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Патент USA US3054382

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Sept 18, 1962
c. H. JONES, JR
3,054,372
SAILBOAT
Filed Feb. 19. 1959
3 Sheets-Sheet 1
amass h‘. JONES, JR. '
INVENTOR.
BY
4/11!
‘
ATTORN Y
Sept. 18, 1962
c. H. JONES, JR
3,054,372
SAILBOAT
Filed Feb . 19. 1959
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
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FIG‘. 6.
CHARLES h’. JONES, JR.
1NVENTOR.
JMW
ATTORNEY
Sept. 18, 1962
c. H. JONES, JR
3,054,372
SAILBOAT
Filed Feb. 19. 1959
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
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CHARLES H. JONES‘, JR.
INVENTOR.
BY
ATTORNEY
3,?54,372
Patented Sept. 18, 1962
2
FIGURE 5 is a sectional view of the invention taken
3,054,372
on the line V—V of FIGURE 2,
SAILBOAT
FIGURE 6 is a sectional view of the invention taken
Charles H. Jones, Jr., 02k St., Lunenbnrg, Mass.
on the line VI—~VI of FIGURE 2,
Filed Feb. 19, 1959, Ser. No. 794,291
7 Claims. (Cl. 114—39)
FIGURE 7 is a sectional view of the invention taken
on the line VII—-VII of FIGURE 2,
This invention relates to a sailboat and more particu
vFIGURE 8 is a sectional view of the invention taken
larly a small sailboat of the transportable type.
on the line VIII—VIII of FIGURE 2, and
The owning and operation of small sailboats has al
FIGURES 9, l0 and 11 are bottom views of the sail
ways been a fascinating pastime, but many factors have 10 boat of the invention showing various positions of the
existed which have tended to suppress interest in this en
rudder.
deavor. For one thing, even small sailboats have been ex
In this speci?cation, the expressions “top,” “bottom,”
pensive, mainly because they represent so much hand work
“front,” “rearward,” “vertical,” “horizontal” and the like
in their manufacture. Also, a sailboat is di?icult to main
are to be understood as applying in the usual way to a
tain, particularly when used in the ocean, because of the 15 sailboat when it is ?oating in the water.
water attacking the hull; the price of preventing deteriora
Referring ?rst to FIGURE 1, wherein are best shown
tion is constant and expensive (or time consuming) paint
the general features of the invention, the sailboat, in
ing of the hull. Furthermore, even when one is careful
dicated generally by the reference numeral 10, is shown
to keep the boat painted, the appearance and ?nish rapid
as consisting of a hull 1'1 and a superstructure 12. The
ly deteriorate ‘because of successive coats of paint. At 20 superstructure has a mast 13 seated in the hull; the
the same time, the small sailboat is easily tipped over,
mast is made in two parts v14 and 15 to permit disassem
particularly if it is built with a small keel for shallow
bly, the lower end of the upper part 14 telescoping with
draft or to permit it to be readily transportable. Some
the upper end of the lower part 15 for a short distance
small sailboats, when upset, either sink or are incapable
to lock them together into a rigid unit. Both parts
of being righted in deep water. These and other de~
?ciencies in the prior art devices have been obviated in
a novel manner by the present invention.
are formed of tubular aluminum ?lled with a foam of
polystyrene plastic or the like.
The upper end of the
upper part 14 of the mast 13 is provided with an aper
It is, therefore, an outstanding object of the present in
ture through which passes a short length of rope 16
vention to provide a sailboat which can be inexpensively
which is attached to the upper end of a triangular nylon
made from readily-obtainable materials with a minimum 30 sail 17. The rope is knotted to lock it in place at the
of skilled labor.
Another object of this invention is the provision of a
sailboat whose hull is almost completely fabricated from
plastic, thus requiring no painting or other maintenance,
yet which is not subject to deterioration even in salt
water.
A further object of the present invention is the pro
vision of a sailboat having a simple and rugged element
which operates effectively ‘both as a rudder and as a
keel.
It is another object of the instant invention to provide
a sailboat having a plastic hull with an unusual con
?guration of combing molded on its upper surface, where
by the sailor is able to operate the boat without slipping
and to balance his weight against the tilting produced by
the wind.
It is a further object of the invention to provide a
sailboat whose hull is fabricated in an unusual way, so
that its manufacture is inexpensive and, yet, results in an
unsinkable quality.
top of the mast. As has been stated, the sail is in the
form of a right triangle made up from relatively narrow
strips of nlyon cloth arranged with their lengths ex
tending perpendicular to the long or free side of the sail.
