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Патент USA US3064972

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NOV. 20’
35064362
7
awn“/ /\
II
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m
m
BI._IT;I.34.1.13
2
INVENTOR
FRANK ‘1 BoRoN
me
%
/
Hg
5.
Nov. 20, 1962
F. J. BORON
3,064,962
FURNACE DIVIDER PLATES
Filed June 15, 1960‘
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
-4
1
_ 4A
55
32A
mmvroza.
FRANK ‘I. BoRoN
BY
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Nov. 20, 1962
3,064,962
F. J. BORON
FURNACE DIVIDER PLATES
Filed June 15, 1960
48
4 Sheets-Sheet 3
M?m
a5@- Mn 380
1g. 7
1g18
‘$9764
7
/
INVENTOR.
FRANK J. BoRoN
BY
791%’ 5
Nov. 20, 1962
3,064,962
F. J. BORON
FURNACE DIVIDER PLATES
Filed June 15, 1960
4 Sheets-She'et 4
al ?!
INVENTOR.
EBANK I. BoRoN
M
‘Hi-Z’
5
3,%4,9ti2
i
Patented Nov. 20, 1962
2
1
3,064,962
FURNAQE DE‘VIDER IE’LATES
Frank .l. Boron, Elyria, Ohio, assignor to American Brake
Shoe Company, New York, NBL, a corporation of
Delaware
Filed June 15, 1960, Ser. No. 36,413
4 Chime. (Cl. 266-25)
ing links connected to the upper part of the divider plate
by articulated connections, as by hinged joints or the like;
and this construction constitutes a specific object of the
present invention.
The depending links can be arranged in one or more
generally horizontally extending and vertically aligned
rows, and it is a further object of the present invention
to offset the links in immediately adjacent rows to mini—
mize the packing of the material in the spacings between
This invention relates to divider plates for an orc
processing furnace of the kind used to sinter and con 10 individual links and consequent mechanical stresses on
the links.
solidate ?nely divided ore material or other metal~con~
Preferably, the upper part of the divider plate includes
taining material such as ?nely divided iron ore or the
a sloped upper edge effective to slice through and divide
like.
the downwardly dividing material in a manner akin to
In ore-processing furnaces of this kind charges of the
material to be processed are introduced through the top 15 that of a knife blade. In one form of the present inven
tion the upper part of the divider plate is a solid, one
of the furnace, and air for sustaining combustion during
sintering the metal-containing material is introduced into
the furnace through tuyeres at the bottom thereof. The
air thus introduced ?ows upwardly through the furnace
piece member having a corrugated cross-section of sub
stantially uniform thickness afforded by at least one
alternate and generally horizontally disposed rib and
and reacts with the material in process to develop the
groove on the opposite side faces thereof.
necessary high temperatures required for the sintering
operation. In the course of the sintering operation th
form of the present invention the upper portion of the
divider plate has conduit means formed internally therein
material within the furnace gradually moves downwardly
therethrough with additional charges of ?nely divided
material being periodically introduced through the top
of the furnace.
In another
for circulating cooling fluid therethrough. Divider plate
constructions incorporating the foregoing structural fea—
tures constitute further objects of the present invention.
Other and further objects of the present invention will
It is desirable that the air travel freely through the
be apparent from the following description and claims
material within the furnace, but it has been found that
there is a tendency for the material to pack and form a
hard crust at the top of the bed, which hard crust pre
vents the free passage of air therethrough. Ore-proc
by way of illustration, show preferred embodiments of
the present invention and the principles thereof and what
and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings which,
is now considered to be the best mode contemplated for
essing furnaces of this general kind are oftentimes
applying these principles. Other embodiments of the
equipped with divider plates which project inwardly from
invention embodying the same or equivalent principles
may be used and structural changes may be made as de
the side walls of the furnace for breaking up the crust
thus formed in the downwardly moving material to main 35 sired by those skilled in the art Without departing from
the present invention and the purview of the appended
tain the material in a loose, unpacked condition. The
claims.
divider plates are subjected to large temperature gradients
In the drawings:
between the lower and upper parts thereof and are also
FIG.1 is a diagrammatic top plan view of a furnace
subjected to large vertical loadings by the burden of the
downwardly moving material. The combination of these 40 in which the present invention may be embodied;
FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along
two factors has contributed to early failure and a rela
the line indicated by the arrows 2-2 in FIG. 1;
tively short useful life for the divider plates, thus render
ing frequent replacement necessary.
