close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US3069084

код для вставки
Dec. 18, 1962 ‘
M. E. SALLACH
3,069,075
PUNCHING MACHINES
Filed June 14, 1961
15 Sheets-Sheet 1
51:3
NUMBER
0 123
CODE
9
DESIGNATION‘:4.
56789
o
O
mmvrox.
MAX E. SALLACH
2
Hist-74d 5‘.
Dec. 18, 1962
M. E. SALLACH
3,069,075
PUNCHING MACHINES
Filed June 14, 1961
l5 Sheets-Sheet 2
Dec. 18, 1962
M. E. SALLACH
3,069,075
PUNCHING MACHINES
Filed June 14, 1961
FROM
PAR‘TY
5
+
15 Sheets-Sheet 4
STORAGE
9a
MATRsX
75
/5// RING COUNTER 75 _/34I
\____ /
30.7I
302
325
.____ 33/
3323/ 32
324
"'
357
_
=~
32/
335'
To PUNCH
CHECK
INVENTOR.
"358* MAX E. 'SALLACH
536
wake
Bidi
Dec. 18, 1962
M. E. SALLACH
3,069,075
PUNCHING MACHINES
Filed June 14, 1961
l5 Sheets-Sheet 7
0.?
/
5
Nm‘.h/
ing
F.0OP
O
kg.
2.-
_
@
@
om». Ev
Km»
DOQMJZEPmNOImwU Qva5wo6mxwv
Edi .
mEMuowFmdluv.
Gig
INVENTOR.
E. SALLACH
m W; h
TILE’
5 .
Dec. 18, 1962
M. E. SALLACH
3,069,075 -
ruucnmc MACHINES
15 Sheets-Sheet 9
Filed June 14, 1961
UZ§OMNE0..wE\wtv
Dec. 18, - 1962
M. E. SALLACH
3,069,075
PUNCHING MACHINES
Filed June 14. 1961
15 Sheets~$heet 1O
i
w 2 01 ul
$92.
INVENTOR.
MAX E. SALLACH
P3511755
Dec. 18, 1962
M. E. sALLAcH
3,069,075
,PUNCHING MACHINES
Filed June 14, 1961
15 Sheets-Sheet 12
~13
2
P6
47
5g
TO ERROR
"is
‘go '1
‘v
|2%
4
GQMPARA'TOR E2201
cmcuw 40a
INVENTOR.
MAX E. SALLACH
BEL/5
Dec. 18, 1962
M. E. SALLACH
3,069,075
PUNCHING MACHINES
Filed Julie 14,, 1961'
0?M0 0 .
15 Sheets-Sheet 15
>KW2E80N
N8
INVENTOR.
MAX E. SALLACH
~ United States Patent O?ice
1
2
3,069,075
'
Max E. Sallach, Chesterland, Ohio, assignor to Addresse
-
PUNCHING MACHINES
graph-Multigraph Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio, a cor
poration of Delaware
3,069,075
Patented Dec. 18, 1962
.
Filed June 14, 1961, Ser. No. 120,127
13 Claims. (Cl. 234-34)
systems, the volume of data is quite substantial, to say the‘
least, so that the speed at which the reproducing punch
operates is a critical factor in determining the economic
utility of the entire credit system.
It is an object of the present invention, therefore, to
provide a new and improved control system for a punch
ing apparatus which is effective to punch data in record
cards, in accordance with a given data code and in re
This invention relates to a new and improved control
sponse to information which is pre-printed on the cards in
system for a data-controlled recordpunch, and more par 10 a substantially di?erent code. Speci?cally, the printed
ticularly to a new and improved translation and control
data code comprises a two-element parity code, although
system for controlling the operation of a punching appa
ratus to punch record cards, in accordance with a given
code, with information corresponding to and representa
other parity codes could be used.
A further object of the invention is to assure accurate
and effective operation of a reproducing record card
tive of a code data that is pre-printed on the record cards 15 punch, actuated in accordance with code data that is pre
in accordance with a parity code. This application is a
printed on the cards being punched, despite the presence
continuation-in-part of application Serial No. 30,601, ?led
May 20, 1960, now abandoned.
of extraneous marks on the cards.
Another object of the invention is to provide a con
In credit systems, and in similar record keeping sys
tinuous and effective check of the data being punched in a
tems, ,it is frequently desirable to record the initial data 20 record cards, to make sure that all of the requisite data
as rapidly as possible and in a form which permits sub
is punched and that no extraneous data is punched in the
sequent conversion to a data code, or “machine language”
cards.
