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Nov. 13, 1962
F. E. TURNER
3,063,409
APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS COATING OF ELONGATED ARTICLES
Filed Feb. 6, 1959
'7 Sheets-Sheet 1
4.
1
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L
INVENTOR.
FRANK E. TU RNER
ATTORNEYS.
Nov. 13, 1962
F. E. TURNER
3,063,409
APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS COATING OF ELONGATED ARTICLES
Filed Feb. 6, 1959
7 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Nov. 13, 1962
F. E. TURNER
3,063,409
APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS COATING 0F ELONGATED ARTICLES
Filed Feb. 6, 1959
7 Sheets-Sheet 3
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INVENTOR.
FRANK E. TURNER
ATTORNEYS _
Nov. 13, 1962
F. E. TURNER
3,063,409
APPARATUS FOP. CONTINUOUS COATING OF ELONGATED ARTICLES
Filed Feb. 6, 1959
7 Sheets-Sheet 4
INVENTOR.
FRANK E. TURNER
BY 2
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ATTORNEYS
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Nov- 13, 1962
F. E. TURNER
3,063,409
APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS COATING 0F ELONGATED ARTICLES
Filed Feb. 6, 1959
7 Sheets-Sheet 5
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INVENTOR.
FRANK E. TURNER
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ATTORNEYS.
Nov. 13, 1962
F. E. TURNER
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3,063,409
APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS COATING OF ELONGATED ARTICLES
Filed Feb. 6, 1959
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APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS COATING OF ELONGATED ARTICLES
Filed Feb. 6, 1959
'7 Sheets-Sheet 7
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INVENTOR.
FRANK E. TURNER
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ATTO E‘ NEYS.
United States Patent O?tice
I
3,953,4d9
Patented Nov. 13., was
2
FIGURE 1 is a plan view, partly in horizontal cross
3,063,409
APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS COATING (3F
ELONGATED ARTICLES
Frank E. Turner, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor, by mesne as
signments, to RlaW-Knox Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a
corporation of Delaware
Fiietl Feb. 6, 1959, Ser. No. 791,612
I2 (Tiaims. (iCl. 118-426)
This invention relates to the treatment of elongated
articles with liquid material and more particularly to an
improved method of and apparatus for the continuous
hot galvanizing of metal products such as pipe, bars,
shapes, etc.
In the accompanying drawings and the following speci
section, illustrating my invention as incorporated in pipe
galvanizing apparatus;
FIGURE 2 is an enlarged vertical cross-sectional view
taken substantially on line 2—2 of FIGURE 1;
FIGURE 3 is a vertical cross-sectional View taken sub
stantially on line 3-3 of FIGURE 2, the pipe conveying
and sinking screws, however, being illustrated in the posi
tions they assume as a pipe is being moved endwise out
of the galvanizing bath;
FIGURE 4 is an end elevational view taken substan
tially on line 4-4 of FIGURE 1 and illustrating the
internal and external coating control stations and the mag
netic roll conveyor means for removing coated pipe from
?cation there is described and illustrated a method of 15 the galvanizing tank;
and apparatus for hot galvanizing metal pipe, but it will
FIGURE 5 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken sub
be understood that my invention may advantageously be
stantially on line 5——5 of FIGURE 1 and illustrating
employed in numerous other applications where it is de
the indexing transfer means for moving pipe from the
sired to treat elongated articles such as pipe, ‘bars, shapes,
magnetic roll conveyor to the internal coating control
etc., in a liquid bath. Accordingly where reference is
station, the water bosh, the spray coating unit, etc.;
made to “galvanizing” herein, it is intended to include
FIGURE 6 is an enlarged view, generally similar to
not only galvanizing per se but also other coating opera
FIGURE 3 but also illustrating in phantom lines the sev—
tions such as the application of paint, enamel, cleaning or
eral positions of the longitudinal axes of the pipes as they
pickling solutions, etc., and where reference is made to
move into and through the galvanizing kettle;
“pipe” it is intended to include other elongated articles 25
‘FIGURE 7 is an enlarged vertical cross-sectional view
such as bars, shapes, etc.
through the galvanizing kettle and illustrating the front
In galvanizing steel pipe it is common practice to sub
conveying screw;
merge the pipe in a bath of molten zinc so that both the
inner and outer surfaces of the pipe are completely cov
ered. The lengths of pipe are then withdrawn and
drained. Various schemes involving conveyors or the
like have been proposed for depositing the lengths of pipe
in the galvanizing tank. The pipes have customarily been
manually lifted from the galvanizing bath and brought‘
into engagement with suitable rolls or conveyors which
remove the pipes from the tank.
With such prior pro~
cedures there is no way of insuring that the pipes are
withdrawn from the bath in the same order that they enter
the bath, and accordingly the time of immersion may
vary to a considerable degree resulting in undesirable
variations with respect to the coating thickness and the
quality of the ?nished coated product.
It is an object of the present invention to provide a
fully automatic continuous pipe galvanizing machine or
the like wherein the pipes or other elongated articles
FIGURE 8 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken sub
stantially on line 3—8 of FIGURE 7 and illustrating the
discharge end of the front conveying screw;
FIGURE 9 is a view generally similar to FIGURE 7
but illustrating the rear conveying screw;
FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken
substantially on line Iii—1t) of FIGURE 9 and illustrating
the form of the discharge end portion of the rear con
veying screw;
FIGURE 11 is a fragmentary view of a modi?ed form
of the galvanizing section of my apparatus in which a flux
tank is provided immediately ahead of the galvanizing
kettle; and
FIGURE 12 is a View generally similar to FIGURE 7
but illustrating a modi?ed form of a conveying screw
having a double thread and particularly adapted to handle
pipes of relatively small diameter in pairs.
