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Патент USA US3070323

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Dec. 25, 1962
w. K. FORTMAN
3,070,313
APPARATUS FOR THE ACOUSTIC TREATMENT OF LIQUIDS
Filed March 5, 1962
A
INVENTOR
WILLIAM K. FORTMAN
BY imwl
H. K'Ra,
ATTORNEY
United States Patent 0"
3,070,313
Patented Dec. 205, 1962
2
1
3,070,313
spider there is provided a supporting stem 24 which may
be moved axially by means of adjusting screw 25. When
OF LIQUIDS
William K. Fortman, Syosset, N.Y., assignor to
Astrosonics, Inc., Syosset, N.Y.
Filed Mar. 5, 1962, Ser. No. 177,395
7 Claims. (Cl. 239—102)
the spider, supporting stem, and screw, in position. The
portion of the hole extending through members 21 and
23 may be drilled in advance. Resonator cup 30 is pinned
APPARATUS FOR THE ACOUSTIC TREATMENT
a suitable axial position is attained, as indicated by a
desired spray pattern, a hole is drilled into supporting
stem 24 and screw 25 and a locking pin 26 inserted to lock
to the end of supporting stem 24 by pin 32. It will be
This invention relates to an improved apparatus for
the acoustic treatment of liquids. The apparatus may, 10 noted that member 22 is provided with a conical bore
forming a restricted throat 34 which again tapers out
by way of example and without intent to be limiting, be
employed for atomization, spray-drying, agglomeration
of airborne contaminants, and/or deposition of liquids
wardly in a downward direction at about a 15° angle to
form nozzle 14. The throat dimension should be de
slgned to provide an increase of air velocity to about
by subjection of the liquid to sonic energy.
Brie?y stated, the invention employs an acoustic gen 15 Mach 1.0. The subsequent increase in diameter to form
expanded nozzle 14 results in achieving of a velocity of
erator of the Hartmann type, such as disclosed, for ex
about
Mach 1.5.
.
ample, in US. Patent No. 2,519,619 to Yellott and Savory
The mode of operation of the acoustic generator is
for “Acoustic Generator.” The liquid to be treated is
well described in the literature as, for example, in the
dispensed through an annular premixing chamber which
aforementioned US. Patent No. 2,519,619, and accord
uniformly distributes the liquid through jet ori?ces into
ingly need not be described herein.
the sonic ?eld produced by the acoustic generator.
The liquid to be treated is introduced through ?tting
It is a feature of this invention to provide a sonic energy
11 and passes through tube 35 into an annular mixing
re?ector so located as to prevent ?uids from contaminat
chamber 38.
ing the resonator.
The body member 39 enclosing chamber 38 may readily
Still another feature of this invention is to provide a
sonic energy spray nozzle requiring relatively low gas and
liquid operating pressures.
be formed by ordinary machining techniques. The body
member is composed of two major sections. The ?rst is
an annular member 40 provided with an open annular
recess. Member 40 threads onto body portion 22 of the
30 acoustic generator. The other section comprises an annu
A particular feature of this invention is to provide a
lar cover member 42 which threads into body 40 to de?ne
spray nozzle of the type described wherein the liquid in
the enclosed annular chamber 38. O-rings 44 and 46
let ori?ces may be positioned at an optimum distance from
provide a liquid tight seal between members 40 and 42.
the resonator.
Liquid is dispensed through ori?ces 18 extending into
These and still other objects and advantages of the
annular chamber 38. The method of assembling the annu
invention will, in part, be pointed out with particularity
lar chamber to the acoustic generator is advantageous as
and will, in part, become obvious as the following de
it permits employment of one acoustic generator with a
scription proceeds taken in conjunction with the accom
wide range of annular chamber assemblies having a differ
panying drawing.
ent distribution arrangement or ori?ce size. The chamber
In the drawing:
40 should be sufficiently large as to permit free circulation
FIG. 1 is a perspective showing of the spray apparatus
and uniform distribution of the liquid to all ori?ces. By
of this invention.
way of example, a chamber 1A” x %” has been found to
FIG. 2 is a vertical section taken through the center
‘be suitable. A spacing between the bottom of the annular
of the apparatus.
_
chamber (at the ori?ce) to the midpoint between the end
FIG. 3 is a section taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2.
of the nozzle 14 and the resonator 30 of one wavelength
Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawing, there is shown
at the frequency at which the resonator is operating has
a plane wave spray nozzle designated generally by the
been found suitable. Generally an operating frequency in
reference numeral 10. A standard Ms” pipe ?tting 11 is
the range of 7000 to 9500 c.p.s. is preferred.
provided for coupling to a liquid supply and a standard
Thus as the sonic energy ?eld is generated in the well 16,
%” pipe ?tting 12 is provided for coupling to a gas sup 50 it is directed upwardly toward the radial face 41 of mem
ply. The gas supply may be steam, air, inert gases such
ber 39. The radial face serves to beam the sonic energy
as nitrogen, highly reactive gases such as oxygen and
?eld downwardly and outwardly so that the energy is not
chlorine, solvent gases such as carbon tetrachloride vapor
randomly dissipated. At the same time the liquid is
or other compressible ?uid.
into the ?eld.