The vertical edge of the sail is provided with a hollow
seam or hem 18 through which the mast passes and
the horizontal edge is made with a similar hollow hem
19 in which a boom 21 resides. The ‘boom is formed
of aluminum tubing reinforced with elastic foam. The
corner of the sail at which the hems 18 and 19 meet is
cut away and provided with a reinforcement 22. The
reinforcement de?nes a small arcuate area in which the
inner end of the boom 21 protrudes from the hem 19
and is provided with a ring 23 which loops loosely around
the mast 13 as it emerges from the hem 18. The outer
end of the boom is provided with an aperture. A rope
24 passes through this aperture and also through a grom
met, not shown, sewn in the adjacent corner of the sail,
and is then knotted. The rope hangs downwardly from
A still further object of this invention is the provision
the boom and is provided at its lower end with a small
pulley or block 25.
of a sailboat having a shallow-draft rudder and keel,
with a rudder-actuating mechanism which is free of com
as that of a surfboard, in that it has a boat-like plan, as
The hull 11 has a shape which might best ‘be described
plication and is unlikely to become entangled in Weeds 55 is evident in FIGURE 2, and a ?at upper surface 26
or the like.
and a generally flat lower surface 27, the sides being
quite straight or vertical compared with the curved sides
With these and other objects in view, ‘as will be ap
usually used in boats. The hull is formed with an upper
parent to those skilled in the art, the invention resides
part 28 and a lower part 29; each part is formed as a
in the combination of parts set forth in the speci?cation
dish-like Fiberglas shell, with the parting line between
and covered by the claims appended hereto.
the two extending around the hull in a horizontal plane
The character of the invention, however, may be best
spaced somewhat above the waterline. A plastic mold
understood by reference to certain of its structural forms,
ing 31 extends around the hull and covers the parting
as illustrated by the accompanying drawings in which:
line. Before assembly each part of the hull is provided
FIGURE l is a perspective view of a sailboat embody
with
a ?lling 30 to the parting line edge with a plastic
65
ing the principles of the present invention,
foam, such as a mixture of polystyrene beads and a plas
‘FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the sailboat with the
tic cementing agent; the two parts are then cemented
superstructure removed,
together to form a non-sinkable, rot-proof structure which
FIGURE 3 is a sectional View of the invention taken
is very light in weight. Molded in the upper part 28 is
on the line III-III of FIGURE 2,
a U-shaped combing 32 which occupies the center third
70
FIGURE 4 is a sectional view of the invention taken
of the upper surface 26. The combing has a relatively
on the line IV-IV of FIGURE 2,
broad main body 33 from which relatively thin legs 34
3,054,372
(D
4
boat is then ready for use. In sailing, the sailor ?nds a
and 35 extend along the sides of the hull. The combing
is smoothly streamlined into the shape of the hull and
the inwardly-facing sides of the legs 34 and 35 are quite
steep, as is particularly evident in FIGURES 5 and 6,
sitting position which will allow him to shift his weight
the easiest while regulating the tiller 44 behind his back.
As the sailboat heels over, the sitting position allows him
to put his feet against the combing for support. Oc
to permit the sailor to lock his feet against them. A
diamond-shaped mat 36 of cross-hatching is also molded
into the surface of the hull between the legs 34 and 35,
the grooves in the surface vbeing V-shaped, as is clear
from an examination of FIG. 5.
casionally this boat will capsize, due to its small keel and
due to the fact that the sailor will be tempted to run with
the boat heeled over as much as possible. It is quite
easy to right it again if this happens. The sailor swims
I The hull shape can be readily visualized from an ex 10 around quickly to the bottom of the boat and, at a posi
tion forward of the keel-rudder, places his, knee against
amination of FIGURES 3 through 8 which are successive
cross-sections taken from the bow to the stern. It is clear
that the upper surface 26 is fairly flat and, horizontal,
except for the protuberance introduced by the combing
32. The lower surface 27, on the other hand, is ?at only
in the center portion, as shown by FIGURES 5, 6, and 7;
at the how it is smoothly curved, as is clear from FIG
URES 3 and 4-; at the stern it is also smoothly curved, as
is shown in FIGURE 8. The hull is considerably thicker
in the center portion and the sides in this part of the boat
are quite straight, although they merge smoothly with the
upper and lower surfaces. The sides at the bow and stern
have, a somewhat curved con?guration, as is particularly
evident in FIGURES 3 and 8.