Referring particularly to FIGURES l and 2, the auto
maintain the same positive relation to each other through
matic continuous pipe galvanizing line illustrated includes
out the entire process, i.e., the pipes pass through the proc
a loading rack comprising a plurality of inclined skid
essing steps and are withdrawn ‘from the galvanizing tank
members 1 adapted to receive bundles of pipe from stor
in exactly the same order as they enter the tank, and
age or previous processing operations. On these racks
every pipe is subjected to exactly the same treatment. An 50 the pipes P are arranged in a single layer and rolled down
other object of my invention is to provide means for
wardly by gravity. At the lower end of the loading rack
automatically submerging hollow elongated articles in a
the pipes are picked up by an automatic selector unit
coating bath whereby one end of each article is caused
comprising a plurality of rotating conveying screws 2
to enter the bath initially at a lower level than the other
which are simultaneously driven by suitable gearing and
end and, during travel of the pipe through the bath, the
shafting such that their rotation is in a direction to ad
longitudinal axis of the pipe is tilted so that the coating
vance the pipes one at a time in a direction perpendicular
bath will {flow freely through the inside of the article
to their length. The pitch of the screws 2 and the shape
without entrapment of air, and whereby, after complete
of the entering ends of the threads thereon is such that
immersion, ‘the pipe will be withdrawn from the bath with
one individual length of pipe will be removed from the
the aXis tilted in the opposite direction from its position 60 loading skids I at every 360° of rotation of the screws.
on entry. A further object of my invention is the pro
vision of a means for continuously pickling and cleaning
a series of pipes or the like and causing same to be sub
merged in and withdrawn from a galvanizing tank in se
Thus the pipes P are removed one at a time from the
skids I and are individually advanced in spaced apart
relation in a direction normal to their longitudinal axes.
From the screws 2 the pipes are delivered to a rotating
quential order. My invention also contemplates im 65 purge chamber 3 in which a vaned rotary gas seal and
proved means for withdrawing the pipe from the coating
transfer wheel L4 is mounted. As illustrated, the wheel
tank and removing excess zinc or other coating material
4 has a plurality of vanes (six as illustrated) separating
therefrom in a continuous and automatic manner.
the unit into a plurality of compartments. As seen in
The above and other objects of my invention will ap
FIGURE 1, the shaft 5 on which the transfer wheel 4
pear from the following description of an apparatus for
is supported is connected by a chain 6 to the drive shaft
galvanizing steel pipe or the like, reference being made
2a for the rotating screws 2, and thus the rotation of the
to the accompanying drawings in which:
screws 2 is synchronized and interlocked with the trans
3,063,409
fer wheel 4 so that the screws 2 will successively dis
charge pipes, one into each of the compartments formed
by the vanes of the transfer wheel. As seen in FIG
URE 2, the wheel 4 rotates in clockwise direction and
has a fairly close ?t with the walls of the chamber 3
so that a seal is provided for preventing undesired entry
or escape of atmosphere to or from the furnace F. A
controlled atmosphere of suitable type, to be referred
to later, is caused to enter the compartments formed by
the rotating wheel 4 in the purge chamber 3 to purge the
A.
conveyor chain 7 is connected through gear box 24 and
shaft 25 to gear box 26 which is driven by the motor
27. Shaft 28 extends from gear box 26 and has geared
connection to shafts 20 and 21 which support the con
veying screws S and S’. This interconnection of the con
veyor screw drive and the chain drive provides posi
tive synchronization of the chains 7 and the screws S
and S’ so that each complete rotation of the screws a
length of pipe P will be picked up from the conveyors
7 and moved along the guides or skids G by the enter
ing or pick-up portions 29 and 30 respectively of screws
air from the compartments and pipes contained therein
S and S’ (see FIGURES 7 and 9).
before they enter the furnace.
As clearly seen in FIGURE 3, the pipe guides or
Immediately beyond the purge chamber and rotating
skids G are spaced longitudinally of the galvanizing kettle
transfer wheel in the direction of pipe travel is a chain
transfer or conveyor comprising a plurality of conveyor 15 19 and are offset from the front and rear conveying
screws S and S’. Although the size and contour of the
chains 7 which extend through the furnace F and carry
several guides G vary for reasons which will be later re
the lengths of pipe P therethrough. Screw conveyors
ferred to, they each have a horizontal entering portion
may be employed in place of chains 7 if desired.
31, the top edge of which is disposed approximately at
Each of the chains 7 is supported on end sprockets
the level of the outside of the threads 32 and 33 on the
8 and 9 mounted respectively on shafts 10 and 11 and
pick-up portions 29 and 30 of screws S and S’. Just
is guided by suitable idler sprockets as seen as 12, 13
beyond the entering portions 31 of guides G are down
and 14 in FIGURE 2. Floating counterweights 15 main
vided with spaced upstanding lugs '7a which engage the
wardly inclined portions 34- which extend into the gal
vanizing kettle ‘19 and have their upper edges sloped
through the furnace F. The shaft 10 which supports
the sprockets 8 is connected to the shaft 5 of the rotary
transfer Wheel 4 by chain 15’ so that there is positive
synchronization of the automatic selector screws 2, the
ing bath in kettle 19.
In addition to the pick-up portions 29 and 30 of the
screws S and S’, each has ?aring or enlarging portions
35 and 36 respectively. The pick-up thread portions
tain the desired tension on the chains 7 which are pro
pipes P and move them on suitable rails or skids 7b 25 to impart the desired travel of the pipes P into the coat
vaned transfer wheel 14, and the chains 7 or conveyor 30 32 and 33 of screws S and S’ continue on the ?aring por
tions 35 and 36 thereof and are indicated at 35’ and
screws. As the lugs 7a on the individual chains 7 are
36’. As seen in FIGURES 7 and 9, the guides G and
transversely aligned, the pipes will be rolled thereby over
the enlarging threaded portions 35’ and 36' of screws
the skids 7b in individual sections or compartments in
S and S’ are so correlated that the pipes P will be sup
a direction perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.
ported on the inclined portions 34 of the guides G and
The furnace F, as best seen in FIGURE 2, consists
advanced downwardly into the coating bath in the kettle
of an entry chamber 16, a heating chamber 17, and an
19 by the action of the threads 35’ and 36’.