Gas passing through nozzle 14 is compressed in resona 55 injected
The following experimental results were obtained em
tor cavity or well 16, as explained in the aforementioned
ploying a device as described having 8 ori?ces, each 0.40"
US. Patent No. 2,619,619. Liquid is simultaneously
in diameter.
sprayed into the sonic field for treatment. It has been
found that some liquids will dry faster into particles or
Operational range (air) _________..p.s.i.g__
l5—60
beads after exposure to the sonic ?eld. Many gelatines
Volumetric ?ow range (air) _______s.c.f.m__
14-33
and waxes will fall to a collection basin in dry form after
Frequency range _________ ________ __c.p.s__ 7000-9500
spraying into a sonic ?eld at room temperature. Other
Flow conditions:
materials need to be sprayed into a heated atmosphere
006 g.p.m__ 0.5 lb./min. 20~40 micron droplets‘.
1.92 g.p.m__ 16.0 lb./min. 300-400 micron droplets.
for drying to occur.
The internal construction of the apparatus is shown in 65
Having thus disclosed the best embodiment of my
FIGS. 2 and 3. While a 300 series stainless steel in gen
A further feature of this invention is to provide an im
proved, sonic energy liquid treating apparatus.
erally suitable, for special applications cermets, ceramics
invention presently contemplated, it is to be understood
and other suitable materials may be employed. The body
20 is conveniently machined of two mating pieces 21 and
without departing from the spirit of the invention.
22, respectively, which are force fit to form a unitary 70
member. Force ?t within portion 21, there is provided a
spider 23. Fitting within a central bore formed in the
that variations may be made by those skilled in the art
What is claimed is:
1. An apparatus for treating liquids by sonic energy
comprising:
-
3,070,313
3
4
an acoustic generator having an ori?ced nozzle for
producing a ?uid jet;
an oscillator having a well in spaced opposed relation
ship to said nozzle ori?ce;
a member surrounding said acoustic generator, said 5
member de?ning an annular liquid-receiving chamber
and having a plurality of holes communicating from
7. An apparatus for treating liquids by sonic energy
comprising:
an acoustic generator for producing a sonic energy ?eld
having an ori?ced nozzle for producing a ?uid jet;
a rod extending axially into said ori?ce;
an oscillator, having a well inv spaced opposed relation- ‘
ship to said nozzle ori?ce supported by said rod and
for producing a sonic ?eld directed towards said
the’chamber to an exterior portion of said member
above said nozzle ori?ce; and
conduit means for introducing liquid into said chamber. 10
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said member is
detachable from said acoustic generator.
3. The apparatus of claim 1 provided with a throat
portion of lesser diameter than said nozzle immediately
15
upstream from said nozzle.
4. The apparatus of claim 3 in combination with a
compressible ?uid source under su?icient pressure to pro
duce a ?uid jet having a velocity of at least Mach 1 at said
throat and in excess thereof at said nozzle.
20
5. The apparatus of claim 3 in combination with a
source of a compressible ?uid at su?icient pressure to
produce a fluid jet at said nozzle in excess of Mach 1.
6. An apparatus for treating liquids by sonic energy
comprising:
an acoustic generator having an ori?ced nozzle for
25
nozzle;
means to axially move said rod;
a member surrounding said acoustic generator and
having a radial face positioned in the path of said
?eld upstream, with reference to the fluid jet from
this nozzle, said member de?ning an annular liquid
receiving chamber having a plurality of holes com
municating therefrom to said radial face and arrangeda
to dispense liquid into the resultant sonic ?eld; and
conduit means for introducing liquid into said chamber.
References Cited in the ?le of this patent .
UNITED STATES PATENTS
1,939,302
2,481,620
2,519,619
2,908,443
2,944,029
Heaney ______________ __ Dec. 12, 1933
Rosenthal ____________ __ Sept. 13, 1949
Yellott et a1 ___________ __ Aug. 22, 1950
Fruengel _____________ __ Oct. 13, 1959
Jones et a1. ____________ "July 5, 1960
producing a ?uid jet;
OTHER REFERENCES
a rod extending axially into said ori?ce;
Institute
of
Radio
Engineers, Transaction on Ultra
an oscillator, having a well in spaced opposed relation
30 Sonic Engineering, an article by I. V. Antonevich, Febru
ship to said nozzle ori?ce supported by said rod;
ary 1959, pages 6-15.
means to axially move said rod;
“Ultrasonic Engineering,” A. E. Crawford, Butter
a member surrounding said acoustic generator, said
worth’s Scienti?c Publications, London 1955, pages 113~
member de?ning an annular liquid-receiving cham
122.
ber and having a plurality of holes communicating
from the chamber to a portion of said member above
said nozzle ori?ce; and
conduit means for introducing liquid into said chamber.
Chemical Engineering, September 4, 1961, pages 84
and 86, “Sound Waves Form Uniform Drops In Spray
Nozzle” by Astronics, Incorporated, Syosset, Long Island,
N.Y.
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