In my Patent No. 2,824,730, dated February 25, 1958,
there is disclosed a divider plate construction which has
enabled a significant increase in the life of a divider
plate to be realized. The aforesaid patent discloses a
solid, one-piece divider plate having‘ corrugations dis
FIG. 3 is a side elevation view of a divider plate con
structed in accordance with one form of the present in
vention;
FIG. 4 is an end elevation view of the divider plate
illustrated in FIG. 3;
FIGS. 3A and 4A are respective side elevation and
posed parallel to the isotherms developed in the furnace. 50 end elevation views of another construction for atop por
tion of a divider plate;
This divider plate construction has proven an eminent
commercial success and is at the present time extensively
used. In comparison with the art as heretofore known,
the divider plate of Patent No. 2,824,730 has afforded
FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of a divider plate con
structed in accordance with another form of the present
invention;
FIG. 6 is an end elevation view of the divider plate
an eleven-fold increase in divider plate life. It is a pri 55
illustrated in FIG. 5 ;
mary object of the present invention to construct a divider
FIG. 7 is a section View taken substantially along the
plate which is even more resistant to thermal abuse and
line indicated by the arrows 7-7 in FIG. 10;
early break-up than that of the aforesaid patent. Tests
FIG. 8 is a sectional View taken substantially along the
indicate that a divider plate constructed in accordance
with the present invention will enable a three-fold or 60 line indicated by the' arrows ‘6-3 in FIG. 10;
FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken substantially along the
greater increase in divider plate life over that of the
line indicated by the arrows 9-9 in FIG. 10;
aforesaid patent to be achieved.
FIG. 10 is a side elevation view of another form‘ of a
It is an object of the present invention to form the
divider plate constructed in accordance with the present
lower portion of a divider plate with a segmented con
struction which, while effective to maintain the material 65 invention;
FIG. 11 is an end elevation view taken in the direction
in process separated and in a loose and unpacked condi
of the arrows 11-11 in FIG. 10;
tion, minimizes the transfer of thermally induced stresses
FIG. 12 is a fragmentary view taken. in the direction
between the individual segments of the lower portion of
of the arrows 12-12 in FIG. 10;
the divider plate and also between these segments and
FIG. 13 is a fragmentary end elevation view taken in
70 the direction of the arrows 13-13 in FIG. 10; and
the other parts of the divider plate.
In accordance with the present invention the segmented
FIG. 14 is a sectional view taken substantially along
construction may take the form of a plurality of depend
the line indicated by the arrows 14-14 in FIG. 10‘.
(ii.
U
In FIGS. 1 and 2 there is shown diagrammatically a
part 31 which is of a generally triangular shape in side
furnace PR of the kind with which the present invention
elevation and which includes a downwardly inclined up
is concerned. The furnace PR is constructed of refrac
per surface or edge 32 for dividing and separating the
tory brick and includes vertical side walls 10 and 11,
downwardly moving material in process within the fur
vertical end walls 12 and i3, and a bottom wall 14. The CR nace. The upper part 31 presents a relatively narrow
bottom wall 14- is provided with an opening 16 of the
pro?le in plan view when the divider plate NA is
usual kind through which a blast of hot air is introduced
oriented in an operative position‘within the furnace. In
into the furnace from tuyeres to produce the heat in the
this instance the upper part 31 is formed with a corru
furnace cavity.
gated cross-section, as best illustrated in the end view
The ?nely divided ore material that is to be exposed to 10 of FIG. 4. The upper part of the divider plate has a
the heat is introduced at the top of the furnace, and under
substantially uniform thickness so that a groove as 33
the present invention the side walls lit} and 11 at the up
in one side surface of the divider plate is presented as a
per portions thereof are provided with a plurality of in
rib 34 in the opposite side surface of the divider plate.
wardly directed divider plates 21} which maintain the top
The corrugations thus de?ned project substantially nor
of the bed B of the material undergoing heat treatment 15 mal to the direction of downward movement of the mate
in a continuous collapsed, that is, loose condition so that
rial in process, and, as will ‘be apparent from an inspec
any tendency for the material to coalesce or fuse into a
tion of FIG. 2, the ribs and grooves extend generally
cake or crust is prevented. This assures a free, uniform
parallel to the isotherms within the furnace. The pur
How of hot air upwardly through the furnace and breaks
pose of this corrugated con?guration of the upper part of
up the material in the furnace so that the material is uni
the divider plate is to facilitate the differential expansion
formly heat treated.
along the vertical extent of the upper part of the divider
The divider plates 24} in the present instance are pro
plate, which differential expansion is caused by the tem
duced as castings, and because of the high temperatures
encountered these castings consist of a heat-resistant alloy.