The guides G each have bottom portions 37 over which
In the galvanizing apparatus shown in FIGURES l and
the pipes P are traversed by the threads of the front and
2 a controlled atmosphere is maintained within the fur
nace F suitable to effect gas pickling of the pipe prior 40 rear conveying screws S and S’. In addition, each of
the guides G has a support portion 38, the upper part
to galvanizing. With such an arrangement it is un
of which is adapted to rest on the top of the galvaniz
necessary to subject the pipes to the usual liquid acid
ing kettle 19 and thus hold the guide in proper position
pickling before they enter the galvanizing furnace or pre
therein while permitting it to be removed when it is de
heater although, if desired, liquid pickling or cleaning
sired to clean out the kettle or for any other reason.
may be employed as will be referred to later and in which
As indicated in FIGURE 3, the guides G are preferably
case the furnace atmosphere will be a reducing gas which
arranged in pairs that are joined together by connecting
will maintain previously pickled pipe in a clean condi
bars 39. This assists in properly locating and maintain
tion while heating. The length of the heating chamber
ing the guides G in position in the galvanizing kettle 19.
17 of the furnace F is such that, as the pipes travel there
As previously mentioned, the location of the angle of
through, they will be heated to a temperature proper 50
slope of the portions 34'01’ the several guides G varies.
for hot galvanizing. Heat may be supplied to the fur
As seen in FIGURE 7, the guide G that is immediately
nace by any suitable means (not shown) such as elec
adjacent the front conveying and sinking screw S has a
trical resistance heating elements, ?uid fuel ?red radiant
portion 34 which is inclined at a lesser angle than the
heating tubes, gas burners, etc., and sliding gates 17’
corresponding portion 34 of the guide G adjacent rear
may be provided for closing off the furnace chamber
conveying crew S’ and seen in FIGURE 9. In these two
if desired.
FIGURES, and also in FIGURE 6, the pipes illustrated
Disposed within the galvanizing chamber section 18
are given the same reference characters.
of the furnace F is a galvanizing machine unit which
It will be observed that the pipe indicated at J in both
includes a galvanizing kettle 19, adapted to contain a
bath of molten zinc, the level of which is indicated at 60 FIGURES 7 and 9 has just been picked up by the ?rst
thread of the screws S and S’ and- is starting its travel
Z in FIGURES 6, 7 and 9, and a pair of spaced pipe
over the horizontal portions 31 of the guides G. The
conveying and sinking screws generally indicated at S
exit end and galvanizing machine housing section 18.
and S’. These screws are mounted respectively on shafts
screws S and S’ are so arranged, and their driving con
nections are so interlocked, that the pipes are traversed
20 and 21 which extend across the top of the galvaniz
ing kettle 19 and through the end wall 22 of the furnace 65 over the skids G with their longitudinal axis extending
at right angles to the axes of the conveying screws. The
F. A suitable frame structure 23, Within the exit end
pipe K as seen in both FIGURES 7 and 9 is in the second
portion 18 of furnace F, is provided for supporting shafts
pitch of the conveying screws while the pipe L has been
20 and 21, and the feed screws S and S’ are so dis
moved along the horizontal portions 31 of skids G until
posed that their entering or pick-up ends 29 and 30
(lefthand as seen in FIGURE 2) are positioned to take 70 both ends are disposed directly above the left hand side
wall of the galvanizing kettle 19. The effect of the
the pipes P one at a time as they leave skids 7b at the
difference in the location of the slope of the inclined
exit end of the conveyor chains 7 and move them in an
portions 34 of the guides G becomes apparent from the
advancing series on spaced guides or skids G (see FIG
positions of the portions of the pipe M that are seen in
URE 3) toward the galvanizing kettle 19.
The shaft 11 which carries the sprockets 9 for the 75 FIGURES 7 and 9. Thus the front end portion of pipe
5
3,063,409
M (front being identi?ed as the end which exits ?rst
when the pipe is moved longitudinally out of the gal
vanizing kettle as will be later described), as seen in
FIGURE 7, has started down the incline 34 of the adja—
cent guide G while the rear end of the same pipe M, as
seen in FIGURE 9, is still resting on the horizontal por
tion 31. The enlarging or expanding threads 35’ and 36’
of the screws S and S’ respectively are so formed that
they will maintain the pipes being traversed with their
6
ment into the galvanizing bath so that the front end enters
?rst and then the rear end being moved down so that the
pipe is horizontal when fully submerged in the bath.
The pipes are traversed through the bath in a direction
perpendicular to their length and ultimately move into
the grooves 40 and 42 on screws S and S’ respectively.
When a pipe ?rst enters these grooves, its axis is substan
tially horizontal ‘but, as the screw S’ continues to rotate,
the rear end of the pipe is further submerged into the
longitudinal axes substantially perpendicular to the axes 10 galvanizing kettle to a position such that the pipe will
of the conveying rolls S and S’ at all times.
have a substantial inclination upwardly (for example
From the positions of pipe M seen in FIGURES 7 and
about 18°). As seen in FIGURES 3 and 6, as the rear
9 it will be apparent that the front end of a pipe, as it
end of the pipe is lowered, the front end will be elevated
begins its movement into the galvanizing kettle 19, is
somewhat because it pivots on the screw S a short dis
somewhat lower than its rear end.
