damage to the fabric,
‘and preventing contraction of said fabric while the ‘fabric
is in the drier to prevent the loss of attenuation of the
fabric achieved by treatment with the liquid but without
vated temperature obtains for relatively rapidly drying
the fabric but where such temperature is su?iciently low
to avoid damage to the ‘fabric, and preventing contraction
of said fabric while the fabric is in the drier to prevent
the loss of attenuation of the fabric achieved ‘by treatment
with the liquid but without permitting further attenua
tion, whereby the stretch at break of the fabric may be
reduced and held within desirable limits.
7. The method of impregnating, attenuating and diy
8
said fabric in a substantially relaxed state into a drier
where a sut?ciently elevated temperature obtains for
to attenuate the fabric, moving said fabric in a substan
tially relaxed state into a drier where a su?iciently ele
10
permitting further attenuation by taking up and maintain
ing the increased length of fabric, whereby the stretch at
break of the fabric may be reduced and held within
desirable limits.
iug narrow Woven fabric including, advancing the fabric
References Cited in the tile of this patent
‘by contact with a plurality of driven rolls all turning at
the same peripheral speed so that the fabric travels for
UNITED STATES P TENTS
wardly in a substantially relaxed state, applying an excess 15.
491,901
Millet _______________ __ Feb. 14, 1893
of liquid with which it is desired to treat the fabric to
2,355,465
Oberkeik _____________ __ Aug. 8, 1944
said fabric, subjecting the fabric to the action of trans
2,601,394
Hansen _____________ __ June 24, 1952
versely oscillating rolls in the presence of the excess of
liquid so as to expose the interstices of the fabric to the
2,627,480
Heizer _______________ __ Feb. 3, 1953
liquid and to attenuate the fabric, subjecting said fabric 20
2,708,303
Walton et a1 __________ __ May 17, 1955
to the action of squeeze rolls driven slightly faster than
the ?rst mentioned driven rolls taking up the increased
length of fabric resulting from attenuation and moving
FOREIGN PATENTS
659,068
Great Britain ________ __ Oct. 17, 1951
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