1 have found that a highly alloyed steel containing 24
percent chromium, 12 percent nickel, 0.30 percent car
bon, and the remainder essentially iron gives highly sat
isfactory performance. This alloy is extremely strong
and ductile, consistent with the mechanical and thermal
stressconditions encountered in a furnace as FR. Chro
miurn may vary from '20 to 40 percent; nickel from 10
to 20 percent; carbon from 0.20 to 0.46 percent; re
mainder substantially iron.
As shown in FIG. 2, the upper side edges of the furnace
FR are bevelled. The plates 20 are adapted to be se
cured to these bevelled faces of the furnace PR, and to
this end are formed with hanger brackets 21 adapted to
receive fastening bolts 248. The bolts 24B serve to
anchor the plates 20 securely in place with the plates ex
tending inwardly of the side walls of the furnace, that
is, in normal relation compared to the side walls of the
furnace. The divider plates indicated generally at 20
in FIG. 2 may be of any of the speci?c forms to ‘be de
scribed in detail hereinafter.
perature gradient through this part of the divider plate.
A base flange 35 is formed integral with the upper part
31 in a plane generally normal thereto, and is adapted
to seat against the inner surface of a side wall of the
furnace in the mounted position as illustrated in FIG. 2.
The base ?ange 36 includes an upwardly extending part
3'7 which is adapted to function as a hanger member for
fastening the divider plate ZQA to the side wall of a fur
nace whenever a mounting bolt as 2433 (see FIG. 2) is
inserted within a rectangular-shaped slot 38 formed in the
hanger member 37.
With reference once again to FIG. 2 it will be observed
that the highest temperatures are developed in the lower
portion of the divider plate. The divider plate 20A illus
trated in FIGS. 3 and 4 incorporates a segmented lower
construction in which a plurality of individual segments
or link members 38A and 33B are separated and slightly
spaced from one another so as to be free for thermal ex
pansion and relative movement with respect to one an
other.
Therefore, any thermally induced stresses tend
ing to produce deformation or cracks in any one segment
are localized therein and cannot be transferred to any
The thermal stresses to which the plates 20 are sub
jected are rather severe, especially when it is considered
that the heat near the lower edges of the plates 20 may
exceed 2000° F. under certain conditions, and under these
other segment. In other words, the lower extremity of
the divider plate is discontinuous and comprises isolated
same conditions the temperature at the top of the mate
38A and 38B are also attached to the upper part 31 in
elements which con?ne the thermal stresses.
In this instance the individual segments or link members
rial bed just above the upper edge of the plates may be
articulated connections which substantially eliminate any
less than 500° F. In FIG. 2 the variations in the tem
transfer of thermally induced stresses between these seg
peratures in various parts of the material in process are
ments and the upper part 31 of the divider plate. Thus,
diagrammatically indicated in a very general manner by
in the form of the divider plate illustrated in FIGS. 3 and
isotherms 1-1 and L4 in which the higher numbers
4 the individual sevments depend from the upper part 31
indicate higher temperatures. It will therefore be seen
in two substantially horizontally extending and vertically
that the temperature differential between the upper and 55 aligned rows. The segments 33A are attached by a hinge
lower edges of the plates 20 is quite large, and such
connection to the upper part of the divider plate while the
severe temperature conditions have resulted in short life
segments 385 in the lower row are attached by a hinge
of furnace divider plates. Thus, the large temperature
connection to the lower ends of the segments 38A. Thus,
differentials existing between the upper and lower parts of
the lower edge of the upper part 31 of the divider plate is
each divider plate cause these parts to expand different 60 formed with a number of hinge knuckles 39, and each of
amounts and develop internal stresses within the divider
the segments 38A includes an eyelet 41 interposed between
plates, which stresses are directly proportional to the
a corresponding pair of hinge knuckles 39. A pin 42,
temperature differential existing therein.