The reason for this
is to facilitate the free and immediate entry of the molten
zinc into the interior of the pipe and to prevent entrap
ment of air therein. The contours of the’ inclined por
tions 34 of the guides G and of the enlarging screw por
tions 35 and 36 of screws S and S’ are such that, as a pipe
is advanced into the galvanizing bath, its longitudinal
axis is tilted so that the front end of the pipe enters the
bath before the rear end. As the pipe is fed further
into the bath, the rear end is lowered without correspond
ing lowering of the front end until, when the pipe reaches
the bottom of the inclined portions 34 of the guides G,
it is fully submerged in the molten zinc and its longi
tudinal axis is substantially horizontal (see pipe Q in
FIGURES 6, 7 and 9).
The several positions of the pipes being submerged in
the coating bath that are shown in FIGURES 7 and 9
are also indicated by phantom center lines in FIGURE 6.
Thus in FIGURE 6 the center line of pipe L of FIG
URES 7 and 9 is seen at L, and it will be observed that
at this point the pipe is horizontal and Well above the
zinc level Z. The pipe M of FIGURES 7 and 9, as seen
by its center line M in FIGURE 6, has had its front end
tance back from the front end.
'
As the conveyor screws S and S’ rotate, the permanent
magnet portions 41 and 4-4 thereof will hold the pipe
?rmly against the base of the grooves 40 and 42 and
cause the pipe to be fed longitudinally in the direction
of its length. As seen in FIGURE 3, two permanent
magnet rolls 50 and 51 having V-grooves on their outer
surface to assist in gripping and guiding the pipes, are
mounted just beyond conveying screw S in the direction
of pipe travel. The axis of roll 51 is vertically offset
from the axis of roll 50 so that, as a pipe P is moved
into its upwardly inclined position by the action of the
cam portion 43 of rear conveying screw S’ and is moved
longitudinally by magnets 41 and 44 on screws S and
S’, the forward end of the pipe will engage magnetic
30 rolls 50 and 51. These rolls are driven by suitable means
(not shown) and will continue to move the pipes P in
the direction of their length completely out of the coating
liquid in kettle 19 after the magnets 44 and 41 have
moved out of contact with the pipes. The rearward in
clination of the pipes as they are withdrawn from kettle
l9 insures prompt and complete draining of the coating
liquid from the pipes back into kettle 19.
tilted downwardly, and pipe N of FIGURES 7 and 9,
The advancing ends of the pipes P, as they are moved
while its axis is maintained substantially parallel to the
out of the galvanizing kettle 19, are moved into engage
position of the axis of pipe M, has been moved bodily 40 ment with the lower rolls of a magnetic roll conveyor
downwardly until its forward end has entered the zinc
unit that is best seen in FIGURE 4. This unit includes
bath. Pipe Q of FIGURES 7 and 9 has reached the
at its ‘lowermost end a pair of driven permanent magnet
bottom of the inclined portions of guides G and, as seen
rolls ‘52 and 53 which are aligned with the path of
in FIGURE 6, is now disposed with its axis horizontal
travel of the pipes as they exit from- the galvanizing
and is completely submerged below the level of the zinc
tank. These rolls 52 and 53 engage and pick up the
in the kettle 19. The pipe P that is seen in full view in
FIGURE 6 has, as will be more fully described later,
reached the exit grooves and the conveying screws S
and S’ and is steeply inclined for angular removal from
the kettle 19.
Just beyond the last pitch of the thread 35’ on front
screw S is an annular groove 4%} to which the last pitch
of the thread 35’ connects and into which the pipes are
moved by said thread. This groove Ali} is circular, as
seen in FIGURE 8, and has a permanent magnet portion
41 which extends around a portion only of the base of
the groove. At the end of the enlarging thread 36’ of
conveying screw S’ is a groove 42 formed on an enlarged
pipes as they come along. Supported on an inclined
frame 54 are a series of driven electromagnetic rolls 55,
‘56, 57 and 58 which are adapted to be energized and
idle-energized by suitable electrical connections and con
trols (not shown) in a well-known manner.
As seen in FIGURE 4-, the pipe P has been moved
in the direction of its length by the permanent magnet
rolls 52 and 53 and has engaged the electromagnet rolls
55, 56, 5'7 and 5%, which are energized at all time except
when the limit switch 59 is actuated. The depending
contractor 59’ of limit switch 59 extends into the path
of the end of the pipe P. As seen in FIGURE 4, the
pipe P has left the permanent magnet rolls 52 and 53
cam portion indicated at 43. A permanent magnet 44 is
and is supported by the energized electromagnet rolls.
mounted in the cam portion 43 and is effective over the 60 The leading end of pipe I is just about to operate the
portion of the bottom of the groove 42 that is most re
limit switch 59 and, when this occurs, the electrical con
mote from the shaft 21 (see FIGURE 3). In the guides
nection to the electromagnet rolls 55, 56, 5'7 and 58
is broken and the rolls immediately become de-energized
permitting the pipe P to drop onto the movable racks 64b
These slots permit the cam portion 43 of screws S’ to
65 of the indexing transfer units which are generally indi
rotate therethrough and also permit the pipes that are
cated at T in FIGURES 4 and S.
conveyed into the grooves 42 by the threads 36’ to be
A plurality (three as illustrated) of the indexing trans
lowered as the enlarged part of the cam portion ap
fer units T are spaced along and below the pipes that
proaches its lowest position.
are conveyed by the electromagnet rolls SS, 56, 57 and
In the operation of the galvanizing apparatus just de
70 53. As seen in FIGURE 4, the units T are supported
scribed, the pipes P are picked up from the ends of the
on an inclined frame structure ‘61. Each unit T includes
G that are supported adjacent the rear conveying screw
S’, elongated slots 45 (seen in FIGURE 9) are provided.
conveyor chains 7 and are traversed by conveying screws
S and S’ successively over the horizontal portions 31 of
the guides G and down into the galvanizing bath in the
a movable rack 6t? pivotally supported on a pair of paral
lel arms 62 which are in turn mounted on driven shafts
for rotation in the direction of the arrow in FIGURE 5.
kettle 19, the axis of each pipe being tilted during move 75 A second movable rack 63 is similarly supported on
3,063,409
6
arms 64 which are also arranged in parallel relation and
on the opposite side of the main frame 65 of unit T
from the arms 62. The arms 62 and '64 are supported
on driven shafts which are interconnected, as by suitable
gearing or the like, so that the shafts will rotate in the
same direction and carry therewith the movable racks
60 and 63 While the upper faces thereof will be main~
tained in a horizontal plane at all times.