‘
that can be used by accounting machines, computers, and
An additional object of the invention is to provide a
like business machines. In one business system of this
new and improved control system for a reproducing punch
kind, which is speci?cally intended to handle credit in 25 utilized to punch accounting and similar data in record
' formation, a record card is imprinted with the‘ requisite
cards in accordance with code data pre-printed on the
data at the time of the credit transaction. The required
cards and to render that control system substantially
information, which may include the serial number of the
independent of any requirement for precise positioning
person receiving credit, the serial number of a branch
of the data in a reference area on each record card. That
business establishment, the amount of the transaction, 30 is, it is an object of the invention'to permit at least some
and other pertinent data, is printed on a record card in
variation in the positioning and alignment of the pre
coded form; it may also be printed in visually readable
printed code data on the record cards without adversely
form at the same time. Preferably, the code employed is
aifecting operation of the punch control system.
a relatively simple one and occupies a minimum of space,
An additional object of the invention is to provide a
since at least some parts of the code data may necessarily 35 new and improved control system for a reproducing punch
be applied to a relatively small embossed printing device
constructed to operate in accordance with a given code
used as a credit card. Subsequently, it is necessary to
or “machine language” Without requiring that the control
convert the printed code data into a form which may be
system itself be actuated by the same data code.
used with conventional accounting machines or like ap
A particular object of the invention is to provide for
paratus. In the speci?c example described hereinafter, 40 high speed operation of a control system for a card punch
the initial code data is ultimately converted to a con
actuated by pre-printed code data on the record cards
ventional decimal code of the kind used in many account
being punched without entailing any sacri?ce in accuracy
ing machines, although other forms of machine-usable
of operation and without requiring undue precision or the
code may also be employed. The present invention is
absence of extraneous markings in the preparation of the
directed to a translation and control system for the con 45 record cards themselevs.
trol of a reproducing punch which is effective to punch
the pre-printed data in the record cards for subsequent
use by accounting machines.
In a credit system, particularly where a large number
.
Another object of the invention is to provide a direct
and accurate comparison of the setting of individual punch
elements, in a control system for a card punch, with the
original data supplied to the set-up apparatus that actu
of branch o?ices or establishments are involved, as in the 50 ates the punch.
_
case of ?lling stations, there are several requirements
An additional object of the invention is to permit rapid
which must be met in a control system of the kind with
and effective comparison of the total of all code data
which the present invention is concerned. It goes without
from a series of detail cards, in a card punch, with the
saying that the control of the reproducing punch must be
corresponding data from a control or summary card, and
quite accurate in order to preserve the basic integrity of 55 to actuate the card punch to afford a positive indication
the accounting information. This accuracy must also be
of error if the comparison shows any difference.
maintained in situations where the pre-printed record
A speci?c object of the invention is to provide a new
cards may be accumulated over a period of time and
and improved translation and control system, for a high
may become smeared, marked, or otherwise defaced,
speed card punch, that inherently ‘and e?ectively protects
Furthermore, the control system must maintain substan 60 the integrity of the punched data with respect to additions
tial accuracy even when the pre-printed data marks are
to or omissions from the imput data supplied thereto.
displaced slightly from their‘normal reference positions
Thus, the control system of the present invention is
on the record cards. Displacement of the data may be
applied to a punching apparatus, operable in accordance
occasioned by variations in alignment of the'record cards
with a given machine code, which is utilized to punch
in the printing machines employed to print the code data 65 data in record cards in accordance with a given data
on the cards. The individual operators using these data
code that is different from the machine code, the punched
printing machines may, in at least some instances, affect
data corresponding to and being representative of data
their operation by the manner in which they operate the
which are pre-printed on the cards in accordance with a
machines. On the other hand, the requirement for ac
parity code. A two-element parity code is preferred, but
curacy of operation under adverse conditions is no more 70 others can be used. In most instances, the parity code
important than the requirement that the control system
is substantially different from both the punched data code
be susceptible of high speed operation. In many credit
and the machine code. A control system constructed in
3,069,075
3
4
accordance with the invention comprises means for feed
ing the pre-printed record cards in sequence through a
scanning station to a punching station. The scanning
station includes photoelectric sensing means which are
FIG. 14 illustrates a translation, control, and accumu
lator circuit employed in the system of FIG. 8;
FIG. 15 is a logic diagram for an error detection cir~
cuit incorporated in the system of FIG. 8;
employed to scan the pre-printed code data on each of
FIG. 16 illustrates a storage circuit employed to verify
the cards and to develop parity code signals representa
tive of that data. The parity-code signals are applied
the setting of punch actuation elements under control of
the system of FIG. 8;
FIG. 17 is a logic diagram showing several auxiliary
to a parity checking circuit which develops a control
control circuits incorporated in the system of FIG. 8;
signal indicative of the presence of extraneous marks or
of the absence of any of the required code marks on each 1O and
of the cards. The parity-code signals are also applied to
FIGS. 18 and 19 are detailed schematic diagrams of
typical operating circuits that may be used in the system
a code translator or convertor which is coupled to the
of FIGS. 8—17.
