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Патент USA US3052911

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Sept 11, 1962
H. GULBRANDSEN ETAL
3,052,901
MACHINES FOR APPLYING PRESSURE TO SHOE BOTTOMS
Filed NOV. 1. 1960
6 Sheets-Sheet 1
,,,, __
inventors:
Sept. 11, 1962
H. GULBRANDSEN ETAL
$052,901
MACHINES FOR APPLYING PRESSURE TO SHOE BOTTOMS
Filed Nov.‘ 1. 1960
§§
x. ,
i “.
.Mm.
SePt- 11, 1962
H. GULBRANDSEN ETAL
3,052,901
MACHINES FOR APPLYING PRESSURE TO SHOE BOTTOMS
Filed Nov. 1. 1960
6 Sheets-Sheet 3
aw‘
SePt- 11, 1962
H. GULBRANDSEN ETAL
3,052,901
MACHINES FOR APPLYING PRESSURE TO SHOE BOTTOMS
Filed Nov. 1. 1960
6 Sheets-Sheet 4
Sept- 11, 1962
H. GULBRANDSEN ETAL
3,052,901
MACHINES FOR APPLYING PRESSURE T0 SHOE BOTTOMS
6 Sheets-Sheet 5
@1634;
.56
Sept 11, 1962
H. GULBRANDSEN ETAL
3,052,901
MACHINES FOR APPLYING PRESSURE TO SHOE BOTTOMS
Filed Nov. 1. 1960
6 Sheets-Sheet 6
United States Patent Oil ice
3,052,901
Patented Sept. 11, 1962
2
1
3,052,901
MACHiNE-S FOR APPLYENG PRESSURE TO
SHOE BGTTQMS
Helge Gulhrandsen, Beverly, and Gordon V. Sprague,
In, Danvers, Mass, assignors to United Shoe Machin
ery Corporation, Flemington, N.J., a corporation of
New Jersey
Filed Nov. 1, 1960, Ser. No. 66,559
19 Claims. (Cl. 12-38)
distributed pressure for secure attachment with abrupt
reductions in pressure along central areas of the forepart
and the edge of an outsole which projects beyond the
bottom of the shoe, so that the surplus projecting margin
of the sole will not be wrapped tightly against the upper
of the shoe and the ?nished sides of a Louis heel, but
will extend in diverging relation to the sides of the shoe
upper and heel.
A need ordinarily met in the attachment of an outsole
10 to a cement shoe and simultaneously in the attachment
of a breast covering flap to a heel already mounted on
This invention relates to improvements in machines
such shoe, especially where solid resilient pads are pro
and apparatus for attaching outsoles to cement shoes,
vided, as distinguished from ?uid containing pads, is in
particularly when it is desired at the same time to attach
manual adjustment of the general contour on the sup
breast covering ?aps split from the 'outsoles to Louis or
port for the pads. A pressure pad is supported in a box,
other heels by applying simultaneous pressure on the
the contour on the bottom surface of which is capable
sole and heel breast, as disclosed in a co-pending appli
of being changed to conform with the general shape of
cation for United States Letters Patent, Serial No. 763,055,
the shoe. With the use of solid compressible pads it
?led September 24, 1958 in the name of Helge Gulbrand
may be necessary to change the contour of the pad box
sen, new application Serial No. 91,547, ?led October 24,
bottom to a greater extent than has been found necessary
1961.
with the supporting pad box for a ?uid containing pad.
The nature of an outsole attaching operation for a
This is because a ?uid containing pad conforms with the
cement shoe is such that two steps must be taken into
shape of the shoe more readily and, all other things being
consideration; ?rst, as related to the problem of con
equal, the ?uid containing pad does no worse in character
forming the outsole with the shape of the shoe bottom
including the breast of a heel when one is attached to the
emphasis with great changes in shoe sizes and styles. In
shoe bottom; and second, as related to the problem of
bringing the outsole into ?rm intimate contact with the
surfaces of the shoe bottom for maximum adhesive dis
any case such ?uid pad does not add desirable character
tribution and absorption. If an attempt is made to con
form the sole and to attach it with a single instantaneous
application of pressure, di?iculty is encountered both
from the fact ‘that the material operated upon is subjected
to destruction under heavy impact and that the character
of adhesive, which is employed for outsole attachment,
introduces a time-pressure factor, within which e?ective
attachment of an outsole to a shoe bottom is not readily
capable of being accomplished. 'If the time of pressure
is reduced below a practical minimum, then the intensity
of pressure required for satisfactory attachment of the
outsole must be increased all out of proportion to that
which may safely and practically be applied. In making
provision for proper conforming of an outsole and there
after for insuring a practical time-pressure action during
the outsole attaching operation, it has been common prac
tice to move with a light preliminary force a shoe quickly
toward a pair of toe and heel supporting abutments
through a sul?cient distance for convenient introduction
and removal of a shoe from a pressure pad, as a ?rst
step, to prevent disruption of the outsole or shoe parts
as
result of sudden impact.
Thereafter, as a second
step, the pressure on the pad is gradually increased with
the required heavy force and held for an appreciable
length of time to insure effective adhesive distribution
and absorption by the outsole and shoe bottom. These
emphasis to a shoe to the extent obtainable with a prop
erly contoured solid resilient pad. It thus appears that
problems met in a solid pad include adaptability and ad
justment; whereas, the problems met with ?uid containing
pads include character emphasis in any adjustment.
The object of the present invention is to provide a
supporting box intended to be used with a solid resilient
pad for attaching outsoles to shoes and simultaneously
for attaching breast ?aps integral with an outsole to a
heel already mounted on a shoe, in which any adjust
ments required in the contour of a pad supporting surface
in a pad box are accomplished automatically without any
attention on the part of the operator for the machine,
thus attaining a degree of adaptability equal to that pro
vided by the use of a ?uid containing pad.
