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Патент USA US3058174

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Oct. 16, 1962
3,058,164
B. M. ROWE»
METHOD OF MAKING ARTIFICIAL STONE
Filed March 16. 1960
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
INVENTOR.
BA RTHOLOMEW M. Rows ,
0d. 16, 1962
B. M. ROWE
3,058,164
METHOD OF MAKING ARTIFICIAL STONE
Filed March 16, 1960
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
F IG.
.
INVENTOR.
BAIZTHOLOMEW M. Rgwc
United States Patent O?ice
1
3,058,164
METHOD OF MG ARTIFECTAL STONE
Bartholomew M. Rowe, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor of
twenty-?ve percent to Charles W. Howard, Sherman
Oaks, Calif.
Filed Mar. 16, 1960, Ser. No. 15,411
5 Claims. (Cl. 18-483)
p
3,058,164
Patented Oct. 16, 1962
2
a mold for receiving the material with the mold embody
ing a base member of generally rectangular con?gura
tion, and having U-shaped marginal side walls on the
material receiving side thereof. The side walls are de
signed so as to act as a gauge for establishing thickness
of the ultimate slab to be formed. Also, the base member
is provided with an irregularly contoured surface portion
including areas thereof angled with respect to the plane
This invention generally relates to a method of form
of the base member on the material receiving side.
ing slabs of molded material, and more particularly re 10
After the molds have been so formed, coloring matter
is deposited on the irregularly contoured surface portions,
lates to a method of forming slabs of concrete with
one side thereof textured to simulate natural stone and
and the mold is then ?lled with the liquid concrete ag
gregate material to the height of the side walls.
rock materials.
After the molded material has hardened or set, a slab
At the present time, the usefulness of the invention is
primarily directed towards providing a simulated stone
will be formed of uniform thickness, according to the
height of the side walls, and having an irregularly con
and rock facing material for the exterior or interior side
toured and colored surface on the side juxtaposed with
Walls of residential, commercial, ‘and industrial buildings
respect to the irregularly contoured surface of the mold.
of various types.
Preferably, during the depositing of the coloring mat
It will be appreciated that natural rock and stone ma
ter on the mold, the mold is inclined such that the areas
terials in the form desired are not generally available
angled with respect to the base member will be substan
at the usual job site, ‘and oftentimes must be transported
tially horizontal to enable the adhering of the coloring
great distances at considerable cost in order to be em
matter as it is deposited ‘onto the irregularly contoured
ployed in building construction. Also such natural stone
surface portion of the base member in the mold.
and rock materials are relatively expensive and dit?cult
to procure in particular sizes and con?gurations that may
Also, it is desirable in accordance with a feature of the
present invention that the molds be stacked in longi
be needed. On the other hand, it is well-known that a
stone or rock facing on a building not only lends an
tudinally staggered relationshi , whereby corner slabs
may alternately be formed, all as will become clearer
as the speci?cation proceeds.
maintenance costs involved in painting, sandblasting, and
A better understanding of the present invention will
related work associated with conventional exterior build 30
be had by reference to the drawings, merely schematically
ing ?nishes. Although the present invention will be de~
indicating for illustrative purposes certain of the features
scribed from the standpoint of its application in pro
aesthetic appearance to the building, but also decreases
ducing slabs of concrete material to simulate stone and
of the steps of the method, and in which:
rock, it will be appreciated that the invention may also
FIGURE 1 is an isometric view of a mold formed in
be applied to other types of materials which are to be 35 ‘accordance with the method of the present invention;
‘FIGURE 2 is a side view of the mold of FIGURE 1
molded to meet analogous requirements.
With the foregoing in mind, an important object of
the present invention is to provide an economical and
efficient manner of producing slabs of concrete with one
inclined according to the method of the present invention
in position for application of coloring matter thereto;
FlGURE 3 is a view of several molds formed accord
side surface thereof being textured to simulate natural 40 ing to the present invention as they are stacked in stag
gering relationship after being ?lled with a molded ma
stone and rock material.
Another object of the present invention is to provide
terial or concrete;
FIGURE 4 is a view of a slab of concrete formed ac
a method of producing slabs of concrete simulating nat
ural stone and rock formations, in which the coloring 45 cording to the present invention and having one surface
matter embodied in the slabs is deposited in such a man
or side thereof simulating natural stone or rock, the
ner that the slabs very closely approximate the coloring
particular slab of FIGURE 4 being adapted for use
about the corner of a building or structure; and
of natural rock and stone material.