photo-electric scanning means; this code translator is
FIG. 1 illustrates a punch apparatus or mechanism
employed to translate the parity-code signals into ma
10 that is actuated under the control of a translation and
chine-code signals. The code translator, in turn, is
control system according to the present invention. The
coupled to a storage matrix which stores the machine
code signals. In addition, the control system includes
actuation means, coupled to the storage matrix, which
machine 10 is used ‘to punch data in record cards, in
accordance with a conventional data code (in this in
are effective to actuate the punching apparatus in ac
stance a decimal code) and in response to code data
cordance with the stored machine code signals upon ad 20 previously printed upon the cards. The reproducing
punch 10 comprises a ?rst storage magazine 11 within
vancement of each record card from the scanning station
which a quantity of pre~printed record cards are stored.
to the punching station. The parity checking circuit, on
From the storage magazine 11, the cards are individually
the other hand, may be employed to interrupt operation
of the machine, to at least some extent, or to warn the
fed to a conveyor or transfer mechanism generally indi
machine operator when a discrepancy is detected with 25 cated by reference numeral 12. The transfer mechanism
12 feeds the cards sequentially through a scanning sta
respect to the required pattern of parity code marks.
tion 13 to a punching station 14. The conveyor 12 also
Other and futher objects of the present invention will
feeds the punched cards from the punching station 14
be apparent from the following description and claims
outwardly of the machine to a receiving hopper 15.
and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings which,
The mechanical aspects of the reproducing punch 10
by way of illustration, show preferred embodiments of 30
are essentially similar to the punching machine described
the present invention and the principles thereof and what
is now considered to be the best mode for applying these
principles. Other embodiments of the invention embody
and claimed in Patent No. 2,710,406 to Walter T.
Gollwitzer issued June 7, 1955. Accordingly, it is un
necessary to afford a detailed description or illustration
ing the same or equivalent principles may be made as
desired by those skilled in the art without departing from 35 of the mechanical operating elements of the punch.
the present invention and the purview of the appended
claims.
In the drawings:
Brie?y, pre-printed record cards are fed sequentially from
the magazine 11 to the conveyor 12. Each record card,
when it reaches the conveyor, is fed through the scan
ning station 13. In the scanning station, the pre-printed
FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a punching apparatus
in which a control system constructed according to the 40 code markings on the card are sensed photoelectrically,
as described in detail hereinafter. The code signals de
present invention may be incorporated;
veloped ‘by the sensing apparatus at the station 13 are
FIG. 2 illustrates a record card containing pre-printed
translated from the parity code used on the record cards
code data utilized by the control systems of the present
into code signals corresponding to the machine code
invention, and also shows the same data in punched deci
normally used to control the reproducing punch 10. The
mal-code form in the record card;
FIG. 3 is an illustrative diagram utilized to explain the 45 code signals developed by the sensing apparatus at the
machine code or “language” for the punching apparatus
station 13 are translated from the party code used on the
of FIG. 1;
record cards into code signals corresponding to- the ma
chine code normally used to control the reproducing
FIG. 4 is a block diagram of a translation and control
system constructed in accordance with one embodiment
punch 10. The code signals are stored, in a storage
50 matrix described hereinafter, until the record card reaches
of ‘the present invention;
FIG. 5 is a detail schematc diagram of a punch check
the punching station 14. When the record card is in the
circuit employed in the system shown in FIG. 4;
FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram showing, in detail, a
member of different circuits employed in the system of
desired position in the punching station 14, the stored
data are employed to actuate the punch mechanism,
which punches the record card in accordance with the
FIG. 4, including the sensing, ampli?cation, code trans 55 same data that it carries in printed form. Thereafter,
the card is removed from the punching station and de
lation, and parity checking circuits;
posited in the hopper 15.