Preferably, the pad and box of the invention are em
ployed in a machine which is capable of a two-step opera
tion, the ?rst of which moves the pad and shoe quickly
relatively to a set of toe and heel abutments with a rela
tively light force until the contour of the pad supporting
box has had an opportunity to become adjusted to the
shape of the shoe, and the second of which exerts a much
heavier force on the shoe over an extended period of
time su?‘icient to form a secure attachment of the outsole
to the shoe, the solid pad itself yielding su?ciently to
distribute the heavy pressures along the desired areas.
Other objects of the invention are generally to improve
the operation of a cement sole attaching machine, in which
steps have been performed separately during successive 55 the set of toe and heel abutments is adjustable in accord
ance with the size of a shoe being processed by the ma
time intervals, either with the use of hollow pads con
chine regardless of whether a heel already is attached
taining a pressure distributing ?uid or with the use of
compressible pads of solid resilient material. With the
use of hollow ?uid containing pads a uniform pressure
is applied at right angles to all surfaces but without ob
taining special bene?ts in character of contour in a shoe
through the use of greater pressures along certain areas
and lower pressures along others.
to the shoe bottom or whether a shoe is intended to have
its heel attached afterwards.
The features of the invention contributing to the ob
60
jects above outlined are embodied in a machine having a
set of pad elements in an automatically adjustable pad
box comprising forepart and heel trays and a shank sup
porting member between the forepart and heel trays, in
The more desirable type of pad contains, at least, along
which
there are balancing connections between the fore
its shank and breast engaging elements a reinforcement of 65 part and heel trays and the shank member acting to
solid resilient material, which when in uncompressed
press the shank member of the pad into the shank area of
condition is shaped to apply increased pressures along
the shoe with a force equal to the sum of pressure com
the margins of the shank and heel breast while minimiz
ponents exerted by both the forepart and heel trays.
ing pressures on areas between the margins of the shank
Such an arrangement distinguishes from previous pad
and heel breast during the ?rst light force step. Also, 70 supporting boxes, in which connections are provided for
along the forepart of a shoe it is desirable to apply a
balancing the components of the boxes, but none are ar
3,052,901
4
3 .
ranged to apply pressure along the more critical shank
sults of a desirable breast ?ap attaching operation on a.
area of a shoe with a force equal to the sum of pressure
shoe heel; and
FIG. 16 is a similar detail perspective view of a shoe
doing the'machine of the present invention is capable of
emphasizing the character of contour by increasing the
heel taken in section along the line XV-XV of FIG. 5,
indicating an improper breast ?ap attaching operation.
pressure imparted to selected areas of the shoe rather than
The machine illustrated in the drawings is intended for
by applying pressures equally throughout the entire areas
acted on, regardless of their irregularities or the need
operation on a lasted cement shoe on the bottom of which
for different treatment.
is already mounted a Louis or other type of heel, whether
the heel is attached directly to the heel seat of the shoe
'
Another feature of the invention resides in an auto
10 or to a sole, which in turn is temporarily attached to the
matically actuated mechanism for adjusting the spacing
shoe bottom. To apply pressure to the shoe it is placed
on a pad supporting box and compressed between the
pad box and shoe engaging and holding devices which are
between toe and heel abutments, against which the pres
sure of the shoe on the pad is exerted, the distance be
brought together by suitable actuating means.
, tween the toe and heel abutments being increased for
use with large sized shoes and decreased for smaller sized 15
shoes, preferably by the engagement of a feeler member
directly with a portion of the shoe or of the last on which
the'shoe is mounted.
These and'other features of the invention, as herein
after described and claimed, will be apparent to those
‘skilled in the art from the following detailed speci?cation,
taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in
which:
,
_
components exerted on the forepart and heel trays. In so
Also, the machine without any substantial changes or
adjustments is capable of operating to advantage upon a
shoe, to the bottom of which no heel is attached, the heel
being attached after the sole attaching operation is .com
pleted.
Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the machine is
illustrated as operating upon a shoe having no heel at
tached, the machine being capable of automatic adjust
ment to suit the contour of the shoe bottom without neces
a
‘FIG._1 is a view in front elevation and partly in sec
tion of the principal parts of a machine embodying the
features of the present invention, shown in use with a
shoe having no heel attached;
FIG. 2 is a perspective view on a reduced scale, look
ing from the rear of the machine illustrated in FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is an enlarged view in side elevation of a pad
box and shoe engaging devices in the machine shown in
use with a Louis heel shoe, indicating the parts of the
machine in positions assumed before an attaching oper
ationhas been initiated;
FIG. 4 is a-fragmentary detail view of a portion of
the operating connections for a heel supporting mech
anism in the machine;
FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the same parts of the
machine illustrated in FIG. 3, in positions assumed While
applying pressure to a Louis heel shoe;
FIG. '6 is a perspective detail of a heel pad tray in
the machine looking from beneath the front and right
sitating the exercise of special control or adjustment on
the part of an operator when changing from one size or
style of shoe to another. The shoe illustrated in FIG. 1
is of conventional form having a ?at lasted upper 10
supported on a last 12 with an outsole 14 spotted and
a?ixed to the overlasted margin of the upper along the
30 bottom of the shoe. The pad box is provided with a com
posite set of pad elements, the upper surface of which
is protected by a leather cover 16 secured in the pad box
‘by a plate 18 by means of stud screws 20 and threaded
pins, one of which is shown at 22 in FIG. 7. The plate
18 is clamped in place on the rim of the pad box by nuts
23 threaded on each pin 22. In other respects thema
chine is similar to that disclosed in United States Letters
Patent N0.~2,568,065, granted September 18, 1951 upon
application ,of Helge Gulbrandsen, except that instead of
employing a pad supporting box containing forepart,
shank and heel pad supporting members connected to
gether for manual adjustment relatively to each other, as
in the patent, connections are provided between these
members of the pad box to enable them to adjust them
45 selves automatically with relation to each other in accord
of the machine;
ance with the contour of the shoe bottom being operated
FIG. 8 is a plan view, partly in section, of the pad box
side;
a
'
FIG. 7 is a plan view of a shoe disposed on the pad box I
upon.