A bore 37 extends downwardly through the main body
33 of the combing to retain the mast. The bore is rein
forced by a short length 38 of aluminum tubing which is
the bottom and reaches up with his hand 'to grasp the
' combing. He then pulls steadily, throwing his weight
backwards. The water will slowly dump from the sail
15 and then the boat will upright. He then can head the
boat into the wind and climb aboard for more sailing.
A version of this sailboat which has proved extremely
popular and practical had an overall length of 12'0", a
width of 311/2”, a draft of 10'', a mast 17'0" in length, a
sail which has dimensions of 14'0" by 8'6" (618 square
feet, and a hull weight of 85 pounds; this boat was capable
of carrying a crew of 350 pounds.
It is obvious that minor changes may be made in the
form and construction of the invention without depart
25 ing from the material spirit thereof. It is not, however,
desired to con?ne the invention to the exact form herein
shown and described, but it is desired to include all such
supported laterally by the ?ller in the hull and at the lower
end by a boss 39 formed on the inner surface of the bottom
of the hull shell. Extending completely through'the hull
slightly rearwardly of the mat 36 is a bore 41 reinforced
by a short length 42 of aluminum tubing. Through this
bore extends a rudder rod 43 which is provided with an
enlarged upper end to prevent it from sliding downwardly
as properly come within the scope claimed.
The invention having been thus described, what is
claimed as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent is:
l. A sailboat, comprising a hull formed of upper and
lower parts, each part being formed as a hollow shell of
Fiberglas of substantial depth, the upper part having a
?at upper surface with a molded combing formed thereon
of U~shaped form with the legs of the formextending
in the bore. To the upper end is keyed a wooden tiller 35
44 which extends forwardly and horizontally over the
upper surface 26 of the hull. The lower end of the rud
der rod 43 extends frornthe hull and is bent at a right
angle to form an arm 45. which extends rearwardly of the
rearwardly along the sides of the hull, the molding having
a substantially greater width than height, the parting-line
between the two parts extending in a horizontal plane
parallel to the waterline, each part being separately ?lled
The rearward end of the arm 45 is bent downwardly to
with a plastic foam to the parting line.
2. A sailboat, comprising a hull formed of upper and
extend slightly rearwardly to form a fastening portion 46
which is provided with several apertures. This fastening
formed as a hollow shell of Fiberglas of substantial
boat closely parallel to the lower surface 27 of the hull.
portion is attached by rivets or the like to the rearward
end of a rudder 47. Although for the purposes of this
application the member designated by the reference nu
lower parts ?lled with plastic foam, each part being
depth, a plastic strip covering the parting-line between the
parts which parting-line extends in a plane parallel to
the waterline, a rudder ‘fastened to the underside of the
meral 47 is called a “rudder,” it will be clear as the de- '
hull, the rudder consisting of an elongated ?exible strip
mainder is free of the hull and is capable of being'warped
depth, a plastic strip covering the parting-line between
handle 51 is mounted at the stern and extends laterally of
?exible plastic extending longitudinally for approxi
of material extending longitudinally for approximately
scription proceeds that it functions as a combination
half the length of the hull, means fastening the forward
keel and rudder.’ The rudder 47 consists of a long thin
strip of a ?exible plastic material such as polyvinyl plastic. 50 end of the rudder to the hull,'a rudder post extending
vertically through the hull and having an arm extend
As is evident in FIGURE 1, it has a length approximately
ing at a right angle. to its lower end, a tiller fastened
half that of the hull. It is fastened securely to the lower
to the upper end of the rudder post, ‘the rearward end of
surface 27 of the hull by means of 'a bracket 48, which, as
the rudder being ?xed to the outer end of the arm to
is evident in FIGURES 9, l0, and 11, is elongated in the
direction of the length of the hull and holds a consider 55 cause a warping of the rudder as the post is turned.
3. A sailboat, comprising a hull formed of upper and
able length of the front end of the rudder immovable rela
lower
parts ?lled with‘plastic foam, each part being
tive to the hull. However, this front end is the only part
formed as a hollow shell of Fiberglas of substantial
of the rudder which is ?xed relative to the hull; the re
and twisted by rotation of the rudder rod 43.
. 60 the parts which parting~line extends in a plane parallel
to the waterline, a rudder fastened to the underside of the
‘Mounted at the bow of the sailboat is a handle 49 ex
hull, the rudder consisting of an elongated thin strip of
tending longitudinally for ease in handling. A similar .
mately half the length along a ?at bottom surface of the
the hull; this handle may be used in carrying the boat and,
7 during sailing, a rope 52 is tied to it, extends around the 65 hull, a bracket securing a forward length of the rudder
in a position at a right angle to the bottom surface of
block 25, and is held by the sailor to regulate the position
of the boom and sail.
