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Патент USA US3070251

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Dec. 25, 1962
K. H. JOHNSTON
3,070,241
MACHINE FOR UNSTACKING PALLETIZED LOADS
Filed Aug. 24, 1959
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Dec. 25, 1962
K. H. JOHNSTON
3,070,241
MACHINEYFOR UNSTACKING PALLETIZED LOADS
Filed Aug. .24, 1959
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‘Dec. 25, 1962
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MACHINE FOR UNSTACKING PALLETIZED LOADS
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Dec. 25, 1962
3,070,241
K. H._ JOHNSTON
MACHINE FOR UNSTACKING PALLETIZED LOADS
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Patented Dec. 25, 1962
2
3,070,241
MAtlHlNE FOR UNSTACKING PALLETTZED
LOADS
Kenneth H. Johnston, Cleves, Ohio, assignor to Alvey
Conveyor Manufacturing Company, St. Louis, Mo., a
corporation of Missouri
Filed Aug. 24, 1959, Ser. No. 835,583 -
Q1.
3 Claims. (Cl. 214—8.5)
many instances in the past, because it provided the only
kind of stack which could be accommodated by the avail
able depalletizer machines. The present invention pro
vides a depalletizer which works equally well with either
type of stacking system, because it does not require that the cases within a stack be arranged in any precise order,
other than that they be arranged in layers. The cases
may, if desired, be arranged haphazardly within each
layer, even to the extent that there are voids within the
This invention relates to article handling apparatus 10 layers. Such voids could not be tolerated by the depal
letizers of the past.
and it is directed in particular to an improved machine,
The palletizer machines of the past designed for full
of the type designated a “depalletizer,” which is adapted
depth cases removed a layer at a time from the bottom
to undo the stacked condition of boxes, cases, cartons
of the stack. The other machines, designed for use with
etc. in which these articles are arranged for storage and
half-depth cases, removed a layer at a time from the top
for transportation upon a pallet, a pallet being a- simple
rectangular platform, usually made of wood, which is
of the stack. The full-depth depalletizer employed large
adapted to be moved about by means of a fork-lift truck.
This disclosure is explained in relation to the unstack‘
ing of the cases which are used in bottling plants, be
grippers which moved in from both sides of the stack to
press against the cases. As a ?rst step in a depalletizing
operation for full-depth cases the entire stack was raised
cause the depalletizers of the past were designed pri 20 and the pallet removed from beneath it. The entire stack
was then lowered and released by the grippers. The
marily for such use. Bottling plants use two types of
grippers then moved up to the layer of cases second from
cases, one being a full-depth case, in which the bottles
are completely enclosed, and the other being a half
depth case, in which the upper halves of the bottles are
the bottom and the stack again lifted so that the lower-'
most layer was free to be removed from underneath
exposed. In the past, two, entirely different types of 25 it. This procedure was repeated, working up the stack,
going from layer to layer to the top. This method of
depalletizer machines have been required to handle these
unstacking has the disadvantage that there was nothing.
two types of cases.
to support the bottom of the stack between the grippers’.v
The primary objective of the present invention has
and consequently, a considerable amount of pressure had
been to provide a machine capable of handling both
types of cases; and as will be apparent, to provide a ma
to be exerted on the sides of the cases to prevent the
chine which is capable of handling many other types of
articles in addition to bottle cases, including non-rigid
articles such as sacks of heavy materials, for example
cement, which could not be handled by the depalletizers '
individual cases in this layer from slipping out. Ob
viously, there could be no voids in any of the layers of
the stack.
For the most part, full-depth cases were stacked in
of the past.
In a typical, large bottling plant operation, incoming
columns. However, in some instances the, cases were of
such a size that an interlocking pattern could be used and
cases of empty bottles are unloaded from the delivery
trucks and stacked upon pallets. The cases are then
transported by a fork-lift truck to a storage area where
they remain in stacked condition upon the pallets until
needed. When needed, the cases are transported to the
still be accommodated by the available machines. This
method of unstacking from the bottom up worked ‘fairly
depalletizer which removes one layer of cases from a
stack at a time and deposits them on an unscrambler
table or on a conveyor leading to an unscrambler table,
the purpose of the unscrambler table being to align the
cases end to end for delivery by a conveyor to an un~
loading machine which removes the bottles from the
cases. At the depalletizer, provision is made to remove
and stack or otherwise take care of the empty pallets.