FIGURE 5 is a view of another slab formed according
Another object of the present invention is to provide
a method of forming slabs of concrete material simulat 50 to the method of the present invention, for example, as
shown in FIGURE 3, not embodying a corner portion.
ing on one side thereof natural rock and stone formations,
Referring now to the drawings, there is shown in FIG
in which the slabs may be formed for use about corners
URE 1 a mold employed in conjunction with the method
of buildings and yet which at the same time enables
of the present invention. Preferably, the mold embodies
slabs to also be formed in a convenient shape for eco
nomical shipment to the job site.
55 a base member 10 of generally rectangular shape. The
base member 10 has upstanding therefrom side walls 11,
Another object of the present invention is to provide
12, and 13 which are of given height according to the
a method of forming slabs of concrete material simulat
thickness of the slab to be formed. The side walls 11
ing on ‘one surface thereof natural stone and rock, in
and 12 extend along the marginal sides of the base mem—
which the slabs may be formed without the requirement
ber 10, while the sidewall 13 closes off one of the ends
of any expensive tooling and by employing relatively
thereof.
unskilled personnel.
In one form, the base member 10 may merely com
Still another object is to provide a method of forming
prise a sheet of plywood material, while the sidewalls
slabs of concrete material simulating on one surface
11, 12, and 13 may consist of wooden members formed
thereof natural rock and stone materials, where the total
of one inch by two inch stock, two inch by four inch
65
square footage required for the job requirements may
stock, or the like according to the particular thickness
be closely approximated.
.
of the slab desired. It will be appreciated, however,
These and other objects and advantages of the present
that the mold may be formed of other materials to the
invention are generally attained by providing a method
particular rectangular shape as shown.
of making slabs of molded material to have or be char
The base member 1%} is provided on the upper surface
acterized by an irregularly contoured and colored sur 70 thereof with a layer of bonded “Fiberglas” or rubber 14
face on one side thereof simulating natural stone and/or
having an irregularly contoured outer surface portion 15
rock. The method comprises the steps of ?rst forming
characterized by ridges, valleys, crevices, indentations,
3,058,164
3
4
Of course, a similar corner may be formed as between the
molds 27 and 29 as partially indicated.
and the like to simulate the appearance of natural rock
and stone contours.
In consequence of the method of stacking the molds,
as shown in FIGURE 3, in conjunction with the co-operat
ing mold structure as such as shown in FIGURE l, it is
possible to form a series of corner slabs (for example, 24)
In accordance with the method of the present inven—
tion, after the mold has been formed in accordance with
the shape of FIGURE 1 it is positioned on a ?oor 16 or
other supporting surface and tilted to an angle of approxi
alternating with flat slabs (for example, 26). The ?nally
mately 45 degrees preparatory to the depositing of color
ing matter thereon. The particular angle to which the
produced slabs are more clearly shown in the view of
mold is tilted may vary to a great degree depending upon
FIGURES 4 and 5.
Thus, in FIGURE 4, there is shown a corner slab 24
having a corner portion 32. The slab 24 has an upper
the particular coloring effect desired in the concrete slab
being formed. Thus, the surface portion 15 of the mold
material 14 normally will include various sloped por
tions 17, 18, and 19, extending between relatively high and
low areas of the irregularly contoured surface. By tilt
surface 33, as viewed in FIGURE 4, which is flush in
view of the fact that it has been leveled off by the mold
2S and the closed end thereof. The slab 24 has an ir
ing the mold to an angle of approximately 45 degrees, 15 regularly contoured lower surface 33 which is formed
with an exterior surface portion of the corner 32, denoted
assuming the portions 17, 13, and 19 are nominally of
by the numeral 35.
approximately a 45 degree slope, relative to the plane of
The irregularly contoured surface portion 35 of the
the base or bottom member 10, these portions will be in
corner 32 may be formed manually by hand since it is
a substantially horizontal position such that coloring
of relatively small overall dimensions. In this regard,
matter will adhere thereto. Generally speaking, any angle
it should be noted that the corner 32 together with the
between 30 degrees to 60 degrees is usually satisfactory
slab corners aligned above it will form a substantially solid
for this purpose.
wall (except for open end mold edges) whereby manual
Thus in accordance with the method of the present
application of coloring matter and shaping is convenient.
invention, the coloring matter, usually of a powdered form
It will be appreciated that in stacking the molds 23, 25,
is deposited in the direction of the arrows or vertically
27, and 29, as shown in FIGURE 3, that the mold 25, in
downwardly by gravity through manual sifting, spraying
or the like from a container to form minute layers of
coloring matter at 20, 21, and 22. Thereafter, it is desir
able that the coloring matter be moistened prior to ?lling
of the molds.