with the pad removed;
_ FIG. 9 is a perspective w'ew of the pad and the pad
For the purpose of automatic adjustment in the machine
of the present invention the connections between a fore
tion extends lengthwise of a shoe (illustrated in broken 50 part tray, a shank supporting member and a heel sup—
box, partly indicated in section, the plane of which sec
lines), the parts of the pad box being shown in positions
porting tray herein illustrated at 24, 25 and 26, respec-'
assumed during the application of pressure on the shoe
trvely, in the order noted are arranged to be yieldingly ,
held in preliminary positions of adjustment so that when
a shoe is brought into engagement with the cover 16 it is
FIG. 10 is a sectional perspective View of the pad,
shown in FIG. 9, the section for which extends length 55 pressed downwardly relatively to a base structure for the
pad box and so that the forepart and heel trays will be
wise of the shoe with the parts of the pad in uncompressed
depressed bodily in the base until the required pressure is
condition;
.
distributed along the shank of the shoe by upward move
FIG.'1l is a transverse sectional view of upper portions
.of the pad and box, taken along the line XI——XI of ‘ ' ment of the shank supporting member located between the
FIG. 5 through the shank portion of a shoe, illustrating 60 forepart andheel trays. After the operation on the shoe
is_completed the pressure is relieved and the forepart and
the compression of the pad by the shoe;
heel trays rise, in the pad box base to their original posi
FIG. 12 is a transverse sectional view of the pad box,
tions.
indicating a shoe‘ under compression, the section being
It will be understood that the reference to the direction
taken along the line XII—X1I of FIG. 5;
bottom;
movement for the pad box parts relatively to the base
FIG. 13. is a similar sectional view of a portion of the 65 of
is selected for convenience of expression and whether this
pad and box with a shoe thereon, indicating the positions
movement takes place with'relation to a ?xed part of the
of the parts before the application of pressure;
machine has no bearing on the features of invention in
' FIG. 14 is a detail perspective view looking from the
volved. For instance, the shoe may be raised against ?xed
light of the machine of mechanism for adjusting the dis
abutments or the abutments may be lowered against the
tance automatically between the toe and heel abutments
of the machine with‘ relation to a shoe being operated
upon;
7
7
FIG. 15 is a detail perspective view taken partly in sec
shoe; depending on the type of machine employed, either
manner of operation being old in the art.
Heretofore, attempts have been made to adjust auto-.
matically the pad supporting parts of a pad box relatively
tion along the line XV-XV of FIG. 5, showing the re 75 to the. base to distribute the forcesron independent pad
3,052,901
5
elements in a desirable manner throughout the bottom
area of a shoe being operated upon. These attempts have
not resulted in a pad box which was universahy adjustable
to different sizes and styles of shoes, so that for practical
purposes the advantages of utilizing solid resilient pad ele
ments of rubbery material have heretofore required sub
stantial manual adjustment between operations on shoes
6
of the forepart tray 24. The pin 46 is arranged to be
guided vertically in the side plates 42 of the pad ‘box base
‘by the provision of vertical slots 50‘ in the side plates.
The rearward end of the link 44 is also formed with hori
zontal slots 52 to receive a ?oating pin 54 secured between
the side plates of the base 42 within a close ?tting open
ing at the forward end of the shank lever member 25.
Thus, the link 44- serves as a ramp extending between the
for the full range of styles and sizes found in the average
forward end of the shank member 25 and the rearward
shoe factory.
The force distributing connections of the resent inven 10 end of the forepart tray ‘24 and adds to the tendency to
rock the forward end of the lever member 25 downwardly.
tion act to concentrate on the shank of the shoe compo
The connections between the heel tray and the lever
nents of those forces which are exerted on the forepart
ike shank supporting member 25 impart greater upward
and the heel of the shoe. In this way effective pressures
are brought to bear on the shoe shank where the greatest
variations in curvature occur between shoes of di?erent
movement to the forward end of lever member in the
sizes and styles. To accommodate the variations in curva
ture ordinarily met along the shank of the shoe, the shank
pad box base and press the shank elements of the pad
upwardly relatively to the base into the shank of the
shoe as the heel tray is depressed by downward pressure
pressing pad element is composed of independent layers
on the shoe ‘heel.
28 of vertically divided resilient material and a vertical
armed lever 56 (see FIGS. 1, 3, 5 and 8) composed of
three approximately horizontally disposed arms and a
downwardly extending arm all pinned to a horizontally
extending ‘shaft 57 having its ends rotatably mounted
heel breast pressing layer 39, having a rearward surface
shaped to ?t the curvature of the breast on a Louis heel.
The layers 28 and 39 are generally perpendicular to the
shoe bottom. However, when operating upon an unheeled
shoe as in FIG. 1, the space beneath the heel is ?lled in by
a compressible heel ?ller block 32 disposed above a U
shaped heel embracing pad 34, the opening of the U in
which provides space for 2. Louis heel when required. The
heel pad 34 is supported in the tray 2.6 and the lower edges
of the vertical shank layers are supported on the member
The heel connections include a four
in vthe side plates 42 of the base.
The two outer arms
of the lever 56 carry lugs 58 extending toward each
other beneath downwardly projecting flanges on the heel
vtray. A central arm of the lever 56 extends forwardly
and is formed with a slot 5? through which passes a
short stud 6t} ?xed in lugs extending rearwardly from
the shank supporting lever member 25. Passing trans
versely ‘through the shank supporting member 25, between
25. To press the forepart of the shoe the leather cover 30
16 rests on a forepart pad which consists of a layer 36 dis
the stud 6t} and the shaft 40 is a pin 62 con?ned between
posed on parallel underlying layers 38 supported in the
forepart tray 24 having upstanding ?anges to prevent dis
placement of the forepart pad. The layers 36 and 32 are
arranged in substantially parallel relation to the shoe
the side plates 42 of the base and embracing this pin
are a pair of forked portions of the heel tray 26 formed
integrally with its downwardly extending ?anges. The
relative lengths of the horizontal arms on the lever 56
bottom.
