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Патент USA US3033628

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May 8, 1962
P. J. LARSEN
RAILWAY JOURNAL BOX LUBRICATOR
Filed Oct. 17, 1960
3,033,618
United States Patent 0 ” vice
3,033,618
Patented May 8, 1962
1
2
3,033,618
In addition to serving as ‘an oil reservoir, the foam
serves as a spring holding the upper end 11 of the wick
RAILWAY JOURNAL BOX LUBRICATOR
Peter J. Larsen, Erie, Pa., assignor to Lord Manufactur
ing Company, Erie, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania
Filed Oct. 17, 1960, Ser. No. 63,090
4 Claims. (Cl. 308—87)
This invention is a ‘railway journal box luibn'cator in
a preferred form of which the oil is con?ned in a body
in contact with thejournal under all conditions,both in
the presence ‘and absence of oil.
.I
‘
Oil may be added .or the‘oil level checked through a
spout-like extension or ?exible tube 20 cemented to the
body. The lower end of the extension extends below the
oil level 18 and the upper end is closed by a suitable
plug 21. The oil level may be inspected by removing
of open pore polyurethane sponge which serves both as 10 the plug ‘and oil added if required. The oil ?ows direct
ly into the cavity 9 and‘ is not impeded by the wick or
an oil reservoir and as a spring for maintaining pressure
by the foam. As is apparent from FIG. 2, the wick
contact between a wick and the journal. Polyurethane
closes the upper end of the cavity 9 but the. chambers 19
sponge is different 'froinf'natural sponge ‘and other pres
at the lower end of the cavity are open ‘and unobstructed.
ently known synthetic sponges in that it does not absorb
or soak up oil and its modulus of elasticity is unaffected 15 This unobstructed volume ‘of the cavity holds enough oil
so that whenever removal of the inspection plug 21 indi
by the presence or absence of oil. Natural sponge soaks
up oil and becomes limp. Neoprene sponge swells. ' cates that the oil level is low enough to require adding oil,’
this may be done quickly without waiting‘ for the oil to
Cellulose and vinyl sponge dry out and harden. The
be soaked up by the wick or sponge.
sponge is coated with an oil resistant skin which forms an
The manufacture is very simple. The foam body 7,
oil retaining envelope.
20
together with any desired cored out openings such as the
In the drawing, FIG. 1 is a longitudinal section through
cavity 9 and chambers 19 with the ?ller tube 20, is easily
‘a journal box and FIG. 2 is a transverse section through
made in a suitable mold and after molding, may be
the journal box.
painted with the oil impervious skin 8.
In the drawing, the common parts are readily identi
It will be noted that the upper surface of the pad is
?ed, 1 being the journal box, 2 the journal, 3 the journal 25
dished around the upper end of the wick so that any ex
bearing, 4 the wedge and 5 the access cover held closed
cess lubricant fed to the journal will be scraped off by the
by a‘ leaf spring 6. These parts are or may be of com
wick and will drain back into the foam either through
mon construction.
the upper end of the wick cavity 9‘ or through other suit
Between the lower side of the journal and the journal
box is a body 7 of open pore polyurethane sponge having 30 able drain openings in the skin. The dished oil collect
ing upper surface may ‘be preformed into the molded
painted on its outer surface ‘an oil impervious skin or
body, or the dished surface may be formed by the pres
coating 8, of any suitable material such as acrylo, acrylo—
nitrile, polysul?de, silicone, or ?uoro elastomers.
The ~
sure exerted on the upper end of the wick as the foam
body is compressed between the bottom of the journal
skin forms an oil retaining envelope vand encloses the
7
entire outer surface of the body except for a wick cavity 35 box and the under surface of the journal.
‘If the oil impervious skin 8‘ is omitted, the body 7 pre
9 in the upper surface of the body below the journal
vents splashing of the oil out of the journal box.
which receives the lower end of a felt wick 10 having an
The oil impervious skin provides a clean and easily
integral pad 11, the upper end of which bears against
handled construction. Dirt is kept out of the oil. Oil is
the under side of the journal. The wick 10 is convenient
kept within the skin. The sponge reinforces the skin so
ly made of two sheets 12. of felt stitched together by seam
that the danger of rupture or puncture is slight, even
13. The length and thickness of the felt is such that
when the skin is thin. The skin would be advantageous
the lower end 14 ?ts snugly in the cavity 9 so that oil
with other oil resistant sponges where it might be neces
cannot flow out of the cavity even when the car is inverted
sary to use supplementary spring reinforcement and oil
for dumping the contents. At opposite ends of the seam
13, the felt has shoulders 15 projecting beyond the ends 45 feeding wicks.
