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Патент USA US3052121

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Sept- 4'1 1962
1. c, HQWES
3,052,111
KNITTED PILE FABRIC AND METHODl OF" MAKING SAME
Filed NOV. 25, 1959
M_.
5: Sheets-Sheet 1
Sept. 4, 1962
1. c. Howes
3,052,111
MMITTED PILE FABRIC AND METHOD oF MAKING SAME.
Filed NOV. 25, 1959
3' Sheets-Sheet 2
Sept. 4, 1962
l. c. HowEs
3,052,111
KNITTED PILE FABRIC AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
Filed Nov. 25, 1959
12108223024:
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3,052,ili
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United States Patent O
1
3,052,111
KNITI'ED PILE FABRIC AND METHOD
0F MAKING SAME
Irving C. Howes, North Andover, Mass., assigner to
Davis & Furber Machine Company, North Andover,
Mass., a corporation of Massachusetts
Filed Nov. 25, 1959, Ser. No. 855,312
7 Claims. (Cl. 456-191)
" ICC
Patented Sept. 4, 1962
2
face of the knitted fabric so that the loops `of the pile are
virtually invisible on the rear :of the fabric.
FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view of the completed
knitted pile fabric taken along one Wale and showing three
courses with the pile in interlo'cked position.
FIGS. 10, ll, l2 and 13 show in side elevation the full
sequence of operations.
FIG. l0 shows the last loop on the needle prior to the
introduction of the pile.
FIG. l1 is a section on the line 11-11 of FIG. l show
This invention relates to a new and novel construction 10
ing the pile introduced into the hook of the needle.
of knitted pile fabric and to the method of making same.
FIG. l2 is a section on the line 12-12 of FIG. 3 show
The invention is more particularly concerned with the
ing
the last loop and pile pushed downwardly on the shank
manufacture of knitted goods made on a circular knitter
of
the
needle by the shoe with the new thread introduced
into which is introduced during the knitting process fibers
into the hook.
which are caused to be interlocked. with the knitted fabric
FIG. 13 is a section on the line 13--13 of FIG. 5 show
so that the resultant fabric has a pile surface on one side.
ing
the pile and llast loop sliding upwardly over the beard
Knitted pile fabrics are old in the art, but when made
of the needle and about to engage the new thread in the
according to known processes certain disadv-antages are
hook of the needle.
present Itherein. One of these disadvantages 4is that the
The invention may be carried out by either the united
method of introducing the pile into the fabric during the
needle
type machine, as exemplified by the Tompkins
knitting process results in the base of the pile being visible
knitter disclosed herein, or the independent needle type
on the reverse side. Thus the finished goods when viewed
machine, such as the Wildman. In each of these ma
from the back side show not only the yarns of the knitted
chines,
the needle loop is moved downwardly on the
fabric but also the base of the pile which is interlocked
needle prior to introduction of the new thread. It is im
25
therewith.
material whether the needle is moved relative to the loop
According to the process to be disclosed hereinafter, the
or the loop relative to the needle so long as the hook is
pile is introduced during the knitting process in such
vacated by the needle loop so that the hook is empty when
manner that it thereafter becomes interlocked with the
the new yarn is fed into the hook. The invention will ybe
knitted yarns in a manner to render the pile base substan
by reference to a Tompkins machine in which
tially invisible on the back side. Additionally, the length 30 explained
the needles are ñxed and the needle loops are moved
of the resulting pile for a given length of fiber introduced
downwardly on the needle Shanks. Furthermore, the in
durn'ng knitting is longer :and hence offers better cover
vention may be performed on either the bearded or latch
on the face of the knitted fabric, but at the same time is
type needle. The bearded type is shown, but obviously
interlocked with the fabric in a manner fully as secure as
the latch type could be substituted therefor.
35
that of the knitted pile fabrics of the prior art.
In the conventional knitting process herein disclosed
These and other advantages will become better under
and considered ‘apart from the introduction of the pile,
stood «as the description proceeds with the aid of the ac
the needles are revolving continuously with the rotating
companying drawings in which
head
and on each needle is the last loop of the knitted
FIG. l shows a front elevation of a group of needles in
The conventional knitting process will be de
the hooks of which the pile fibers have just been intro 40 fabric.
scribed with respect to a single needle on which is the 4last
duced and prior to the fibers being knitted into the fabric.
loop of that particular wale of the knitted fabric. As
The last loops of the knitted fabric are `shown behind the
each needle reaches the cloth shoe which is on the inside
fibers.