It will be appreciated that if the mold were not tilted
as shown, the coloring matter would all settle to the
bottom of the valleys, crevices, or the like, characterizing
the irregularly contoured surface portion 15. Thus, by
so angulating the mold relative to the horizontal, in ac
order to maintain the thickness of the slab 24 throughout
its corner portion 32, should extend exactly a distance
equalling the desired slab thickness beyond the closed
end portion of the mold 23. Thus, the open end portion
of the mold 25 should be approximately one inch beyond
the closed end portion of the mold 23, assuming the
height of the side walls of the molds being used are ap
proximately one inch from the base member employed
35 therewith. Of course, if the sidewalls are higher, the open
cordance with the present inventive method, the coloring
matter will adhere to the sloped areas of the contoured
surface in order to achieve the desired simulated effect
of natural stone or rock in the surface of the slab formed
on the mold, as will become clearer as the speci?cation
proceeds.
After the coloring matter has been deposited upon the
mold, it may again be placed in a horizontal position to
be ?lled with the particular concrete or cement and ag
gregate mixture employed. This latter step of the method
is illustrated by FIGURE 3.
Thus, as shown in FIGURE 3, a mold 23, substantially
identical to the mold described in conjunction with FIG
URES 1 and 2, is ?lled with molding material 24 to the
height of the side walls thereof.
In accordance with a feature of the present invention,
after the mold 23 has been ?lled with the material 24,
and prior to the time it sets, another mold 25 is placed
upon the mold 23 and supported by the sidewalls thereof
in a longitudinally staggered position relative to the mold
23. Next, the mold 25 is ?lled with concrete material 26,
and thereafter another mold 27 is placed upon and sup
ported by the side walls of the mold 25, to also be ?lled
with concrete material 23. Thereafter mold 29 is sup 60
ported from the mold 27, and so on.
For convenience in illustration, the molds 23, 25, 27,
and 29 have been shown as including the mold material
as an integral part of the base structure, which is also an
alternative method of construction of the molds.
Thus, with this type of stacking of the molds in longi
tudinally staggered relationship, it will be appreciated,
for example, that the mold 25 has its open end portion
30 extending a given distance beyond the closed end por
tion of the lowermost mold 23.
end of the mold 25 will extend out further relative to the
closed end of the mold 23 according to the particular
given height of the sidewalls and corresponding desired
thickness of the slab.
The slab 26 shown in FIGURE 5 is merely illustrative
of a conventional slab formed by the mold 25. The par
ticular number of corner slabs (for example, slab 24) to
be formed will normally be a percentage of the total
slabs being furnished for the particular material job re
quirements. Of course, this percentage will vary accord
ing to the area to be covered relative to the particular
corners being enclosed, but usually can be estimated rela
tively closely by the contractor or architect‘.
Thus, if
fewer corner slabs are required than conventional ?at
slabs, as the molds are stacked one upon the other, cer
tain of the molds may be aligned to produce more flat
slabs than corner slabs rather than in the alternating
manner suggested by FIGURE 3.
It will be evident in shipping the slabs 24 and 26 that
they may be readily nested together for economical and
convenient transportation.
On the job site, the slabs will normally be broken apart
into various con?gurations to simulate stones or rocks
and then the ?at sides thereof secured in plaster or the
like to the building side walls. Desirably one inch thick
slabs are formed in order to comply with building re
quirements for adherent veneer.
It will be appreciated that with the method of the
present invention not only is an economical and e?icient
means attained of producing concrete slabs having a sur
face portion thereof simulating natural stone and rock,
but also a method has been achieved such that the slabs
may be economically and e?iciently formed to be used
upon corners of the building and also for the purpose of
As a consequence, the 70 convenient transportation, shipping, and measurement by
closed end portion 31 of the mold 25 will be disposed
above and inwardly of the open end portion of the
mold 23.