There are several ways of arranging the cases within
a stack upon a pallet. In one, the cases in the lowermost
layer are arranged side by side in two or more rows.
All cases in the next layer and the next, so on to the top
of the stack, are arranged in this same order. Thus,
the completed stack consists of a number of columns of
cases, each column consisting of cases which are stacked
directly one on top of the other. Such a stack may be
eight or more cases high and it must be handled careful~
well, providing the cases are full-depth cases and pro
viding not too great a load is placed on the lowermost
layer in the stack. It could not be used for half-depth
cases, because the short walls of half-depth cases do not.
provide the required bridging effect across a layer of
cases from gripper to gripper.
For half-depth cases the machine which have been.
provided utilized tines, these tines moving under a layer
of cases between the necks of the bottles in the cases
immediately below it. This operation, of course, required.
that the bottles, and thus the cases, be precisely aligned
across the stack. Furthermore, this type of operation
had a very serious limitation, because the last or bottom
layer of the stack could not be lifted with the tines and
had to be removed from the pallet by hand.
It may be appreciated, therefore, that the two ap
proaches in the past to the problem of undoing a stack of
cases have not considered the possibility of a mechanism
capable of entering the juncture between two layers within
a stack of full-depth cases or in the instance of half~depth
ly while it is being moved, because in this arrangement 60 cases, the possibility of entering the juncture between the
lowermost layer and the pallet. The machine of this in
of the cases within the stack, there is nothing to tie the
vention works upon this principle, and it includes an ap
individual columns together.
paratus, designated a “stripper,” which moves into the
From the viewpoint of handling and moving palletized
stack from the side, engaging the stack, and moving across
loads, another stacking method, providing an interlocked
it underneath the cases in the uppermost layer to strip the
stack, is preferred. In a stack of this sort the cases in
cases in this layer from the stack. This operation is car
any one layer are turned through 90 degrees with re
ried out by unstacking from top to bottom with the stack
spect to the cases in the layers above and below it. The
resting directly upon the pallet and, as will be seen, sub
interlocking pattern thus provided prevents toppling of
stantially any type of stacked containers, including bags
the cases while they are being moved from place to place
by a fork-lift truck, and the interlocking method is pre 70 etc. may be depalletized by the machine without making
any changes in it other than minor adjustments. Hence,
ferred over the column method of stacking for this rea
in a bottling plant, the one depalletizer may be employed“
son. However. the column method had to be used in
acre-e41
4
in other article handling operations, even including opera‘
cutout to accommodate these sprocket wheels, the wheels
being larger in diameter than the depths of the channels.
A chain 32 is engaged over the top of each sprocket 31.
One run 33 of this chain extends down along the outside
tions in which the articles to be handled are not regular
of the channel member as shown in FIGURE 2 and its
to unload both full-depth cases and half-depth cases from
column stacked or interlocking stacked pallet loads with
out change, and the same machine is also adapted for use
lower end 34 is secured to an end of the cross rod 22
in outline, without substantial changes being made.
Other objectives and advantages of the machine of the
invention will be readily apparent to those skilled in the
art from the following detailed description of the draw
ings in which:
FIGURE 1 is a top plan view of a depalletizer machine
incorporating the principles of the present invention.
10
which is welded to the underside of the elevator ?oor.
The other end of the chain passes down into the channel
around a guide pin 35 and it has a weight 36 a?ixed to it,
the weight being constrained to ride inside of the channel
by means of pin 35. The other side of the elevator also
has two sprocket wheels designated 37-37 respectively
which correspond to sprocket wheels 31-31 mounted in
FIGURE 2 is a front elevational view thereof.
like fashion in the upper ends of the two corner posts
FIGURE 3 is a side elevational view thereof.
FIGURES 4 through 7 are semi~diagrammatic views 15 15-15. Chains 38-38 are engaged over two sprocket
wheels 37-37. As previously described, one end of
illustrating, step by step, the manner in which layers of
half-depth cases are unstacked.