yof the needles, the shoe acts `to push the last loop down
FIG. 2 is a perspective view of three of the needles
the shank of the needle with the stretched knitted
shown in FIG. 1, illustrating more clearly the initial posi 45 along
fabric
extending upwardly along the inner face of the
tion of the pile fibers with respect to the last loops of the
cloth shoe. While the loop on the needle shank is held in
knitted fabric.
this down position by the cloth shoe, the new yarn is in
FIG. 3 shows the subsequent disposition of the last loops
troduced into the hook of the needle. Thereafter when
of the `fabric and the pile fibers as the needles have ad
the needle has advancced to the other upwardly sloping
vanced from the position at which the pile fibers are in
end of the cloth shoe, the loop on the needle slides up
troduced to be engaged by the cloth shoe and forced
wardly toward the beard of the needle but before reach
downwardly «along the shanks of the needles. While
ing the beard the beard comes into engagement with a
the loops and übers are in depressed position, the new
presser which forces the beard into the eye in the needle
yarn is introduced into the needle hooks.
permitting the rising last loop of the fabric to slide
FIG. 4 is a perspective view of three of the centrally 55 shank
upwardly over the beard. As the needle continues toad
located needles shown in FIG. 3.
Vance, the upward pull on the last loop exerted by the pre
FIG. 5 shows how continued advance of the needles
viously knitted fabric drags the loop olf the upper end of
past the cloth shoe results in the last loops of the fabric
the needle causing it to become interlocked with the new
and the pile fibers being knitted together with the new 60 thread that had been inserted into the hook of the needle
yarn to bind in the fibers while forming -a new course in
while the loop was held down by the cloth shoe. In this
manner »a new loop has been positioned in the hook of
the knitted fabric.
FIG. 6 is a perspective view of two of the needles shown
the needle to add one more course to the knitted fabric.
in FIG. 5 as the fabric »and pile fibers are riding up the
The needle continues its rotation until it comes back to
needle shanks as permitted by the sloping side of the cloth 65 the cloth shoe, at which time the newly Iadded loop is
pressed down in the manner already described to become
shoe.
interlocked in ydue course with the new yarn that is being
FIG. 7 is a perspective view of two of the needles -at
fed in the needle hook.
the right of FIG. 5 and their resulting combination of
In the practice of the present invention, the pile übers
knitted yarns and pile fibers.
FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the resulting knitted 70 are introduced to the needles as the latter are pursuing
their circular course and are at a position just ahead of
fabric ‘and interlocked pile fibers that have just been in
the cloth shoe. The fibers are introduced to the needles
troduced showing how the pile fibers are secured to the
‘
j
_
3,052,111
3
by processes well understood which utilize über carding
mechanisms, the last element of which is a brush or doffer
which sweeps the übers upwardly in a continuous stream
resulting in a suitable number of übers being caught by
each ’needle as it moves by. These übers will be ’of anr
average length ‘according to the material used and the ^
4
subsequent course of loops has been introduced into'the
hooks of the needles as indicated in FIGS. 3„,5 and 12._
The new yarn 24 is put in position after the loop 12 and
pile übers 16 have been forced down along the shank 2
by the cloth shoe sufficiently to clear the beard 6.
With the end of the beard 6 positioned in eye 16 as
number of übers picked up by each needle will be approx
shown in FIGS. 5 and 13, the loop 12 and the associated
imately the same.
pile übers 16 can slide upwardly over the beard, all `as .
The result is a general uniformity in `
the amount of pile introduced to each course of the knitted
fabric.
'
'
Y
`Referring to FIG. l, we will consider the process with
respect to the needle marked A. This needle, like all the
other needles, is aiüxed to the rotating head of the knit~
» indicated at the needle positions Ae,.Af, Ag and Ah in
FIG. 5, »and ünally the loop 12 and the fibers 16’ slide olf
the needle and over the new yarn 24 to create a subsequent
needle loop 26 from the new yarn 24, which loop 26 con
stitutes one of the loops of the next subsequent course.
As can be plainly seen in FIGS. 7 and 8, the last‘needle
zontal path. All of the needles are identical and the be- ` 15 loop 12 is so related to the new needle loop 26 that the
havior of the needle A with respect to the fabric and pile
pile übers 16 are bound in to lie on the upper side of
is the same las the behavior of `all of the other needles.
needle loop 12 and under the head portions 28 and 30 of
ting machines and is continually moving in a circular hori
Y The needle A has a shank 2, a hook 4 and a beard 6.
adjacent sinker loops
Y 29 and 31. In other words, thej
The beard 6, during the course of the needle rotation,
pilerübers 16 are locked intothe knitted fabric byjthe.v
engages‘a presser 8 shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 9 which 20 sinker loops only on the face of the cloth in a manner
causes the lower end of the beard to be moved toward
that renders them substantiallyinvisible from the rear.
the shank 2 with the tip Vof the beard pressed into a cavity
The manner in which the pile übers 16 are ,held by the
'or eye 10. With the beard in the eye, it becomes possible
knitted fabric is further illustrated in FIG. 9. Here the
forA the last needle loop of the fabric to slide upwardly
subsequent needle loop 26`is shown in the hook "4 of nee-.f
over the beard and thence over the new yarn in the hook 25 dle A.
