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Патент USA US3045720

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July 24, 1962
P. AMMERALL
3,045,710
CARPET FABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME
Filed Aug. 2, 1956
5 Sheets-Sheet 1
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July 24, 1962
P. AMMERALL
3,045,710
CARPET FABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME
Filed Aug. 2, 1956
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
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July 24, 1962
3,045,710
P. AMMERALL
CARPET FABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME
Filed Aug. 2, 1956
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3,045,710
Patented July 24, 1962‘
1
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3,045,710
ring, like groups of loops, each such group consisting of
two high nodes followed by two low nodes. The pile
CARPET FABRIC AND IVETHOD OF
G THE SAME
Peter Ammerall, Framingham, Mass., assignor to Rox
bury Carpet Company, Saxonville, Mass., a corporation
formingyarns of these two types are so arranged in the
fabric that the high and low nodes of a group, in which
the high and low nodes alternate, are disposed weftwise
of the fabric, in alignment with a high and a low node,
respectively, of a group which consists of a plurality of
two high nodes followed by two low nodes. The pile
forming yarns occur in sets of three. Stu?’er warp: yarns
This invention pertains to textiles and more especially 10 38 are disposed in sets of three between each pair of ad
of Massachusetts
Filed Aug. 2, 1956, Ser. No. 601,693
7 Claims. (Cl. 139-—403)
to a woven fabric of the type known as “velvet” which
jacent warp yarns 34, 36 beneath the pile-forming yarns
is commonly employed as carpeting and has for its prin
cipal objects to provide an ornamental sculptured carpet
fabric by employing pile tufts or loops of different type,
26, 28.
The warp threads, of which the fabric is comprised,
are arranged in groups of opposing heddles and, by se
twist or color.
15 quence or cycle of loom motion and with Varied height
As herein illustrated, the carpet fabric comprises a
of pile wires, as will now be described, produce a novel
ground layer of upper and lower sets of weft yarns and
textured pile fabric as described and shown.
interwoven warp yarns, and a top layer of pile-forming
Referring to FIGS. 6 to 13 inclusive, the pile forming
warns arranged warpwise of the fabric between the sets
warp threads are denoted in their shed formation by
of weft yarns, with pile-forming loops projecting up 20 the numbers 1 and 6. The stuifer warp threads by the
wardly between the weft yarns in the top layer, the loops
numbers 2 and 3 and the chain Warp theads by the num
in certain regularly occurring pile-forming yarns being
bers 4 and 5. The heddle frames through which these
arranged in regularly recurrent groups, each consisting
threads are guided are operated to form sheds through
of a single high and a single low node, while the loops
which high and low wires may be shot to produce the pile
in certain other regularly occurring pile-forming yarns ' loops wanted and through which the shuttle may be shot
are arranged in recurrent groups, each consisting of a
carrying the weft for fabric formation. Starting with
pair of high nodes followed by a pair of low nodes. The
FIG. 6 as step 1, in the operation it will be seen that the
high and low nodes, respectively (in each group, which
cams which are ‘correlated with the warp threads by cor
consists of a high node followed by a single low node),
responding number and which are fast to a common shaft
are arranged in alignment (weftwise) with a high node 30 are in a position to form a shed in which the pile warp
and a low node of a group wherein a pair of high nodes
threads 1 and 6, the stuifer warp threads 2 and 3 and
alternate with a pair of low nodes. The pile-forming
alternate ones of the chain warp threads ‘5 are above the
yarns occur in sets of three.
path of the shuttle and the remaining or intermediate
The invention will now be described in greater detail
chain warp threads 4 are below the path of the shuttle.
03 U A part’ of the pile warp threads, those designated 1, above
with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:
FIG. 1 is a section taken transversely of the fabric,
the path of the shuttle are raised with respect to the re
that is, parallel to the weft threads;
maining threads 6 to permit a loop forming wire to be shot
FIG. 2 is a section taken longitudinally of the fabric,
through to hold them-‘aloft until the weft is shot through
that is, parallel to the warp threads on the line 2—2 of
and beat up. In step 2, as shown in FIG. 7, the cams
40
\FIG. 1;
have turned through a quarter (4%) revolution clockwise
FIG. 3 is a, section taken longitudinally of the fabric,
to reform the shed so that now the pile warp threads 1
that is, parallel to the warp threads on the line 3-3 of
and 6, the stuffer warp threads 2 and 3 and the chain
FIG. 1;
warp threads 4 ‘lie below the path of the shuttle and the
lFIG. 4 is a photornicrograph in plan view of a frag
chain warp threads 5 lie above the path of the shuttle.
mentary portion of the fabric with the warp threads run 45 At this time the shuttle travels back across the shed lay
ning bottom to top and the weft threads running from
ing in the weft and the wire is withdrawn. Step 3, as
‘side to side;
shown in FIG. 8, is effected by another quarter (1A) turn
FIG. 5 is a photograph in plan view to scale of a por
tion of the fabric with the warp threads running from
bottom to top and the weft threads running from side
to side;
‘FIGS. 6, 7, 8 and 9 are diagrammatic illustrations of
the shed formations and the heddle-operating cams there
for, for making the high pile; and
FIGS. 10, 11, 12 and 13 are corresponding diagrams
for making the low pile.