and the distances between the fulcrum shaft 49, the pin
The force distributing connections between the heel tray
26, the shank supporting member 25 and the forepart tray
62- and the stud 60 on the shank member 25 comprise
parallel movement linkage which causes the lugs 58 on
24 consist in links and levers arranged to press the shank
element of the pad into the shank of the shoe with a force
equal to the sum of pressure components on both the fore
one end of the lever 56 to be raised or lowered at the
same rate as the pins 62 on the other end. Thus, a sub
of the shank of a shoe disposed on the pad and ?xed at its
end of the shank member are compressed lengthwise more
than those directly above the fulcrum shaft 40. For this
stantially horizontal relation is maintained by the heel
part and heel trays. To stabilize the pad supporting struc—
tray 26 regardless of its vertical height. In this way
ture of the pad box, the heel tray is mounted for vertical
rocking movements of the heel tray are prevented. Fur
movement while being constrained from angular move
thermore, bodily relative movement in the pad box
ment with respect to the other parts of the pad box. rThe
base in a direction generally perpendicular to the shoe
45
forepart tray is mounted for vertical movement and also
bottom of the heel tray is permitted, causing the shank
for swinging movement about an axis extending trans
member 25 to vswing about its vfulcrum shaft 4%) and the
versely of a shoe disposed in operating position on the
forward arm of the member 25 to move upwardly, com
pad.
pressing the elements of the shank pad against the shoe.
The shank supporting member 25 is in the form of a
As the lever member 25 swings to compress the vertical
wide lever fulcrumed on a shaft 41'} extending transversely 50 layers of the shank pad member, those at the forward
ends in side plates 42 comprising the pad box base. The
fulcrum shaft 4% is located in the base side plates with its
axis directly beneath the line of division between the heel
reason there will be a greater component of horizontal
pressure exerted in a rearward direction on the shank
breast pressing shank layer 3% and the next adjacent shank CA' Ul layers ‘directly above the fulcrum shaft and particularly
layer 23, so as to facilitate vertical movement in opposite
on the breast pressing layer 30 than would otherwise
directions of these shank layers while the shank support
be present. This greater rearward pressure is found to
ing lever member 25 is being adjusted to conform with
the requirements of a particular shoe. The portion or" the
shank supporting lever member 25 forwardly of the shaft
40, however, is actually greater by a ratio of about one
be of particular advantage when operating upon shoes
having Louis heels already attached, as will be explained
and one-half to one than that of the portion rearwardly
of the shaft. As the shank lever member 25 swings about
flanges engaging a pin 64 mounted in the forward arms of
a pair of balancing levers 66. The balancing levers are
the shaft 49 the individual layers 28 of the shank pad shift
more fully below.
The forepart tray has a pair of downwardly extending
secured ‘to a fulcrum shaft 68 mounted for rotation in
the side plates 42 of the base and the rearward arms of
the levers 66 are reduced in horizontal thickness and
on the member 25 and being applied to it at its forward
extend beneath the forward arms of the shank member
end, tending to rock in a counterclockwise direction as
25. The levers 66 thus act to transfer the downward
viewed in FIG. I.
To avoid an abrupt gradient of pressures exerted be 70 force on the forepart tray 24 to the shank supporting
member 25, tending to cause ‘movement thereof in the
tween the shank supporting member 25 and the forepart
tray 24, the two are connected loosely together by means
same direction as the component of downward ‘force on
the heel tray 26.
of a wide link 44 having secured within openings at its
forward end a horizontal pin 45 passing also through
Because the lengths of arms on the various supporting
similar close ?tting openings in the lower rearward end
and balancing levers are proportioned to transfer the
with relation to each other and with relation to the heel
pressing layer 36, the greater proportion of force acting
3,052,901
desired components of downward force on the heel and
While the machine is herein illustrated‘ as having a pad
forepart trays to the shank supporting member 25, the
shank supporting member applies the proper degree of
box raised by pressure applying means comprising a
vertical force to the shoe and exerts the proper horizontal
to a machine such as that illustrated in United States '
and rearward component of that force to give the desired
double diameter piston, the invention is readily applicable
Letters Patent No. 2,047,185, granted July 14, 1936, upon
results. For the same reason the bodily adjusting move
application of Ballard et al., in which the pressure apply
ments of the heel and forepart trays are substantially
equal to each other, so that the balance of these forces
ing means acts to force the toe and heel engaging abut
ment devices downwardly to compress the shoe against a
pad in the pad box. In the present machine a single ?uid
and the horizontal position of the shoe as a whole does
not change during the operation on the shoe.
10 pressure‘actuated lever, such as that indicated at 314 in
the Ballard et al. patent, would thus have secured to its
‘The forepart tray is not restrained against angular
forward end the frame part 104 of the present machine
movement of its ?anges about the pin 64, and is free for
and the pad box would be secured rigidly to an underlying
rocking movement to accommodate the angle between the
?xed portion of the machine frame. While the Ballard
shank and forepart of the last supporting the shoe. Such
angular movement does not change the pressure on the 15 et al. patent illustrates two separate ?uid actuated pistons
and two separate levers, one of which levers operates to
shoe shank.
depress the toe-engaging abutment wh'?e the other actu
The support for the pad box and the actuating means
ates the heel-engaging abutment there would be no neces
for bringing together the pad box and the shoe engaging
sity for such an arrangement with the machine of the
and holding abutments to apply pressure to the shoe are
the same, except as hereinafter described, as in the ma 20 present invention, inasmuch as a single walking beam
type of connection to balance the forces applied to the
chine of the prior co-pending application above identi
?ed. The pad box base near its forward end has con
nected between its side plates 42 a rectangular bar 69
and at its rearward end a bracket 70, both bar and
bracket being secured to the side plates by cap screws
7-2 (see FIG. 3). At the bottom of the base near its
rearward end there also is secured a block 74 made fast
to the right-hand side plate by screws 76 (FIG. 3). The
bar 69 and the block 74 are located ?ush with the bot
tom edges of the side plates so that they form means for
attaching the pad box base to the pressure applying
means.
