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Патент USA US3055718

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INVENTOR.’
WALTER P. BAERMANN
BY
aß!
/~
Sept. 25, 1962
w. P. BAERMANN
3,055,708
SEATING AR'I‘ICLE
Filed. Jan. 6, 1961
2 Sheets-Shee’c 2
INVENTOR:
WALTER P. BAERMANN
nited States Patent
Patented Sept. 25, 1962
1
2
gether at the points where they contact and more par
3‚‘055‚708
ticularly at the edges either by means of adhesive er by
SEATING ARTICLES
stapling to produce a unitary strueture 3 as shown in FIG
Walter P. Baerrnann, Waynesville, N.C.‚ assignor to
URE 5.
Prestige Furniture Corporation, Newton, N.C., a cor
The unitary structure affords excellent resiliency and
5
poration of Nortl1 Carolina
unusual durability and, at the same time, it is relatively
Filed Jan. 6, 1961, Set‘. N0. 81,080
light in weight.
6 Claims. (C1. 297-445)
The bottom er seating part of the unitary structure
This invention relates to furniture and more particularly
has the corresp’onding areas of both shells centacting
to articles of seating. The invention is especially cou 10 throughout -as shown in FIGURES 6 and 7. In the
cerned With =upholstered furnture and more speci?cally
bettom area therefore the shells provide an unusually
With chairs, sofas and the like for use in living roorns,
streng larninated strueture.
leunges and similar locations.
'
lt will be observed from FIGURES 3, 5, 6 and 7 of
One of the ebjects of the invention is to provide
the drawings that the bottom er seating area of the skin
upholstered articles ef seating that are lighter in weight 15 stress structure has a recess er re-entrant space 4. The
than conventional upholstered seati'ng articlcs.
Another object of the invention is to provide uphel
stered furniture having uniform Weight distribution and
greater stability and cornfort.
laminated parts 5 and 6 in this area provide an unusually
streng suppor-ting stru*cture for springs er other types of
resilient means that are employed to give the seating
area resiliency. The invention is not limited to the use
Still a further object of the inventien is to previde 20 ef any particular type of resilient means. Conventional
new and improved upholstered furniture having good
steel springs can be employed, sponge rubber can also
strength and durability.
be used, er elastic bags containing air er other compress
Anether objec-t of the invention is te provide a new
ible ?uid can be used. In any case, the pertions 5 and
and improved type of upholstered chair structure which
6 of the shell structure provide an unusually streng sup
eliminates many ef the requirements for present day 25 port and make it virtually impossible for the resilient
manufacture of upholstered chairs.
means such as springs te break through the bottom of
An additional object of the invention is to provide a
new and improved chair structure characterized by the
fact that arm chairs, armless chairs and chairs having
the chair as so often happens in cenventional upiholstered
furniture. As shown in FIGURE 6, the well er recess
area 4 is prerferably deeper toward the back of the chair.
wings on the arm- er back can be made readily frorn the 30 This is made possible by providing a rather sharply in
same basic structure.
clined ar-ea 7 which torrns an ebtuse angle 8 with a less
Another object of the invention is to provide a new
shar-ply inclined area 9 extending approximately to the
and improved seating structure manufactured from streng
but light weight melded materials.
center of the chair as measured from freut to back where
there -is a greater obtuse angle 10 With respect to a less
Other objects and advantages of the invention will 35 sharpl=y inclined area 11. The latter makes anether ob
appear from the fo?owing description in conjunc‘tion witl1
tuse angle 12 with an upwardly inclined area 13.
the accompanying drawings in which:
As shown by FIGURE 7, the two shells are spaced
FIGURE 1 represents ene embediment =of an armless
from eac‘h ether -at the sides so as to ~provide hellow
upholstered chair provided in accordance with the in
spaces 14 and 15. A hellow space 16 is also previded
40 between the two shells at the rear of the chair as shown
vention;
in FIGURE 6.