which is preferably a cast member of heat-resistant alloy
In accordance with the present invention a divider plate
rather than a forged member, is suitably retained in axial
includesa lower portion having a segmented construction 65 position Within the hinged knuckles 39 as vby ‘being welded
in which individual segments are separated from one an
other and are permitted relative movement therebetween.
at W to a hinge knuckle 39. Eyelets 43 are formed on
the lower ends of the link members 38A and ?t between
hinge knuckles 44 formed on each of the segments 3813.
As will become more apparent from the description to
follow this segmented construction minimizes the trans
A pin 46, which is also preferably cast like the pin 42,
fer of thermally induced stresses, ‘both between the in 70 completes the hinge connection between the link members
dividual segments and the upper part of the divider plate.
38A and 38B and is retained in axial position as by
One form of a divider plate thus constructed in ac
welds W1.
cordance with the present invention is illustrated in FIGS.
In the form of the divider plate illustrated in FIGS.
3 and 4 and is designated generally by the reference nu
3 and 4, each of the segments 38A and 33B is slightly
meral 20A. The divider plate 20A includes an upper 75 spaced from an adjacent segment, and the eyelets 41 and
aoeaeez
5
5
43 are permitted some axial movement with respect to
the respective hinge knuckles 39 and 44 so that thermal
expansion without binding is permitted for all tempera
ture conditions that may occur in the course of operation
of the furnace.
In operation the upper part 31 of the divider plate 29A
functions as a blade member for slicing through and di
viding the downwardly moving material, while the articu
lated and segmented lower portion of the divider plate
ZhA forms a downwardly extending continuation of the
upper part of the divider plate and is effective to maintain
the divided material in a loose, unpacked condition.
The bene?ts obtained from the segmented construction
are at least three-fold. As noted hereinabove, the transfer
of thermally induced stresses from any one individual seg
ment to any other part of the divider plate is effectively
minimized. Thus, for this reason alone the divider plate
20A is capable of a great deal of thermal abuse since free
relative thermal expansion and contraction of the upper
and lower parts of the divider plate without cracking
therebetween is permitted.
Additionally, the divider plate 20A can effectively per
articulation of the individual segments is thereby en
hanced.
A third form of a divider plate constructed in accord
ance with the present invention is illustrated in FIGS.
7-14 and is designated generally by the numeral 51. In
this instance the upper part of the divider plate is adapted
to have cooling ?uid circulated therethrough. Thus, the
upper part of the divider plate includes peripheral, gen
erally tubular-shaped conduit structure which de?nes a
substantially triangular-shaped upper part, as illustrated in
the side elevation view of FIG. 10. The tubular-shaped
conduit structure includes avertically disposed leg 53
integrally joined with a hanger member 54 and a base
?ange 56. The leg 53 joins with a generally horizontally
extending leg 57, which in turn merges into leg 58 at the
forwardmost end of the divider plate 51 to define a hollow
nose portion in that area of the plate. The leg 53 extends
upwardly from the forwardmost end of the divider plate
to the hanger member 54 and affords an upper inclined
surface 59A and 583 effective to slice through and divide
the downwardly moving material in process in the same '
manner as the corresponding surfaces of the other forms
form its function even though a part thereof should be
of the divider plate of the present invention. A web 61
damaged or lost. Thus, in the form of the divider plate
extends between and joins the legs 53, 57, and 5% but
illustrated in FIG. 3, the divider plate 20A can function 25 is formed with openings a2. and 63 in the corners de?ned by
effectively even though up to three segments as 38A or
the merger of the legs 53 and 57 with the leg 58. These
383 should be lost in either or both rows.
openings 62 and 63 alleviate the build-up of stress con
_ The divider plate ZllA also achieves economy in opera
tion inasmuch as the upper part 31 will generally last
longer than the lower portion. Therefore, the divider
plate ZilA can be periodically removed from the furnace
and the upper pm‘t 31A ?tted with replacement segments
as 38A and 3813.