FIG. 7 is a detail schematic diagram showing several
In some instances it may be necessary or desirable to
stages of the data storage matrix and associated counter
effect an auxiliary printing operation in the machine It).
for the embodiment of FIG. 4;
FIG. 8 is a block diagram of a translation and control 60 For this purpose, a printing station 16 may be incorpo
rated in the reproducing punch 10, preferably intermediate
system constructed in accordance with a preferred em
the punching station 14 and the receiving hopper 15.
bodiment of the present invention;
Inasmuch as a suitable printing apparatus is described in
FIGS. 9A through 9] are explanatory ?gures used to
complete detail in the aforementioned Gollwitzer patent,
illustrate the signi?cance of symbolic circuit element rep
65 and since the control system of the present invention is
resentations used in succeeding drawings;
not concerned with the printing operation, no further
FIG. 10 is a logic circuit diagram showing the data
description of the printing station 16 is provided herein.
sensing devices and certain code translation and error
FIG. 2 illustrates a record card 21 which is pre-printed
detection apparatus of the system of FIG. 8;
with accounting or other data in accordance with a parity
70 code, in this instance a two-o'f-?ve code. The card 21
tection and control devices of the system of FIG. 8;
represents a preferred form of card employed in the
FIG. 12 illustrates a driver and storage circuit matrix
control system of the present invention. In this regard,
incorporated in the system of FIG. 8;
the actual size and shape of the card 21 are not particu
FIG. 13 is a logic circuit diagram of a ring counter
larly important, nor is the location of the pre~printed code
FIG. 11 is ‘a logic circuit diagram of further error de
used to control the drivermatrix of FIG. 12;
data 22 on the card especially critical.
However, the
3,069,075
5
code markings. employed for the data’ 22 are of some
importance with respect to the operation of the control
system and, accordingly, require description in detail.
The illustrative code data 22 shows the individual mark
ings employed for each of the numbers one through ten.
In each instance, the numerical value is represented by two
code marks, the actual numerical value being set forth
immediately above the corresponding code markings.
6
to the 2-4-6~8~9 machine code required by the reproduc
ing punch and illustrated in FIG. 3. The relative code
values of the input and output circuits of the translator 72
are designated in FIG. 4 for convenience. The output or"
the translator 72 is coupled to a storage matrix 73 which,
in the illustrated arrangement, includes ten storage stages
each having ?ve individual storage levels corresponding
to the ?ve signi?cant elements in the output code of the
The code employed is a parity code; that is, there are no
translator. The storage matrix 73 also includes the driving
code designations which include more than two marks
circuits for the reproducing punch, this portion of the
and there are no code designations which comprise less
control system being described in greater detail herein
than two marks. Starting from bottom to top, the ?ve
after in connection with FIG. 7.
code levels or columns for the code data 22 correspond
The adder circuit 71 is coupled to a parity check circuit
generally to the numerals 1, 2, 4 and 7, the top column
74 which, in turn, is coupled to a ring counter 75. The
being the parity column and being identi?ed by the letter P. 15 ring counter 75 is utilized to control the timing of record
The same designations apply to the alignment of the
ing in the storage sections of the storage matrix 73. In
photocells used to sense the data 22. The alignment of
addition, the ring counter 75 is coupled to a digit count
the photocells at the sensing station is shown at the left
check circuit or punch check circuit 76 which is utilized
hand side of FIG. 2, the photocells being designated by
to make sure that each record card includes all of the
the reference characters 31, 32, 34, 37 and 40 respectively. 20 necessary pre-printed code data, and no excess data, before
The card 21 is also punched with the same information
a punch operation is effected.
as the pre-printed code data 22 in the form of punched
In considering operation of the system illustrated in
data apertures 41. The punched data code, in this in
FIG. 2, it may ?rst be assumed that the ?rst column 24
stance, is a conventional decimal code of the kind used by
of the pre-printed data 22 (FIG. 2) is moved into sensing
a wide variety of accounting machines. It will be recog 25 position relative to the sensing photocells 31, 32, 34, 37
nized that the punched data 41 corresponds exactly to the
and 40. At this position, the photocells sense the presence
pro-printed data 22. In addition, the punch unit 14
(FIG. 1) may include manually settable punch members
of code markings in the ?rst and parity columns; that is,
the photocells 31 and 40 are effective to produce output
for punching additional data in the card, as indicated in
signals indicating the presence of pertinent code markings.
