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Патент USA US3034247

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May 15, 1962
D. 1.. HUNTING ET AL
3,034,235
PROTECTIVE TOE STRUCTURE FOR SHOES
Filed Dec. 31, 1959
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
/_
24
I6
E;E_J__
, DONALD
E.
JOHN
L. HUNTING
MOYLE
INVENTORS
May 15, 1962
3,034,235
D. |_. HUNTING ETAL
PROTECTIVE TOE STRUCTURE FOR SHOES
Filed Dec. 31, 1959
2 Sheetsmsheet 2
2/
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2/
DONALD L. HUNTING
E- JOHN MOYLE
INVENTORS
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I4
BY
44
3 _ 24m
3,034,235
‘ice
atnt
Patented May 15', 1962
1
3,e34,23s
PROTECTIVE TOE STRUCT
2
FOR SHGES
Donald L. Hunting, Belmont, and Edward John Moyle,
Rockford, Mich, assignors to Wolverine Shoe and Tan
ning Corporation, Rockford, Mich.
Filed Dec. 31, 1959, Ser. No. 863,229
2 Claims. (Cl. 36-77)
. sole, and therefore the relative stiffness of this piece does
not interfere with the movement of the shoe.
The several features of the invention will be analyzed
in further detail through a discussion of the particular
embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawings.
, In the drawings:
'
FIGURE 1 is an exploded view showing the compo
nents of the sole of the shoe, and their relationship» with
This invention relates to the construction of “safety
the reinforcement member and supporting member of the
shoes,” this term being used to designate a shoe which 10 preferred form of the invention.
includes a shell-like dome extending in an arch over
FIGURE 2 presents a view of the assembled compo
the toe area to give protection‘ against crushing. This
nents shown separated in FIGURE 1;
type of shoe is widely ‘used in industry where there is
FIGURE 3 presents a side elevation of a complete
some likelihood of heavy objects falling on the foot.
shoe embodying this invention.
The usual protective member is a formed piece of sheet 15
FIGURE 4 presents an enlarged section on a plane
steel extending over the top and sides of the toe area, ' ,; transverse with respect to the shoe in the area occupied
and terminating in short horizontal ?anges resting on the
by the reinforcement member.
sole structure of the shoe, and perhaps upon superim
FIGURE 5_ presents a similarly enlarged section on a
posed intermediate layers of material. As a heavy load
central plane in the same area of the shoe as shown in
is applied to the top of the protective member, there is a 20 FIGURE 4.
.
tendency for it to de?ect in such a manner as to move ;.:
The shoe shown in FIGURE 3 is of the so-called
the edges laterally outward. The protective capability
“oxford” type, and includes the top leather or “vamp”.
of the member is greatly increased if some form of lateral
10, the toe area 11, the heel 12, lacing 13, and a laminated
restraint is applied to the peripheral edges to prevent
sole including the layers 14 and 15. The structure in the
this outward collapsing movement. In some forms of 25 toe ‘area of the shoe is shown in FIGURES 4 and 5. A
shoe construction, the layer of leather which is applied
dome-shaped reinforcement member of formed sheet
over the top of the protective member extends outward
steel is indicated at 16, and extends over the front and
to form a shelf which is sewn directly to the assembly
sides of the toe. The outer layer of leather 10 is brought
of material forming the sole of the shoe. This arrange
around underneath the peripheral edge 17 of the rein
30 forcement 16, where it joins ‘with the inner layer of ma
ment results in the con?nement referred to above.
Some forms of shoe construction, however, do not in
terial, or vamp lining, identi?edat 18 and also meets
clude an outer layer which is sewn to the sole outside of
the insole sheet 19. The steel member it is received be
the periphery of the reinforcement member. One such
tween the layers ‘10 and 18, and the lower extremity of
form is the Well-known construction in which the over
these three laminations is received within the groove 20
lying leather is brought inwardly underneath the rein 35 in the supporting member 21. A standard adhesive serves
forcement member, and is adhesively secured to the sole.
to bond these components in assembled relationship,
This system does not adequately provide for the lateral
and it will be obvious that the strength of the adhesive is
restraint of the edge of the reinforcement member as
not the primary factor which serves to laterally position
it tends to de?ect under load. This invention combines
the edges of the reforcement member 16. With this ar
an arrangement for laterally con?ning the edges of the 40 rangement, the adhesive merely becomes an agent for
reinforcement member in an entirely different manner
holding the components in engagement with the groove,
than has heretofore been used. One component of the
the groove itself being responsible for applying the re
sole assembly is formed with a groove or depression ex
straint to the edges of the reinforcement member. To
tending directly underneath the peripheral edge of the re
simplify the structure of the shoe, the laminated type
inforcement member, and the engagement of the edge 4."- of sole is selected so that a portion of the upper lamina
with the groove serves to prevent the tendency of the
tion 15 can be cut short as shown at 22 to provide for
edge to move outwardly as load is applied. The dimen
the supporting member 21, this member being of the
sions of the groove are preferably such as to accommo
same thickness as the lamination 15.