FIGURE 2 illustrates an ernbodiment of the invention
consisting of an upholstered arm chair With wings on
As shown in FIGURE 7, the side portions 17 and 18
of the shell structure are provided with ?anges generally
the arms;
FIGURE 3 is an exploded view illustrating the com
shown at 19 and 20 where the two shells meet and are
ponent parts ef the essential main structure of the chair 45 united by an adhesive er other means. Ranges 19 and
shown in FIGURE l;
20 provide inset er recessed -areas 21 and 22 and the
FIGURE 4‘ illustrates -a modi?cation of the structure
upper shell is molded in such a way as te provide op
‘pesing inset er recessed areas 23 and 24.
shown in FIGURE 3 which makes it possible to manu
facture a chair having the structure shown in FIGURE 2;
When it is desired to 1nake an arm chair, a separate
FIGURE 5 illustrates a partial assembly ef the com 50 piece 25 is molded in such a way that it Will ?t in tele
scoping relationship over the portion 26 of the upper
bined seat and back formed by uniting twe of the com
ponents shown in FIGURE 3;
shell 1 and seat in the recesses 22 and 24. The opposite
‘FIGURE 6 is -a sectional view taken verticall=y from
arm is constructed in -a similar manner. The arm piece
25 in each case is riveted er otherwise fastened to the
front to back through the center of the chair shown in
55
FIGURE 2; and
FIGURE 7 is a sectional view taken vertically and
upwardly extending Portion 26.
Where it is desired to provide a Wing on the arm, a
transversely through the chair shown in FIGURE 2.
wing piece 27 is molded and riveted er otherwise fastened
Referring to FIGURE 3 ef the drawings, i-t will be
seen that the main supporting structure of the chair illus
to the arm piece 25 as shown in FIGURE 7.
By com
structing the shells, the arm pieces and the wing pieces
trated consists ef a ~front er upper Shell 1 and a back 60 from a felted cellulose rnaterial, it is easily possible to
Bach of these shells is a unitary molded
staple these pieces together. Thus wing piece 27 can
structure Which is preferably mad-e by felting cellulose
be fastened to the top of the arm piece 25 by means of
er lower shell 2.
?bers from an aqueous slurry en a porous forrner er die
on which the übers accurnulate to the desired thickness.
In practice, it is prefera=ble te make each Shell a-s a pre
forn1 of molded übers and eaeh pre-form is dried to
produce a ?nal shell having a thickness from about 3/32
inch to 3/16 inch. The two shells are so shaped that they
a staple 28 and the ?ange 29 of the wing piece 27 can
'be fastened to the side of the arm piece 25 by a staple
30. It will <be understood, of course, that a number of
staples may be required fer this operation. In a sirnilar
manner, the wing pie‘ce 31 on the opposite side 0f the
chair is fastened to the arm piece 32.
The legs and frame of the chair generally shown at 33
telescope into each other and have coinciding edges along 70 in FIGURE 3 preferably consist of a welded steel base
the freut, bottom, sides and back With an air space in
34 to which the legs 35, 36, 37 and 38 are suitably fastened
the sides and back.
in any conventional manner.
The two shells are then bonded to
4
3
The shel1 structure in the perimeter of the seating area
is molded with a marginal Portion 39 where the upper and
lower shells coincide as shown in FIGURE 7. This seats
on the top of the welded steel frame 34 and the Shell struc
ture is fastened to the welded steel frame -by means of
screws 40 or other suitable means.
A prefered type of spring arrangement is illustrated
sired shape can be obtained. Armless and arm chairs for
living rooms and lounges are readily produced With or
without arm wings and back wings.
This invention is hercby claimed as follows:
1. A seating article having a cornbined seat, side and
back structure comprising a pair of molded shells cou
tacting one another substantially throughont the seat por
tion of said structure and at the edges of said shells and
having hollow spaces between said shells in the side and
in FIGURES 3, 6 and 7 and consists of a plurality of
rubber Webs 41 which extend from front to back of the
chair and are held in place by fastencrs 42 and 43. Bach 10 back portions of said structure.
2. A seating article having a cornbined seat, side and
of fasteners 42 and 43 consists of a bent metal bar which
has a clamping portion adapted to clarnp one end of the
rubber webbing. The rubber webbing is preferably re
enforced With fabric at the clarnping p011i0n. The other
end of the fastener is attached, for example, by means of 15
one of the screws 40 to the shell structure and the frame.
back structure comprising a pair of molded shells contact
ing one another substantially throughout the seat portion
of said structure and at the edges of said shells and hav
ing hollow spaces between said shells in the side and back
portions of said structure, said seat portion being recessed
and having resilient rneans disposed in said recess.