What is claimed as new is:
of the cavity 9 so that under load the upper surface of
1. In a railway car journal box, a device for supplying
the body 7 is dished inward as indicated at 16 in FIG. 1.
oil to the journal and journal bearing comprising a body
There is a similar dishing of the upper surface of the
of open cell polyurethane foam between the journal box
body 7 as indicated at 17 in FIG. 2. Oil on the upper
surface of the body drains toward the center and ?ows 50 and the under side of the journal, said body being exteri
orly coated with an oil impervious skin or envelope
back into the sponge. The skin 8 may be cut away at
whereby the body serves as a reservoir for holding oil at
17:: around the cavity to facilitate drainage.
the desired level in which the cells of the foam impede
The sponge does not absorb oil. The cells of the
?ow of oil so that oil is not lost during inversion of the
sponge ‘act as miniature oil reservoirs from which the oil
is free to run out but at a restricted rate. The oil accord 55 car for dumping, and a wick on the upper surface of the
body having its upper end contacting the under side of
ingly tends to assume its natural level both in the foam
the journal and having portions extending into said body
and in the wick cavity as indicated at18, thereby main
below said oil level within the envelope, said body being
taining a level of oil around the lower end 14 of the wick.
of greater thickness than the space between the upper end
The wick cavity 9 and chambers 19 on either side of
the cavity 9 provide a place where oil can collect in rea 60 of the wick and the journal box whereby the body is com
pressed and exerts a force resiliently holding the upper
sonable quantity and be absorbed by the wick as needed.
end of the wick in contact with the journal.
The body 7 does not act like natural sponge because
2. The construction of claim 1 in which the body'has
it does not soak up or absonb oil. From one aspect, the
envelope or skin 8 acts as \an'oil container and the foam
in ‘addition a spout-like extension or ?ller tube between
merely divides the oil into a great many small pools with
thebox and the outer end of the journal, and the upper
65
restrictions between each pool preventing rapid ?ow.
This is an important advantage in railway cars which must
. be inverted for dumping.
When inverted, the foam so
end of said extension extending above the oil level, the
lower end of the extension depending below said oil level,
and means closing the upper end of said extension.
1, restricts the flow of oil that there is no oil loss during
3. In a railway car journal box, a device for supplying
the time required for dumping. Of course, if the rail 70 oil to the journal and journal bearing comprising a body
way car remained in an inverted position, in time the
of open cell oil resistant sponge between the journal box
lubricant would ‘all drain out.
and the under side of the journal, said body being ex
aosaa
3
whereby the body serves as a reservoir for holding oil at
and a restricted upper part leading to an opening in the
upper surface of the body, a wick ?tting in said open
the desired level in which the cells of the foam impede
ing and depending into but occupying only a part of the
?ow of oil so that oil is not lost during inversion of the
car for dumping, ‘and a wick on the upper surface of the
volume of the lower part of the cavity whereby a sub
stantial part of the volume of the cavity is open and un
obstructed, a ?ller tube sealed to and extending through
the envelope, said tube having its upper end accessible
for ?lling and its lower end leading to the unobstructed
volume of the cavity, the unobstructed volume of the
teriorly coated with an oil impervious skin or envelope
body having its upper end contacting the under-side of the
journal and having portions extending into said body
below said oil level within the envelope, said body being
of greater thickness than the space ‘between the upper end
of the wick and the journal’box whereby the body is 10 cavity being sufficient to permit adding oil to the desired
level without waiting for oil to be soaked up by the wick
compressed between the Wick and the journal.
or sponge.v
>
4. In a railway car journal box, a device for supply
ing oil’ to the journal and journal bearing comprising a
References Cited in the ?le of this patent V
body ‘of open cell polyurethane foam between the journal
UNITED STATES PATENT.
box and the under side of the journal, said body being 15
exteriorly coated; with an oil impervious skin or envelope
Keeler et a1. _______ __'___’ Dec. 6, 1938
2,l38,971
whereby the body serves as a reservoir for holding oil
at the desired level in which the cells of the foam impede
?ow of oil so that oil is not lost during inversion of the
car ‘for dumping, said body having a cavity within the 20
envelope with an enlarged lower part below the oil level
2,571,235
Hamer ______________ __ Oct. 16, 1951
OTHER REFERENCES
“Foamed Polyurethanes,” published in British Plastics,
January 1956, pages 5 through 9 and 39 relied upon.
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