As clearly seen in FIGURE 5, the arms 64 are dis
8
conveyors pass over a pan. or trough 70’ which is
adapted to collect surplus coating liquid which may be
sprayed onto the pipes, as they move over the pan 70’,
by suitable spray heads or the like (not shown). This
spray is preferably of a solution which inhibits the
formation of so-called “white rust” or bloom on the sur
face of the galvanized pipes. After leaving the con
veyors 70, the pipes reach the inspection table 71 from
which they may be removed for further processing,
posed 90° in advance of the arms 62 and, because of 10 storage or shipment.
When the pipes P are withdrawn from the bath of
the interconnection of the drive shafts of the arms 62
molten
zinc in the galvanizing kettle 19, they pass
and 64, this angular spacing remains constant. A sta
through an exterior coating control station which is
tionary transfer rack 66 is mounted on the main frame
located between the permanent magnet rolls 52 and 53
65 of the units T. The arms 62 and 64 are disposed
and consists of an annular pipe 78 connected to a suit
on opposite sides of frame 65 and thus the stationary
rack 66 is disposed between the paths of the movable
racks 60 and 63.
able source of steam or air under pressure and having
a plurality of small holes or jets adapted to direct
As shown in FIGURE 5, the movable racks 60 and
streams or steam or air over the entire outer surface
this single revolution control means is such that when
a pipe P engages the limit switch 59 and de-energizes
the magnet rolls 55—58 and a pipe P is dropped from
these rolls onto the movable rack 60, the rotary move
ment of the racks is started and continues through 360°
whereupon the racks stop in their at-rest positions and
and equalize the coating so the desired uniform thickness
is obtained.
of the pipes P as they pass lengthwise through the
63 are in their normal or at-rest positions. Suitable
opening in the annular pipe 78. The effect of the im
20
single revolution control means (not shown) are pro
pinging jets of air or steam on the molten zinc on the
vided for the drive means which operates the shafts on
outside of the pipes P is to remove excessive amounts
which arms 62 and 64- are mounted. The operation of
remain their until another single revolution cycle is
started by engagement of the limit switch 59 by the
In order to control the thickness of the coating on the
interior of the pipes P, the internal coating control sta
tion generally indicated at C in FIGURE 4 is provided.
Before describing unit C, however, it is pointed out that
the movable rack 63 on the indexing transfer unit T that
is disposed under the electromagnet roll 58 (FIGURE 4)
has a permanent magnet associated therewith and e?ec
When the arms 62 have moved counter
tive on the pipes supported thereby so that the pipe P’ is
clockwise through 90° from the position seen in FIGURE
held on this rack 63 against backward lengthwise move
5, the pipe receiving notches on the top face of rack 60
ment during operation of the internal coating control
will be aligned with the pipe receiving notches on the
top face of the stationary rack 66. When rack 63 is in 35 apparatus thereon.
The unit C includes a horizontally adjustable support
its at-rest position seen in FIGURE 5, a pipe, indicated
ing frame 72, a slide or guide member '73, and a cross
at P’ will be supported thereon. This pipe is also seen
head 74- slidable in said guide 73 and connected to a
at P' in FIGURE 4 and is disposed in alignment with
connecting rod 75 which in turn is operated by crank unit
the internal coating control station as will be later de
scribed. During the ?rst 90° of counterclockwise rota 40 76 mounted on a suitable shaft and driven by suitable
means. A bell mouth pipe end engaging member 77 is
tion of the rack 63, which occurs with the above referred
carried by the cross head 74 and is provided with air or
to rotation of rack 60, the pipe P’ disposed thereon will
steam pressure connections adapted, when the bell mouth
be dropped down onto the adjacent movable chain type
is in engagement with the forward end of a pipe P’, as
cooling bed B which carries the pipes to the water
seen in FIGURE 4, to discharge air or steam under
bosh 68.
pressure to the interior of the pipe while sealing the end
As the movable racks 6%‘ continue their rotation be
thereof. This air or steam, or other ?uid under pressure,
yond the 90° point, the pipe P will be left on the
blows out the excess coating material from the interior
stationary racks 66. When the movable racks 63 have
of the pipe.
traveled through 180°, they will be aligned with the
By means of the crank 76 and connecting rod 75, the
stationary racks 6'6, and as the racks 63 continue to
bell 77 may be withdrawn from its operating position to
move, they will pick up the pipe P which was previ
permit the pipes P to be moved into and out of internal
ously left on the stationary transfer racks 66 byv the
coating control position. When a pipe has reached this
movable racks 60. Continuing rotation of the racks 60
position (indicated at P’ in FIGURES 4 and 5), the crank
and 63 will bring racks ‘60 back to the position shown
in FIGURE 5 ready to receive another pipe from the 55 '76 is operated to move the bell 77 into tight engage
ment with the end of the pipe. The air or stream under
electromagnet rolls 55—58 and will return racks 63 into
pressure is then discharged through the pipe by suitable
their horizontal at-rest positions seen in FIGURE 5 with
automatic control valve means, and the internal coating
a pipe supported thereon ready to be subjected to the
control operation is carried out. The bell 77 is retracted
operation of the internal coating control means.