7
Referring to the drawings, the fabric illustrated here
of the cams which reforms the shed so that pile warp
threads 1 ‘and 6, stuffer warp threads 2 and 3 and chain
warp threads 4 are now at the top of the shed and chain
warp threads 5 are below the path of the shuttle. In this
position the shuttle passes through the shed carrying the
weft across at the same time the wire is shot across be
55 heath the pile warp threads 1 which are held elevated
from the remaining threads 6 to permit the wire to pass
beneath them. Step 4, ‘as illustrated in FIG. 9, is affected
by the next quarter (1A1) turn of the camand in this posi
tion pile warp threads 1 and 6, stuffer warp threads 2 and
in is of the velvet type consisting of warp and weft
threads of different twist and/or color, woven to produce
3 ‘and chain warp threads 5 are lowered so as to be be
a surface pattern, such as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, which, 60 neath the path of the shuttle while chain warp threads 4
in relief, has high, intermediate and low surfaces.
are above the path of the shuttle. During the shuttle
As herein illustrated, the carpet fabric comprises a
crossing the wire is ‘withdrawn. The foregoing four steps
ground layer of upper and lower sets of weft yarns 30, 32,
are carried out with a pile forming wire of predetermined
and interwoven warp yarns 34, 36 and a top layer of
height, namely .290" to provide the high pile or tufts in
65
pile-forming warp yarns 26, 28, extending warpwise' of
the fabric. The low pile or tufts are woven in, in exactly
the fabric between the sets of weft yarns 30, 32 with pile
the same succession of steps‘ as illustrated in FIGS. 10
forming loops or modes projecting upwardly between the
weft yarns in the top layer. Certain of the pile-forming
yarns comprise regularly recurring, like groups of loops,
each such group consisting of four nodes, of which the
first and third are high and the second and fourth are low,
while other pile-forming yarns comprise regularly recur
to 13 inclusive, wherein the cams are the same and the
warp threads diagrammatically shown in shed formation
are correspondingly identi?ed. The only difference is
that the pile forming wire shot through in this succession
of steps is of lower height, namely .154”. A redescrip_
tion of the successive steps as shown in FfGS. 10 to 13
3,045,710
3
inclusive, is not deemed necessary since they correspond
exactly to those previously described with reference to
FIGS. 6 to 9 inclusive.
Whilev pile wire heights of .290 and .54" respectively,
are herein referred to as the high wire and low wire opera
tions it is to be understood that these are not in any sense
4
arranged in groups alternating with groups of said other
pile-forming yarns.
2. A woven fabric according to claim 1, wherein the
yarns having the alternate high and low nodes are of
different twist than the yarns having the alternate pairs
of high and low nodes.
3. A woven fabric according to claim 1, wherein the
ground layer, the nodes of the lower loops and the nodes
to be limiting but that different heights may be substi
tuted therefor without departing from the spirit of the
invention.
of the high loops are disposed in vertically spaced, paral
The yarns or threads used in the formation of the pile 10 lel planes.
may be ‘of the same character; however, as herein shown
4. A carpet fabric according to claim 1 wherein there
some of the pile warps are of soft twist, others of hard
are stu?‘ing warp yarns disposed between the sets of Weft
twist, some of one color and some of another color. Con
yarns beneath the pile~forming yarns.
siderable variation in the make-up of the pattern may be
5. A carpet fabric according to claim 1 wherein the
had by varying the twists and colors for the yarns with 15 warp yarns occur in spaced pairs and the stuffing warp
out departing in any respect from, the weaving of the yarn
yarns occur in threes between each pair of warp yarns.
as related.
6. A carpet ‘fabric according to claim 1 wherein the
The weaving operation results in the formation of the
pile-forming yarns occur in groups of three.
pile loops, and it is within the scope of the invention to
7. Woven fabric according to claim 1, wherein the
leave the loops intact or to cut or clip them. Accordingly 20 pile-forming warp yarns are so disposed in the fabric that
as herein described, the word “tuft” has been employed to
the high and low pile loops of a group, which consist
mean either a loop or the cut ends of the loop. It is also
of a single high loop followed by a single low loop, are
intended that different multiples of warp threads may be . arranged to register, Weftwise, with a group wherein a
used withoutdeparting from the spirit of the invention so
plurality of high loops alternate with a plurality of low
long as the treatment in the weaving operation is the same. 25 loops.
' It should he understood that the present disclosure is
for the purpose of illustration only and that this inven_
tion includes all modi?cations and equivalents which fall
within the scope of the appended claims.
I claim:
30
1. A carpet fabric comprising a ground layer of upper
2,164,090
2,270,103
Shuttleworth ________ __ June 27, 1939
Baynton ____________ __ Jan. 13, 1942
and lower sets of weft yarns and interwoven warp yarns
2,319,073
'McElhaney __________ __ May 11, 1943
and a top layer of pile-forming warp yarns arranged
Dacy ______________ __ Nov. 11, 1947
Shuttleworth ________ __ Nov. 13, 1951
Crawford ___________ __ Sept. 1, 1953
certain of the pilefform'ing yarns comprise regularly re~>
curring’ like groups of loops, each such group consisting
2,430,559
2,575,029
2,650,621
2,685,894
2,700,401
2,709,461
of four nodes, of which the ?rst and third are high and
the second and fourth are low, while other pile~forming 40
2,713,877
2,715,917
Jackson ____________ -2 July 26, 1955
Smiley ______________ __ Aug. 23, 1955
yarns comprise regularly recurring like groups of loops,‘
each such group consisting of two high nodes followed by
two low nodes, said certain of the pile-forming yarns being
2,715,921
2,777,468.
Smiley ____ _; _______ __ Aug. 23, 1955
Jackson-___'___‘ ______ __ Jan. 15, 1957
2,905,203
Hoeselbarth ,_ ________ __ Sept. 22,
Warpwise of the fabric between the upper and lower sets ’
of weft yarns with pile-forming loops projecting upwardly 35
from the weft yarns in the. upper set, characterized in that
References ?ted in the ?le of this patent
UNITED'STATES PATENTS
Parlin ______________ __ Aug. 10, 1954
Smiley ______________ __ Jan. 25, 1955
Groat ; _______ Q. ____ __ May 31, 1955
1959
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