It is preferred that the depalletizer be utilized in con~
junction with a roller conveyor, such as the one desig
each one of these chains is a?ixed as at 39 to an end of
the cross bar 22. The opposite ends pass around guide
pins 40-40 and each has a Weight 41 affixed to it to ride
nated 10, which delivers palletized stacks to the machine, 20 within the channel. The two sprocket wheels 37-37 are
and a conveyor, such as the one designated 11, which de
livers the cases, after they have been unstacked, to a ma
chine such as an unscrambler table. In the operation dis
closed, it is also preferred that some means be provided
for taking care of the empty pallets after the cases have
been unloaded from them. Any suitable apparatus may
be employed and positioned as shown at 12 by dot-dash
lines. The conveyor 10 may be powered if desired, or it
keyed to a cross shaft 42 which is similar to the cross shaft
29. The two shafts are connected so that they rotate to—
gether by means of a chain 43 which is engaged over a
sprocket 44 on shaft 29 and a sprocket 45 on shaft 42. It
may be seen, therefore, that when the motor is driven in
one direction, the two sets of chains which are attached
to the elevator are either raised or lowered depending
upon the direction of rotation of the motor and speed re
duction unit 23, the motor of unit 23 being a reversing
may be slanted so that the loaded pallets roll toward the
machine by gravity. The conveyor 11 may also be pow 30 type. This motor is also controlled by means of switches
to which reference is made later so that it raises the ele
ered or it may be slanted to convey the cases by gravity
vator from the position shown in FIGURE 2 stepwise, the
away from the machine.
raising movement in each instance being equal to the
There are two main elements of the machine, one being
height of the individual cases of the palletized load to be
a stripper assembly, designated generally 13, and the other
being an elevator assembly, designated generally 14. The 35 unstacked. As will be seen, one of the few changes in the
machine necessary to adapt it for operation of different
elevator will be described ?rst. This part of the machine
types of stacked articles is to adjust the amount that the
comprises four corner posts. Two of these posts, indi
elevator is raised during each one of its stepwise move
cated at 15-15, are located at the two sides of the end
ments.
of conveyor 10. The other two corner posts are desig
As disclosed, the machine is arranged to unstack a load
nated 16-16 and they are spaced from the ?rst set of 40
which is eight layers of cases high, see FIGURE 3. The
corner posts by an amount to accommodate the longest
cases shown are half-depth cases so that the upper halves
pallet utilized. The type of corner post is not critical,
of the bottles are exposed. Also as shown, the cases are
although it is found that channels such as those shown
stacked in an interlocking pattern. In this stack a pallet
in the drawings work well. These channels may be se
is shown on the bottom at 46. Following conventional
cured to a base member (not shown) or they may be
practices this pallet may be made of wood with slots
embedded in concrete at floor level, which level is indi
such as those shown at 47-47 being provided for the
cated by the dot-dash line 17.
reception of the tines of a lift-fork truck. The layers of
The ?oor of the elevator comprises a power driven con
cases on pallet 46 are designated A through H going
veyor section 18 which may be of conventional construc
rom the bottom to the top. As shown, the stripper 13
tion including side rails 19-19, a plurality of driven roll
is disposed at the level of the layer of cases H which is
ers 20, and an electric motor and speed reduction unit 21
the top layer of the stack, and it includes side rails 48-48
by means of which the rollers are powered. Each end of
which are channel-shaped or U-shaped in cross section
the elevator floor has a cross bar 22 welded to its under
with the open sides of the channels facing inwardly to
side and, as will be seen in FIGURES l and 3, these cross
ward one another such that they may mount tracks for
bars project beyond the side rails 19-19 of the conveyor
four wheels, each one of which is designated 49, mounted
section forming the elevator ?oor.
at the four corners of a rectangular carriage 50. The
Another electric motor and speed reduction unit is
frame of the carriage comprises two side rails 51-51
shown at 23. This unit is mounted at the top of the ele
each one of which is formed from a channel, the open
vator upon a base 24 welded or otherwise a?‘ixed to a
bracket 25 which extends ‘between and is welded to the 60 sides of which ‘face outwardly. Appropriate cross brac
ing may be provided to interconnect the two side rails
two corner posts 16-16. A sprocket 26 is keyed to the
51-51. As shown, eight conventional conveyor rollers
drive shaft of the motor and speed reduction unit 23 and
52 are journalled between the two side rails 51-51 and
this sprocket is in driving connection with another sprocket
it is preferred that all of these rollers be driven in the
27, which is directly beneath it, by means of a chain 28.