In the particular form of the machine illustrated the
pressure applying means acts in a direction generally
perpendicular to the shoe bottom and comprises a double
piston 78 (see FIG. 1), a large diameter portion of
toe and heel abutments is all that is required to insure
proper automatic adjustment of the pad' supporting parts
in the pad box of the present invention.
The advantage of a two-pressure system, one intensity
of which brings the shoe quickly into engagement with
the abutment devices and the other intensity of which
exerts proper attaching action of the shoe and sole .is
apparent where a relatively light force is desirable for
adjusting the parts of a pad supporting box and there
after where a much heavier force is needed to complete
the operation on the shoe. A further advantage of the
two-pressure system is that the major part of the adjust
ment is accomplished under light pressure so that the
adjusting parts are subjected to relatively gentle forces
during their relative movement; whereas, much heavier
which is guided in a cylinder 80 and a small diameter
portion of which is guided in a cylinder 82. The cylinders
vforces may be applied to the same parts after the adjust
ing movements have substantially been completed with
80 and 82 vform parts of a machine frame and are sup
out undue wear or other undesirable e?ects.
Thus, ?uid under pressure is ?rst directed into the small _
cylinder 82 .to move the shoe quickly ‘from a lowered
at its lower end and is engaged by one end of a strong ten
sion spring 106 stretched between the lever arm and an
eye bolt 108 secured in the cross bar 69. The action of
the spring 106 is to raise the toe and heel trays 24 and 26
In order that the adjustments of the pad box may be
plied With pressurized ?uid under control of two sepa 40
accomplished throughout the full range of possible move
rate hydraulic systems, the pressure applied to the shoe
ment during each operation on a shoe, the downwardly
by the smaller diameter portion of the piston being less
extending arm of the lever 56 in the pad box is perforated
than the pressure applied by the larger diameter portion.
position where it is readily applied to the pad to a
higher position where it engages a pair of toe and heel
abutment devices ‘84 and 86 mounted in the frame oppo
site the pad elements. The toe abutment device 84 is
to their full height while depressing the shank support
ing member 25 into the position more fully illustrated in
mounted for vertical adjustment on a slide 88 and the 50 FIG. 3. In this way if a shoe, such as that illustrated
at 110, having a Louis heel 112 is to be operated upon,
heel abutment device 86 is pivotally mounted on a slide
90. The slides 88 and 90 are supported by similar
guideways 92 and 94 formed on the lower ends of
plungers 96 and 98 slidable in an overhanging portion
of the machine frame. Connected between the upper
ends of the plungers 96 and 98 is a walking beam 100
supported on a pivot shaft 102 secured in the overhang
ing portion, indicated at 104 of the machine ‘frame, the
portion 104 extending rigidly between the pivot shaft
the spacing block 32. is removed to expose the opening
in the heel embracing pad 34. After the shoe has been
located with the heel within the opening of the heel
. embracing pad a heel supporting mechanism connected
with a pad block 114 is rendered operative to engage and
backup the rearward surface of the heel 112 in syn
chronism with the application of pressure to the shoe.
This mechanism is the same as that described in the prior
102 and the cylinders 80 and 82 ‘for the piston 78, so 60 application and in the machine of that application the
block is locked against the heel directly by engagement
that when ?uid pressure isintrodu-ced into the cylinders
of the heel pad with the block. For a shoe having no heel
the shoe is raised into engagement with the abutment
attached this mechanism is rendered inoperative inasmuch
devices 84 and 86. As soon as the abutments are en
as there is no necessity for supporting the heel.
gaged by the shoe the continued upward movement of the
With the shoe in position on the pad box the forepart
shoe raises one and causes the other to be lowered
and heel of the shoe is held raised to a point where
. through the action of the Walking beam 100 until bal
many of the surface areas of the shoe bottom are entirely
anced positions of the two abutment devices are reached.
disengaged frorncertain portions of the cover 16 for. the
Thereafter, upon further increase in pressure the shoe
pads. As pressure is applied to the piston the heel sup
is held by the abutment devices and the pad box is raised
porting block 114 moves along the heel pad 34 into en
until the pressure on the shoe bottom reaches a maximum,
gagement with the rearward surface of the heel to urge it
the cylinder 80 then being subject to the full ?uid pres
against the shank pad layer 30. Thereafter the heel sup
sure of the system connected thereto. To secure the pad
porting block is locked against rearward movement and
box in position on the double piston 78 a pair of cap
screws ‘105 pass through a ?ange on the piston and into
as the shoe engages the toe and heel abutments'the toe
threaded engagement with the bar 69 and the block 74.
75 and heel trays 24 and 26 are depressed and the shank
3,052,901
10
supporting member is raised to bring the ‘shank engaging
portion of the cover 16 into a desired pressing engagement
with the shank of the shoe in the positions illustrated
in FIG. 5 of the drawings. Eventually a condition of
equilibrium between forces applied to the shoe is reached
and the heavy attaching pressure is applied to the piston.
The pad box is then raised somewhat higher, the pad
zontal links 142. The rearward ends of the links 142
are pivoted at 144 to upstanding portions of the side
plates 42, which extend between the ears on the forepart
tray. The upstanding portions of the side plates 42 at
either side of the shank pad element prevent escape of
the shank pad and maintain it in alignment with the
layers 38 (see also FIG. 12). The frame 139 has side
elements being compressed horizontally and expanded
?anges resting on the crossbar 64': between the side ?anges
laterally to ?ll in the voids between them and the curved
of the frame and the side ?anges have horizontal slots
areas about the shank and heel of the shoe; otherwise, 1O 143 through which pass loosely the pin 46. 'The frame
the operation is similar to that described in the applica
139 also has threaded openings to receive the screws 2!)
tion above identi?ed.
and the pins 22.