From the above, it will be seen that the indexing 60 by further rotation of the crank 76 upon completion of
the coating control operation and before the next single
transfer units T provide means for timed transfer of
rotation cycle of the support members 63 of indexing
pipes from the conveying rolls 55—58 to the internal
transfer units T.
coating control station and further transfer from this
From the above description, it will be observed that I
coating control station to the movable chain type cooling
have provided a completely automatic apparatus for con
bed B. The bed B includes a pair of chain conveyors 67
veying elongated articles to and through a coating bath,
and a plurality of spaced supporting rails 67’ (see
which apparatus subjects each successive article to exactly
FIGURE 1). The discharge ends of these rails 67’ are
the same treatment as each other article. In the pipe gal
all disposed in the same level above the top of the
vanizing apparatus shown in FFGURES 1 and 2 the pipe
water bosh or tank 68. As the coated pipes move over
the rails 67', the Zinc coating cools and solidi?es. The ' cleaning or pickling is effected by a gaseous atmosphere,
and with such treatment the articles do not need to be
discharge end of the rails 67' are curved downwardly
?uxed prior to coating. However, if the pipe is cleaned
as seen at 67" to faciliate the desired free fall of the
by pickling in an acid bath in well-known manner, the
lengths of pipe into the water in the bosh or tank 68.
furnace 17 is used only for bringing the pipes up to
Chain conveyors '70 pick up the pipes as they are dropped
into the bosh 68 and remove them therefrom. These 75 proper galvanizing temperature in a reducing atmos
next pipe.
9
‘3,063,409
phere, and a flux tank 80 may be provided ahead of the
galvanizing tank 81 as seen in FIGURE 11.
The con
veying end sinking screw S" is provided with an entering
portion 82 which takes the pipes from the furnace, a
double inclined ?uxing portion 83 which moves the pipes
down into the ?ux bath in tank 89 and then lifts them
out again, a horizontal transfer portion 84 which car
ries the pipes after they are withdrawn from the ?uxing
bath to the galvanizing tank 81, and a galvanizing por
tion 35 generally similar to the corresponding portion 10
of screw S of FIGURE 2. The screw S” is the front
conveyor screw, but it will be understood that the rear
conveyor screw for an installation including a ?uxing
bath would be generally similar to the rear conveyor
screw of the apparatus of FIGURES 2 and 3 except for
the addition of the forward part of the screw which
moves the pipes into and out of the ?ux tank. By prop
erly contouring the skid or guide members which support
the pipes through the ?ux tank 89, the desired entry into
1G
product. Extremely hazardous and awkward manual
handling of product in conventional galvanizing lines is
presently common practice. In addition to eliminating
the occupational hazards of galvanizing, my apparatus
may be ‘operated with a minimum of manpower and at a
high rate of production.
Although I have described the illustrated embodiments
of my invention in considerable detail, it will'be under
stood that variations and modi?cations may be made in
the particular design and proportions of the elements
making up my apparatus. Accordingly, I do not wish to
be limited to the exact structures and arrangements herein
shown and described but claim as my invention all em
bodiments thereof coming within the scope of the ap
pended claims.
I claim:
1. In combination with a coating tank for elongated
articles, means for conveying articles to said tank, a
conveying screw supported with its axis extending across
and exit from the ‘tank may be provided.
20 said tank in a direction transversely of the length of the
In the apparatus described hereinabove the threads on
elongated articles brought to said tank by said means for
the conveying screws S, S’ and S" are “single.” It will be
conveying said articles, said screw having a portion of
understood that the maximum diameter pipe that may
uniform diameter disposed above the coating liquid level
be handled by such an apparatus is slightly less than the
in said tank and a portion of progressively increasing
pitch of the thread, i.e., if the minimum pitch of the 25 diameter extending below the coating liquid level in said
thread of the screw S, seen in FIGURE 2, is ?ve inches,
tank, means for supporting said elongated articles in said
the maximum diameter pipe that can be handled thereby
tank in feeding engagement with said conveying screw,
will be less than ?ve inches outside diameter. When such
means for rotating said conveying screw in a direction to
an apparatus is used for handlnig small pipe, for example
feed said articles from said conveying means into said
under two inches diameter, there is considerable waste
tank in a direction transversely of the length of said
of machine capacity and a corresponding reduction in
articles, and means for removing said articles from said
production output. To increase production, when small
tank.
size pipes are being handled, it is proposed to employ
2. In combination with a coating tank for elongated
conveying and sinking screws having double threads, as
articles, means for conveying said articles to said tank,
seen in FIGURE 12. In this ?gure the screw 8"’ is a
a pair of spaced conveying screws supported with their
front conveying screw and di?ers from screw S of FIG
axes parallel and extending across said tank in a direction
URE 2 largely in that it is provided with a double thread.
transversely of the length of the elongated articles brought
Thus, one thread of screw 8”’ is indicated at 86 while the
to said tank by said means for conveying said articles,
next or second thread is indicated at 87. The pitch or
said screws each having a portion of uniform diameter
lead of these threads at the entering (left) end of screw
disposed above the coating liquid level in said tank and
5''’ is increased in order to facilitate removal of the pipes
a portion of progressively increasing diameter extending
from the conveyor 88, but in the main body of the screw
below the coating liquid level in said tank and non
the pitch of the threads 36 and 87 is substantially the
advancing grooves at their delivery ends, means for sup
same as that of the thread 32 of screw S.
porting said elongated articles in said tank in feeding
If, for example, the single thread screw S of FIGURE
engagement with said conveying screws, means for rotat
2 is adapted to handle pipe up to four inch diameter,
then the double thread screw 3''’ can handle two pipes of
about two inch diameter in the same lineal space. Thus,
by means of the double thread conveying screw shown in
FIGURE 12, the output of the machine, when operating
on small sizes of pipe, may be about doubled over that
which could be obtained if the single thread screw S were
ing said conveying screws in a direction to feed said
articles from said conveying means into said tank in a
direction transversely of the length of said articles, and
means for removing said articles longitudinally from
said tank when they reach said non~advancing grooves in
said screws.