direction shown by the arrows in FIGURES 4-7. The
Sprocket 27 is keyed to a cross shaft 29 which is jour-'
forward end of the stripper adjacent to the elevator has
nalled in the walls of the two channels forming corner
two driven stripper or friction rollers 53-53 which are
posts 16-16. As shown in FIGURE 3, the opposite ends
of shaft 29 may be journalled in holes provided in the side
walls of each of the channels and following customary
practice anti-friction bearings (not shown) may be used
at these holes. The shaft 29 is prevented from shifting
also journalled between the two side rails 51-51 in align
ment with the rollers 52. All rollers of the stripper ro
tate at the same speeed and in the same direction, being
connected by means of a chain 54 which engages sprock
ets on the rollers at the left side of the stripper as shown
longitudinally by means of collars 30-30 which are se
in FIGURE 1. Inasmuch as a drive of this type is con
cured to its opposite ends at the outer sides of the corner
ventional, the interconnection of the chain to each of
posts. Each end of shaft 29 mounts a sprocket wheel 31.
The webs of the channels forming the corner posts are 75 the sprockets on the rollers is not shown in detail. Power
3,070,241
.5
6
for the 'rollers' of the stripper is provided by an electric
motor andspeed reduction unit 55 which is mounted di
rollers of washing machines through which clothes are
rectly upon the stripper to move with it. As shown in
FIGURE 1, the motor and gear reduction unit is located
to one side of the stripper and at the end thereof away
shaft 65 to which a cylinder of rubber is vulcanized.
However, instead of being a continuous cylinder the
roller preferably is broken into a plurality of short sec
from the elevator. Following conventional practices the
tions as shown. This may be done in one of two ways
fed to remove excess water.
Each roller comprises a
during the manufacture of the roller. Either the roller
motor and speed reduction unit drives a sprocket around
may be made as a continuous cylinder and then sections
which a chain 56 is engaged. This chain is linked to the
cut out, or the roller may be made initially in the short
chain 54 by means of a second sprocket 57 and appro
priate gearing not shown in detail. It may be seen, there 10 sections shown, each section being vulcanized in place.
It is found to be expedient to employ soft rubber, at least
fore, that all of the rollers of the stripper are “live roll
ers” and as will be explained, it is preferred that these
for the surfaces of all of the roller sections. These sur
rollers operate continuously.
faces also may be roughened if desired.’
The two channels or tracks 48—48 in which the car
riage 50 rides extend into the elevator as shown in FIG
URE 3 at the level of the uppermost layer of the stack,
terminating at an abutment plate 58 which is secured to
the two corner posts 15 and 16 of the elevator which are
at the front of the machine. This abutment plate is se
cured to the inner sides of these two corner posts by 20
. The stripper carriage advances to present the front
stripper roller to the sides of the cases in the uppermost
iayer of the stack. The point of contact of the front
roller with the top layer is shown in FIGURE 4. It will
means such as a mount bracket 59. As shown, the abut
As may be seen in FIGURE 4 the cases in the top layer
ment plate slants downwardly below the two channels
48—48 to provide a wedge surface 60, the purpose of
53 so that the upper layer of cases cannot shift toward
be noted that the front stripper roller and all of the
rollers are driven in a direction which causes the cases
of the layer with which contact is made to be raised.
are backed up by engagement with the abutment plate
the front of the machine when the front stripper roller
which is to shift any misaligned layers of cases so that
the sides of these cases do not catch under the abutment 25 contacts those cases which are at the rear of the upper
plate during the raising of the elevator. The stripper is
layer. The carriage continues its forward movement and
driven by means of a hydraulically or pneumatically op
erated cylinder 61. This cylinder includes a conven
tional piston rod 62 and the outer end of the piston rod
is attached to the carriage 50 by means of a simple
in doing so the cases are lifted onto the live rollers and
they start to feed toward the rear of the carriage. It is
bracket as shown. Inasmuch as the piston and cylinder
assembly is of conventional construction it is not be
top of the live rollers of the carriage do not interfere with
cases being picked up by the front stripper roller. The
stripper carriage continues forward, picking up cases as
lieved necessary to disclose it in detail here, other than
to state that its stroke must carry the forward end of the
preferred that the rollers be driven slightly faster than
the forward lineal speed of the carriage so that cases on
it goes until it moves into a position adjacent to the for
stripper from the’ position shown in FIGURE 3, where 35 ward end of the machine where it comes into contact
it is just to the rear of cases upon the elevator, forward to
a point where it just clears abutment plate 58.