The last needle loop 12 is interlocked with new'
loop 26 and the pile übers 16 reside on the face sideof
dure is well understood. As previously mentioned, it will
loop 12 and are held in position by the overlying parts 28'
be further understood that other types of circular knit
and 30 of the'newly formed adjacent sinker loops.
ting machines may be used, using either the spring beard
It will be understood that the spacing of the pileY übers
needle just referred to or the latch needle.
30 as shown in the figures is greatly exaggerated for the pur
In FIG. 1,_the needle loopV 12, which is a part of the
pose of illustration `and clarity. Actually the succession
previously knitted fabric, represents the last course of the
of the pile übers in both the wales and courses isso close
knitted fabric. For clarity in disclosure, the previously
together that the pile spreads out to completely conceal
knitted fabric, of which needle loop 12 constitutes the last
the underlying knitted fabric.
"
.
y
v
course, is not shown in FIGS. 1 to 8, but three courses 35
`In summary, it may be said that the invention resides
are shown in FIG. 9 and two courses are shown in FIGS.
in the afore'descnibed method and the pile fabric producedA
10 to»13,. As the needle A with the loop 12 thereon
thereby, which method comprises introducing the pile
moves past the brush of the carding element, the übers 16
übers into the hooks of the needles while .the last needle
which will subsequently form the pile of the knitted fabric
ï lloop of the previous course is still in position in the hook.
are _sweptupwardly into the -hook 4. That is, the übers 40 Then the last loop -and the pile übers 1are forced down
» pass upwardly between the shank 2 and the beard 6 to be
along the needle shank by the cloth shoe with the pile¿
caught Vin the hook and pulled from the brush or dolfer of
übers on top of the last loop.V This frees the hook of the
needle and while -the needle is free the new yarn> is in
the carding element. In like manner, fibers 16a, 16h, 16e
and 16d areapplied automatically to the hooks of the
troduced so that when the last loop andthe pile übers
following needles Aa, Ab, Ac and Ad. This situation is 45 thereafter slide upwardly along the needle shank and
disclosed in a perspective view in FIG. 2 and in side eleva
over the closed beard (or the closed latch, if latch needles
t'o form a subsequent needle loop. This knitting proce
tion inFIG. 11. ’
Y
After leaving the position at which the pile fibers are
introduced into the needle hooks, the needles advance
are used), the last loop and the übers that are on top>
thereof will slide off the needle and over thei new yarn
to form- the next subsequent needleV loop with the pile~-
toward the cloth shoe 18, which is a üxed vertical curved 50 übers bound in on the upper face of the knitted fabric
between the last needle loop and the head portions of,
plate on the inside of the needles and on the outside of
the newly formed adjacent sinker loops.
,
the'previously knitted fabric. The cloth shoe has a down
wardly sloping leading edge 20, the initial portion of whlch
' It is my intention to co-ver all changes and modiüca
tions of the example ofy the invention herein chosen for
is above the tops of the needles. As the'needle A ad
vances toward the sloping edge 20, the last loops of the 55 purposes of the disclosure which do not constitute def
p‘artures fromY the spirit and scope of they invention.
previously knitted cloth 14 and the pile 16 are engaged by
the cloth shoe so that the loop 12 and pile 16 are forced
downwardly along the shank of needle A as indicated at
the left in FIG. 3. The pile is on top of the needle loop
1. The method of introducing pile übers into a knitted“
fabric comprising the steps of sweeping pile übers up-4
12 with the ends extending upwardly behind shoe y18 (see
wardly into the hook of a „knitting needle on which is the
FIG. 12). The needle A continues to move in the direc
tion of the arrow reaching in due course the end of the
cloth shoe 18 as at the position 21, reaching the upwardly
said last needle loop and said übers downwardly on the`
I claim:
'
last needle loop „of the previously knitted fabric, forcing'
shank of the needle -to free saidhook, positioning al new
thread in the hook of said needle and then fdrawing said12 and pile übers 16 commence to slide upwardly alongV 6 needle loop and übers upwardly on the .said shank and»
oif the needle to produce a next needle loop and adjacent
the shank 2 of the needle A under the upward pull of the
sinker loops from said new thread, said übers being in-A
previously knitted fabric.