In view of this inter-relationship of the molds 23 and
square footage to meet job requirements. It will further
be appreciated that by providing the unique manner of
applying coloring matter, in accordance with the method
,of the present invention, that a more closely simulated
25, a corner 32 may be formed from the slab material 24-. 75 natural stone and rock appearance is attained.
8,058,164
5
6
Of course, certain variations and modi?cations in the
surface portion on one side thereof, the steps of: form
method of the present invention will occur to those skilled
ing a plurality of rectangular shaped molds to receive
in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of
said material, each of said molds being provided with up
the invention as set forth in the following claims.
standing marginal side walls on both side edges and one
What is claimed is:
5 end thereof on a material receiving side thereof so as to
1. In a method of making a slab of molded material
leave the opposite end thereof open, and said material
characterized by an irregularly contoured and colored
receiving side being irregularly contoured in the area
bordered by said sidewalls; depositing coloring matter on
for receiving said material, said mold being formed with
said material receiving side of said molds; placing a ?rst
a base member and U-shaped marginal side walls on the 10 one of said molds upon a supporting surface; ?lling said
surface on one side thereof the steps of: forming a mold
material receiving side thereof, with said side walls being
designed as a gauge for establishing the thickness of said
slab, and said base member being formed with an ir
?rst one of said molds with said molded material to the
height of said side walls to form a ?rst slab; placing a
second one of said molds upon said ?rst one of said
‘regularly contoured surface portion bordered by said side
walls including areas thereof angled With respect to said
base member on said material receiving side; inclining
molds, said second one of said molds benig positioned
such that said opposite end thereof is disposed above and
said mold such that a part of said angled areas will be
the closed end of said ?rst one of said molds whereby the
closed end of said second one of said molds is disposed
above and inwardly of the open end of said ?rst one of
substantially horizontal; depositing powdered coloring
projects outwardly a given longitudinal distance beyond
matter on said irregularly contoured surface portion,
while said mold is inclined such that said coloring matter 20 said molds, and whereby said molded material may be
will adhere to said part of said angled areas; positioning
extended around said closed end of said second one of
said mold in a horizontal plane; and ?lling said material
said molds to form a corner to said ?rst slab.
receiving side with molding material to the height of said
4. The subject matter, according to claim 3, and ?lling
sidewalls, whereby a slab is formed having an irregularly
said second one of said molds to form a second slab.
contoured and colored surface de?ned by the contour 25
5. The subject matter, according to claim 3, and canting
and coloring matter disposed on the irregularly contoured
said mold to the horizontal while depositing said coloring
surface portion of said mold.
matter on the material receiving side thereof such that
2. In a method of making a slab of molded material
said coloring matter will adhere to the higher points of
characterized by an irregularly contoured and colored
said irregularly contoured area.
surface on one side thereof, the steps of: forming a mold 30
to receive said material including a ?at base member and
upstanding marginal side walls, said base member being
irregularly contoured on the material receiving side there
of in the area bordered by said sidewalls; inclining said
mold such that said base member is at an angle relative 35
to the horizontal with the material receiving side of said
base member being disposed upwardly such that certain
areas of said irregularly contoured surface portion will
be substantially horizontal; depositing powdered color
ing matter by allowing same to fall by gravity on said 40
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
856,519
1,168,492
1,570,998
1,608,281
1,681,727
2,144,388
Decks ______________ __ June
lFreund ______________ __ Jan.
Egger _______________ __ Jan.
Weber ______________ __ Nov.
Emerson ____________ __ Aug.
Quasebarth __________ __ Jan.
2,517,432
Hornberger ___________ __ Aug. 1, 1950
3. In a method of making a slab of molded material
characterized by an irregularly contoured and colored 45
1907
1916
1926
1926
1928
1939
FOREIGN PATENTS
irregularly contoured surface portion; and, positioning
said mold in a horizontal plane for ?lling with said mate
rial for molding.
11,
18,
26,
23,
21,
17,
7446/27
217,805
714,341
766,896
Australia ____________ __ May 23,
Australia ____________ __ Oct. 23,
Germany _____________ __ Nov. 6,
Great Britain ________ __ Jan. 30,
1927
1958
1941
1957
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