Operation
with the switch arm 66 of a switch 67. This switch is
mounted upon the forward end of the side rail 48 which
is .at the right side of the machine as viewed in FIGURE
1. This is a reversing switch and it is wired into the
Pal-letized loads of cases approach the elevator of the 40 circuit which controls the pneumatic or hydraulic circuit
of cylinder 61. It causes the piston within cylinder 61
machine on conveyor 10. As explained, the rollers of
to retract, which pulls the stripper carriage toward the
conveyor 10 may be driven or operated by gravity. If
rear of the machine. Since the rollers 52 of the stripper
driven, provision must be made to stop the rollers to
carriage are ordinary conveyor rollers, made of metal,
prevent other palletized loads from being fed onto or
the cases stop their rearward movement upon the carriage
against the elevator when it is in operation. If gravity is
relied upon some sort of a brake or stop must be provided
at the end of the conveyor adjacent the elevator. The
starting position for the elevator is set by means of a limit
when contact is made with a gate 68 at the rear end of
the carriage, the rollers 52 simply slippingv on the bot
tom of the cases.
Means, not shown, are provided to
drop gate 68 when the carriage reaches its fully retracted
switch 63. This switch is wired into the control circuit
for the motor 23 which operates the elevator. The V50 position, the means being a solenoid by way of example,
controlled by a switch 69 having a switch arm 70 in the
switch is positioned to be contacted by the cross bar 22
path of the carriage. When contact is made with switch
at a time when the driven rollers of the elevator are
. arm 70, shown in FIGURE 7, gate 68 drops and the live
aligned with the rollers of conveyor 10. Such contact
rollers of the stripper carriage move the cases off the
tie-‘commissions motor 23. The motor 21 which drives
the rollers 20 of the elevator floor may also be started 55 carriage onto the conveyor 11 in the rear of the machine.
The switch 69 is also wired into the circuit which controls
through means such as a relay controlled by switch 63.
the operation of elevator motor 23 and as soon as switch
Alternatively, motor 21 may be started by a manually
‘69 is tripped, the elevator raises by an amount equal to
operated switch and also de-commissioned in the same
one layer of the stack. Stepping switches for controlling
manner. For accuracy, however, it is preferred that the
motor 21 be de-commissioned by a switch 64 which is 60 the elevator motor during the raising movement of the
mounted upon a side rail 19 of the elevator floor in a posi
tion to make contact with a case in the lowermost layer
elevator are well known and for this reason it is not be
lieved to be necessary to disclose such a switch.
The operation thus described is repeated until the bot
of the stack. Such contact de-commissions motor 21
tom-most layer has been stripped from the pallet. When
when the stack is centered upon the elevator. It will be
noted that the switch arm of switch 64 is above the 65 this occurs the elevator motor reverses and the elevator
with the pallet upon it is dropped down into the position
pallet 46, for reasons which will be explained. See FIG
shown in FIGURE 2. At this time the elevator ?oor
URE 3. Switch 64 may also be wired into a circuit for
motor 21 is started which drives the pallet toward the
controlling the ?ow of air ‘or of hydraulic ?uid, which
left onto the receiver which is shown by dot-dash lines
ever is used, to cylinder 61. In this way, as soon as the
stack of cases is centered upon the elevator, the cylinder 70 12. The pallet moves underneath the switch arm of
switch 64 so that the motor 21 continues to run for
starts to feed the stripper carriage toward the front of
feeding another palletized load onto the elevator, the load
the machine. Preferably, the motor 55 which drives the
stopping on the elevator in a center position as previous
rollers of the stripper carriage operates continuously.
ly explained when contact is made with the arm of
The two stripper rollers ‘53—53 which are at the front
of carriage 50 are constructed much like the squeeze 75 switch 64.