.
terlocked between the said last _needle -loop and the head
1 While the loop 12 is sliding upwardly along the shank 2
portions of the newly formed adjacent sinker loops.
»
of needle A `as permitted by the sloping edge 22 and as
2. The method of introducing pile übers into a knitted
shown in FIGS. 5 and 13, the beard 6 of the advancing 7
fabricl comprising nthe steps -of-sweeping pileÍübers up
needle will be engaged on its exterior face by the presser
wardly into the hook of a *knitting needle on which is the
8 which forces the lower end of the beard into the eye
last needle loop of the previously knitted fabric„forcing
10 just prior to the .arrival of loop 12 and pile übers 16
said last needle loop and said übers Adownwardly on >the
at the eye during their upward movement along shank 2.'
In the meanwhile, the new yarn 24 which will form the 75 -shank of the needle to free said hook, positioning ‘a ‘new
sloping edge 22 of the cloth shoe. 4At this point the loop
3,052,111
thread in the hook of said needle and then drawing said
needle loop and fibers upwardly on the said shank and
off the needle to produce `a next needle loop and adjacent
sinker loops from said new thread, said fibers being
secured to the face of the knitted fabric solely by adja
cent portions of the head portions of the newly formed
adjacent sinker loops.
6
fibers extending under the adjacent portions of the heads
of adjacent sinker loops formed by the next following
course, the upwardly extending free ends of each said
group of fibers being between the heads of the sinker
loops of the said next following course and `the heads
of the needle loops- formed by the preceding course.
6. A knitted pile fabnic comprising a succession of
courses, with needle loops and sinker loops forming needle
3. A knitted pile fabric comprising a conventionally
Wales and sinker wales and groups of individual fibers
circularly knitted foundation having courses, needles
Wales and sinker wales and groups of individual pile 10 in U-shaped formation forming pile on one face of the
fabric, each said group of ñbers being held to said fabric
forming fibers which are held to the face of the fabric
solely by the yarn of a single course, each group of fibers
solely by those parts of each course that constitute the
having their middle portions lying between the upper
sinker loops, each sinker loop securing two adjacent
side of one of said needle loops and passing under ad
groups of fibers to the fabric face, the mid-portions of
jacent portions of the heads of adjacent sinker loops
said fibers parallelin-g the needle loop of the previous
course with each end of each said group of fibers passing
first over and then under one of said sinker loops.
4. A knitted pile fabric comprising a succession of
formed by the yarn of a single course only, the free
ends of said pile being on that face of the fabric on which
are the sinker loops and extending upwardly from `a posi
tion between the said sinker loops and `the head of the
courses with needle loops and sinker loops forming
needle wales and sinker wales and groups of individual 20 needle loop of the second course preceding the said sinker
loops.
fibers in U-shaped formation forming pile on that face
7. A knitted pile fabric comprising a succession of
of the fabric showing the sinker loops, each said group
courses, with needle loops and sinker loops forming needle
of fibers having a middle portion and two free end por
wales and sinker wales and groups of individual fibers in
tions, each said group of fibers being held to said fabric
solely by the yarn of a single course, each said group of 25 U-shaped form-ation forming pile on one face of the
fabric, each said group of fibers being held to said fabric
fibers having its middle portion lying next to and sub
solely by the yarn of a single course, each group of fibers
stantially paralleling one of the needle loops and
having their middle portions lying generally parallel to
having the adjacent part of the said end portions
one of said needle loops of one course and with each of
passing first over land then under the adjacent por
tions of the heads of adjacent sin‘ker loops formed by 30 the sides of said U-shaped formation passing ñrst over
and then under the adjacent portions only of the heads of
the yarn of the next following course, the said free end
Iadjacent sinker 'loops of the next course, the free ends
portions of each group of fibers extending upwardly
from that side of the said sinker loop that faces the next
preceding needle loop.
5. A knitted pile fabric comprising `a succession of 35
courses with needle loops and sinker loops forming needle
wales and sinker wales and groups of individual fibers
in U-shaped formation forming pile on that face of the
fabric showing the sinker loops, each said group of
fibers having its middle portion substantially paralleling 40
the head of a needle loop with the ends of said group of
of said pile being on that face of the fabric on which
are the sinker loops.
References Cited in the file of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
1,179,467
Stafford et al __________ _.. Apr. 18, 1916
2,017,073
2,183,862
2,207,397
Moore ______________ __ Oct. 15, 1935
Davis _______________ __ Dec. 19, 1939
Fleisher ______________ __ July 9, 1940
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