In the machine of the prior application the heel sup
To prevent displacement of the shank pad element rear
porting block is locked against the rearward surface of
wardly, the side plates 42 are formed with horizontal
the heel, merely by raising the heel pad into engagement 15 slots 145 (FIG. 3) through which pass a pair of clamp
with the heel supporting block. In the present machine
bolts 146 for securing in adjusted position a pair of
the mechanism for actuating and locking the supporting
T-shaped clips 143, best shown in FIG. 7. The bolts
block includes a horizontally reciprocating bar 116 hav
146 have threaded on them a pair of wing nuts 159,
ing secured to its under surface a ratchet bar 118, the
which when loosened permit the clips 148 to slide toward
teeth of which are directed rearwardly and downwardly.
and from contact with the heel pressing pad layer 36.
The supporting block bar 116 is slidingly mounted in a
At the forward end of the shank pad element the foremost
carrier 120 having secured to its lower inner surface a
layer 28 engages the rearward ends of the toe pressing
second ratchet bar 122 formed with teeth directed for
pad layers 36 and 38. Also assisting in con?nement of
wardly and upwardly. The carrier 120 is pivotally
the shank pad elements, there are formed at the forward
mounted on a rearwardly extending arm of the bracket 25 end of the heel tray 26 a pair of upstanding ?anges 151
70 so that when the shoe engages the overhead abutment
(FIG. 6) which engage the heel pressing layer 30.
devices the supporting block 114 presses the bar 116
Because the pad box of the illustrated machine con
downwardly to bring the ratchet bar 118 into engagement
tains no water bags to equalize pressures on all parts
with the ratchet bar 122, thus preventing rearward move
of a shoe bottom, the present solid resilient pad elements
ment of the heel supporting block.
30 have a tendency to ?ow and expand horizontally while
To insure that the teeth of the ratchet bar 118 will be
being compressed vertically. These pad elements may
held in engagement with those of the ratchet bar 122,
be suitably contoured when in uncompressed condition to
the carrier 120 is acted upon by a spring pressed plunger
give the desired concentration of pressures for best results
124 mounted in the bracket 70. As the pad box is
and enhanced characteristics on a shoe without distort
raised at the beginning of an operation on a shoe the 35 ing the shoe or tending to stretch or wrinkle the parts
force of the plunger 124 holds the carrier 12!} raised until
being operated upon. As illustrated in FIGS. 9 to 13
downward pressure is exerted on the shoe by the toe and
inclusive, all of the shoe pressing surfaces of the upper
heel abutment devices 84 and 86. To release the teeth
most pad elements are formed with substantial con
of the bar 118 from engagement with those of the
cavities 152 and 154 to conform with the convex curva
ratchet bar 122, so that the supporting block 114 may be
tures both lengthwise and widt'nwise of a shoe being
retracted after an operation on a shoe is completed, a
processed. These concavities assist in a proper prelim
leaf spring 126 ?xed at its rearward end inside the carrier
inary location of a shoe on the pad as well as emphasize
120 acts between the reciprocating bar 116 and the carrier
the shoe character and shape by concentrating all the
120 to separate the two ratchet bars from each other.
pressures applied thereto to the marginal portions of the
To permit the heel supporting mechanism to be rendered
sole while leaving the central areas of both the forepart
inoperative when a shoe having no heel attached thereto
and shank relatively free of pressures.
is being processed, the reciprocating bar 116 is actuated
As shown in FIG. 11 the relaxed and uncompressed
by a link 128 pivotally connected at its rearward end
positions of the parts are shown in broken lines. While
to the bar and formed with an open notch 130 at its
under pressure of the sole attaching operations all of
forward end arranged to embrace a pin 132 secured to
the pressure along the shank is limited to a marginal
an upwardly extending actuating arm 134., as shown in
area 156 of the outsole, leaving a central area 153 free
FIG. 4. When the link 128 is raised‘ manually it dis
of pressure, as indicated by the full line positions. The
engages the pin 132. The actuating arm 134 is pinned
same action is true in the forepart of the shoe, as shown
to a stud 136 rotatable in rearwardly projecting lugs on
in FIG. 13, where the forepart pad 36 is contoured with
the bracket 79. For actuating the arm 134 connections 55 the concavity 152, indicating greater curvature than the
are provided between a laterally extending arm 138 rotat
able on the stud 135 and the frame of the machine, the
arm 138 being yieldingly connected by a spring 137
(FIG. 3) to the arm 134. The free end of the arm
138 is in turn connected to the stationary frame por
tion 89 in such a way that when the piston 78 is raised
convexity of a shoe bottom, so that when the shoe is ?rst
located on the pad a substantial space 160 will be
present between the shoe and the pad. Upon appli
cation of pressure to the shoe it will be forced against
the pad into the position shown in FIG. 12 where most
of the space 160 will be taken up or will be substantially
the actuating arm 134 will press the heel supporting pad
114 forwardly, as in the aforementioned application. In
reduced in area.
case the toe and heel abutments 84 and 86 are actuated
use of a solid resilient pad, as distinguished from a ?uid
The character emphasizing bene?ts ?owing from the
downwardly against the shoe, as in the Ballard et al. 65 containing one are also apparent in processing the shoe
machine, instead of being ?xed as illustrated herein, the
provided with the Louis heel 112, as appears in FIG. 15.
connections for the arm 138 will necessarily be made
When such shoe is being processed the outsole, indicated
directly to the movable portion of the frame 104 which
at 162 in FIGS. 3 and 5, has at its rearward end a reduced
carries the toe and heel engaging abutments.
area portion forming a breast covering ?ap 164. Along
To con?ne the forepart pad layer 35 while permitting 70 the section of greatest curvature close to the joint between
bodily movement in a vertical direction with the forepart
the heel and the shoe bottom the breast ?ap is pressed
tray 24, the pad layer 36 is surrounded by a horseshoe
uniformly against the heel while ?exing any surplus por
shaped frame 139 having on the upper rearward corners
tion 166 along the margins of the ?ap slightly rearwardly
ears through which pass a pair of pins 140 also passing
of the heel breast to form creases 168, along which the
through the forward ends of a pair of substantially hori~ 75 surplus may readily be trimmed after attachment.