3. A seating article having a cornbined seat, side and
back structure comprising a pair of molded shells cou
webbing 41. While only a single webbing 45 is shown, 20 tacting one another in the seat portion of said structure
and at the edges of said shells and having hollow spaces
it will be understood that a plurality of webs can be em
between said shells in the side and back portions cf said
ployed substantially corresponding in number to the Webs
A similar support webbing 45 runs from side to side either
above or below the webbing 41 and is held by fasteners 44.
In the embodirnent shown, the webbing 45 is below the
structure, and molded arm sections telescopically arranged
that run from front to back of the chair.
In order to obtain a cushioning effect in the seat and
on said side portions of said structure.
cushion over the springs. Saat cushion 48 may also be
tions fastened to said arm sections.
4. A seating article having a cornbined seat, side and
back of the chair, it is preferable to use molded ?ller pieces 25
back structure comprising a pair of molded shells cou
made from polyether-type urethane foarn. These picces
tacting one another in the seat portion of said structure
are pre-forrned to the contours of the chair’s basic struc
and at the edges of said shells and having hollow spaces
ture. As shown in FIGURE 6, the pre-formed molded
between said shells in the side and back portions cf said
polyurethane foam section 46 is adhesively secured to the
upper shell 1 to form the back of the chair. Another piece 30 structure, molded arm sections telescopically arranged 011
said side portions of said structure and molded wing sec
of polyurethane foam 47 is providcd beneath the seat
composed of a molded polyurethane foarn.
Another
molded resilient piece 49, preferably consisting of poly
urethane, is provided across the front of the chair. The
5. A seating article having a cornbined seat, side and
back structure cornprising a pair of molded shells contact
ing one another substantially throughout the seat portion
of said structure and at the edges of said shells and having
hollow spaces between said shells in the side and back
portions of said structure, the portions of said structure
padding material can be provided between the fabric and
normally subjected to direct pressure by the user being
the shell 011 the arms of the chair.
Where an armless chair is desired of the type shown 40 covered with a plastic resilient cellular material, and a
covcring material over said resilient cellular material and
in FIGURE l, the telescoping arm and wing sections are
the other parts of said structure normally exposed to
omitted.
The thickness of the pre-molded foam cushioning may
vrew.
6. A seating article having a cornbined seat, side and
vary substantially, for example, frorn % inch on the
arms to 21/2 to 3 inches on the backs.
45 back structure comprising a pair of molded shells com
tacting one another substantially throughout the seat por
While the multiple Shell structure is preferably made
tion of said shells and at the edges of said shells and hav
from cellulose, other materials which are moldable to
ing hollow spaces between said shells in the side and back
self-sustaining structures may be used including, for ex
portions of said structure, the perimeter of the contacting
ample, thermoplastic sheet materials, mixtures of cellulose
?bers and cut bundles of glass ?larnents (cut rovings), 50 shells in the seat portion of said structure being shaped
to sit on a rectangular frame member to Which legs are
mixturcs of cellulose ?bers and synthetic übers (e‚g. poly
amides such as nylon, polyesters such as Dacron), mix
attached.
tures containing rubber, mixtures containing synthetic rub
References Cited in the ?lc of this patent
ber, and the like. The various mixtures may also contain
binders or reinforcing substances. Thus, mixtures of Cellu 55
UNITED STATES PATENTS
lose übers and cut glass rovings (1/2 inch to 6 inches in
2,3M,318
Niedringhaus ......... -- July 13, 1943
length) containing 5% to 95% cellulose based on the
2‚488‚728
Kopplin ............. __ Nov. 22, 1949
weight of the total übers and 5% to 25% by Weight of
2‚711,786
Weiss ................ -- Inne 28, 1955
a polyester resin aliord excellent Shell structures for the
Baranski ............. -- Dec. 27, 1955
purpose of the invention. Similarly, asbestos and other 60 2‚728‚382
entire upper Part 0f the chair is then covered With a Suit
able fabric 50. Polyurethane foam or other suitable
?bers can be used.
The invention provides a simple method of manufactur
ing light durable upholstered articles of seating. Dowel
joints and the like are eliminated. Contours of any de
2‚764,228
2,824,602
2,831,534
Donohue ____________ -- Sept. 25, 1956
Collins .............. -- Feb. 25, 1958
'I'haden .............. -- Apr. 22, 1958
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