FIG. 2 by the further punched data 42. Furthermore, 30 Since there are no code markings in the other three rows
the reproducing punch 10 may be provided with additional
of the pro-printed data code column 24, similar signals
and independent control means for controlling the auxil
are not generated by the photocells 32, 34 and 37. The
iary punch data 42 if desired.
two signi?cant voltage signals are applied to the voltage
FIG. 3 illustrates the basic machine code or language
adder circuit 71 which supplies to the parity check cir
employed to control operation of the reproducing punch 35 cuit 74 a signal that is representative of the sum of the two
in the aforementioned Gollwitzer patent. This data code,
applied signals. The parity check circuit 74 is included in
which is commonly used in connection with printing de
the system to make sure that two, and only two, marks are
vices employed in addressing machines and the like, is
sensed. If this condition is maintained, the parity check
substantially dilferent from the parity code used for the
circuit applies a pulse signal to the ring counter 75, actu
data 22 (FIG. 2). Consequently, it is not possible to 40 ating the counter to apply a‘conditioning signal to the
?rst column in the storage matrix 73.
control the reproducing apparatus 10 directly from the
sensing of the data 22, and the translation and control
The two signi?cant data code signals are also applied
system of the present invention provides for translation
to the code translator 72, which translates these signals
from the pre-printed code data 22 to the basic machine
into the machine code (FIG. 3). In this instance, signi
code illustrated in FIG. 3. Of course, it would be pos 45 ?cant output signals from the translator would appear
sible to use the code of FIG. 3 for the pre-printed data on
on the output lines designated as lines 2 and 9 in FIG.
the cards, but the control system for the present invention
4, since this is the equivalent to the coded numerical
value “one” that appears in column 24 of the pre-printed
rangement of this kind. Moreover, it would also be pos
code data 22 (FIG. 2). In this manner, by a joint action
sible to construct the reproducing punch 10 for direct 50 of the ring counter 75 and the translator 72, the number
actuation by the parity code shown in FIG. 2, but this
‘7‘gne” is recorded in the ?rst stage of the storage matrix
would prevent the use of conventional coded printing
devices in control of the reproducing punch.
This process is repeated until all of the code data 22
FIG. 4 illustrates, in block diagram form, the basic
are recorded, in translated form, in the storage matrix
affords substantial advantages as compared with an ar
control system of one embodiment of the present inven 55 73.
tion. The photocells 31, 32, 34, 37 and 4d are shown in
FIG. 4 as a part of the control system 48; the order of
alignment of the photocells is slightly di?erent than in
When the recording operation is complete, the ring
counter applies an output signal to the punch check cir
cuit 76 which may lbe utilized to condition the reproduc
ing punch for a punching operation.
Conversely, if
FIG. 2 in order that they may correspond to the circuit
some portion or stage of the recording operation is not
alignment described hereinafter in connection with FIG. 6. 60 completed satisfactorily, and the ring counter does not
The photocell 31 is connected to a pre-ampli?er circuit 51
count out, a punch operation is not eifected. In this
which, in turn, is connected to an ampli?er circuit 61, the
manner the punch check circuit 76 prevents a punching
output of the ampli?er 61 being connected to a pulse
operation except when the control system has determined
voltage adder circuit 71. The photocell 32 is connected
that the desired number of data items, as represented by
in circuit with a pre-ampli?er 52 and an ampli?er 62, the 65 the full number of stages in the matrix 73, have been
ampli?er v62 having its output stage connected to the adder
sensed, translated, and recorded in the storage matrix.
circuit 71. The circuit for the photocell 34 comprises
In some instances the printing machine or other means
a pre-ampli?er 54 and an ampli?er 64, whereas the circuit
utilized to apply the pre-printed code data 22 to one or
for the photocell 37 includes a pre-ampli?er 57 and an
more record cards may fail to operate properly, or some
ampli?er 67. The operating circuit for the parity photo 70 other accident may occur which prevents accurate print
cell 40 is essentially the same and includes a pro-ampli?er
ing of one of the code designations. As a consequence,
60 and an ampli?er 70. The individual operating circuits
it may be that only one input signal is applied to the
for the photocells are carried‘through the adder circuit
adder circuit 71, resulting in a low-amplitude output
71 to a translator 72 which is effective to translate the
signal to the parity check circuit 74. When this happens,
1—2—4-7—P parity code of the pro-printed data (FIG. 2) 75 the parity check circuit 74 does not apply the requisite
3,069,075
8
7
punching machine without being punched.
1&2 in the pre-ampli?er 60 is connected to the DC. sup
ply source E~ through a circuit comprising, in series, a
resistor 113 and the voltage divider 105, 114. The out
put circuit for the pre-ampli?er includes a coupling
capacitor 115 which is connected to the collector of the
transistor 102 and to a potentiometer 116, the other ?xed
terminal of the potentiometer being connected to the
Similarly, in some instances additional code markings,
smudges, or other undesirable markings may be inter
center terminal of a voltage divider comprising a pair
of resistors 117 and 118 connected in series between the
conditioning pulse to the ring counter 75. As a conse~
quence, at the end of a sensing operation, the counter
does not count out completely and a punch operation
cannot be effected. Instead, the machine may be inter
rupted in operation or a warning signal may be actuated
to let the operator know that a card has traversed the
posed in the data code ?eld of the card 21 (FIG. 2). 10 negative D.C. supply E- and ground. The variable tap
119 on the potentiometer 116 constitutes the output ter
If an extraneous marking of this kind is one to which
minal for the pie-ampli?er 60.