In FIGS. 3A and 4A there is illustrated a modified and
substantially planar upper part of a furnace divider plate
which can be utilized when the temperature conditions
within the furnace are not so severe as to require a cor
rugated con?guration like that illustrated in FIGS. 3 and
4. Except for the absence of ribs and grooves, the divider
plate part illustrated in FIGS. 3A and 4A is like the part
31 incorporated in the divider plate illustrated in FIGS. 3
and 4, and like reference numerals are used to designate
like parts but with the addition of the suffix A in FIGS. 3A
and 4A. Thus, the part 31A has an inclined upper edge
32A and planar side walls 35. Also, the lower edge of
the part 31A is formed with a series of hinge knuckles
39A for the attachment of segments like those illustrated
in FIGS. 3 and 4.
in the form of the divider plate illustrated in FIGS. 3
and 4 the segments 33B are disposed substantially directly
50
beneath corresponding segments 38A.
In some instances it may be desirable to offset the seg
ments in one row with respect to the segments in another
row to minimize the tendency for the material in process
to become packed within the spacings between the seg
ments or link members. This construction is illustrated in 55
FIGS. 5 and 6. With the exception of the above-noted
olfsetting of the individual segments or link members in
one row with respect to those in another row, the divider
plate illustrated in F168. 5 and 6 is generally similar to
that illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4, and like reference nu 60
merals, but with the addition of the prime mark in FIGS.
5 and 6, are used to designate like parts. Thus, in the
construction illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6 the lower row
comprises alternate segments 38C and 38D. Each seg
ment 38C is approximately half again as wide as a related 65
segment 38A’ in the upper row and is formed with a pair
of hinge knuckles 43 which receive an eyelet 43’ there
between. Each segment 381) is approximately the same
width as a segment 38A’ and includes an eyelet 49 which
fits between a pair of eyelets 43' and which is aligned 70
with the spacing between the respective segments 38A’.
Thus, the spacings ‘between the segments 38C and 38D
are offset from the corresponding spacings between the
segments 38A’ to minimize the tendency of the material
in process to become wedged and packed therein, and
centrations in these areas. if desired, the web 61 can
be formed with a similar opening in the corner defined
by the juncture of the legs 53 and 57. This part of the
divider plate is preferably formed by casting, and as il
lustrated in the respective FiGS. 7, 8, and 9 and 14, the
wall thicknesses of all portions of the upper part of the
divider plate, including the web 61, are of substantially
uniform thickness to thereby minimize problems of dif
ferential thermal expansion.
With particular reference now to H65. 9, 11, and 12,
it is seen that the hanger member 54 is formed with two
internal passageways 6i and 62 separated by a Web 63.
The passageway 51 constitutes an inlet passageway which
communicates with a passageway 64» de?ned by the hollow
interior of the leg 53 (see FIG. 8).
The passageway 62.
affords an outlet passageway in communication with
passageway 66 de?ned within the leg 58 (see FiG.ll).
As illustrated in MG. 7, the leg 57 includes a passage
way 67 defined within the hollow interior thereof, and
this passageway 67 communicates with the passageway 64
in the let7 53 and also with the passageway as and leg 58
through a chamber 68 defined within the hollow interior of
the forwardmost part or nose of the divider plate 51 (see
FIG. 14). Thus, air or other cooling fluid can be in
troduced through the passageway 61 and circulated
throughout the tubular frame of the upper part of the
divider plate by means of the conduit structure described
above. Thereafter, the cooling fluid is removed from the
divider plate through the outlet passageway 62. It should
also be noted that the construction illustrated in FIGS.
7-14 enables air lines or the like to be directly attached
to the uppermost end of the hanger member 54 so that
there is little chance for the connections to be damaged
by the material in process.
The hanger member 54 is formed with a rectangular
shaped slotted opening 71 which is adapted to receive a
fastening bolt like the bolts 24B illustrated in FIG. 2.
In the form of the divider plate illustrated in FIG. 10
only a single row of segments or link members is shown
attached to the upper part of the divider plate. However,
additional rows could be added by arrangements similar
to those illustrated in FIGS. 3—5, if so desired. In the
form of the divider plate illustrated in FIG. 10, the lower
edge of the upper part of the divider plate is formed with
a series of hinge knuckles 72, and the individual segments
70 are each formed with an eyelet ‘73 retained in position
between the knuckles 72 by a pin 74. As in the other
illustrated embodiments of the invention, the pin ‘74- is
3,064,962
'2’
preferably cast and is welded in position by weldment
W—2.
8
2. A divider plate asv de?nedin claim 3 in which a
?rst row of link members is directly connected to the
Thus, in accordance with the present invention there
are provided several forms of divider plate constructions
which are especially adapted to absorb a large amount of
lower edge of the blade member in'va hinge-type joint and
thermal abuse in ore-processing furnaces of the general
members in the second row are horizontally o?'set with
respect to the link members in the ?rst row.
kind described and still remain effective to function in the
manner desired. Each form of the divider plate of the
a second row of link members is connected to said one
row in another hinge-type joint, and in which the link
3. A divider plate for an ore-processing furnace of the
present invention incorporates a segmented lower portion
kind in which the material in process is introduced
substantially coplanar with the upper portion and in which 10 through the top of the furnace and moves progressively
the individual segments are spaced from one another to
downwardly therethrough during the processing opera
minimize the transfer of thermally induced stresses there
tion, said divider plate being adapted to project inwardly
between. Additionally, each segment is connected to an
upper part of the divider plate in an articulated connec
tion and may be readily removed therefrom. The upper
part of the divider plate may be formed with a corrugated
con?guration for facilitating diti‘erential thermal expan
sion, or may be adapted to have cooling ?uid circulated
internally therethrough.
Hence while I have illustrated and described the pre
ferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be under
stood that these are capable of variation and modi?ca
into the material in process in the furnace and comprising
an upper portion substantially of solid blade-like con
struction having a lower extremity and a substantially ver
tically straight rear edge extremity and formed with an
upper surface inclined downwardly from the rear edge
for slicing through and dividing the downwardly moving
material, and a lower segmented portion substantially in
the plane of the upper portion including a plurality of in
dividual one-piece plate-like segments separated from one
another in a front-to-rear row and pivotally connected in_
tion, and I therefore do not wish to be limited to the
dividually to the lower extremity of said upper portion
precise details set forth, but desire to avail myself of such
for minimizing the transfer of thermally induced stresses
changes and alterations as fall within the purview of the 25 between the individual segments.
following claims.
4. A divider plate for an ore-processing furnace of the
I claim:
kind in which the material in process is introduced
1. A divider plate for an ore-processing furnace of the
through the top of the furnace and moves progressively
kind in which the material in process is introduced through
downwardly therethrough during the processing opera
the top of the furnace and moves progressively down
tion, said divider plate comprising an upper member sub
wardly therethrough during the processing operation, said
stantially of solid blade-like construction presenting a
divider plate being adapted to project inwardly from
relatively narrow pro?le in plan view when oriented in
a side wall of the furnace into the material in process
in the furnace and comprising an upper blade member
an operative position in the furnace and having a lower
extremity and a substantially vertically straight rear edge
having a generally right triangular con?guration in side 35 extremity and formed with an upper surface inclined
elevation when oriented in an operative position in the
downwardly from the rear edge for slicing through and
furnace, which con?guration is de?ned by a substantially
dividing the downwardly moving material, a lower seg
vertically extending rear edge adapted to seat against the
mented portion which includes a plurality of individual
side wall of the furnace, an inclined upper edge inclined
plate-like link members depending from and substantially
forwardly and downwardly from the rear edge and eifec
in the plane of the upper member and arranged substan
tive to slice through and divide the downwardly moving
tially in a front-to-rear row, and means affording articu
material, and a substantially horizontally extending lower
lated connections between said link members and the
edge, said divider plate comprising also a lower segment
lower extremity of said upper member for minimizing
ed portion which includes a plurality of individual plate
the transfer of thermally induced stresses between the in
45
like link members arranged in horizontally extending and
dividual link members and between the link members and
vertically aligned rows and depending from the lower edge
the upper member.
of the blade member substantially in a front-to-rear row
and substantially in the plane of the blade member, and
means affording articulated connections between said link
members and said blade member for minimizing the trans
fer of thermally induced stresses between the individual
link members and between the link members and the blade
member.
References Cited in the file of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
2,710,747
2,824,730‘
Shea ________________ __ June 14, 1955
Boron _______________ __ Feb. 25, 1958
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