date the layer of leather which is normally superimposed
The supporting member 21 is preferably of a relatively
harder material than is normally found in the sole
tion on the shoe. The edge of this piece is turned under
assembly. Particularly in the case where the sole lami
and inward around the base flange of the reinforcement
nations 14 and 15 are particularly resilient, the relative
member, and is then adhesively secured to the top of the
rigidity of the material of the supporting member 21
sole assembly.
provides for distributing the load from the reinforcement
The use of safety shoes with the reinforcement mem 55 member over a sufficiently large area so that adequate
ber referred to above has heretofore been limited to shoes
support is applied. It has been found preferable to extend
having a suf?cient rigidity of the material forming the
the rear edge 23 of the supporting member 21 to a point
sole to provide adequate support for the peripheral edge
somewhat behind the rear edge 24 of the reinforcement
member ‘16. An extension in the amount of 7A6 of an
of the reinforcement member. When a crepe or sponge
sole is used, or even fairly dense rubber, heavy pressure 60 inch has been found to give very satisfactory results, and
this dimension still places the rear edge 23 in a position
on the reinforcement member will result in forcing the
considerably ahead of the point of primary ?exure of
edge down into the sole and therefore restricting the
the sole of the shoe, which is in approximately the area
space underneath the protective member to the point
designated at 25'.
where the toes may still become crushed. This invention
The sole laminations 14 and 15 are normally adhesively
provides a construction which will make the safety toe 65
secured
together, and this same form of attachment may
‘features available in the shoes having softer sole mate
be used to bond the supporting member 21 to the lower
rials, and this is made possible by the incorporation of a
lamination 14. The remainder of the structure of the
over the reinforcement member to form the forward por
relatively rigid member in the sole which serves as a
shoe can be of any conventional form.
foundation for supporting the reinforcement member. 70 The particular embodiments of the present invention
The position of this supporting member is such that it
which have been illustrated and discussed herein are for
does not extend into the area of substantial ?exure of the
illustrative purposes only and are not to be considered
A
3,034,235
3
4
V as alimitation upon‘ the scope of the appended claims.
ing at approximately the tipline; a rigid supporting mem
In these claims, it is our intent to claim the entire in
vention disclosed herein, except as We" are limited by the
berai‘?xed to said outsole, said member covering at least
the periphery of the toe area of said outsole; said support
prior art.
ing member lying generally flush with the top of said mid
We claim:
7
a
'
'
'
1. A shoe having aproteetive'toe structure, including:
an outsole comprised of a relatively soft, ?exible material;
sole; a rigid insert shaped to I the con?guration of the
toe of ‘the shoe; the lower portion of said rigid insert
positioned to lie above said rigid supporting ,mem-v
ber; an outer layer of shoe material enveloping said
a midsole secured above said outso-le, also comprised of
a relatively soft, ?exiblemateria'l, said midsole terminat
rigid insert; an inner lining engaging and cemented
ing at approximately the tipline; a rigid supporting mem 10 to the inner surface of said rigid insert; an, insert ce
bervaf?xed to said outsole, said member covering at least
mented to the top surface of said rigid support
the'periphery of the toe area of said outsole; said support
ing member; and said outer layer and said inner lining
ing member lying generally flush with the top of said mid
joined together and cemented to and between said rigid
sole; a rigid insert shaped ‘to the con?guration of the
supporting member and said insole, thereby securing said
toe;.of the shoe; the lower portion of said rigid insert 15 rigid insert in said position.
positioned to lie above said rigid supporting member;
an outer layer of shoe material enveloping said rigid in
References Cited in the tile of this patent
. sert; an inner lining engaging and a?ixed to the inner
surface of said rigid insert; an insole secured to the
top vsurface of said rigid ‘supporting member; and said 20
Outer layer, said inner lining and said insole joined to
gether and secured to said rigid supporting member, there
by securing said rigid insert in said position.
2. A shoe having a protective toe structure, including:
an outsole comprised of a relatively soft; ?exible material; 25
amidsole secured‘ above said outsole, also ‘comprised of
a relatively soft, flexible material,‘ said midsole terminan'
_
UNITED STATES PATENTS
1,412,838
' 1,826,645
Butter?eld‘ _________ __ Oct, 11, 1904
7 Brogan _.____ __________ __ Apr. 18, 1922
Berquist ..'. ____________ __ Oct. 6, 1931
2,409,880
'MeMurray ___________ _._ Oct. 22, 1946
,
772,0e6
f
909,070
FOREIGN PATENTS
Germany _____ __.. ____ __ Apr. 12, 1954'
,
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION
Patent No’. 3,034,235
—-
May 15, 1962
Column-—.4, line 10, for "insert", second occurrence, read
insole
Signed and sealed this 11th day of September 1962.
(SEAL)
Attest:
ERNEST w. SWIDER
Attesting Officer
DAVID L- LADD
Commissioner of Patents
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