the photocells are sensitive, and if the marking is posi
The ampli?er 70 is a three stage ampli?er comprising
tioned in alignment with one of the data columns, it may
three vacuum triodes 121, 122 and 123. The output
be that three or more of the photocells will develop
terminal 119 of the pre-ampli?er is connected to the
signi?cant output signals. In this event, the amplitude
control electrode of the ?rst triode 121. The cathode of
of the output signal from the adder circuit 71 to the
the ?rst stage triode is grounded. The anode is con
parity check circuit 74 is also modi?ed and again repre
nected to a suitable source of positive-polarity unidirec
sents an erroneous operation. The parity check circuit
tional operating voltage 13+ through a circuit comprising,
74, in this instance, again fails to apply the necessary
actuating signal to the ring counter 7 and thus again 20 in series, a resistor 124 and a resistor 125. The resistor
125 is bypassed to ground by a capacitor 126.
prevents an erroneous punching operation.
The output circuit for the ?rst stage triode 121 com
FIG. 6 illustrates, in substantial detail, a number of
prises a coupling capacitor 127 which is connected in
the speci?c operating circuits incorporated in a preferred
series with a resistor 128 between the anode of the triode
embodiment of the control system 48 shown in block
form in FIG. 4. More speci?cally, the circuit shown in 25 121 and the control electrode of the second stage triode
122. The control electrode of the triode 122 is also re
FIG. 6 includes the complete construction of the pre
turned to ground through a circuit comprising, in series, a
ampli?er 60 associated with the parity photocell 40, the
diode 129 and a single-pole, single-throw switch 131. A
ampli?er 70, the adder circuit 71, the code translator 72,
positive bias is applied to the control electrode of the
and the parity check circuit 74. In this ?gure, the am
pli?ers 61, 62, 64 and 67 are also shown; however, since 30 second stage in the ampli?er 7t} by a voltage divider cir
cuit comprising two resistors 132 and 133 connected in
these circuits are essentially similar to the ampli?er 70,
they are not illustrated in detail.
For the same reason,
series with each other between the B+ supply and ground,
the common terminal of the two resistors being connected
it is deemed unnecessary to repeat the pre-ampli?er and
to the control electrode of the tube 122. The cathode of
photocell circuits in FIG. 6.
In the speci?c circuit arrangement illustrated in FIG. 35 the second stage triode is grounded. The anode of this
6, the photocell 40 is shown as a phototransistor. It
should be understood, however, that this photocell may
stage is connected to the B+ supply through a load resis
tor 134. The output circuit to the third stage comprises a
comprise a solid state photo-sensitive diode or any other
coupling capacitor 135 which is connected between the
suitable photoelectric sensing device if desired. Further
anode of the triode 122 and the control electrode of the
output stage 123. The control electrode of the third stage
triode 123 is also returned to a negative supply voltage,
herein designated as F—-, through an input resistor 136.
The anode of the third stage triode 123 in the ampli?er
70 is connected to the B+ supply through a resistor 137.
more, other forms of radiation-sensitive pick-up may be
employed, depending upon the nature of the code mark
ings applied to the record cards. However, photoelec
tric pick-ups are preferred and particularly solid state
devices because these are quite small in size, permitting
condensation of the code data 22 (see FIG. 2) into a
minimum size without adversely affecting the accuracy
and response speed of the system.
The pre-ampli?er 60, as shown in FIG. 6, may com
prise two stages including a ?rst transistor 101 and a
second transistor 102. The base electrode of the ?rst
stage transistor 101 is connected to the collector elec
trode of the photocell 40, the emitter of the photocell be
ing grounded. A suitable bias voltage is applied to the
base electrode of the transistor 101, the biasing circuit
This stage of the ampli?er comprises a cathode follower.
Thus, the output circuit comprises a pair of resistors 138
and 139 which are connected in series with each other
between the cathode and ground, the output terminal be
ing the common terminal of these two resistors as indicat
ed by reference numeral 140. The output terminal 140
of the ampli?er 70 is connected through a resistor 142 to
the ?rst stage of the parity check circuit 74, which is
described in detail hereinafter. Similarly, the output
terminals of the ampli?ers 61, 62, 64 and 67 are connected
comprising a resistor 103 connected from the base elec 55 through corresponding resistors 143, 144, 145 and 146,
respectively, to the parity check circuit. Moreover, the
negative D.C. supply. In this instance, the DC supply
output terminals of these ampli?ers are individually re
comprises a voltage divider including two resistors 105
turned to ground through the resistors 147, 148, 149 and
and 114 connected in series with each other between
150. Thus, the resistors 142-146 comprise a voltage
ground and a suitable source of uni-directional operat 60 adder for the output signals from the ampli?ers 61, 62,
ing potential herein designated as E—.