3. In apparatus for coating elongated objects, a tank
used at all times. In order to facilitate quickchanging
for holding a bath of coating material in liquid form, a
the conveying screws, the portions of the furnace hous
plurality of conveying screws having spaced apart axes,
ing above these elements are removable.
It will be noted that the magnetic rolls 5%, 51, etc. are 55 said conveying screws having pick-up ends disposed to
engage an elongated object at spaced points along its
illustrated as having two pipe receiving grooves therein.
through the galvanizing kettle in pairs, they are handled
length and having threads thereon portions of which
progressively increase in diameter in the direction of
feed of said object and extend into said bath, and a
ing line for elongated articles, particularly suited for the
length and feed same into said tank in a direction trans
cedure.
into said bath, and a plurality of object supporting skids
adjacent said conveying screws and extending into said
tank in spaced apart relation along the length of said
These double grooves are provided so that when the
double thread screw 8”’ is used and the pipes are moved
in pairs as they are moved longitudinally out of the gal 60 plurality of object supporting skids adjacent said convey
ing screws and extending into said tank in spaced apart
vanizing kettle. In like manner, the supporting edges of
relation along the length of said objects being coated.
the racks 63', 63 and 66' of the indexing transfer units T
4. In apparatus for coating elongated objects, a tank
are illustrated as having two pipe receiving notches.
for holding a ‘bath of coating material in liquid form, a
This also is to permit them to be used with double thread
plurality of conveying screws having spaced apart axes,
conveying and sinking screws as shown in FIGURE 12.
said conveying screws having pick-up ends disposed to
From the above description, it will be understood that
engage an elongated object at spaced points along its
my improved appartus provides a fully automatic coat~
versely of the length of said object, said conveying screws
galvanizing of steel pipe or the like. With my appa
ratus, each article is positively maintained in the same 70 having threads thereon portions of the diameters of which
increase in the direction of feed of said object and extend
relation to the other articles throughout the coating pro
Because of the assured “?rst-in-?rst-out” se
quence of handling the product, each article is given ex
actly the same treatment, resulting in uniformly coated 75 objects ‘being coated, said skids having object engaging
3,063,409
12
ll
moved in succession transversely of their length into said
edges contoured to correspond to said diameters of said
conveying screws and spaced below said screws whereby
said object is held in feeding engagement with the threads
bath of coating liquid and one end of each of said ob
jects will be moved through a different vertical travel than
the other end.
8. In apparatus for coating elongated objects, a tank
for holding a bath of coating material in liquid form,
means for continuously moving a series of elongated ob
jects in a direction transversely of their length up to said
of said screws.
5. In apparatus for coating elongated objects, a tank
for holding a bath of coating material in liquid form,
conveyor means for continuously moving a series of elon
gated objects in a direction transversely of their length
tank above the surface of said coating material therein,
up to said tank above the surface of said coating material
therein, a plurality of conveying screws having their axes 10 a plurality of conveying screws having their axes spaced
apart lengthwise of the objects being coated and extend
spaced apart lengthwise of the objects being coated and
ing in the direction of movement of said objects on said
extending in the direction of movement of said objects
article moving means and disposed above said coating
material level in said tank, said screws including portions
thereon portions of which increase in diameter in the 15 having threads thereon that increase in diameter in the
on said conveyor means and disposed above the coating
material level in said tank, said screws having threads
direction of advance of said threads, a plurality of ob
direction of advance of the threads and extend into said
ject supporting skids extending into said tank below said
screws and spaced apart along the length of said objects
being coated, the diameters of said portions of said screws
portions of said threads on said conveying screws increas 20 increasing differently in different screws whereby elon
bath, a plurality of object supporting skids extending into
said tank adjacent said screws and spaced apart along the
length of said objects being coated, the diameters of said
gated objects leaving said conveyor means will be moved
in succession transversely of their length into said bath
of coating liquid and one end of each of said objects will
ing differently relative to each other along the screw axes
whereby elongated objects leaving said conveyor means,
will be moved in succession transversely of their length
be moved through a different vertical travel than the other
into said bath of coating liquid and one end of each of
said objects will be moved through a different vertical 25 end, magnet means on one of said conveying screws
effective over a portion only of the periphery at the exit
travel than the other end, and means for maintaining a
end
of the screw, said magnet means being circumfer
constant angular relationship between said screws.
entially disposed on said screw to move an article being
6. In apparatus for coating elongated objects, a tank
handled lengthwise in exiting direction during a portion of
for holding a bath of coating material in liquid form,
conveyor means for continuously moving a series of elon
30 a revolution of said screw, means for simultaneously ro
gated objects in a direction transversely of their length
up to said tank above the surface of said coating material
therein, a plurality of conveying screws having their axes
spaced apart lengthwise of the objects being coated and
tating said conveying screws, and means for maintaining
a constant angular relationship between said conveying
screws.
9. Apparatus for continuously coating elongated arti
extending in the direction of movement of said objects on 35 cles including, conveyor means for moving a series of said
said conveyor means and disposed above the coating
material level in said tank, said screws having threads
thereon portions of which increase in diameter in the
direction of advance of said threads, and a plurality of
object supporting skids extending into said tank below said
screws and spaced apart along the length of said objects
being coated, the diameters of said portions of said
threads on said conveying screws increasing differently
relative to each other along the screw axes whereby elon
gated objects leaving said conveyor will be moved in
succession transversely of their length into said bath of
coating liquid and one end of each of said objects will
be moved through a different vertical travel than the
other end, said conveying screws having non-advancing
grooves at their delivery ends and having magnet means I
effective over a portion only of the periphery of said
grooves, said magnet means being circumferentially located
on said conveying screws whereby, during part of a
revolution only, an article being handled will be moved
lengthwise thereby in exiting direction, means for simul
taneously rotating said conveying screws, and means for
maintaining a constant angular relationship between said
conveying screws.