3,052,901
1l
1.2
Tlhe condition of the marginal portions where a solid
position where‘ it changes the spacing between the abut;
resilient pad is employed is readily distinguished from
ments for the smallest size of shoe being operated upon,
the use of a ?uid containing bag, which causes the surplus
marginal portions 170 of a flap 172, as shown in FIG. 6,
to be ?exed into intimate contact with the side surfaces
and a pin 196 on the slide 90. The spring 192draws the
arm 180 against an ‘adjustable stop plate 198 secured by
of'the heel. The marginal portions, thus are attached
and must be pried loose before the surplus margins of the
?ap may be trimmed into conformity with the breast of
90 being held in ?xed position on the guideway 94 by a
a spring 193 is stretched between a pin 194 on the arm
means of a releasable screw 200 to the slide 90, the slide
set screw 202 threaded in a portion of the slide 90 and
engaged at its inner end with the guideway 94. As in
loose from the heel particles of adhesive adhere to the 10 prior machines the plungers 96 and 98 of the guideway
are retained at their upper ends in engagement with the
sides of the heel, causing discoloration or resulting in
walking beam 100 by a pair of tension springs 204
abrasion'of the ?nished heel surfaces when an attempt
stretched at their lower ends between the guideways 92
is made to remove them.
and 94 and pins 206 in the machine frame portion 104.
To assist still further in reducing the need of adjust—
With the use of an automatic adjustment slide for the
ment of the machine by the operator according to a
spacing between the heel and toe abutment a particularly
further feature of the invention, the slide for the toe
desirable bene?t is obtained in operating upon shoes hava
abutment 84 is adjusted along its guideway 92 automati
ing a Louis heel already attachedpthe Louis heel acting
cally in accordance with the size of the shoe being
to locate a shoe at its rearward end accurately with
operated upon. In this way it is possible to bring the
relation to the pad box and the heel abutment device 86.
spacing between the toe and heel abutment devices into
In operating upon a Louis heel shoe the shoe is ?rst
correspondence with the locations on a shoe where the
applied to the pad in the pad. box with the breast of its
best results are obtainable. For this purpose the slide
heel positioned ?rmly against the leather cover 16 sup
88 has pivotally connected to it at 174' (see FIGS. 1, 3,
ported by the heel breast pressing pad layer '30., As the
5, and 14) the forward end of a threaded rod 176, the
sole attaching operation is initiated the heel supporting
rearward end of which passes loosely through a rectangu
block 114 is moved against the rearward surface of the
lar head on a pivot 178 rotating loosely in a downward
shoe heel so as to bring the shoe accurately into position
ly extending arm 180 rotatable on the shaft 102. The
lengthwise on the pad. Such accurate location determines
lower end of the arm 180 has a pair of perforations,
uniformly the action of the feeler roll 186 in spacing the
one of which is shown at 182, and the other of which
has passing through it a pin 184 forming a mounting for 30 shoe’ abutment devices, so that vshoes of the same size
will always have the toe abutment device 84 spaced the,
a ‘feeler roll 186. The roll 186 is so located that as a shoe
required distance from vthe heel abutment device 86.
mounted on the pad box is raised from the solid line
The nature and scope of the invention having been set
position of FIG. 3 to the broken line position, the in
forth and a particular embodiment having been described,
clined forward face on the front cone 188 of a last 12
what is claimed is:
or 190 for the shoe engages the roll and swings the
1. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
arm 180 forwardly as in FIG. 5. In moving the arm 180
said machine having a frame, a pad box base in the frame,
the connection provided by the rod 176 moves the slide
a pad box in the base, a set of independent’ pad elements in
88 on its guideway 92 to bring the toe engaging abut
the pad box,’ shoe engaging and holding abutment devices
ment 84 into the proper position ‘to produce the best
mounted in the frame opposite the pad elements, and ac
results on the shoe without overstraining the last during
tuating means for bringing together the pad elements and
the application of sole attaching pressure. Because the
the shoe engaging and holding devices‘ to apply vertical
roll 186 engages the last approximately at a central loca
the heel. In prying the marginal portions of the ?ap
tion between the abutments 84 and 86, little or no varia
tion in movement of the arm is produced as the shoe
pressure to a lasted shoe on the pad elements in a direction
generally perpendicular to the shoe bottom, the pad ele
changes its angular position by forcing one abutment up 45 ment supporting box comprising forepart and heel trays
and a shank supporting member between the forepart and
heel trays, in combination with force distributing connec
tions between the forepart and heel trays acting to press the
shank element of the pad vertically into the shank of the
guideway 92 is permitted, the parts being locked together
as the result of the frictional forces produced by the 50 shoe with a force equal to the sum of the vertical force
components on the forepart and heel trays.
pressure applied.
2. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
T0 enable the shoe to move after engaging the toe abut
as in claim 1, in which the forepart tray is mounted for
ment 84 either by reason of its angular adjustment length
rocking movement to accommodate the angle between
wise relatively to a horizontal position or by reason of
a bulging action of the last between the abutment devices 55 the shank and the forepant of the shoe without changing
84 and 86, the rod 176 is surrounded between its threaded
the pressure on the shoe shank.
end and the pin 178 by a compression spring 191 which
3. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
holds the rectangular head of the pin yieldingly against
as in claim 2, in which the forces applied to ,the shoe en
a pair of check nuts 192 on the rod. In this way there
gaging and holding devices are balanced by a walking
is no danger of abrasion on the shoe upper by movement 60 beam connected between them to equalize the forces ex
of the abutment device 84 during the application of
erted against the shoe bottom by the pad elements in the
and causing the other abutment to be lowered. As soon
as the toe engaging abutment 84 comes into contact with
the shoe no further movement of the slide 88 on the
pressure.
The arm 180 is arranged to move a su?’icient distance
to take care of the full variation in sizes of shoes from
forepart and heel trays.
4. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
the smallest to the largest, the shoe being located in a 65 as in claim 2, in which a pin engaged by the forepart tray
enables the rocking movement and a lever is fulcrumed
predetermined position on the pad in the pad box. When
in the pad box to support the pin in one of its arms and
a Louis heel shoe is being operated upon this position is
to transfer a component of vertical force from the rod
determined ‘automatically by engagement of the heel
to the shank supporting member through another of its
breast with the heel pressing layer 30 of the shank
element. With a shoe having no heel attached the length 70 arms.
5. A'machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
wise position of the shoe may be gaged with su?icient as in claim 4, in which the connections between the heel
accuracy either by the position of the heel supporting
tray and the shank supporting member transfer the com
.block 114, which is rendered inoperative or otherwise by
ponent of vertical force applied to it directly to the shank
markings on the pad box.
To bring the shoe abutment adjusting arm 180 into a 75 supporting member tending to cause movement therein
3,052,901
13
14
in the same direction as the component of vertical force
comprising a spring acting between the reciprocating bar
applied to the heel tray by the actuating means.
and the carrier.
6. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
~
15. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
as in claim 1, in which a link is connected between the
as in claim 2, in which the pad elements supported by the
pad box consist of independent layers of resilient mate
shank supporting member and the fore-part tray, against
rial of which those in the forepart tray are arranged in
substantially parallel relation to the shoe ‘bottom and those
supported by the shank member extend substantially per
pendicularly to the shoe bottom, and a fulcrum shaft
about which the shank supporting member rocks located 10
which link a portion of the pad elements are supported
to avoid an abrupt gradient of pressures exerted between
the shank supporting member and the forepart tray.
16. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom
and simultaneously to the breast of a heel attached to the
with its axis directly beneath a line of division between
shoe bottom, said machine having a frame, a set of in
two adjacent layers of the shank pressing element.
dependent pad elements, toe and heel engaging and hold
7. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom
as in claim 2, in which there is provided a spring for rais
ing the forepart and heel trays and to lower the shank
supporting member at the end of an operation on a shoe.
8. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
as in claim 1, in which the actuating means includes a
two-pressure system, one intensity of which brings the
abutment devices mounted in the frame opposite the
pad elements, actuating means for bringing together the
pad elements and the shoe engaging and holding devices
to apply pressure to a lasted shoe on the pad elements in
a direction generally perpendicular to the shoe bottom,
a pad element in the supporting box comprising a heel
pressing layer having a surface shaped to fit the curvature
shoe quickly into engagement with the engaging and hold 20 on the heel breast, and an external heel supporting mem
ing devices, and the other intensity of which exerts proper
ber separate from the pad elements movable toward and
attaching action of the sole and shoe.
from the rearward surface of the heel of a shoe to urge
9. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
it against the shank pad element, in combination with
as in claim 1, in which the forces on the shoe engaging
means automatically adjusting the spacing between the
and holding devices are balanced by a walking beam con
toe and heel abutment devices including a feeler member
nected between them to equalize the forces exerted against
engaging the front cone of the last on which the shoe
is mounted.
the forepart and heel trays.
16. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
17. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom
as in claim 1, in which the force distributing connections
and simultaneously to the breast of a heel attached to
act on the heel and forepart trays to move them bodily 30 the shoe bottom, as in claim 16, in which spring means
relatively to the pad box base in a vertical direction by
is provided between the feeler and one of the abutment
amounts substantially equal to each other, the forepart
devices to enable the shoe to move after engaging the
tray is fulcrumed for h'ee rocking movement to accom
abutment devices to prevent abrasion of the shoe upper
modate the angle between the shank and forepart of the
during application of pressure on the shoe.
last supporting the shoe, and a lever and linkage are pro
18. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom
vided to hold the heel tray from rocking movement.
and simultaneously to the breast of a heel attached to
11. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
the shoe bottom, as in claim 16, in which there are pro
as in claim 10, in which the connections for the heel sup
vided a reciprocating bar on which the heel supporting
porting tray comprise parallel movement linkage to cause
member is mounted, a carrier in which the reciprocating
the ends of the heel tray to be raised or lowered at the 40 bar is slidingly mounted, ratchet means on the reciprocat
same rate.
ing bar and the carrier arranged to be engaged and to
12. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom,
be locked by pressure exerted on a shoe through engag as in claim 1, in which the pad element in the heel tray
ment with the toe and heel engaging devices, and means
is U-shaped providing an opening for 21 Louis heel on
for releasing the ratchet means from engagement after
the shoe being operated upon.
operation on a shoe is completed, comprising a spring
13. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom
acting between the reciprocating bar and the carrier to
and simultaneously to the breast of a heel attached to
separate the ratchet means.
the shoe bottom, as in claim 1, in which there is pro
19. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom
vided a heel supporting member, a reciprocating bar on
and simultaneously to the breast of a heel attached to the
which the heel supporting member is mounted for move 50 shoe bottom, as in claim 18, in which there is provided
ment toward and from the heel of a shoe, a carrier in
means for insuring that the ratchets will be held in en
which the reciprocating bar is slidingly mounted and
gagement during operation on a shoe, comprising a spring
means for locking the heel supporting member in engage
pressed plunger acting on the carrier to hold the carrier
ment with the shoe heel, including a ratchet on the re
ciprocating bar and a second ratchet on the carrier for the
bar arranged to be engaged by the ?rst ratchet by pressure
of the shoe against the shoe engaging and holding de
vlces.
14. A machine for applying pressure to a shoe bottom
and simultaneously to the breast of a heel attached to
the shoe bottom, as in claim 13, in which there is pro
vided means for releasing the ratchets from engagement
with each other after operation on a shoe is completed,
_ raised while downward pressure is exerted on the shoe
by the toe and heel engaging devices.
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
694,367
942,133
2,656,553
2,914,782
Gi?ord ______________ __ Mar. 4,
Davenport ____________ __ Dec. 7,
Woodman ___________ __ Oct. 27,
Prahl et al. ___________ __ Dec. 1,
1902
1909
1953
1959
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