64, 67 and 70 and thus constitute the adder circuit 71
The collector electrode of the transistor 101 is con
(see FIG. 4).
nected to the DC. supply source B— through the volt
The input stage of the parity check circuit 74 com
age divider 165, 114. The emitter electrode in the ?rst
prises a triode 151, the control electrode of this triode
stage is returned to ground through a resistor 106 and is 65 being connected to each of the resistors 142—146 of the
also coupled to the base electrode of the second transistor
voltage adder circuit. The anode of the input triode 151
102 through a coupling capacitor 107. The base elec
in the parity check circuit is connected to the 13+ supply
trode in the second stage of the pre-ampli?er ‘is returned
through a resistor 152. The cathode is returned to ground
to ground through an input resistor 108. The emitter
through a resistor 153. Both the anode and cathode cir
electrode of the transistor 102 is returned to ground 70 cuits of the triode 151 are utilized as output circuits, so
through a biasing circuit comprising a pair of resistors
that the triode functions both as a conventional ampli?er
109 and 111 which are connected in series with each
and as a cathode follower.
The cathode follower output circuit for the triode 151
other, the resistor 111 being by-passed by a capacitor
comprises a coupling capacitor 154 which is connected to
112.
The collector electrode of the second-stage transistor 75 the cathode of the tube, the coupling capacitor being con
trode to ground and a second resistor 104 connected to a
9
9,069,075
nected‘ through a resistor 155 to the movable tap on a
potentiometer 156. One ?xed terminal on the potentiom
eter is connected to the negative supply voltage E-,
whereas the other ?xed terminal .of the potentiometer is
vreturned to ground. The coupling capacitor 154 is also
connected to the control electrode of a triode 157 which
is combined with a second triode 158 in a one-shot multi
vibrator circuit. Thus, the biasing circuit comprising the
10
a triode 191 having an input circuit coupled to the in
verter stage 183‘ and to the one-shot multi-vibrator 157,
158. The coupling circuit from the triode 183 comprises
a capacitor 192 that is connected to the junction of the
resistors 186 and 187 in the anode circuit of the triode.
The capacitor 192 is also coupled to the control electrode
of the tube 191 through an input resistor 193. A diode
194 is connected from the common terminal of the capa
resistor 155 and the potentiometer 156 affords a negative
citor 192 and the resistor 193 to ground. The other
bias on the control electrode of the multivibrator tube 10 coupling or input circuit to the tube 191 is similar, and
157.
comprises a capacitor 195 and a resistor 196 connected in
The multi-vibrator circuit comprising the triodes 157
series with each other between the anode of the multi
and 158 is substantially conventional in construction. The
vibrator tube 157 and the control electrode of the output
cathodes of the two triodes are connected together and are
tube 191. A diode 197 is connected from the common
returned to ground through a resistor 159. The anode of 15 terminal of the impedances 195 and 196 to ground.
the triode 157 is connected to the 13+ supply through a
The output tube'191 of the parity check circuit 74 is
load resistor 161, the anode of the triode 158 being con
connected in a cathode follower circuit of quite simple
nected to B+ through a resistor 162. The coupling cir
con?guration. Thus, the anode of the triode is con
cuit between the two triodes comprises a coupling capaci
nected to the B+ supply. The cathode of the tube, which
tor 163 connected between the anode of the ?rst triode of 20 in this instance is the output electrode, is returned to
the control electrode of the second triode, the control elec
ground through a load resistor 198. The output terminal
trode of the second triode being connected to the B+
of the ?nal stage in the parity check circuit is indicated
supply through a resistor 164. The circuit parameters
by reference numeral ‘199, and this output terminal is
are such that the triode 157 is normally maintained non
connected
hereinafter
to the in
ringconnection
counter 75,
withwhich
FIG. is7. described
conductive, the triode 158 normally being held conduc 25 detail
tive. When a positive-going pulse signal is applied to the
As noted hereinabove, each of the ampli?ers 61, 62,
triode 157, and when this pulse signal exceeds a given
64, 67 and 70 is coupled to the code translator 72, in ad
threshold amplitude, the tube 157 is driven conductive
dition to the connection to the parity check circuit 74. In
and the triode 158 is momentarily cut off. Upon com
FIG. 6, the individual output circuits from the ampli?ers
pletion of the applied pulse signal, the tube 158 is again 30 to the code translator 72 are identi?ed by the code desig
'driven to conduction and the tube 157 is cut off.
