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Патент USA US3069014

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Dec. 18, 1962
F. E. GALVIN ETAL
3,069,005
REUSABLE SHIELDED CONTAINER
Filed May 10, 1960
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
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FIG.I
INVENTORS
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FRANCIS E. GALVIN
GERALD J. ROFFMAN
1/.A’.Kathi‘, ad?ww
ATTORNEYS:
Dec. 18, 1962
7
LE. GALVIN ETAL
3,069,005
REUSABLE SHIELDED CONTAINER
Filed May 10, 1960
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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INVENTORS
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FRANCIS E. GALVIN
Y GERALD J. ROFFMAN
41274, adzzwoza, cz-J. Q4,» Y‘
ATTORNEYS!
J. M
. vUnited States Patent
3,069,005
"ice
Patented Dec. 18, 1962
1
2
two magnets each of which has a ?eld strength of 6000
,
3,069,005
gausses.
REUSABLE SHIELDED CONTAINER
'
Francis E. Galvin and Gerald J. Rolfman, Philadelphia,
Pa., assignors to the United States of America as repre
sented by the Secretary of the Army
.
'
In order to contain or isolate the stray magnetic ?elds
of these magnets, the interior shield 16 is made of low
carbon steel having a thickness of .035 inch and con
forming to F5 1009 temper 5 of Speci?cation QQ-S-00640}.
Filed May 10, 1960, Ser. No. 28,174
6 Claims. (Cl. 206-46)
It is a cylindrical container, seam constructed, to preclude
welding or riveting. This type of container permits a con
stant ?ux ?ow of extraneous magnetic ?elds around the
The invention described herein may be manufactured 10 circumference of the shield. Heretofore the shielding ma
and used by or for the Government for governmental
terial has been applied in layers around the inner most
purposes without the payment to us of any royalty
box unit. The present shield has the advantage that it is
thereon.
adaptable to normal production practices and can be
This invention relates to a container for transporting
manufactured at relatively small cost. It is 2.01 inches in
an electron discharge tube having an exterior or stray
diameter, has an inside height of 12 inches, and can be
magnetic held. its purpose is to provide an improved
used repetitively thus eliminating re-packaging operations.
container which con?nes the extraneous magnetic ?elds
To prevent corrosion, the steel is prime coated and ?n
to the immediate lvicinity of the tube and protects the
ished with one coat of olive drab enamel.
>
tube against injury or deterioration during its transporta
Consideration has to be given to the spacing between
tion. The shielding procedure may be applicable to 20 the tube 24 and the shield 16. This is necessary to pre
other magnetron tubes of similar con?guration and field ' clu-de demagnetization of the tube. To maintain the re—
(Granted under Title 35, US. Code (1952), see. 266) ‘
strength.
'
quired spacing between the tube and .shield, the tube is
It is known that electron discharge ‘devices, such as
suspended in the four interchangeable molds 20, 21, 22
large magnetrons, are surrounded by stray magnetic ?elds.
and 23 of rubberized curled hair conforming to Speci?ca,l
In the air transportation of such devices it is therefore 2.5 tion MIL-07769. This material consists of 50 percent
necessary that these ?elds be isolated from the magnetic ' new stock cattle-tail and winterhog hair and 50 percent
compass or sensing device of the aircraft. The present
repicked hair. The binding elastomer is neoprene, suit,
invention provides a proven container which accomplishes
able ‘for low temperature requirements of --65° F. Molds
this result, is reusable, is suitable for all types of trans
20 to 23 are reinforced with imbedded celotex ‘pads in
portation, is water-vaporproof, possesses excellent shock
the load bearing area to provide adequate weight distribu
attenuation, and is economical to manufacture. As here
' tion of the tube. The cushion molds 20 to 23 are sprayed
inafter explained, this improved container includes, among
with two applications of binding elastomer to minimize
other things, a low carbon steeel casing and a low carbon
a dusting reaction. The ?nished mold as an approximate
steel interior shield which is suitably spaced from the
weight of 3.25‘ pounds and serves the.dual purposeof
casing and encloses a resilient material in which the tube 35 maintaining proper spacing and isolating the. tube against
is mounted.
' shock.
The invention Willbe better understood from the 1fol~
During the design and development of the shielded
lowing description when considered in connection with
package, it was found that an air void between the inte
the accompanying drawings and its scope is indicated by
rior shield 16 and the casing 10 is essential‘ in ascertain
the appended claims.
40 ing the thickness of the shield.’ Tests showed that, for the
FIG. 1 is a partial sectional view indicating the rela
magnetron tube, type 5795, an average air void of one
tion between the various parts of the magnetically shielded
inch satis?es the need of ‘a single interior shield provided
container assembly,
the casing 10 consisted of 16 gauge low carbon steel.
FIG. 2 illustrates the tube as resting upon two of the
The air void is accomplished by the use of the two im
four non-magnetic molds in which it is supported during
pact cushion disks 18 and 19‘ and the impact cushion ring
its transportation,
17 all of which are secured to the outer casing 10 with
FIG. 3 shows how the tube is supported in the interior
magnetic shield,
an adhesive.
.
The casing 10 is a reusable drum made of low carbon
FIG. 4 shows the outside of the interior shield,
steel conforming to F8 1009, PS 1022, temper number 3,
FIG. 5 shows the casing lid with the spacing or isolat 50 l6 gage of Speci?cation QQ-S-00640. It is provided with
ing disk attached,
handles 12 and with a necked in bottom with reinforced
FIG. 5A is a similar showing of the casing body,
FIG. 6 shows the container with the top coverings of
the tube removed,
chine. This bottom construction permits stacking and
su?’iciently reinforced to preclude the use of rolling hoops.
The lid 11 is sealed to the wall 13 by a seal ring 25.
FIG. 7 differs from FIG. 6 in that the two upper molds 55
are positioned on the tube, and
.
FIG. ‘8 differs from FIG. 7 in that the cover of the in~
terior shield is in place.
As indicated by FIG. 1, the container of the present
Constructed as described above, the shielded container
assembly was subjected to an extraneous magnetic ?eld
test, a rough handling test, ‘an altitude test, and an im
mersion test.
.
The average stray or extraneous magnetic ?eld at a
invention includes a casing 10 which has a lid 11 and.han-' 60 distance of seven feet from the magnetron was found to
dles 12. Located within the casing 10~is an interior shield
be 110 milligausses with no shielding, 13 milligausses with
16 consisting of a wall 13, a bottom 14 and a top 15. The
the magnetron mounted within the inner shield, and 2
‘ interior shield 16 is spaced from the casing 10 by an im
milligausses with the shielded container completely as
pact cushion ring 17 and impact cushion disks 18 and 119.
sembled. These results clearly indicate the effectiveness
Mounted within the interior shield 16 are four molds 20, 65 of the shielded container.
21, 22 and 23 in which the magnetron 24 ‘rests.
In the rough handling test, the shielded container as
The container is required to restrict the maximum ?eld
sembly with a simulated load was dropped cornerwise
strength of the packaged tube to a value not greater than
from a height of 30 inches onto a steel plate, this test
0.00525 gauss at a distance of seven feet ‘from the meas
being repeated on each quarter of the drum. The instru
uring instrument. The illustrated tube 24 is a ‘magnetron 70 ment used for recording shock was an Imp-act-O-Graph,
tube type 5795, one magawatt power output, S~band.
Model HXS which indicated a maximum reading of 14 G.
This is a sensitive and complex electron tube including
In the ‘altitude test, the shielded container assembly was
3,069,005
3
4
placed in an altitude chamber at ambient temperature and
contact therewith while at the same time causing said
molds to be in frictional contact with said inner contour
of said shield.
the temperature was reduced to —65° F. The pressure of
the chamber was then reduced gradually to simulate an
altitude climb of 500 feet per minute. The maximum
altitude reached was 40,000 ‘feet.
Thereafter the pres
sure was increased gradually at a rate of about 500‘ feet
per minute to lower the altitude to that of sea level. The
env
4. A shipping container assembly according to claim 1
wherein the non-magnetic means maintaining the shield
in spaced relationship with the casing consists of an impact
cushion ring af?xed to the interior of said casing and im
pact cushion disks affixed to the top and ‘bottom of said
‘container remained tight and there was no apparent dis
tortion during the entire test.
casing.
The immersion test was the last to be made. It con 10
5. A shipping container assembly according to claim 1
sisted of immersing the container assembly in water so
wherein said shield has a thickness of 0.035 inch and is
that the level of the water was one inch above the top
of the container. After an immersion of 15 minutes,
the container was opened and no evidence of leakage or
condensation Within the container was found.
seam constructed to permit a continuous ?ow of stray
‘?ux ‘around its circumference, and wherein said casing is
spaced one inch from said shield and consists of 16 gauge
15 low carbon steel.
From these tests, it is apparent that the shielded con
tainer assembly is capable of (l) reducing the stray mag
netic ?elds to a point where the shielded container meets
6. A shipping container assembly according to claim 5
further characterized by said non-magnetic means being in
the form of rubberized curled hair, said non-magnetic
means for positioning the device being in the form of
the stringent requirements of Speci?cations T.0.00-85A
16-1 and MIL-S4473 and (2) withstanding rough usage 20 four semicircular molds preformed to have a radial outer
to an extent which renders it reusable.
We claim:
1. A magnetically shielded shipping container assembly
for transporting a device having stray magnetic ?elds ca
surface matching an inner contour of said shield, a sub
stantially radial inner contour to receive said device, a
substantially ?at transverse surface and a transverse sur
face provided with an indentation to cooperate with said
pable of affecting instruments in close proximity thereto 25 substantially radial inner contour to receive said device,
including: a single cylindrical interior shield of low car
and said molds assembled so that the device is enclosed
bon steel, resilient non-magnetic means for positioning
by said molds and held in frictional contact therewith
said device within said shield and in spaced relationship
while at the same time causing said molds to be in fric
therewith, a single closed exterior casing of low carbon
tional contact with said inner contour of said shield, and
steel surrounding said shield, and resilient non-magnetic 30 by said non-magnetic means maintaining the shield in
means maintaining said single shield in spaced relationship
spaced relationship with the casing consisting of an impact
with said casing.
cushion ring af?xed to the interior of said casing and im
2. A shipping container assembly according to claim 1
pact cushion disks a?ixed to the top and bottom of said
wherein said non-magnetic means are in the form of rub
casing, whereby stray magnetic ?elds emitted from said
berized curled hair.
35 device having a ?eld strength of 12,000‘ gausses will be
3. A shipping container assembly according to claim 1
reduced to 2 milligausses at a distance of 7 feet from
wherein the non-magnetic means for positioning the de
said shipping container.
vice is in the form of four semicircular molds preformed
to have a radial outer surface matching an inner contour
of said shield, a substantially radial inner contour to re 40
ceive said device, a substantially flat transverse surface
and a transverse surface provided with an indentation
to cooperate with said substantially radial inner contour
to receive said device, and said molds assembled so that
the device is enclosed by said molds and held in frictional
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
2,388,848
2,897,959
Howe ______________ _... Nov. 13, 1945
Gretz ________________ __ Aug. 4, 1959
2,954,140
Sutherland et a1. _____ _._ Sept. 27, 1960
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