7. In apparatus for coating elongated objects, a tank
for holding a bath of coating material in liquid form,
means for continuously moving a series of elongated ob
jects in a direction transversely of their length up to
said tank above the surface of said coating material there
in, a plurality of conveying screws having their axes
spaced apart lengthwise of the objects being coated and
extending in the direction of movement of said objects on
said article moving means and disposed above the coating
material level in said tank, said screws including portions
having threads thereon that increase in diameter in the
direction of advance of said threads, a plurality of ob
articles in parallel relation in a direction transversely of
their length, a housing for said conveyor means adapted
to maintain a gaseous atmosphere therein, means for heat
ing said articles as they are moved through said housing
by said conveyor means, a coating tank within said hous
ing at the discharge end of said conveyor means, a plu
rality of rotatable conveying and sinking screws disposed
in said housing and having their axes extending across
said coating tank in a direction transversely of the length
of said articles, said screws having article pickup thread
portions at the discharge end of said conveyor means
adapted to pick up articles in spaced series relation from
said conveyor means, said screws having progressively
enlarging thread portions of increasing diameter merging
with said pick-up thread portions and extending into said
coating tank, means in said tank for supporting and guid
ing articles moved by said screws whereby said articles are
held in engagement with said enlarging thread sections
and moved into said tank in a direction transversely of
their length, magnetic means on said screws for moving
said articles endwise out of said tank when they reach the
discharge ends of said screws, means for interconnecting
said screws to maintain a ?xed angular relation therebe
tween, and means for rotating said screws in a direction to
traverse said articles from the discharge end of said con
veyor means into said tank in a direction transverse of
their length and then out of said tank in endwise direction.
‘10. Apparatus for continuously coating elongated arti
cles including conveyor means for moving a series of said
articles in parallel relation in a direction transversely of
their length, a housing for said conveyor means adapted
to maintain a gaseous atmosphere therein, means for
heating said articles as they are moved through said hous
ing by said conveyor means, a coating tank within said
70 housing at the discharge end of said conveyor means, a
ject supporting skids extending into said tank below said
screws and spaced apart along the length of said objects
plurality of rotatable conveying and sinking screws dis
posed in said housing and having their axes extending
being coated, the diameters of said portions of said screws
increasing differently in different screws whereby elon
gated objects leaving said article moving means will be
length of said articles, said screws having article pickup
thread portions at the discharge end of said conveyor
across said coating tank in a direction transversely of the
13
3,063,409
means adapted to pick up articles in spaced series rela
tion from said conveyor means, said screws having en
larging thread portions of increasing root diameter merg
ing with said pick-up thread portions and extending into
111;
charge groove at the discharge end of said thread to which
said thread connect and into which pipes are delivered
by said thread, and means carried by said screw and
effective on a pipe when in said discharge groove to move
said coating tank, spaced apart skid means in said tank
said pipe longitudinally in a direction normal to the di
for supporting and guiding articles moved by said screws
rection of movement imparted to said pipe by said
whereby said articles are held in engagement with said en
thread.
larging thread sections and moved into said tank in a di
12. In apparatus for coating elongated objects, a tank
rection transversely of their length, magnetic means on
adapted to hold a bath of coating liquid, a conveying and
said screws for moving said articles~endwise out of said 10 sinking screw having a pick-up end and a discharge end,
tank when they reach the discharge ends of said screws,
said screw having a double thread extending from one
means for interconnecting said screws to maintain a ?xed
end to the other, said thread including a portion of pro
angular relation therebetween, and means for rotating
gressively increasing diameter disposed above said tank
said screws in a direction to traverse said articles from
whereby said thread enters said bath and is adapted to
the discharge end of said conveyor means into said tank 15 convey a pipe to said bath and sink the pipe therein, and
in a direction transverse of their length and then out of
means for rotatably supporting said screw above said bath
said tank in endwise direction, the threads of said en
with its axis extending thereover.
larging thread sections of two of said feed screws in
creasing in diameter differently from each other and
said spaced apart skid means varying in contour whereby 20
each article will be inclined lengthwise from a horizon
tal into a tilted position during its travel through said
tank.
11. In pipe galvanizing apparatus having a galvanizing
tank adapted to hold a bath of molten zinc, a conveying 25
and sinking screw having a pick-up end and a discharge
end and rotatably supported above said bath with its axis
extending thereover, said screw having a continuous thread
extending from one end to the other, said thread at said
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
545,430
561,712
682,147
Lynch ______________ __ Sept. 3, 1901
947,440
1,851,734
Green?eld ____________ __ Jan. 25, 1910
Smith ______________ __ Mar. 29, 1932
1,869,324
1,935,087
Free ________________ __ July 26, 1932
Free ________________ __ Nov. 14, 1933
pick-up end being of constant diameter and progressively 30 2,326,844
increasing in diameter above said bath whereby said
2,804,841
thread enters said bath and is adapted to sink a pipe be
ing conveyed by said screw into said bath, and a dis
Lewis ______________ __ Aug. 27, 1895
Lynch ______________ __ June 9, 1896
2,906,238
2,951,491
Ely ________________ __ Aug. 17, 1943
Salkeld ______________ __ Sept. 3, 1957
Heaton et al. ________ __ Sept. 29, 1959
Olson ______________ __ Sept. 6, 1960
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