-
'
e
'
The operation of the apparatus of the invention will
now be readily understood in view of the'above descrip
tion. The’ superstructure 12 is assembled after the hull
has been placed in the water. ' The mast and boom are
slid into the hems of the sail and then the corners of the
said are secured by means of the ropes 16 and 2.4. The
the hull, a rudder post extending generally vertically
through the hull and having anarm extending at a right
angle to its lower end, a tiller fastened to the upper end
'of the rudder post, the outer end of the arm having an
extension which extends downwardly in a direction gen
erally parallel to the rudder 'post, the rearward end of
the rudder being ?xed to the said extension to cause a
warping of the rudder as the post is turned.
mast is then stepped into the socket or bore 37 in the hull
and the rope 52 threaded through the block 25. ‘The sail 75 4. A sailboat, comprising a hull formed of upper and ,
5
3,054,372
lower parts ?lled with plastic foam, each part being
formed as a hollow shell of Fiberglas of substantial
depth, the upper part having a ?at upper surface with
a molded combing formed thereon of U-shaped form
6
the rudder being ?xed to the said extension to cause a
warping of the rudder as the post is turned.
6. A sailboat, comprising a hull formed of upper and
lower parts, each part being formed as a hollow shell of
with the legs of the form extending rearwardly along the
sides of the hull, a plastic strip covering the parting
Fiberglas of substantial depth, the upper part having a
line between the parts which parting-line extends in a
plane parallel to the waterline, a rudder fastened to the
underside of the hull, the rudder consisting of an elon
of U-shaped form with the legs of the form extending
rearwardly along the sides of the hull, the combing being
?at upper surface with a molded combing formed thereon
substantially wider than its height, and a substantial non
gated ?exible strip of material extending longitudinally 10 slip area located between the legs of the form.
for approximately half the length of the hull, means
fastening the forward end of the rudder to the hull, a
rudder post extending vertically through the hull and
7. A sailboat, comprising a hull formed of upper and
lower parts, each part being formed as a hollow shell
of Fiberglas of substantial depth, the upper part having
having an arm extending at a right angle to its lower
a ?at upper surface with a molded combing formed there
end, a tiller fastened to the upper end of the rudder post, 15 on of U-shaped form with the legs of the form extend
the rearward end of the rudder being ?xed to the outer
ing rearwardly along the sides of the hull, and a mast
end of the arm to cause a Warping of the rudder as the
socket formed in the part of the combing joining the legs.
post is turned.
5. A sailboat, comprising a hull formed of upper and
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
lower parts, each part being formed as a hollow shell of
UNITED STATES PATENTS
Fiberglas of substantial depth ?lled with plastic foam,
the upper part having a ?at upper surface with a comb
ing molded thereon of U-shaped form with the legs of
the form extending rearwardly along the sides of the hull,
a plastic strip covering the parting-line between the parts 25
which parting-line extends in a plane parallel to the
waterline, a rudder fastened to the underside of the hull,
the rudder consisting of an elongated thin strip of flex
404,626
594,068
1,013,818
1,872,230
2,376,753
2,531,946
2,866,985
ible plastic material extending longitudinally along a ?at
bottom surface of the hull for approximately half its 30
Hunt ________________ __ June 4,
Dobson _____________ __ Nov. 23,
Rochat _______________ __ Jan. 2,
Blake _______________ __ Aug. 16,
Bowen _____________ __ May 22,
Parker ______________ __ Nov. 28,
Blacktnore ___________ __ Jan. 6,
1889
1897
1912
1932
1945
1950
1959
FOREIGN PATENTS
length, a bracket securing a forward length of the rudder
in ‘a position at a right ‘angle to the bottom surface of
293,226
815,011
Germany ____________ __ July 22, 1916
Germany ____________ __ Sept. 27, 1951
the hull, a rudder post extending generally vertically
1,123,150
France _____________ __ June 4, 1956
through the hull and having an arm extending at a right
angle to its lower end, a tiller fastened to the upper end 35
of the rudder post, the outer end of the arm having an
extension which extends downwardly in a direction gen
erally parallel to the rudder post, the rearward end of
OTHER REFERENCES
Popular Mechanics, pp. 210-213, November 1949.
Motorboat, pages 11-13, 50, 52-54, March 1950.
Popular Mechanics, pages 168-172, July 1958.
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