3,070,241"
The control circuitry has not been shown here because
it is conventional and because there are actually a great
number of Ways to provide controls which are known to
those skilled in the art. In addition, different types of
drives can be utilized for the various parts of the ma
chine other than the ones disclosed. For example, the
elevator can be operated hydraulically by means of a ram
8
and elevate said loads step by step in increments each
one of which is equal to the depth of a layer of the load,
a carriage mounted for horizontal reciprocating move
ment between a position in which it is within said elevator
and a position in which it is outside of the elevator to
form a continuation of the second conveyor, a plurality
of conveyor rollers mounted in said carriage, the roller
at the front of said carriage which is adapted to ?rst enter
mounted underneath it. The important consideration is
the elevator being a friction roller, means to drive all of
the stripper and the way in which it functions to raise the
cases and to move into the stack. The driven stripper 10 said rollers in a direction to deliver articles thereon to
ward the rear of the carriage, the last named means driv
roller at the front of the stripper carriage raises the side
ing said rollers such that their surface speeds are greater
of any case with which it comes into contact whether
than the lineal speed of the carriage as it moves into said
this case by a full-depth or a half-depth one. In addi
elevator, and a gate at the rear of said carriage, whereby
tion, it will be appreciated that the shape of the case is
movement of the carriage into the elevator having a load
unimportant so long as there is a surface to be contacted
thereon to ‘bring the friction roller into contact with the
for lifting the case up onto the roller. It will be appre
articles of the uppermost layer causes said articles to be
ciated also that the contact does not have to be against
lifted
onto the conveyor rollers of the carriage for de
a vertical surface such as that provided by the sides of
livery to the gate, and whereby upon movement of the
cases. Contact with the side or end of a heavy paper
sack is also sufficient to cause the sack to raise up onto 20 carriage to the second conveyor and upon the dropping of
the gate, the articles are delivered by the carriage to said
the ?rst stripper roller and once it is raised it is fed to
second conveyor.
3. A machine to undue the stacked condition of articles
from loads in which the articles are stacked in layers
1. A machine to nnstack a palletized load of articles 25 upon a pallet, said machine adapted to be used in con
the rear of the stripper carriage as illustrated in FIG
URES 4 through 7.
Having described my invention, I claim:
ment into and out of the elevator at the level of the
junction with a conveyor for delivering articles from the
machine, said machine comprising a combination of an
elevator adapted to receive palletized loads and elevate
said loads step by step in increments each one of which
is equal to the depth of a layer of the load, a carriage
mounted for horizontal reciprocating movement between
a position‘ in‘ which it is within said elevator and a posi
uppermost layer of articles in said palletized load, a plu
rality of conveyor rollers mounted in said carriage, at
least the front roller of the plurality being resilient and
engageable with the sides of articles in the uppermost
carriage which is adapted to ?rst enter the elevator being
in which the articles are arranged in layers comprising
in combination an elevator adapted to receive said pal
letized load, means to raise the elevator step by step in
increments each one of which is equal to the depth of a
layer of stacked articles in the load, a carriage, means ‘
mounting the carriage for horizontal reciprocating move
tion in which it is outside of said elevator to form a con
tinuation of said conveyor, a plurality of conveyor rollers
mounted in said carriage, the roller at the front of said
a friction roller, means to drive all of said rollers in a
direction to deliver articles thereon toward the rear of
the carriage, the last named means driving said rollers
simultaneously in the direction such that contact with
the sides of articles by the front roller causes the articles 40 such that their surface speeds are greater than the lineal
speed of the carriage as it moves into said elevator, and
to be lifted and to be pulled onto the carriage as the
a gate at the rear of said carriage, whereby movement of
carriage moves into the elevator and the last named means
the carriage into the elevator having a load thereon to
driving said rollers such that their surface speeds are
layer of a stack on the elevator upon movement of the
carriage into the elevator, means to drive all of the rollers
greater than the forward lineal speed of the carriage into
the elevator so that articles upon the rollers to the rear
of the front roller do not interfere with articles being
lifted and pulled onto the carriage by the front roller.
2. A machine to undo the stacked condition of articles
from loads in which the articles are stacked in layers
upon a pallet, said machine adapted to be used in con
junction with a ?rst conveyor for delivering loads to the
machine and a second conveyor for delivering articles
from the machine, the second conveyor being elevated
with respect to the ?rst conveyor by an amount equal
to the distance from the bottom of the pallet to the lower
part of the uppermost layer of articles in the stack, said
machine comprising the combination of an elevator
adapted to receive palletized loads from the ?rst conveyor
bring the friction roller into contact with the articles of
the uppermost layer causes said articles to be lifted onto
the conveyor rollers of the carriage for delivery to said
gate, and whereby upon movement of the carriage to the
conveyor and upon the dropping of the gate, the articles
are delivered by the carriage onto said conveyor.
References Cited in the ?le of this patent
UNITED STATES PATENTS
1,464,513
2,338,048
2,659,497
2,815,870
2,931,531
Sutherland ___________ __ Aug. 14,
Minaker ____________ .._ Dec. 28,
Verrinder ___________ __ Nov. 17,
Laub _______________ __ Dec. 10,
Brudi ________________ __ Apr. 5,
1923
1943
1953
1957
1960
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