nations of the ampli?ers, these being the code designa
The anode output circuit for the input triode 151 of the
tions “1,” “2,” “4,” “7” and “P” relating back to the code
parity check circuit 74 comprises a coupling capacitor 165
designations for the data 22 (FIG. 2). The code trans
which is connected from the anode of the tube 151 to the
lator 72 is provided with ?ve output circuits comprising
control electrode of an ampli?er triode 166. The control 35 the output resistors 202, 204, 206, 208 and 209. These
electrode of the triode 166 is also connected to a voltage
output resistors are individually connected to output cou
divider comprising a pair of resistors 167 and 168, the
pling capacitors 212, 214, 216, 218 and 219‘, respectively.
resistors 167 and 168 being connected between the B+
The output circuit from the code translator 72 which com
supply and ground to a?ord a positive bias for the control
prises the resistor 202 and the capacitor 212 is the out
electrode. The cathode of the triode 166 is returned to 40 put circuit for signals corresponding to the code designa~
ground and the anode of this tube is connected to the B+
tion “2” in the machine code illustrated in FIG. 3. Simi
supply through a load resistor 169.
larly, the capacitor 214 and the resistor 204 are the
The inverter or ampli?er stage comprising the triode
circuit elements which form the “4” code designation
166 is a coupled to a one-shot multi-vibrator circuit, com
circuit under the machine code. The machine code des
prising a pair of triodes .171 and 172, which is essentially 45 ignations are shown in association with the output cir
similar to the multi-vibrator including the triodes 157 and
cuits from the code translator 72 in FIG. 6.
158‘. Thus, the anode of the triode 166 is coupled to the
Between the input and output circuits of the code trans
control electrode of the tube 171 by a coupling capacitor
lator, a resistor-diode matrix is provided which performs
173. The control electrode of the tube 171 is provided
the necessary translation. The translator resistors are
with a negative bias by means of a circuit comprising a 50 generally represented by the reference numeral 221, and
resistor 174 connected from the control electrode to the
movable tap on a potentiometer 175. The potentiometer
175 is connected between the E- supply and ground. As
before, the cathodes of the two triodes 171 and 172 are
the coupling diodes of the translator by the reference
character 222. All of the coupling resistors in the trans—
lator are approximately equal in resistance, and the diodes
222 are also essentially identical with each other. Fur
connected to each other and are returned to ground 55 thermore, the system shown in FIG. 6 for the code trans
through a resistor 176. The anodes of the triodes 171
lator 72 requires that the resistors 221 be substantially
and 172 are connected to the B+ supply through two
larger than the ground-return resistors, such as the re
resistors 177 and 178, respectively. The anode of the
sistor 139, in the input circuits to the code translator.
tube 171 is coupled to the control electrode of the triode
Furthermore,
it is also necessary that the resistors 221
172 by a coupling capacitor 179‘. The control electrode 60 be substantially
smaller than the output resistors 202,
of the tube 172 is connected to the B+ supply through a
204, 206, 208 and 209.
bias resistor 181. The circuit parameters are again se
In considering the operation of the circuits illustrated
lected to afford a one-shot operation as described herein
in
FIG. 6, it may ?rst be noted that the phototransistor
above.
is normally maintained conductive, since the photo
The one-shot multi-vibrator comprising the triodes 171 65 40
cell is ordinarily illuminated by light re?ected from un
and 172 is coupled to an inverter ampli?er stage compris
printed areas of the record card. When this normal con
ing a triode 183. The coupling circuit comprises a cou
dition is changed, as when a code marking is interposed
pling capacitor 184 that is connected between the anode
in the illumination path for the photocell, the photocell
of the tube 172 and the control electrode of the triode 183.
' is rendered non-conductive, producing a negative-going
The control electrode of the tube 183 is returned to
ground through an input resistor 185. The cathode of the 70 pulse signal on the base electrode of the translator 101
in the pre-ampli?er 60. This negative-going pulse sig
tube is grounded and the anode is connected to the B+
nal appears in the output circuit of the emitter follower
supply through a pair of resistors 186 and 187 that are
stage comprising the transistor 101 and is A.C. coupled
connected in series with each other.
to the base electrode of the second stage transistor 102 in
The ?nal stage of the parity check circuit .74 comprises 75 the pre-ampli?er. The pulse signal is inverted in polarity
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
5 044 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа